Greg Minnaar vs Luca Shaw vs Loris Vergier: 3 Santa Cruz V10s Head to Head

Apr 28, 2020
by James Smurthwaite  
Photos: Sven Martin/Santa Cruz Bicycles

With no racing scheduled for the near future, the Syndicate are launching their new colours and bikes virtually instead. The V10 hasn't seen any major overhauls however the team that popularised bigger wheels in downhill racing now has two riders re-introducing 27.5" wheels into the mix. Greg Minnaar is sticking with the full 29er option but his shorter teammates, Luca Shaw and Loris Vergier, have both gone to the mullet set up, with a 29" wheel up front and a 27.5" wheel in the rear on a new frame called the V10 MX. We decided to take all three builds and give them the side-by-side treatment to understand the nuances in the riders' set ups.

About the riders

Greg Minnaar

Steve Peat and Greg Minnaar trying to make sense of it all.

Age 38
Height 6'3" (195cm)
Weight 86kg
Instagram @gregminnaar

Luca Shaw

Luca Shaw is the fastest rider in the World right now he just needs a break on a finals run to prove it.

Age 23
Height 6'0" (183cm)
Weight 79kg
Instagram @luca_shaw

Loris Vergier

Loris Vergier s wrist doesn t seem to be holding him back. Can he go one better than last week

Age 23
Height 5'10" (178cm)
Weight 73kg
Instagram @lorisvergier


Frames

All the riders are on Santa Cruz V10s with Greg and Luca on XLs and Loris on a large. Only Luca is riding stock geometry though as Greg and Loris are both using Chris King Buzzwork headsets to give them 8mm extra reach. The Buzzworks was first developed in 2014 with the Syndicate and they've been using them to stretch out V10s for more than half a decade. Going one step further, Greg also extends his chainstays with a specially machined piece that gives him an extra 5mm on the swingarm.

Greg Minnaar


Frame size XL
Adjustments Greg runs an XL frame with the addition of the chainstay extenders he was seen riding last year and an 8mm Buzzworks headset.

Greg extends his chainstays by +5mm with this custom machined piece.

Luca Shaw


Frame size XL
Adjustments Luca runs a stock XL with no adjustements on either end

Loris Vergier


Frame size Large
HAdjustments Loris runs a Chris King Buzzworks headset with +8mm of extension

Loris gets +8mm on the top tube length thanks to this Chris King Buzzworks headset



Wheels

The Syndicate have been on 29" wheels longer than anyone on the downhill circuit with Greg now entering his fourth year on the bigger hoops. Both Luca and Loris are taking a small sidestep this year though and will be running a mullet set up on the V10 MX. Luca and Loris's bikes use an entirely new swingarm specific to the mixed wheel design that keeps the geometry the same as the 29ers they were running last year. It also made switching back and forth for testing only about the rear wheel size with no other major variables. Want to know why each rider chose their wheel size? Watch the latest Syndicate vlogs here to get the lowdown.

We tried to get some tyre pressure info from the Syndicate as well but as it varies from track to track, it's tough to give an exact number.


Greg Minnaar


Wheel size 29" front and rear
Tyre Pressure Depends on the track
Inserts No


Luca Shaw


Wheel size 29" front, 27.5" rear
Tyre Pressure Depends on the track
Inserts No


Loris Veriger


Wheel size 29" front, 27.5" rear
Tyre Pressure Depends on the track
Inserts No


Suspension

OK, time to get super dorky. The Syndicate's close relationship with Jordi and the Fox team is no secret and the result are some strikingly different set ups. Bear in mind that these are fine-tuned for the riders' weights, riding style, individual preference and World Cup tracks so emulating them won't get you much further than some very sore arms. But still, that's no reason not to get stuck into the nerdy details on the new Fox suspension below (all clicks are measured from fully closed):


Greg Minnaar


Fork
Fork Pressure 115psi
Volume Tokens 5
High-Speed Compression Open
Low-Speed Compression 8
High Speed Rebound 5
Low Speed Rebound 6
Shock
Spring Weight 575lbs
High-Speed Compression 6
Low-Speed Compression 8
High Speed Rebound 3
Low Speed Rebound 10


Luca Shaw


Fork
Fork Pressure 95psi
Volume Tokens 5
High-Speed Compression 7
Low-Speed Compression 8
High Speed Rebound 6
Low Speed Rebound 7
Shock
Spring Weight 550lbs
High-Speed Compression 7
Low-Speed Compression 8
High Speed Rebound 2
Low Speed Rebound 12


Loris Vergier


Fork
Fork Pressure 86psi
Volume Tokens 5
High-Speed Compression 15
Low-Speed Compression 8
High Speed Rebound 6
Low Speed Rebound 7
Shock
Spring Weight 525lbs
High-Speed Compression 10
Low-Speed Compression 12
High Speed Rebound 3
Low Speed Rebound 11


Contact Points

The contact points are one of the few areas of the bikes where we see some spec changes between the riders. Greg and Luca are running Shimano Saint brakes but Loris breaks the mould, and runs XTR. There are also some different bar widths and rises to analyse.


Greg Minnaar


Bar width 800mm
Bar rise 20mm
Brakes Shimano Saint - 203mm rotors
Stem Length 50mm


Luca Shaw


Bar width 790mm
Bar rise 30mm
Brakes Shimano Saint - 203mm rotors
Stem Length 50mm


Loris Vergier


Bar width 790mm
Bar rise 20mm
Brakes Shimano XTR - 203mm rotors
Stem Length 50mm


Details


Greg Minnaar





Luca Shaw





Loris Vergier







154 Comments

  • 70 0
 I was using the official Loris Vergier soundboard to verify the accuracy of the setup numbers, but I was unable to determine how you came up with them.

Source:
www.pinkbike.com/news/the-fantabulous-loris-vergier-soundboard-uses-all-the-sounds-he-makes-during-suspension-set-up.html
  • 24 1
 Greg Minnaar, 20mm bar rise....oh, and 645mm of stem spacers.
  • 3 1
 @scary1:

Bar rise and steerer stack both effect reach and stack differently.
  • 4 7
 @shmoodiver: yes but using stem spacers shortens reach. So using a reach extending headset but then throwing a ton of stem spacers on is a bit counter intuitive. The only way it makes any sense is to get a longer wheelbase and keep the reach I guess but then you could always use a shorter stem and higher rise bar and not use a ton of spacers and longer bolts so again a bit odd.
  • 45 1
 @Jesse221: It's f*cking Greg Minaar man... I think he's got it sorted.
  • 3 16
flag scary1 (Apr 28, 2020 at 18:18) (Below Threshold)
 @islandforlife: Look at his bike....meh-Im not so sure
  • 2 0
 @scary1: @scary1: I would say the same at first because it looks unusual with DM stem but if you look closer he is only using 3x5mm spacer, not that crazy and pretty average on anything else other than DH bike. Why he wouldn´t go for higher rise bar option when burgtec offers it is a mystery to me, might be a superstition lol.
  • 5 1
 @islandforlife: na i reckon he's been running on dumb luck for 20 years
  • 1 2
 @scary1: Glad it wasn't just me that saw that
  • 43 1
 115 psi in the fork? Has Minnaar considered just switching to a rigid fork?
  • 19 0
 Probably, it is Greg Minnaar after all. Custom Fox 40 with a length of PVC pipe inside it.
  • 5 3
 maybe it's so he doesn't have to bench press at the gym
  • 11 1
 @nouseforaname: the fox 4∞
  • 3 0
 Can anyone who rides a Fox 40 put these into perspective? I went to the setup guide on Fox's website and they don't have recommended settings @115 PSI. It looks like these are all pretty high pressures for their weights, and really fast rebound settings for the spring rates (Fox suggests 1 & 0 clicks for LSR & HSR @ 96 PSI). Curious to hear someone's input who has this fork.
  • 1 0
 @OpeSorryAbootThat: I'm ~155 lbs and ran around 65 psi in my 40.
  • 4 0
 @toast2266: That's nuts, I guess these guys have been doing their push ups
  • 3 0
 This is based off of the new 40s, not the last gen. The new ones have a larger negative spring. Naturally you will need to increase the pressure in get the sag correct. The reason for this was to help add more mid stroke support and create a more linear spring curve closer to that of a coil.
  • 1 0
 @OpeSorryAbootThat:

they increased the negative volumein the new evol air spring for 2021 so now runs more pressure than before, anyway its a lot ofnpressure for the normal rider even having that in consideration.

the damper its obviosly been revalved for their needs as you point out in the positions of the rebound adjuster
  • 4 1
 Welcome DH World Cup racing! AG is using even higher values Wink
  • 1 0
 @OpeSorryAbootThat: the rebound rates posted based off of air pressures are more a “guideline” than a specific rule or formula. Rebound setting is largely based off of air pressure, but the also the velocity of impact and a surprising amount of comfort. At WC speeds, rebound settings are usually set a little faster because the speeds are so much higher and comfort goes completely out the window. Fitness plays into this massively, and you’ll notice the strongest / most fit riders tend to be setting rebound faster as well as much higher air pressures.
  • 2 0
 @OpeSorryAbootThat: also keep in mind, while it is a guideline, it is a range and settings can fall outside that, but usually not deviate too much from that almost ever. Only under extreme conditions should something deviate from that range, and at that point the damper should be re-valved / re-shimmed. Which, these riders more than likely have done to compensate for all of the above. It’s very rare that a WC rider at their level isn’t on their own custom shim / valve setup that will as a result have a different range of settings.
  • 1 0
 @OpeSorryAbootThat:

I’m about 200lbs and tend to set my forks way below recommended fox pressures. Since it was my first experience with a fox40, I started with the recommended settings and I found it to be rather stiff, I was getting mad arm pump.

I kept lowering and lowering the pressures and playing with spacers to a point in which I thought that either the forks were defective or I was going nuts. I even plugged a shockwiz to make sure it was not me. I have settled at around 65psi, which is ridiculously low for my weight.

I’m a mediocre wannabe dentist guy, so no mad sends or KOM’s but I can hold my own. I can’t even imagine how 115 psi feels like, given that I started at around 80-85 psi.

Pro riders.... absolute mind blowing animals is the logical takeaway I guess.
  • 1 1
 @psicoizaguirre: I would not read into this too much. There are many variables to consider like volume spacers, is this the new evol spring or old one, and sag ect. Sounds to me like this is minimal volume spacers at a high sag point. Greg running a 575 in the rear at 185lbs would put him in the range of about 18%-20% sag. I would assume hes in the 10%-12% sag up front. This will give the bike a more lively poppy feel. The other things to consider (which somebody cleverly pointed out) hes counting over 8 clicks of HSC on the fork making this a first gen grip 2 damper.
One thing to consider is the HSC setting is harsh on these forks and running wide open is preferred for heavier riders. To offset this, increasing the spring rate to increase mid stroke support is necisarry to prevent the fork from diving.
I'm 215lbs, and run 95psi with 4 tokens and my LSC two clicks open from closed, HSC wide open, HSR 3 clicks from closed, and LSR closed.
One advantage to the newer VVC style grip 2 will be the allowance of more HSC without the harshness, and the ability to open up the LSC with a better platform to prevent the fork from diving.
Ultimately the faster you go, the firmer your setup will need to get. In turn the slower your rebound to prevent the bike from hopping around. The harshness your experiencing isnt necisarilly spring rate or compression, it's probably rebound. Try closing the LSR a few clicks. It should feel slow returning the first inch or so. Rebound is directly related to spring rate, so the deeper the bike goes into the travel, the faster it will recover, and it should gradually get slower until the end of the stroke. The other things to consider is your sag front and rear on the bike. 30% is average, but probably the maximum you wanna go in the rear. Max 15% for the front.
  • 1 0
 @jomacba: according to LinkageX3 its close to 33% on the rear
  • 1 0
 @Y12Sentinel: hmm, I have a hard time believing that. I run an SLS 600lbs spring (which dyno's at an average of 561lbs). Its a 250mm eye to eye with a 75mm stroke shock. Sag is on this spring is 17.5mm. Which equates to 23.3% sag. I weigh 218lbs no gear. (Pants and t-shirt)
Greg has a rider weight of 86kg (189.598lbs). He had also stated he went back to the factory linkage as the custom linkage didnt have the same feeling he wanted.
He also stated in the last podcast he was on that he doesnt like running much sag past 20%. So neither the math nor the data match up to 33.3.
  • 1 0
 @jomacba: maybe my template for the new v10 is wrong, plug in the numbers and check for yourself
  • 1 0
 @jomacba: @foxfactory whats Greg's rear sag? thanks
  • 1 0
 @Y12Sentinel: I cant seem to find your template. In curious to see it.
  • 25 2
 Why say tyre pressures depend on the track and then give exact details of suspension set-ups, which they will also adjust depending on the track (as evidenced in the Fox videos with both Loris and Greg continually tinkering with their suspension settings). Why not just give the usual tyre pressures they will start with on a standard rough WCDH track? They likely have a 'go to' pressure F+R that they will then adjust from maybe 1-2 PSI depending on rain, sharp rocks etc..
  • 5 0
 They got all the details and then forgot to ask that one last question. Wink
  • 1 0
 Could be because they are testing new maxxis prototype tires that are said to eliminate the need for inserts.
  • 5 0
 The new prototype tires are using oxygen to give more lift/float. Frames are being filled with oxygen as well
  • 5 1
 @JimmyWeir: Oxygen is 1.429g per litre, whereas the air we breathe (proprietary matrix) is 1.225g per liter... So it would in fact make it heavier.
  • 1 1
 @jomacba: yeah it would be heavier, did I say that it would make it lighter? No I didn't
  • 1 0
 Maybe hydrogen would be better?
  • 1 0
 @JimmyWeir: Not directly, but you implied it when you said "lift/float".... Just saying.
  • 1 0
 @JimmyWeir: Nope, that has hindenburg written all over it....
  • 25 0
 Given that they're riding custom shim stacks, do any of the fork metrics beyond PSI and volume spacers mean anything?
  • 5 0
 Valid lad!
  • 1 0
 Custom shim stack is a relative term. All this means is that the transfer from low speed to high speed would be more variable based off of the size of the compression. Again, all these numbers are relative to the new suspention which does not use the typical shim stack, but rather a leaf spring design that changer the fulcrum point of the spring. This emulates the charictaristics of changing the shim stack because the adjuster no longer puts preload on the stack.
  • 1 0
 Not even PSI or spacers. I think I heard Jordi say something about a larger negative chamber in a dialled video, so even those could mean nothing.

Same with the Öhlins fork. Bruni saif he runs 105 psi, I run 140 depite being 6kg lighter, also something very different
  • 1 0
 @jomacba: not sure if that’s accurate as the “new” high speed compression and rebound only have 8 clicks so these settings like the 15 clicks from closed high speed compression are based off the old grip2. These must be last years settings.
  • 1 0
 @Jesse221: Ah, good eye. I didnt see that. Your probably correct. However the air pressure in the fork seems on the high end, but I guess that's relative to volume spacers too.
  • 1 0
 @Jesse221: one thing to note however, is the adjustment dials. Those are FIT4 RC2 dials. So if this is in fact relative to the suspention they ARE running, I'd be curious. I also know last season at the end of the season they were riding Mojo Rising offset crowns, so I'm curious if this suspention was out on simply to show off the frames before the 2021 suspention actually made it into the country. I know that Fox Canada and USA arent expecting to get their shipments of the 40s for public sale until Mid June. But that could change.
  • 1 0
 @Jesse221: The adjusters are the Old RC2 damper.
  • 19 0
 Wow those new colors are niiiice
  • 14 2
 So most factory riders right now are like "Mullet Set-ups are the way to go." Then the same companies they ride for come out with their new bikes and are all "29ers are the only way to go!" I don't get it. Why are so few brands selling mullet bikes? Last year Specialized released a brand new bike in only 29 meanwhile Bruni dominates on a mullet.
  • 27 6
 Maybe what's best for the pros, isn't for us, mere mortals ?
  • 9 0
 In my opinion 27.5 and 29er Bike or Frame (Mullet or not) should be a option in any brand.
  • 8 12
flag JakinM (Apr 28, 2020 at 9:31) (Below Threshold)
 mullet bikes are great, but for the average joe they are too complicated. You need to have two sets of everything, so you can't buy standard wheel sets, you need two sets of replacement tubes if you flat, need different components, etc. It just isn't practical yet. Plus the idea fad is like less than a year old. Companies usually test new stuff on the world cup riders for that long before releasing it anyway
  • 14 1
 @JakinM: Do you think someone who is buying a brand new, top of the range DH bike is put off by having to by 2 different tube sizes (if they even use tubes at all), or spending a tiny margin more to buy two separate wheels rather than as a wheelset deal?
  • 2 1
 Agreed..... Scott and Specialised need to sort it out! Not everyone is racing every weekend, so people just want a fun DH bike to ride instead! Be interesting to see what is happening with the new Canyon Sender..
  • 3 6
 @JakinM: Totally agree. My goal is to standardize as much stuff as possible between my two bikes. They run the same drivetrains and hubs. Saddles are the same. Both use SRAM brakes, so the bleed kit is the same. Both are full 29ers, so they can use the same spare tubes.
  • 16 0
 @JakinM: 27.5 tube works in 29 silly
  • 9 0
 @Hambo24: Yes! It's crazy that so few people know this.
I've always said about Mullet/MX bikes that their biggest enemy towards becoming the norm is peoples lack of understanding and unfortunately this thread exemplifies that a little too good.

Like people thinking they are harder to ride and only for the pros - WTF? It's the opposite you fools! They are easier to get along with than a full on 29'er no matter what skill level you have. But because people in general are highly ignorant and likely won't buy one because of sheer ignorance and lack of understanding, the bike brands don't really dare to release them to the public yet.
  • 3 3
 @luisferreira: all front wheels should be 29
  • 1 0
 So let's take a few things into consideration here. Currently the number one traded thing in this world is Data. This is also the key fundamental behind everything in downhill racing today. A perfect example of this is fork offset. Fox released the 49 with a 58mm offset. The initial tests were done on a modified 27.5 fork with the arch machined out and an offset of 52mm. They chose 58mm based off the numbers related to wheelpath saying it's better, rather than truly doing some significant testing. Problem here is creating a bunch of casts for lowers gets expensive, and given that the prototype was a modified 27.5 fork, the results were skewed.
The incarnation of 29" wheels were no differant. The companies who jumped on producing 29er DH bikes felt some pain (commencal is a perfect example of this) and thus have since redesigned the bike after some significant data acquisition under Amaury Pierron.
Santa Cruz were the first to the party to introduce the 29er to racing, yet were among the last to release to the public.
Mullet bikes are no exception. Just because a 29er behaves one way and a 27.5 bike behaves another isnt a simple case of meet in the middle.
Santa Cruz probably have the most dialed setup compared to every other company right now, somtheir transition into mullet is expected. However, I would expect to see some time and some real world data applied before it gets released to the public. After all, your spending top dollar on a bike, dont you want to make sure the people who designed and built it were certain it's dialed?
  • 1 2
 @Hambo24: I heard you can stretch a 27.5 intch high roler with your mums hair dryer and put it on a 29 intch bike
  • 3 0
 @JakinM: I run my YT Capra 29 as a mullet. 27.5 wheel in the high position is EXACTLY the same geo as 29 in the rear in the low position. It (high vs low)changes the leverage ratio a little bit. I can’t tell.

Anyhow, I carry a 26” tube because they’re rubber and they stretch and the 26” is smaller. I used to carry a 24” but that was a bit of a PITA.

Anyhow, I bought a front wheel and a back wheel. I bought a front tire and a back tire. No extra expense. But it sure is nice dropping a step track without a wheel buzzing my ‘taint. If I did this for a living (insert laugh track) I really wouldn’t want a tire in my ‘taint all day everyday.
  • 1 0
 @Ralston88: I didn't even realise the Gambler 7x0 had been dropped from retail, but the frame still supports 650B.
  • 6 2
 @DirtyDee: you know how I can tell you’ve never worked in a bike shop?

Trying to explain the word Geometry, let alone what a head angle is to the vast majority of customers is like banging your head against the wall.

Trying to explain the advantages of two different size wheels, best of luck getting the customer to actually internalize their bike has two different size wheels.

I’d bet money on getting a phone call “I bought a bike from you a month ago and I got a flat today and my brother’s friend’s cousin’s uncle told me my wheels are two DIFFERENT sizes! I need to talk to manager, this is ridiculous”.

It’s brilliant when you get a customer who knows what’s up and you get to nerd out. Otherwise you’re stuck trying to explain how a Demo is different from an Epic.

The bike industry isn’t here to sell the best possible product, it’s here to sell the most product to most number of people, with the least demand on a margin suppressed dealer network with an underwhelming amount of trained staff.
  • 2 0
 @bonfire: You know how I can tell you know nothing about me, because I have worked in bike shops over the last 15 years.

The 'vast majority of customers' will be buying a commuter/hybrid bike and for the MTB riders it will be a trail/enduro bike. The post I was replying to was asking why they release a 29er DH bike when Bruni dominates on a mullet, if someone is buying the latest top end DH bike and follows the World Cup to know what Bruni rides then this doesn't need explained.

If you somehow get a total numpty in who is buying the most expensive DH bike available with no idea about bikes or DH, then you just say the front wheel is bigger so it rolls over bumps and smooths them out and the rear wheel is a bit smaller so you don't buzz the tyre off your bum all the time and it makes it corner better. Simple.
  • 13 0
 Shorter riders going for 27.5" - still 6ft and 5'11!
  • 2 0
 muhuahahahaha
  • 2 0
 Great user name
  • 3 0
 @lastminutetech: Great band too!
  • 2 0
 @ridestuff: Rip Tony Sly
  • 1 0
 From a couple of the faster racers I've talked to that like the mullet bikes this could be about butt buzz with the bigger wheel in the back. I have short legs, and have had issues with butt buzz on some 29ers. However the longer wheelbase bikes of late have made that issue easier, but it can still be a problem on steeper tracks.
  • 1 0
 @timmigrant: Oh, I thought you would be replying to my comment about how he runs his fork super stiff and explaining that it is all a super secret African method for going fawst.
  • 11 0
 CANT WAIT FOR THE WORLD CUP!!! ...... whenever that may be
  • 2 0
 2021!
  • 12 0
 Having WynTv withdrawals
  • 3 0
 The Bulldog should be back in time for round one!
  • 3 0
 @me2menow: Wynthdrawals?
  • 11 0
 Chris King need to release the buzzworks reach adjust headset already
  • 3 2
 I'm guessing it's not reliable or some thing otherwise they would of released it years ago, gotta be around for 8 years now.
  • 2 0
 @bigburd: Or manufacturing cost does not meet with the expected demand at the price point to have a valid point going to production. Guessing that it is not reliable is the thing where I am sure this is not the issue, @christiaan how perfect are the bearings in your five year old one?
  • 3 0
 @OkkervilRiver: they spin like new, ano has faded a bit, but otherwise it is as new
  • 4 0
 @OkkervilRiver: I have a Chris King headset that I got in 2006 and is in it's third bike and the bearings are still perfect. I'd bet that their market surveys say there's not a ton of demand for that product.
  • 5 0
 @bigburd: My oldest King headset is now 23 yo. It started in my XC race bike. Then it migrated to my DH bike. Since then it's been in a DJ frame, a touring bike, and finally it's lies next to useless on my fixie. Other than wiping the headset down when I switched bikes, I've never done a single bit of work on it. That's why ALL my headsets are King headsets!
  • 1 0
 You do remember how long it took them to release their BB right......????
  • 1 0
 @bigburd: why wouldn’t it be reliable? It’s just a headset with an offset bore, super simple.

Anyone that wants to do the same thing without the Chris King bling/reliability/cost can just get one from Works Comp, Superstar, Reverse, Commencal maybe others, plenty already out there.

Ran a Works Comp one on my DH back when I had a DH bike, did the job.
  • 3 0
 I thought the Buzzworks was the 29” rear tire and a not super tall rider.
  • 6 0
 How loud are Chris King headsets?
  • 3 0
 @boozed: I suppose it depends on how you use them? As a headset, probably silent, if you use them as a musical instrument, who knows?
  • 2 0
 @ridestuff: Same. Chris King personally installed a Rasta headset by the light of his pickup truck's headlights one evening at his tent at the 1995 Sea Otter. it still works. I shoved some grease in it once.
  • 10 0
 Who ever did the metric conversion for Greg’s height is way off
  • 2 0
 190.5 per google so I am guessing someone misread it.
  • 8 0
 And why are they all on tje old rc2 damper and not grip 2 vvc?
  • 3 1
 They probably took these photos before the new Fox product release so they had to put old tech on them? They are clearly riding the new Fox 49 forks with white lowers in the videos.
  • 4 1
 @Patsplit: It's weird because I don't think the 49 ever came with RC2 damper, only GRIP2... would be weird to throw a 3 year old RC2 40 on a new bike for press shots?
  • 1 0
 @gramboh: also have the old lowers now ??? Odd....
  • 1 0
 Probably adjusters for a prototype "RAD" damper.
  • 8 2
 Those XTR brakes on Loris's bike look exactly the same as Saints.
  • 2 0
 XTR levers?
  • 1 0
 @mark79: the levers also look exactly like Saints. You can see the gold reservoir
  • 1 0
 @gnarcissistictendency: not xtr then ????????????
  • 2 0
 I get using the Buzzworks to stretch out a cockpit setup as an experiment or stop-gap design fix with a new rider bike fit. But after 6 years, and so many frame iterations, and all of their riders using it, why not design the frame to put the cockpit where you actually want it?
  • 2 2
 Because they make bikes the public use too, not just WC racers. Easier to modify 3 pro bikes to their individual tastes.
  • 3 0
 Nice looking bikes!
Yes they are set up really different for the same job of going fast?
How would you set up your bike, for racing round your house?
  • 6 2
 After 20 years in DH Greg Minnaar is still figuring out what size bike he needs, bless him! lmao!!!
  • 4 0
 LOL. After 20 years of winning too. Wink
  • 3 1
 @mybaben: That is a testament to his skills not the bike! However, imagine what he would have achieve had he had the right size bike all along?
  • 1 0
 I was always curious about that: Has anyone broken a v10 at the virtual "meeting point" of the top tube and seat tube? That area just seems like it is missing some gusset, at least for me. I pretty much know you dont sit too much on a DH bike, but still you can slip a pedal or misjudge some jump and land on your seat hard.

BTW biks look super clean.
  • 1 0
 They all have the HSR very closed on their shocks. Ive always been a big fan of setting my HSR on the slower side for when things really get hectic. When you are flat out and start over shooting landings and maching into rough sections it really keeps the bike calm and planted in the back. No OTB buck surprise feelings.
  • 4 0
 *Minnaar numbers rounded to nearest one
  • 4 0
 Luca's bike is pure porn ,I'd marry it Smile
  • 6 2
 No inserts is pretty surprising!
  • 18 4
 Proper DH tyres and sealant is all you really need. Inserts are for people who run flimsy tyres to save weight then put foam in there to bring it back up to wieght and make them reliable again.
  • 4 1
 Reserve rims have been amazing to ride man. I’ve collapsed Enve hoops with cushcores on some of the same trails. No inserts needed, no problems yet *knocking on wood*
  • 5 0
 Does anyone know an approximate proportion of the DH world cup riders that are riding tire inserts?
  • 1 2
 @leviatanouroboro: Funny, I've had exactly the opposite experience. I've seen Reserves last exactly a weekend. Were your Enves current-generation? Also, inserts can increase stress-spike in your wheels. I've heard multiple wheel companies talking about it but no one has presented data - yet. If we're being honest with ourselves, we have to realize that anything can and will break given the right circumstance. 9/10 carbon rim failures come down to damaged spokes or a tire failure first, then rim damage/failure after continued use. Is that the rider's or the manufacturer's fault? We all seem to arbitrarily choose what maintenance-free lifespan is acceptable for the components on our bikes.
  • 4 1
 Minnaar's bike would look so so good with a Rockshox boxxer with red lowers, same with the rear shock.
  • 4 0
 even though i know how old greg is.. i still have to read it twice.
  • 2 0
 The GOAT. Amazing.
  • 1 0
 The math for the riders sizes doesn’t work. In cm Greg is 12cm taller than Luca, but in inches it’s only 3”, which is 7.5 cm!
Can we assume that Greg really is 195cm (6’4.7”) tall, and the imperial number is wrong?
  • 1 0
 yes that would be right.
  • 1 0
 6-3 seemed too short after meeting him.
  • 3 0
 WOW !

Basically the same shock spring rate than for Rampage ????
  • 3 1
 My gosh. It's impossible to pick which colour I like the best. All sensational looking bikes!
  • 4 1
 Luca's bike is definitely the best looking of the lot.
  • 2 0
 agreed. pink and red in theory sounds horrific, but seeing it.....damn its purdy. love it
  • 1 0
 Minnaaar's mate! Wink
  • 2 0
 Can somebody explain to me how the Chris king buzz works offset headset works? Looking at the photos I can’t figure it out
  • 1 0
 You can buy the same thing from Works Components, SS, Reverse etc
  • 3 0
 The bikes will be out of date by the time they get to race them.
  • 1 0
 High speed rebound seems really slow. Must be something counteracting that.
  • 1 0
 Lots of volume spacers probably.
  • 2 0
 When can we buy a MX frame?
  • 1 0
 Why dont Santa Cruz just make thier frames a bit longer rather than rely on reach adjusting headsets
  • 1 0
 How long ago was this done? Those are some old 40s
  • 1 0
 Nice, I often wear a face mask when carrying out my home mechanical jobs
  • 2 2
 I'm no rocket scientist but 6´3" is about 190 cms. Anyway we use the metric system so don't t care.
  • 1 0
 You are right.
But is he 195 or 190,5cm tall?
????
  • 1 0
 @tgmdgn: actually in his webpage appears 188 cms.
  • 1 0
 Wow that red V10 looks Intense!
  • 1 0
 Where is the Shimano Saint 2021 ?
  • 1 0
 How long are Greg’s chainstays?
  • 1 0
 Love the 8 year old groupset! C’mon Shimano!
  • 1 0
 Why don't the make them longer or an XXL, since there is a evident need?
  • 1 1
 Anyone else find it interesting that they don't run tire inserts?
  • 1 0
 guessing if they lose a good amount of air the insert would allow them to finish but not at a time that theyd care about anyways...?
  • 1 0
 Fun and comfort. Perfect
  • 1 0
 Where is grip2 damper??
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