Guillaume Bout's Bonkers Concept Bikes

Nov 30, 2018
by James Smurthwaite  

After becoming fed up of "doing computer graphics pictures of huge VIP aircrafts for filthy rich people", Guillaume Bout, 36, quit his job and decided to look for something new. With time on his hands, skills to use and creativity to burn, it wasn't long before his mind focussed in on his biggest hobby - bikes. He explains: "I think it was just the urge to create something, just like you would paint, draw, or play an instrument. When winter comes, and it’s dark and cold, I just spend more time in front of the computer than on the bike... maybe I should get a girlfriend!"

The result of those long evenings is a fleet of bonkers and beautiful rides rendered on 3DS Max and V-Ray. Don't be fooled into thinking they're just gimmicks though, as you'll see there are details aplenty on these rides. It's also worth clarifying that these bikes will never see the light of day, for a start, Guillaume hasn't begun to consider the constraints that production processes would bring. Guillaume puts it best when he says, "while I put some serious thoughts into it when I do them, these are not to be taken seriously."

And so his Zebra bike brand was born. The brand was called Zebra because "a zebra is quite similar to your everyday horse, but very different at the same time... I also happen to like stripes pattern". It fits the four-strong range well, with everything from a gearboxed hardtail to a penny farthing to a fat downhill bike inlcluded. Take a look at the highlights below:


Zebra O.T.B (Oddly Tall Bike) 21st Century Penny Farthing

Mountain bikers have looked to history to re-embrace bum bags, skin wall tires and fitting water bottles to frames, so why not take inspiration from even further back and ride this fully carbon fibre penny farthing?


Guillaume has been working on the design for two years. He says: "The idea of a modern all-mountain penny-farthing kept bugging me regularly. The initial picture I had in mind was of an aluminium frame, but once I started blocking the proportions in the 3D software I realized a carbon frame would be much more appropriate with the difficulty to pedal on such a bike. Then surprisingly, most of the penny-farthing came together by itself rather quickly."

Guillaume's hardest challenge was keeping the Q-factor low. Penny Farthings are direct drive so Guilluame had to squish in a geared front hub, a disc brake, two cranks and the fork and still keep a comfortable pedalling position. It apparently came down to a matter of millimetres.

There are no geometry figures for this bike but Guillaume will say it had to be pretty slack to help prevent OTBs. Would it work? Even Guillaume's not sure. He says: "While the big wheel would monster-truck its way over pretty much anything, the small wheel would have a hard time clearing small obstacles and could even get stuck and snap the frame in half, so the 150mm of suspension travel had to make up for it."

Zebra OTB Specification
Frame: Zebra OTB composite
Shock: Fox DHX2 10.5x3.5
Fork: Zebra OTB composite
Transmission: “Some kind of weird concentric blend between a Kris Holm unicycle geared hub and a Rohloff speedhub with custom Effigear cranks"
Brakes: Shimano Saint
Brake Discs: XT IceTech, 203mm front, 160mm rear
Stem: Hope all mountain, 35mm
Bar: Custom Renthal Fatbar

Grips: Lizard Skins MacAskill

Saddle: Custom shaped Fabric Scoop Radius Pro Team
Seatpost: Cane Creek eeSilk
Wheels: Custom Enve composite M635 and/or M640 rims, 50” front, 20” rear
Tires: Schwalbe Magic Mary 50”x2.4” and 20”x2.4”
Pedals: Spank Spike
So yeah, it's mad, but just try and convince us you wouldn't fancy a go.

The 150mm travel frame has attracted plenty of negativity in the mountain biking world but Guillaume has had penny farthing enthusiasts reach out to him to say they wished it really existed.

The carbon fork took the most work. Guillaume originally wanted a suspension fork but was worried it would wreck a rider's knees when it was compressed. In the end a rigid, four bar carbon fork would have to do.

There's another 20mm of travel in the seatpost and a neat integrated clamp.

A scooped saddle keeps the rider in place on steep pitches and, of course, a water bottle mount has been thought of. The mudguard acts as a "thigh guard" against spinning rubber when the rider has the bike leaned over turning.

50" of trail crushing roll-over
Big wheels need big brakes - a 203mm Saint rotor.

A massive 10.5x3.5 Fox DHX2 handles suspension duties on the YT Tues inspired read end. The suspension isn't so much there to dampen shocks but to give more clearing capabilities to the rear wheel.

The handlebars give thigh clearance and the cables are, of course, internally routed.
The beast laid out
A mock up of the riding position

Zebra F.F.B (Freaky Fat Bike)


Guillaume first designed the F.F.B back in 2014 but recently updated it as he was between jobs. There was no specific urge to design this particular bike, he just wanted to scratch his creative itch and this is the result.

Guillaume says: "Fatbikes were all the rage back then so I wanted to do one. But doing 'just a fatbike' would have been a shame when you can do whatever you want, right? So my brain thought, 'if a fat tire on a 26" rim gives an outer diameter of 29" then put some fat tires on 24" rims and you'll get an outer diameter of about 27" and you can still add big suspensions.' So I said, 'you know brain, it's a bit of a silly idea', to which brain promptly replied, 'sure, let's do it'."

So here it is. 200mm of travel, 24" wheels, a widened, inverted DVO Jade fork, and Effigear gearbox and loud Kawasaki green paint. Guillaume was aiming for 'over the top' and he probably exceeded it.

Zebra OTB Specification
Frame: Zebra FFB composite
Shock: DVO Jade
Fork: Custom widened DVO Emerald
Transmission: Effigear gearbox with Gates carbon belt
Brakes: Shimano Saint, 2x front, 1x rear
Brake Discs: XT IceTech, 203mm (but only as centerlock
Stem: Hope direct mount, 30mm
Bar: Custom Renthal Fatbar
, 800mm
Grips Oury All-Mountain
Saddle Fabric
Seatpost: RockShox Reverb Stealth
Wheels: 24"Nextie Wild Dragon II carbon rims
Tires: Custom Surly Bud & Lou, 24"x4.8"
Pedals: Spank Spike
Guillaume says: "I like it as much as I find it lame. As cool as ugly. As awesome as ridiculous. The front triangle is nice, the rear one not so much. The design feels a bit weird, a bit unbalanced but all in all, I think I eventually like it, in a weird kind of way.

The FFB in all its... glory?

A Nicolai inspired link is driven by a DVO shock.

Guillaume isn't satisfied with the rear triangle design but the fat tyres and belt drive didn't leave him much wiggle room.

Two 203mm discs are charged with stopping this beast. Two brakes means added power but they also equalise the twisting force one would exert on the fork, even despite the beefy carbon arch.
A closer look at that monstrous, custom fork.

bigquotesI've seen full suspended fat bikes. Fat bikes with DH forks. Fat bikes with 2 front disscbrakes. 24" fat bikes. I put it all together, with a gearbox for good measure.Guillaume Bout

These Surly tires are only available in 26", so a custom 24" pair was rendered for this bike.

When the most normal part of your bike is an Effigear gearbox...


Zebra S.L.B Strapping Long Bike

Somebody get Aston on the line...

Guillaume also designs some more conventional bikes such as this Nicolai inspired Strapping Long Bike. All of Guillaume's bikes are designed with Effigear drivetrains and not just for performance. He says: " I like the concept and it would give my bikes something different... and partly because a standard transmission looked mighty annoying to do in 3D. I eventually just did one and the derailleur was indeed mighty annoying, but the great thing with 1x transmission is that I didn’t have to do a front derailleur at least!"

Guillaume has also designed this J.S.B hardtail

So what's next in the pipeline for Guillaume? "With computer graphics I can do whatever I want so I might as well try atypical ideas as there are no production constraints. I’d like to try a tracked bike for snow, or a lighter, more 'artistic' hardtail, if I have time."

For more of Guillame's work check out his Artstation page or follow him on Instagram and Facebook.
Guillaume has no affiliations with the brands depicted

MENTIONS: @Will-narayan



190 Comments

  • + 256
 I want some of whatever he’s smoking
  • + 14
 It may be as much a curse than a blessing, but that's my normal way of being without smoking anything Big Grin
  • + 6
 @Will-narayan: So what happens when you smoke things!?!?
  • + 12
 PUT IT ON PINKBIKE FIELD TEST!
  • + 3
 And a water bottle to booooot.
  • + 5
 How much does that big wheeler’s front Enve rim cost? That’s the real question here
  • + 1
 @chyu: rode and sponsored by Ratboy with a tophat
  • + 1
 I want that hardtail (numbers pending).
  • + 1
 @richierocket: You're the 3rd one in the comments to say that, of course there's quite a difference between saying "I'd want this" and actually buying it, but it's interesting.
Would you rather have a gearbox on a hardtail (some sort of wheather proof, trouble free hardtail for when it rains) instead of on a full-suspended bike and all the anti-squat theory/issue that comes with it ?
The price may be off-putting though.

@gnarnaimo: I'm totally rational and coherent :p
  • + 1
 This isn’t from smoking, its from hallucinogens lmao.
  • + 2
 @Will-narayan: Because pretty much everything was well outdated on my previous bike I indeed was very seriously considering some kind of gearbox to be then done with all worries about drivetrain wear and all that. I considered the Portus Cycles Krowd Karl ED, the Olsen bike (though I preferred steel, and he could get that sorted too) and I even discussed the possibility of a BTR Ranger with gearbox with Tam Hamilton. I also considered the Rohloff hub for the BTR and 11ants (local brand). Eventually I went with a fairly standard 26" wheeled BTR Ranger (though with a lowered top tube for more fun) with a Zee drivetrain. I'd need a massive load of drivetrain wear before the break even point of any of these. But yeah I seriously considered all of them. I also thought the Effigear was more interesting (and I at least understand how it worked) but some of these brands strongly preferred Pinion. But yeah I still think all of these bikes are quite cool. Especially the Krowd Karl ED with the Intend US forks as shown on Eurobike looks wicked. Though I think the way Olsen omitted the split rear triangle for use with the belt drive is very clever.

Maybe if I would really have wanted the wide gear range (currently riding 11-36 in the rear) I would have gone with one of these gearboxes. Especially as I hate long rear mechs. But you're never sure until you're very close to making the final call. I'm really happy with what I have now. And I later learned that if you really don't maintain those belt drive systems, belt and sprockets wear soon enough too. And these won't be cheap either. So yeah, that kind of misses the point for me. At least for making an investment like that. Not saying this goes for everyone, but these are the thoughts and considerations from someone who was quite close to getting a hardtail with some kind of gearbox.

@DirtMcGuirk07 : I think he's called Dandy Macaskull.
  • + 1
 20 and 50 aint dead
  • + 1
 @vinay: Ok, thanks for your feedback. Gearboxes are quite an investment.
Possible that several brands prefer the Pinion as it can be mounted on the frame, rather than be part of the frame like the Effigear, which may render the frame building more difficult (though they recently supplied a mountable version to Starling who’s currently doing a full-sus frame for it, so this may be cool).
The Effigear would need some kind of « breakout » deal to boost the development, hopefully the Muvea e-bike can help in this regard.

Yes the Olsen bike is interesting, I think I considered this solution too at some point, but as the Effigear output gear is higher compared to the concentric Pinion, it didn’t work design-wise, so I dropped the chainstay instead.
  • + 99
 That's mint! We don't build 26, but we'd build some 20's and 50's to make that Penny Farthing happen Smile
  • + 37
 I would buy the Penny Farthing! Hands down the most classy take on a bike from the past Smile
  • + 57
 Thankfully with 2019 UCI rules changes its legal for comp next year
  • + 31
 Yeah, at first I was like, "Yawn . . . another carbon fiber, penny farthing mountain bike." But, then I was all, "Wait!! Did that say ALL MOUNTAIN?!"
  • + 8
 @rivercitycycles: you are SO PORTLAND!
  • + 1
 @taurausmountain: That's funny......because I live in Central Washington! My user name came from when I use to live in Sacramento which is also know as the River City Wink
  • + 5
 @rivercitycycles: here I was thinking you represent the bike shop!
  • + 4
 Really depressing to hear as a rider still on a 26er...though you probably know your target market well enough to know that us cheapskates on old bikes aren't terribly likely to buy $2k wheels anyway.
  • + 10
 That ENVE 50” front rim would cost like $15K all by itself.
  • + 2
 Central WA represent! @rivercitycycles:
  • + 1
 @DRomy: let alone a 50" magic mary... I shutter to think what that costs...
  • + 2
 @DRomy: it is actually cheaper to make them then what they charge one 27.5 rim. Enve just likes to rip stupid people off.
  • + 3
 Our biggest tire is 36x2.25, making 50er? It wont be a big deal,,hell yeah!!
  • + 64
 Pinkbike should commission Guillaume to do some more renderings later for April 1st
  • + 11
 I have a few ideas but I need to learn ZBrush first^^
  • + 44
 I am impressed. This took some time to model... and map/wrap. And then it took lots of knowledge about bikes and engineering.

How about you become an engineer? If you can model this with such detail it means you have more than a basic understanding of how to make bikes. And other things. And you can model, learning Catia or Solidworks will be a breeze. Engineers get paid without being asked too much. Visualization people... oh can you do a couple of those pictures for me? What? 2000€?! Sorry I thought this was your hobby. Ok, then can you make a simple interior before lunch tomorrow?
  • + 20
 Most engineers I know wouldn't be able to draw like this. By the time you learn the material sciences and math you'd be stretched pretty thin to have these kinds of drawing skills.
  • + 2
 @iantmcg: I happen to know a couple of engineers and "sciences" to their everyday job are what maths is to me as an architect. During 10 years of my short career as an architect I worked with people without architectural degree who can design spaces better than some of architects I know. Conversely I am at least equal to some of engineers at our office at building construction, details, choice of materials, how to build stuff on the site. I can't calculate arming and can do only gross estimation o size of elements (even though I took two year course in calculations of concrete and steel) but still, I can operate in the building production and construction environment to a big degree. All that didn't stop me from learning basics of freeform 3D modelling and visualization.

What I mean with all this drivel is that education is more often a formal limiter to ones capability to GET a certain job, at least as long as you do not work alone. We always rely on competence of our coworkers, such team is always more efficient and creative than a bunch of nerds specialized in one direction. That leads to a conclusion that practice is always the supreme education. University is the entry card. One of very limited areas where school has to come forward is engineering trades dealing with stress calculations, these people can't be treating things lightly. Although in my "career" I have met structural engineers who were eager to try things and those who were absolute square heads. The latter is much harder to work with, while both kinds have to deliver solutions that will not collapse.

I am more than confident that having such modeling skills coped with basic understanding of function and structure (as well as usage) can create a very valuable working partner for many industries, in this case, bike in particular. When it comes to bicycle design, the engineering part is laughable. No matter how many courses you took, if you can't deal with production, you are not going to be successful, hence you hire a dude who is good at it to polish the details, set tolerances, advise how to cut costs. Look at companies like Transition, Pole, you can be sure these folks are not sharpest at "science"... more of learning by doing/failing. In bicycle design craftmanship is more important than God knows what course you took at which university. BTR is a perfect example. Single pivot, pfff, yeah, the issue with single pivot is that it is very hard to make one that does not look like Orange... it takes learning by doing, curiosity to create asthetically pleasing form for this suspension design. They made it, oh they did. But did they take a post doc at Oxford? No...

Combination of excellence at a few skills is no less valuable than perfection at a skill or two.
  • + 12
 Most engineers don't have any need to make a render like this, because it takes a lot of extra time and effort to make a pretty looking image; time and effort that is usually better spent on other aspects of the design. An ugly pastel color model is sufficient 99% of the time, as long as it is dimensionally accurate. The actual fabrication drawings are almost always black and white anyway.

The real beauty is in the final product. Modern bikes are technical marvels; it takes the cumulative effort of thousands of people to build the components of a mountain bike, all so that we can play in the dirt.

Edit: I should add that I think these renders are fantastic. My point is that it is a skill that wouldn't be needed by most engineers. Someone trying to make a pitch to customers though? killing it.
  • + 0
 @CaptainBLT: it has nothing to do with rendering. It has to do with ability to model particular kind of thing. It has to do with the feel for the form and shape. None of 3D visualization guys at my office or our grasshopper nerd wouldn’t make such accurate 3d models of bikes. Guy knows what he is doing, it takes skill, knowledge and sensitivity. Shiny materials, lighting, has nothing to do with what I wrote above. That is the exact reason why I completely dropped 3d visualization. It gave my my first job and allowed me to stay at it. I am happy I no longer need to do it, because you get bogged in trenches and nobody believes you can be a designer or engineer. You are a modern kind of painter. I havea feeling This fella here is more than that. I obviously appreciate his work here fully. When I started Waki leaks I dreamed of ability to make such models and renders but had no time to do it. With limited skill it would take sht loads of time for me
  • + 3
 You couldn't have been more right with the visualization thing. "Just bring your notebook, you can do a visualization of the whole bar while you drink a few beers here."
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: grasshopper nerd? I'm not familiar with the term.

Just like drawing is a critical skill for architects but not the core competency, modeling is only one of many skills needed to be a good engineer.

Honestly, the most impressive part to me is not that he was able to make the models, but that he made this many to this level of detail. Even with quite a bit of skill, that's a lot of work! I would know, because its literally my job to design and engineer complex assemblies and I'm procrastinating on pinkbike because my Catia model hates me, haha.
  • + 0
 @adam102: ok, everything is great, one last thing, can we change the lighting of the scene from evening to day time ? We keep everything else as it is.
  • + 4
 @CaptainBLT: Hehe, yeah as I said in another comment, I carried parts from one bike to another (brakes, stem, gearbox, seatpost, pedals) because it takes so much time. The fatbike frame is a bit rushed (the topology is a bit ugly sometimes), the SLB is much refined though more classic, the JSB is the same but hardtail and the OTB is a totally different breed. The OTB was the one where I had the most freedom to play with luttle shapes, crease here and there.

I'm trying to reply to your comments but you guys type to fast :p
  • + 4
 @Will-narayan: I love it, this is my favorite pinkbike post in a while. Kudos!
  • + 2
 Thumbs up from Waki is a good thing.
  • + 5
 Thanks Waki Smile . I’m actually in a reflection phase, on what to do next, and the world changing quickly doesn’t help. It took me too long to realize that I was stuck at my previous work where I was working pretty much on my own and not evolving, so now I’d see myself better as part of a team where I’ll do CG stuff but where I can learn new things and be part and contribute to the design, conceptual stages.
I have a very visual mind but the mathematics are long gone (I barely remember sohcahtoa…) so I don’t know if I could become an engineer now, though learning solidworks may be a good idea.
It’s as if I’m « in between », I like the visual/artistic aspect of things, but I need the physical constraints to channel it, « form follow function » all the way with a bit of compromise to make things look better.
I’m very bad at brainstorming, as it doesn’t make sense to me to say random things just for the sake of it, but after 15 minutes I may draw links between what has been said before and deliver an interesting idea.
As you say, when you learned something academically, you may not find new ways, for instance someone who learned music through years of music theory may be reluctant to suddenly use dissonant notes that don’t fit theoretically with the rest of the song, but someone who learned music by himself will play whatever notes he wants to play, even if they’re theoretically wrong.
Maybe I could come up with the weird idea and the engineer decides if it’s good or not.
But I also know that it’s « easy » to have weird ideas when there’s no financial constraints like on these bikes.
I hope recruiters can have the same reasoning as you and see that there’s more than just piling up countless amounts of polygons, and if so, that I can meet the expectations Smile
You sum it up pretty well when comparing engineer and CG artists.
The problem is that apparently it costs as much (or even more) to do such a CG bike than to do a real world prototype, so these bikes look good but the outlet are scarce, it’s mostly needed when there’s a publicity stunt (like Canyon’s road bike).
Oh well, if I can’t make a living with these bikes hopefully I’ll keep doing these for fun Smile
  • + 5
 @iantmcg: Design Engineering Manager here ( and holder of master's degree and two bachelors in engineering). Please don't speak for engineers. Some of us do have the skills to model something like this.However this is not what engineers are task to do. Engineering is the application of science, mathematical methods, and empirical evidence to the innovation, design, construction, operation and maintenance of structures and machines. In a large company there are product modelers that typically do the CAD work. And usually they don't do the Mapping of textures. There is usually another group that renders scenes for marketing purposes.
  • + 2
 You should send your CV to IKEA though...
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: amazing how you find time to work in between posting on pb.
  • + 2
 @edreyes: Well, some engineers in the past did everything, and then a little bit more. It depends on the size of the company and the flexibility of managers...
  • + 1
 @Aptlynamed: and I get everything done on time. And I am a sought after resource, currently in in 3 projects, managing 2 of them, one of them is under construction whcih is double trouble. But the building site is next to dirt jumps so nearly every wednesday after the meeting and the visit on the site I go jumping. Living a dream aye? I only suspect that my wife hates me.
  • + 15
 I use solidworks for a living and have done some basic rendering, more industrial than artistic though. Do yourself a favor and go to his artist page and look at the close ups of the brake levers and such. The amount of time involved in just modeling this is massive then to render it all and add all the textures and coloring. Like the finish on the renthal bars for example is perfect. And to the engineering argument, most bigger companies dont have the same guy engineering a product and taking to it to this point of rendering, usually hand it off to someone like this guy to do. Very impressive!
  • + 13
 Thanks Smile Indeed it's a lot of time, hence why some parts have been carried over from a bike to the next one, like the saint brakes that were a PITA to make or the Hope stem (I'm probably not the only one to have a thing for CNC parts ?).
Actually a volumic software like solidworks may be better sometimes than messing with polygons with a surfacic software like 3DS Max.
As I had the FFB parts I could focus more on the frame the SLB. Then the JSB went quicker and I could try a few colors rather than just raw/stealth black. Then for the OTB it was different and I could mostly focus on the frame, with much more freedom as it's made of carbon.
Only problem though is that it appears to be about as long and as expensive to do a CG bike than a real prototype equiped with peripherals at OEM prices, so I'm not sure I can make a living of doing CG bikes, but at least it makes a nice portfolio.
  • + 2
 @Will-narayan: get solidworks and you will speed up the process for sure.. i work in the motorcycle world using solidworks and keyshot. i rarely go in to this much detail but have used some renders for marketing in the past.
  • + 1
 @doek: Seconded. I've used SolidWorks to render images for brochures, datasheets or presentations (school and work) and it's very intuitive. Compared to something like Creo, SolidWorks is user-friendly and relatively inexpensive compared to other CAD software suites. These renderings you've created are fantastic! I especially like the JSB Hardtail Smile Here was a quick rendering I did for a school project where I modeled an AP Racing brake caliper (www.pinkbike.com/photo/16639404).
  • + 13
 Would I buy a Freaky Fat Bike if it was a reality?... on just the name alone, HELL YEA! plus the fact it looks like the monster truck of the bike world! thing just shouts "get the fu*k outa my way, unless you wana get squished like a bug!"
  • + 0
 That thing could even roll over gods dick
  • + 2
 You could come pretty close with a Foes Mutz
  • + 0
 @tempo: you aren’t kidding man, the mutz is this bikes little sister
  • + 1
 Imagine how bouncy that thing could be with tubeless + low PSI with the already 200mm of travel it already has
  • + 10
 I can't believe how realistic those look. Obviously I'm aware of the modern state of computer graphics but never seen photos that looked so real before.
  • + 22
 you probably have, you just didn't realise they were renderings.
  • + 1
 Guillaume has, for sure, the french line attitude mostly graphically ;-)
  • + 7
 I am guilty of riding less now the weathers turned shitty, and I try my best to use the time pretty well, but I don't think I'll ever get Guillaume's level of using off bike time quite this well!
I'd be very surprized if he doesn't get at least a few calls/emails from bike manufacturers, as he's clearly a very talented chap.
  • + 3
 Yeah he totally deserves it! The SLB (not the simply loveleh brotherhood) :-) is a good looking bike! I’d love that! Great work fella!
  • + 7
 This is what goes on in those Friday Fail vids: So I said, 'you know brain, it's a bit of a silly idea', to which brain promptly replied, 'sure, let's do it'."
  • + 3
 Haha, thanksfully, or regretfully, or somewhere in-between, my brain only works that way when imagining things, but when there's a physical risk it starts to imagine all the way things could go wrong, so I'm not really a skilled mountainbiker Frown
  • + 8
 I'd love to take that fatbike to a ski slope to hit jumps.
  • + 4
 I like that the Penny Farthing has pegs for grinding rails and for flatland tricks. You're not just going to just ride the thing after all Wink .

That said, I think the Effigear cranks on that one are a bit off. You can have gears but not Effi. Get a Schlumpf hub for unicycles, you can still mount a disc brake on one of these.

Other than that I think it is good, but not good enough for Pinkbike. Remember people seem to like their head angles slack and seat tube angles steep these days. Just swap that handlebar and saddle and I'll act like I didn't see anything, ok?
  • + 5
 Actually, only the cranks are Effigear on this one, the hub itself is indeed a fictitious mix of Chris Holm/Schlumpf and Rohloff speed hub (look on artstation there's a close-up of the hub).
Said differently it's a Rohloff speedhub mounted concentrically on the crank axle like a Chris Holm/Schlumpf 2 speed unicycle hub. That would be a pretty intricate gear mess, and because of this it uses huge bearings, consequently I had to widden the disk spider (also I understood why Rohloff do their own 4 holes disks, cuz' a regular 6 holes isn't compatible). The 203mm disk is overkill but the bigger the disk, the more clearance I had for the caliper, and so the spoke are even on each side (though this may flex quite a bit).
Also, I've seen that the disk is mounted outside of the fork on unicycle, and with the q-factor of the penny it would've been too dangerous (well it's not like the bike exists but still, I took leg burns or cuts into consideration :p)
I also thought about using V-Brakes but I wasn't in the mood for modeling one, and a big disk looks more stylish.
I cheated a bit by saying that the shifting would work with a simple trigger shifter rather than the 2 cables system of Rohloff.
  • + 1
 @Will-narayan: Oh boy, you could have gone with the regular Kris Holm/Schlumpf hub but brought Rohloff in there. Kris Holm usually mounts the brake rotor to the cranks, which is why they're on the outside. Bearing size doesn't really matter there as these are clamped by the unicycle "frame/fork". I've never ridden one of these with a disc brake though. I'd probably break it though I wouldn't be too worried about leg burns. The rotor spins at the same speed as the crank and especially as you're running pretty big rotors, they won't get too hot. I can imagine V-brakes aren't nice to model. Unicycles typically use Magura hydraulic rim brakes with the "trials mount" that does away with the brake boosters and all that. These are probably easier to model.

Cheers!
  • + 4
 On a wheel that big it doesn't seem like a 203mm rotor is overkill at all. In fact I don't get why you would have a 260 rear and a 203 front. The rear is going to break loose as soon as you tap the brakes, I'd got with a 140 on the rear.
  • + 8
 I think the last thing you'd want is the ability to stop that front wheel from turning.
  • + 0
 @Bob-Agg: hmmm.... think it depends on what exactly the hub is like.
  • + 2
 @iantmcg: I'd say it's more on how much you want to be smashed into the ground.
  • + 1
 @Bob-Agg: Yeah I guess the hub would be irrelevant, you'd have to feather the breaks just right so that you didn't launch yourself. Seems taking that thing down anything steep would be a total disaster.
  • + 5
 @iantmcg: Yes, the headangle is a bit slack for low grade slopes, but when things get really steep downhill I think the best may be to stand on the pegs, nose in the bars, ass up, elbows wide, heels down, and ready to jump of the bike if things go wrong.
  • + 3
 Looks like 260 was a typo and it’s 160mm. Look at the pics - it’s clearly smaller than the front rotor.
  • + 3
 I really admire the work you did Guillaume. It is a bit `fantasist`- sorry I don`t know the english word for that - but the world always need people like you to design what nobody would have thought about. I like utopic and borderline things. Thanks again!!!
  • + 1
 Thanks Smile Maybe I should have done video games then (I wanted to when I was younger), but I'd rather do something that has a purpose in the real world now. You're the one who mailed me about the FFB in red with Hope brakes ?
  • + 2
 Zebra needs beefier fork. The amount of grip available at speed will turn those stanchions into noodles.

I’d sell some toys to get me that penny bike if it was in production. Perfect for putting around the campground in the summer. It would look sweet parked on the beach.
  • + 2
 what is with media outlets analyzing all these renderings like they are real creations. Stance Works just did this with a rat rod rendering, See below. Must be running out of shit to write about

www.stanceworks.com/2018/11/the-alt-c-hellion-ash-thorps-t-bucket
  • + 2
 Stanceworks went wank when the e9 went if I’m honest. The players & low n slow stuff has been done to death now. I’m bored shitless of it! Just upgrade the car to fast road / track spec and it’ll automatically be cooler as it can generate more pace!
  • + 4
 These look like photographs of real bikes, and not computer animation. Blown away.
  • + 5
 That OTB bike made me grin like a kid for a good minute.
  • + 1
 Foes actually made a very similar bike for a while, if you really wanna give it a go.
  • + 1
 Hi there! I'm testing out to make a instagram-like page on here maybe. I don't know if people will enjoy, if not, I'll just move on. However, yes, I'm trying to get attention I admit, even though you can just check out quickly, and leave a follow if you are interested in a pinkbike page. :3

Hope I didn't waste your time, or the comment section.
  • + 4
 Someone give this man materials and the means to actually build this stuff
  • + 1
 DH fat bike makes perfect sense, rail corners on fat tires and it occurs right away how capable that would be in a DH rig, every design he has is really impressive. the penny Farthing looks freaking awesome!
  • + 1
 The idea of the 24 inch fat wheels was to have more maniability than 26 inch fat wheels. But most opinions I've seen on plus tires was that they are not precise enough (hence why the 3" pretty much disapeared, and why everybody seem to prefere tires in the 2,5"-2,8" range), so I wonder how it would feel, probably not that great or we would have seen it already.
Now with fat tires and 200mm of travel, you may just need to calculate where the bike touches the ground every now and then while flying over everything in-between^^
  • + 1
 Specialized had a carbon penny farthing with disc brakes at a interbike in the 90s if I remember my dirtrags correctly. No rearsuspension though
  • + 2
 We should crowd fund the penny f then have it travel around to major events so we can try it out!
  • + 2
 Look out Waki... There is a new player in town and you have some work to do...
  • + 2
 Bike industry continually forcing new standards on us just so they can make a pretty penny.
  • + 3
 That J.S.B hardtail is a thing of utter beauty!
  • + 1
 Thanks Smile Unfortunately, unless the gearbox gets mass produced, it would make for a very expensive hardtail, probably more than most would be willing to pay for a hardtail.
  • + 1
 @Will-narayan: what gearbox is it a custom design also?
  • + 1
 @landscapeben: No the gearbox is real, made by Effigear for their own bikes under the brand name Cavalerie (I just added a little chamfer in 3D to catch light differently). They also did some gearbox for some original one-offs (currently), like the integrated shock DH bike by Resistance bike, and a bolt-on version of their gearbox for a full-sus by Starling cycles currently in production, keep an eye on those bikes if you like the gearbox concepts.
  • + 1
 Fatbike says 203 discs only as Centerlock in discription, but the seperated parts and pics show 6 bolt rotors. Did I win a prize?
  • + 2
 It's the same rotors with cooling fins and 6 bolts on all renders, the description is just pointing out that I mixed 2 different things : Either XT rotors with 6 bolts but no cooling fins, or XTR rotors with cooling fins but as centerlocks only.
  • + 1
 @Will-narayan: The OTB might be one of the only bikes ever to get a slacker head angle as it goes deeper into its travel Smile Might just work!
  • + 3
 Genuinely want all of these.......
  • + 2
 i like the lowered chainstay on the hardtail and the SLB.
  • + 2
 Cool, I did it that way so you can change the belt without having to open the frame (I precise it cuz' it's only written on artstation), and so it gave a particular look to my bikes.
  • + 2
 @Will-narayan: i knew that. your design work is mental. you now have 6 followers. cheers
  • + 1
 " The 203mm disc is overkill but it keeps the drivetrain compact."
This has absolutely no sense.
  • + 3
 Lol, thanks for pointing it out. What I mean is that while the disk is 2mm thick, the calliper is about 30mm thick, so as you don't want the calliper to be stuck between spokes, the further away from the axle the more clearance you have, so while a 160 or 180mm disk would have forced me to bring the hub's left flange inward, or the disk/calliper more outward, the 203mm disk allowed me to keep both flanges even at 60mm from middle line (or 120mm appart).
  • + 1
 @Will-narayan: more sense now. Good job btw
  • + 2
 Stop it! I cant tell what's real and what's fake anymore!
  • + 1
 I wanna ride an F.F.B !! Need to find that V10 with the fat tires until the FBB is a reality.
  • + 1
 This fool needs to work at Sram so we can see some real innovation. Not some retarded proprietary tendencies.
  • + 2
 I want to ride that fat bike so bad. So awesome!
  • + 2
 Dang I want that F.F.B so bad! What a ripper that would be
  • + 1
 please design some 3d printed mountain bikes from sustainable materials sincerely global warming
  • + 1
 That Green Mean Machine...Wow! Give Guillaume a design desk at one of the Bike manufacturers! You have my vote.
  • + 1
 Does he live in Freetown Christiania? I would expect to see a carbon mudguard on that cool 4 bar front fork!
  • + 1
 Yep', carbon would make sense but there already enough carbon on the bike so I used a plastic mudguard for a bit of contrast and variation.
  • + 1
 Two Saints up front?!!?? They misnamed that one, name swap that to OTB! Lol
  • + 1
 You should design a half legged unicycle. With a special hub it would be possible to make.
  • + 2
 Well, I mean, it does have a water bottle mount...
  • + 2
 Can't say it looks like a session
  • + 2
 GIVE ME THAT PENNY FARTHING!!!
  • + 1
 These bikes are freaking awesome, all of them !
Not sure how the Zebra OTB would fare on a downhill track ... Smile
  • + 2
 Boneshaker has a water bottle, hardtail does not. Pinkbike implodes.
  • + 1
 The FFB doesn't have one, but JSB, SLB and OTB all have one (you can see it on artstation), I just make the whole renders without it as it's more an accessory than part of the bike.
  • + 1
 What does the rear suspension do on the penny farthing besides potentially send you over the front?
  • + 1
 It's not there so much to act as a suspension than as a way to give more clearance capabilities for the small wheel as the big wheel would clear 20cm obstacles with no problem while the small wheel would get stuck and stop you on the spot. But yes you would have to carefully set the rebound speed. But as the article says, while I've put some serious thoughts into these bikes, in the end they're not to be taken seriously, particularly the penny-farthing, maybe I should have done the fork steeper in fact, as the bike will get slacker at sag.
  • + 0
 Very cool, do it while you can. Once you get a girlfriend/wife then kids all the free time goes out the window. Makes me feel lazy pre keep saying.
  • + 0
 Pre-kids*
  • + 2
 That penny-- wow!!!!! Beautiful work!!!
  • + 1
 anyone knows where i can find a good tall hat helmet ?? and how is that suit with the long flaps in the back call ???
  • + 2
 Great, another new wheel size.
  • + 3
 Carbon fiber top hat.
  • + 1
 Would the OTB be CUI legal? I could seer a variation of being customized for downhill coaster use that might be fun.
  • + 2
 The reach numbers on the OTB are not progressive at all.
  • + 2
 Think about the jacked triceps you'd get riding it though!
  • + 1
 Even the Zebra OTB can handle a water bottle. Hire this guy YT!
  • + 1
 If you take the Enve sticker off the price goes down by 80%
  • + 1
 Nice touch on the carbon Top Hat Big Grin
  • + 1
 Yes! Something to wipe that 29’er off my arse now! Sign me up
  • + 1
 I love the Carbon fibre Top hat!!
  • + 1
 A penny for your thoughts
  • + 1
 I'd call that penny farthing the "Helmet Tester". Pass.
  • + 1
 reminds me charlie chaplin.
  • + 1
 I want to make love to that S.L.B ... Is that weird?
  • + 1
 I will buy that FFB right now!
  • + 1
 I will test ride the Penny Farthing on Cypress if you pay for gas.
  • + 1
 Holy sheez!!! Thought they were real. Duped.
  • + 1
 That water bottle mount on the penny farthing!
  • + 1
 Seriously awesome. How could people be mad about this lol
  • + 1
 Cool images! Very creative
  • + 1
 Damn that FFB. i want one! I'd trade/sell my 26 for this
  • + 1
 That fat bike all ready exists in some far Eastern factory
  • + 1
 I love the penny farthing!!!
  • + 1
 That green thing makes me want to get on it...
  • + 1
 Had to double check it wasn't April 1st.
  • + 1
 Has that top hat got MIPS? Want...
  • + 1
 This is what happens when your brain is on dope!
  • + 2
 Love it.
  • + 1
 That Penny Farthing would be awesome with a slacker head angle
  • + 1
 Is that a 69er? Lol F$k me!
  • + 1
 We want a review of these on the trails !!!
  • + 1
 Aaron on Zebra for 2019 !!!
  • + 0
 Sign me up as test a Rider. I would love a go with each one of these, but I'm sure I couldn't afford any of them.
  • + 1
 test the OTB last you might die on it. There could be more to the rider rendering being a skelton than we think. I know back in the day when they raced those, guys would sit on the bars and race rather than the seat so they could jump off when going down hill.
  • + 1
 Is it April's fool early?
  • + 1
 Trigger shifters? The pics don't say.
  • + 2
 When I did the fatbike in 2014 the Effigear gearbox wasn't yet using a trigger shifter so it still has the old shifter with 2 cables, but now it does, so the JSB & SLB have a trigger shifter. The OTB too but the whole hub of this one is fictitious.
  • + 1
 @Will-narayan: the icing on the (pretty amazing) cake!
  • + 2
 STL please. Print.
  • + 1
 THAT HARDTAIL...PHWOOOOAAARR
  • + 1
 eeSilk on that Penny Farthing... straight fire.
  • + 1
 1 OTB please. now that's a beach cruiser ...
  • + 1
 Don not touch the frontbrake of this Oddly Fall Bike.
  • + 1
 Get ready for the two new wheel standards 50 inch and 24 inch
  • + 1
 That Penny Farthing needs Whatton bars. Much safer for highspeed riding.
  • + 1
 I think more accurately "OTB" actually means "Over The Bars"
  • + 1
 Yep', this was a pun Wink
  • + 1
 My back aches just thinking about climbing on that Penny Gnarthing
  • + 2
 I want that fat bike.
  • + 1
 Bad Penny!
  • + 1
 Looks like a dirt bike
  • + 1
 Interesting!
  • + 1
 Nice renders dude Smile
  • + 1
 Looks like a Session.
  • + 1
 Good work!
  • + 1
 get a job
  • + 3
 Working on it Smile
  • + 1
 Is it 29+. Compatible?
  • + 1
 kickstarter?
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