Henty Enduro Backpack - Review

Mar 16, 2018
by Richard Cunningham  
Henty Enduro Backpack


Henty is a no-nonsense company from Tasmania that makes a range of durable, travel-based soft-goods. Their Enduro Backpack is a hybrid that mates the comfort of a hip pack with the stabilizing effects of a conventional-style hydration pack's shoulder straps. It's not high fashion, but it ticks the boxes for storage capacity, durability, and comfort for riders who need to carry essentials that can't easily be stuffed into cargo bib-shorts - like cold-weather layers, photo gear, or a three-liter water bladder.

Henty's Enduro backpack stores up to five liters, and it has a lumbar protector sewn into its wide hip belt. The hydration compartment can easily fit three-liter
Enduro Backpack Details:

• Purpose: Enduro racing, adventure riding
• 5 Liters total storage
• Easy access mesh zip pockets, 2 side pockets, water-resistant internal zip pocket
• 3 liter water storage zip (R&L hose exits)
• Mesh back, padded shoulder straps
• Weight: 550 grams
• MSRP: $110 USD
• Contact: Henty
bladders (not included), the zippers are high quality, and there are enough pockets, tie-points, and cargo loops designed into the pack to accommodate a light overnight adventure. The mesh back panel has a map pocket and the straps have loops to secure a hydration hose (right or left). Henty's Enduro Backpack is sold in black for $110 USD, or camo' for $130 USD.

Henty Enduro Backpack
Open the back flap to expose well-organized essentials behind mesh pockets. External elastic loops can secure mini-pumps or fly fishing rods.


Features and Performance

Henty builds their Enduro pack from 500 denier Cordura nylon fabric, which is ultra tough and long wearing. There are no separate slots inside the mesh pockets to organize tools or such, but the layout of the pack's back-flap cargo system keeps all of your essentials within sight, which is a good trade-off. the upper mesh pocket zips, while the lower two are stuff-pockets with elastic rims. The top-flap does not completely cover the contents, so mud and water can (and does) muck up exposed items, which seems short-sighted for an otherwise well-designed pack.

Henty Enduro Backpack
Henty Enduro Backpack


The main, zippered cargo area is intended to house a hydration bladder and hose ports are located on either side. That said, the 110-dollar pack arrives with bladder instructions, but no bladder. I used a Leatt hip-pack bladder, which is designed to operate horizontally, but Henty insists that as long as you bleed out any air trapped in the bag, any hydration bladder system will work fine. You can choose to carry bulky items there instead, and the cavernous pocket extends well into the hip belt, which is a useful feature. Smartphones and fragile items can be stowed in a water-resistant zip pocket tucked behind the bladder compartment, which proved to be a perfect hiding spot for my camera.

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Henty's hybrid pack doesn't bounce, and it can be unbuckled to make adjustments or to access items without dropping down.

The wide hip-belt is padded with closed-cell foam that evenly distributes the weight of the pack onto the rider's hips without constricting the abdomen, and it is also advertised to offer impact protection. Additional versatility comes in the form of two quick-access zip pockets and additional cargo loops on the belt, which is secured with a single bayonet buckle.

bigquotesThis is the moment where Joey yells from the back of the classroom: "Isn't getting rid of shoulder straps the whole point of using a hip pack?"


The Burning Question:

This is the moment where Joey yells from the back of the classroom: "Isn't getting rid of shoulder straps the whole point of using a hip pack?" Aaaand, he'd be right. Getting rid of shoulder straps allows fans to read those logos your sponsors printed on your jersey (my home trails are often lined with spectators). Jokes aside, there are compelling reasons to carry essentials in a hip pack. Nixing the sweaty back, and enjoying the ventilation that a loose-fitting jersey affords are two of them.

Hip packs also have some negatives which come with the territory: They need to fit snugly around the waist, and the contents must be compressed. Otherwise, the pack (or its contents) bounce while you are rolling over bumpy terrain. A snug-fitting belt is not the best choice when you need to gulp every bit of air you can stuff into your lungs. And, a heavily loaded hip pack can be like having a beer belly on the wrong side of your body and a maraca stuck in your shorts.
Henty Enduro Backpack
The mesh back is a little warmer than nothing at all, but very breathable and comfortable.

Henty's Enduro Backpack trades style points (which hip-pack wearers have already eschewed) for function. Shoulder straps help stabilize the load, so you don't need to cinch the waist-belt much, which is an instant boost in comfort and performance. The pack's padded belt still lets the hips carry the weight, which leaves minimal tension on the shoulders. Henty's hybrid pack doesn't bounce much (if at all), and it can be unbuckled to make adjustments or to access items without dropping down. Overall, Henty's design is much easier to deal with, especially when it's loaded up.

What the Enduro Backpack can't do, however, is duplicate the airy feel of that unencumbered jersey. Riding with the Henty is super comfortable, but as light as the shoulder straps feel and as breathable as its mesh Y-back panel is, the trade-off for the pack's extra performance and stability is difficult to ignore. If you need the extra water capacity and storage, the Enduro Backpack is a far better option than wearing overstuffed cargo bibs or strapping on a heavy hip pack. If you always travel lightly, however, Henty's option may feel a little like the worst of both worlds.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesHenty's Enduro Backpack offers the most comfortable way that I have found to carry two or three liters of water and your essential gear on a bicycle without cramping my riding style or comfort threshold. It's built like a tank, doesn't weigh much and offers little to complain about in its features. I'd like to see a full-coverage back flap and a hydration bag included in the price before I'd rate it ten out of ten. As is, Henty's hybrid hip pack is as good as it gets for riders who need a comfortable way to carry a useful load of gear.RC



153 Comments

  • + 242
 This seems like a product specifically developed to troll the Pinkbike comment section.
  • + 71
 General critique of people who dislike riding with packs: Shoulder straps are uncomfortable, and I feel having something on my back is hot and restricts my movement.

General critique of people who dislike fanny packs: It makes me look like my dad on vacation. Should I wear white socks and sandals, too?

Henty: Let's give 'em the worst of both worlds!
  • + 30
 No bottle cage mount!?
  • + 40
 Can they make a baby harness accessory to strap to it? i always wanted to ride with a dwarf in robin hood hat, equipped with bow and arrows, shooting people in front of me.
  • + 3
 @TheR: You hit the nail on the head! This pack is one of those great on paper, horrible in reality type of things... I can't get over how functional it seems, yet how goofy it looks!
  • - 7
flag jmd2drsrbtrrthn4 (Mar 16, 2018 at 9:57) (Below Threshold)
 @TheR:

I think you mean the worst of both worlds.
  • + 9
 EDIT. Literacy FAIL.
  • + 17
 Thought I saw Hentai instead of Henty. Started to get excited.
  • + 6
 @TheR: When sarcasm goes terribly wrong
www.pinkbike.com/photo/15698185
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns:
That would be the " Natural Bjorn Killah"
Edition.
  • + 3
 I am a bit surprized that they didn't squeeze a small battery and motor in there somewhere, just for the sake of it.
  • + 1
 So for the record this is not a fanny pack with shoulder straps?
  • + 3
 @TheR: These style of packs work though. The straps aren't the uncomfortable part, its how they're weighted. This is honestly the best of a fanny pack and a backpack. I have a Source hydration pack and you can remove the straps... anytime there's real weight in the pack, I put the straps on
  • + 1
 @fecalmaster: Clearly not.
  • - 3
 @TheR: fanny packs can't carry 3 liters of water. You are just ignorant to what this design meant to do. Keep up the troll.
  • + 2
 I’ve got one of these, it works really well and have had mine for awhile, it’s seen a few crashes and been through the wash a few times and has held up. I like the looks of it, if you need to carry your water and/or tools out on the trails and can’t fit them in your bike for me this bag is the next best option.
  • + 1
 Little Joey was right to ask ...
  • + 1
 Nevertheless, Dick's the man!
  • + 1
 @TerrapinBen: have you used it?
I feel your comments may be biased toward form over function. These packs are amazing and as a person who carried everything on my frame, this is now my go-to bag when riding. Try it before you hate on it.
  • + 95
 Looks like in the last pic the guy is peeing
  • + 64
 No surprise, after having tested a 3L water storage pack.
  • + 21
 "We aim to please"
  • + 28
 Having "The Burning Question" as the caption doesn't help, RC.
  • + 1
 I expect this type of activity at a rest stop.... www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0G7F81LTZw
  • + 5
 only if urine the outdoors.....
  • + 1
 @rwjones4: Your aim will help!
  • + 8
 Pissing uphill....not advisable, especially whilst wearing fancy Italian shoes!
  • + 1
 Pee ruins trails.
  • + 4
 Well at least he's not taking a dump
  • + 52
 110$ for half a backpack
  • + 26
 ...and no bladder.
  • + 17
 @dstroud70: or water bottle holder.
  • + 137
 And its not half a back pack, its a fanny pack with Shoulder Harness Integration Technology. (SHIT)
  • + 7
 @Boardlife69: Hilarious.
  • + 4
 Seriously, different strokes for different folks, I guess, and if you like this product, that's fine, but if you're going to go this far, why not just go with a smaller backpack option?

At least that way, the load is distributed across a wider area rather than right in the middle of the small of your back.
  • + 2
 If you feel the need to carry more than 0,5l of water in your fanny pack, you may as well buy a back pack... just saying. I love fannies, have 2 different sizes, but I’d never carry any serious weight in it as it start jumping on my back too much... I didn’t drop the back pack for up to 3h rides to have yet another thing loosely attached to my body...
  • + 1
 Similar or a bit less than WingNut packs.....
  • + 7
 @TheR: The Henty loads the hips, like high-end backpacks. It's way better to ride with than a hydration pack for load-bearing comfort and stability.
  • + 1
 @RichardCunningham:
Yes but if you don't tighten the belt enough, or if the load is not well compressed (I don't see any compression strap on the pack) , then I don't see any advantage to carry the load on your hips.

Moreover, on most of pictures it looks like you're wearing the pack on your waist rather that on your hips, particularly when you ride, so the weight is distributed on your lumbar area and on your shoulders rather than on your hips, negating the benefit of a hip pack.

"A snug-fitting belt is not the best choice when you need to gulp every bit of air you can stuff into your lungs."
I disagree, a snug-fitting belt set on your hips will not interfer with your breathing.
First, when you need this kind of air you're usually climbing and you're already bent on your belly then you cannot have an abdominal breathing, your upper rib cage do the work.
Second, thanks to the hip bones, you can tighten a hip belt a lot before you compress soft tissues, bladder, etc...
For instance, Aiki-dokas wear their belts and hakama low and tight on the hips, to increase the feeling of their hara (center of Qi) and promote abdominal breathing.

I barely can carry any weight on my upper body due to a sacro-lombar discal hernia, and hip packs are the only way to really unload my shoulders. As you mention, good trekking back packs have a very good hip belt and mountaineers will teach you to tighten it to bear the load on the hips rather than on shoulders, using shoulder straps only to stabilize the load.

The best hip pack for MTB I found to date is the Ortlieb hip pack 2.
  • + 1
 @gnralized: look into frame bags, water on the bike is even better than a hip pack.
  • + 2
 @Kitejumping: I strap my evoc fanny pack to the bars in case of a long climb or ride to the trails. Perfect.
  • + 0
 I would say okay if this would cost 40$

I can not understand those expensive fanny packs who are enduro specific like the last one. Only because they are MTB specific they cost that much.

For that Price Ive got my 32Liter Evoc Backpack, natural that I compare bags and other stuff to it because it is awesome and never let me down.

Now I clamped a lot stuff to my Superenduro frame, the frame had no threads for cages. Now it can hold 8 bottle cages Razz however I only use one of them. The point I want to make is that everyone can strap/clamp/glue stuff to their frame. Even if the shock will soak most of the space out of the main triangle it will work if the human owner can think.

I also bought some fanny/hip/butt bags yesterday but I ordered 3 of them with two additional bottle holders for the bags and guess what? 70$ for all of it and I will only keep one of it so I payed maybe 30$ total. f*cking crazy hipsters who spend 110$ for the specific thing who maybe dont work as good as my mole bag.
  • + 1
 All that's missing is the crotch strap to stop it riding up
  • + 21
 2016: "WAIT, what if we took off the shoulder straps on a backback and brought back the nerdy fanny pack? Enduro-bros would love it!"

2018: "WAIT, what if we added shoulder straps to those uncomfortable fanny packs? Enduro-bros would love it!"
  • + 10
 @ltj999 If you don't already work in a marketing department you should submit that post as your resume.
  • + 1
 2020: nerdy fanny packs combined with old school suspenders. It'll be the year of the Enduro-Hipster bro!!
  • + 19
 Waiting for a review of some shoulder straps. Just that. Straps I can wear without worrying about the need for storage.
  • + 18
 As the last picture shows, you can comfortably pee without having to remove your fanny pack. Brilliant!
  • + 9
 I have this pack and absolutely love it. I sweat profusely while riding so riding without a water bladder is not really an option for me. The pack keeps the weight nice and low and the straps are significantly more breathable then a full on backpack. I really like that I haven't had to compromise what I bring with me on a ride to have more air flowing across my back. I am able to fit a 3L bladder in the pack but the pack doesn't fit quite as well if it is filled all the way. I usually ride with 2.5L in the bladder and that works great for me.
  • - 6
flag mhoshal (Mar 16, 2018 at 8:48) (Below Threshold)
 So instead of sweating from your back you are sweating all around your waist? Id rather have a wet back then a soaked waist
  • + 3
 @mhoshal: Fun fact: your pants and backpack already have a waistband so.... no, you don't "sweat all around your waist" more than normal.
  • + 2
 @mhoshal: I get your point but I personnaly need to ride with a pack of some sort a water bottle or two just won't keep me hydrated. Id rather have a small area around my waist covered then my whole back.
  • - 1
 @bkm303: ya you do
  • + 2
 @mhoshal: wow man great point....
  • - 1
 @bkm303: good for you bud you know where to find the neg prop it still doesn't change the fact that it DOES make you sweat more around your waist when wearing these fanny pack designs and personally I find it alot less comfortable sweating around my waist the my back not to mention my camalpak sits about 2 inches off my back and is way more comfortable then riding with basically a life preserver around my waist.
  • + 12
 Clearly taking the piss with this one.
  • + 1
 It looks like he was!
  • + 1
 Thick stream was clearly photoshopped out.
  • + 11
 Literally only clicked on this review for the comment section.
  • + 1
 Same
  • + 1
 Same here :-)
  • + 4
 Sorry... the way that flap is designed seemingly specifically to ensure all your gear gets covered in as much mud and water as possible is ridiculous. I ride in the Pacific Northwest... this pack would be fine for a few months of the year when it's bone dry. But the rest of the year, the way that flap is designed, I would would weigh 50 pounds by the end of the ride. I don't want a pack that I have to clean the inside of or that makes my gear so dirty it's unusable. Even a quick creek crossing would give all the gear under that flap a good soaking.

It's strange because Tasmania's west coast has very similar weather... I guess they only tested this in the summer?
  • + 3
 I have one, it's great! Hardly feel it's there. It's not as hot as my Camelbak but does restrict air movement under your jersey than not having shoulder straps. The pockets in the mesh are handy for extra gels and the waist side pockets allow you to get to your multi tool without taking your pack off. I'd recommend a waist style bladder over a vertical type to make it easier to drain the last of your water
  • + 2
 I used to always ride with a pack, then I forced myself to get used to riding with a bottle or two. I got used to not having anything strapped to my waist which does bother me now if I use a pack, but if I need a lot of water then nothing is better than a pack.
  • + 5
 Is it possible to spin pack around to pull out a chicken taco from rear pocket with out undoing any buckles ?
  • + 3
 Nope, only beef
  • + 0
 People who eat chicken ride like chicken.
  • + 2
 They're currently trying to fill the gap between the hip pack and the backpack. One step further towards a backpack and you get one of those from Ergon. One step further towards the hip pack would be where it pins to your jersey. Don't worry industry, there will always be something for us to argue about.
  • + 2
 As with every enduro fanny product.... still not better than Mountainsmith. The design is like 30 years old and still as good as anything out there.

A Mountainsmith Tour / Drift + Strapettes = this product, except with more volume, and you can take the straps off for short rides, or once you've drank all your water. The tool flap on this thing is a nice feature tho.
  • + 3
 This is compatible with 'most' 3L bladders. Aren't most bladders designed for vertical orientation? Would seem to be that you'd have a certain and much greater volume of undrinkable (without having to remove bladder) water.
  • + 5
 As long as you bleed the air out you are able to get most the liquid out of the bladder. There is usually a few ounces that I am unable to get out of my 3L when it is laying horizontally..
  • + 1
 Always interesting PB topic!! I'm a backpack guy who never wants a bottle cage on my bike and don't care if there is room for one on the frame..... there is big percentage that feel the exact opposite in this community!! I don't care if that's your preference I will not judge you..... we can all go to the same bar afterwards
  • + 1
 It places à lit of Hardware near a body part you land on often in this sport. I am not a friend of anything heavy up high when riding but when I do I prefer one of those jobbies with a back protector. Before they existed always went for a pack with a contraption of plastic and mesh to give airflow plus the benefit of something between your spine and tools. They did waste much space though. I tried a waist bound pack for a week bike parking in the Alps. Still haven't managed to give this pack away.
  • + 1
 Time to make the sequel.

www.pinkbike.com/news/Video-Whats-Enduro-Mountain-Biking2.html

and props to R.C and anyone else brave enough to put themselves out there for the wonderfully vicious Pinkbike comment section.
  • + 1
 Wearing heavy loaded (water and gear) fanny packs suck due to much load bouncing and flapping on low back despite cinched waist straps. Backpack is best for carrying water, especially with any kind of bladder in my opinion. I only tolerate fannies with little gear at most even when cinched tight on hips.
  • + 1
 Mmmm... all the benefits of a fanny pack with all the negatives of a back pack and none of the benefits of a backpack. Never heard of Henty but bravo to them for realising mountainbikers are complete idiots with their money.
  • + 1
 This is kind of appealing to me, as someone who REALLY likes carrying a hip pack, but also has lower back problems that get exacerbated by them. Transferring some of the weight up to the shoulders while still carrying all the weight down low seems like the best of both worlds to me.
  • + 1
 I did not see one pack wearing mofo racing enduro in Crankworx Rotorua! Enduro stages are short AF! If you flattened, have a mechanical issue, you've no chance! Walk to the aid station and fix your issue there, get out of the way for the on coming racers! Here's a tip, use a jersey with back pockets at most for stashing your stuff, that's it!
  • + 6
 No bottle cage. Smh
  • + 1
 When is someone going to figure out how to make a pack properly. Instead of having the pack at the back it should be at the front. Look at all of the fat guys that can still ride and they never complain about their gut getting in the way.
  • + 5
 The burning question: Is that guy modeling the pack or peeing?
  • + 2
 @QN14 Just as long as it doesn't burn when you pee.
  • + 4
 It doesn't come with a bladder and it doesn't get in the way of emptying yours...
  • + 3
 That reminds me a lot to my time in the army... thats the reason why I never would wear such a thing.
  • + 4
 Do a jump with it on in slowmo, the rest is irrelevant
  • + 4
 A hip pack with backpack shoulder straps...
  • + 17
 I have eyes. But thanks.
  • + 1
 When I put stuff in my ordinary back pack. Gravity causes all the weight to snug around my waist. 3 litres of water weighs 3 kilos or over six pounds. Water filters are light weight and quite affordable these days.
  • + 4
 designers of this product must feel delighted reading comments.
  • + 3
 First we had a fannypack, we found out that it's too big and heavy so we added shoulder support. We got this.
  • + 1
 Straps on my shoulders make me a bad rider as they are restricting my moments, so fanny packs are better, now, any more things you can sell me so i can make more excuses of why I am a crappy rider
  • + 4
 I was wondering when the tacticool fad would come to MTB
  • + 2
 ha! I was looking for a low profile hydration pack with pockets in front for work and ended up with Camelbak Delta-something hydration vest from their military line...was thinking about trying it for bike too but the tactical look is rather embarrassing. Also it's not nearly breathable enough. I was already dubious of the quantity of bike gear now available in camo...

All other packs I could find w/ good pockets in front are those running vests that sit really high up on the back. In all honesty, dear outdoor industry, are runners the only people who can benefit from not having to take one's pack off anytime they need to access something? Patagonia Sweet Pack Vest was another option but not low profile and it's designed for fly fishing.
  • + 1
 @ecologist:

Camelbak has a cycling specifc vest now based off the running vest. Check out the Camelbak Chase Vest. I just picked one up, I have one ride on it and it's awesome so far. Very snug and doesnt move around, pockets on the vest fronts make it easy to get phone or tools out quickly.
  • + 1
 Recently bought a backpack with 1.5ltr hydration pack in it holds ei need for the day .
And it didn’t cost $130. So there’s plenty to choose from for competition or day pack.
  • + 2
 The Burning Question (for me)
Did you actually catch him relieving himself during that photo?
  • + 2
 Best not to put a pump or tools across your back. Unless you want to break your back.
  • - 1
 Jesus donkey; what crap. Purely for the comment section I'm sure. Fer f*cks sake why don't cha do a stealth mission into Shimano and get info on their new xtr group. Way Rambo I mean Enduro. Goggles make sense, how about a goggle review/ test/ enduroriffic. hip packs are like biopace. Yup, remember when the biopace was a thing probably 25 years ago? Long enough that some up and coming know it all invents it again and it's the latest and greatest until peeps realize that it actually sucks for several reasons. Chowdermonkey.
  • + 3
 A backpack with only the utility of a fanny pack??
  • + 3
 I find things to dislike in all bags and now dislike this one double.
  • + 1
 On the other side they do the BEST suit carrier commuting bag. I've had mine for years now and its ace henty.cc/shop/wingman-messenger
  • + 3
 This pack is awesome. Stable and can hold a lot.
  • + 0
 In the last fanny pack review somebody in the comments made a joke made a joke about adding shoulder straps to it. Camelbak has a much better solution with their water -in-the-hip backpacks.
  • + 3
 This is a fanny pack with suspenders, so no.
  • + 2
 would be cool if we could get it with the old fat guy rainbow suspenders they sell at the hardware store.
  • + 1
 @RichardCunningham where's the fancy blue Schwalbe tube? must be outdated by now Smile
  • + 2
 It really looks like you're peeing in that last photo.
  • + 2
 It's marketed for ENDURO racing but it does not have a spine protector?
  • + 3
 Modern day fanny pack
  • + 2
 First person to name a dumber product reviewed on PB wins one of these!
  • + 1
 All this shit people wear to race enduro just weighs you down, you already lost from the start!
  • + 3
 This is peak Enduro
  • + 0
 Never go peak Enduro
  • - 1
 @colincolin:My words. Never go peak Enduro. Allways go FULL ENDURO.
  • - 2
 Peaking like a Chinese Duck.
  • + 3
 Is this ebike compatible?
  • + 2
 Village elder drinks water pack, I drink water pack.
  • + 0
 Bummer that fanny packs completely ignore the tandem mountain bike riders that are prevalent around the world. No one wants a fanny pack in their face, come on.
  • + 2
 It's one of those things you can never un-see
  • - 2
 My leatt holds 5L inside and has no shoulder straps, no needed... Why would you mix the worst of a backpack with a fanny pack?

Call it whatever but I carry less water now with my fanny pack, maybe cuz I sweat less in my back? this design will still make you sweat so whats the point?
  • + 2
 USWE for me.
  • + 1
 Love my USWE!
  • + 1
 Looks like a fanny pack sports bra combo
  • + 1
 The Rambo Combo Stealth Hipback Hydration Device!
  • + 2
 I doubt I’ll buy one
  • + 1
 dinesese pack is 99 euro and holds more and is better in my opinion
  • + 1
 Will have to debate this, the new Palos, and the cascadia pack..
  • + 1
 High Above pack hands down . get the BOA buckle if you can .
  • + 1
 I meant COBRA!!! belt buckle not a BOA system , got them mixed up as they both use a snake name.
  • + 0
 It would be interesting if someone would just make a backpack that had a bladder in it...
  • + 0
 I wrote Enduro on a hot dog with mustard. It made it so extreme. Dear bike industry. It's called mountain biking.
  • + 1
 I wrote "Enduro" on a veggie burger with organic ketchup. I'm probably more enduro than you.
  • + 0
 @PinkyScar: No, that makes you a bikepacker who wants to ride enduro but doesnt have the balls to do it
  • + 1
 ware it back to front and snack on the ride
  • + 2
 EVOC FR Lite for me.
  • + 1
 I'm with you, Evoc all the way..
Stage 12 for short days and races
FR Trail 20 for epic backcountry days.
Comfort, performance & quality are worth paying for.
  • + 1
 Looks kinda dorky if you ask me Wink
  • + 2
 No bottle cage.
  • + 0
 The bike industry has enough garbage products!
  • + 0
 is it waterproof ?? and can it carry a water bottle ??
  • - 1
 I'd like to see a nonsense company make a fanny pack. Although I think that's already been done.
  • + 0
 The banana hammock of ENDURO
  • - 2
 I still like being able to strap my knee pads to my pack for the climb...I know thats not enduro but just so much more comfortable...
  • - 1
 The latest in the on-going effort of mountain bikers to look more and more ridiculous!
  • - 1
 Looks like an assault pack from the military surplus, bikers can now carry guns!
  • + 0
 it looks like a trek session!
  • + 0
 too heavy
  • - 1
 As a back country free rider, this is what I've been waiting for!
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