Hope HB160 - First Ride

Aug 21, 2017
by Paul Aston  



Hope are finally ready to unleash the Beast from Barnoldswick to the public. Hope owners, Ian Weatherill and the late, Simon Sharp, had always dreamed of building their own bike. There are hundreds of different sketches and renderings at Hope HQ and prototype bikes, but it wasn't until now that they could finally construct a bike they wanted to ride, and more importantly to them, build almost entirely in-house.

The HB211 prototype was shown to the public, but the brand was always coy about whether or not it would make it into production, or if it was purely a showpiece. Now the bike is available to order, in limited quantities, and you can have it in any color you like, as long as it's raw carbon and black. In fact, the only option for customers is the color of anodized parts, the usual six Hope shades will be available, and finally Team Green will be available to buy on this complete bike only. Color aside, the bike is only available as one package (with some options on rotor size, stem length, chainring size), built with as many Hope parts as possible, and only from selected Hope dealers or direct from the factory. Available from September onwards, Hope will produce 500 bikes per year, so get in line. How much is the big question: £7,500 will get you a piece of hand laid history.



Hope HB211

Hope HB160 Details

• Intended use: trail, enduro, mountain biking
• Carbon front triangle, alloy rear
• Travel: 160mm
• 27.5" wheels
• 130mm rear hub spacing
• Fox Suspension
• Weight: 14 kg (claimed)
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• Made in the UK
• Price: £7,500 / $9,663 USD approx.
www.hopetech.com



Details


Hmmm weavy...
Hmmm, weavy...
Hmmm machiney...
Hmmm, machiney...

Where to start on the details? It seems that every nook and cranny of the HB160 has been pondered over many a brew (that's tea in Yorkshire). Not simply selecting parts from a catalog and putting them in the right place, but thinking critically and making parts that better suit the needs of this bike. The front triangle is carbon, laid in Barnoldswick in return for British wages, safety standards and income directed into their local community. Cable routing is internal with 3D ports printed in-house. The water transfer graphics are added before the final matte finish lacquer is applied.


HB211


Carbon production is currently always associated with Asia. But Hope pointed out some good reasons UK manufacture is a smart move. Firstly, one of the major costs of a carbon bike is the mold. If your entire business revolves around machining bike parts, then this isn't an issue, though they did have to buy a machine bigger than anything they had previously to machine the huge £700 hunks of raw material into shape.

Secondly, the UK has a huge wealth of carbon expertise related to Formula One car construction, so finding an expert to help with the finer details of this black art was easy.


Production models will be badged the HB160. Does that mean there could be some other numbers following the capitalised letters in the future
Production models will be badged the HB160. Does that mean there could be some other numbers following the capitalized letters in the future?
Cable routing ports are 3d printed in house.
Cable routing ports are 3D printed in-house.

HB211
Hope HB211
Hope's solution to creaky press-fit BB's uses a tube that threads together inside the frames bottom bracket shell for a solid fit. There is a custom chain guide that fits onto tabs above the bottom bracket shell, single chainring compatible only, of course.


Moving towards the rear wheel things get more interesting with the funky offset rear triangle; following somebody along a trail on the HB160 almost looks as if their bike has taken a side on impact from a car. The idea here is to reduce the width of the rear hub to 130mm for better clearance through Yorkshire gritstone, though the hub flanges sit a similar width apart to a boost hub. Space is saved between the frame and disc, and disc and spoke flanges, the spoke angle is also symmetrical which is touted as the ultimate solution for reliable wheel building. The hub axle is 17mm instead of 12mm, which is the size of Hope hub inner bearing races, the races sit directly on the axle, instead of on spacers on the axle.


I m glad that a company finally sorted out the waste of space found at the rear axle of nearly every bike on the market. Instead of making it wider you can just make it better
I'm glad that a company finally sorted out the waste of space found at the rear axle of nearly every bike on the market. Instead of making it wider, you can just make it better.


The radial brake and mount are also Hope's own. Both are designed to sit perpendicular to the hub. This means that to change disc size riders can simply to add or remove spacers to raise or lower the caliper, instead of trying to find that obscure 'IS160 Front Old to PM203' mount from 2003 that you need on your modern bike to upgrade the rotor by 20mm. There are also Lego-like bosses on the mount that sit inside the bolt hole on the caliper to help keep things in line.


Confused and frustrated by numerous weird brake mounts across the industry Hope made it more confusing by creating another one themselves. At least this one is perpendicular to the axle so simple spacer can be used to change the disc size instead of hunting through boxes of old mounts to get the right one.
Confused and frustrated by numerous weird brake mounts across the industry, Hope arguably made it more confusing by creating another one themselves. At least this one sits perpendicular to the axle, so a simple spacer can be used to change the disc size instead of hunting through boxes of old mounts to get the right one.
Hope HB211
The rear brake caliper is a custom version of the Tech4. The bolts are neatly placed through the main bulk of the caliper instead of on tabs.


Some people may complain that Hope are creating more standards, but this bike is a package deal only. If you care about the fact that you can't insert 'Component X' here or there, then you have missed the point of this bike.


Hope HB211


HB211
HB211
The sections of the swingarm of the HB160 are now bonded together. This gives a cleaner finish and is also said to be a more accurate way to keep the bike aligned during manufacture.


Hope HB211
Hope HB211


Geometry


Hope said they wanted to stay on the conservative side of geometry rather than chasing the longer, lower, slacker, trend. That said, the numbers are still fairly progressive compared to a few 160mm travel machines that are lagging behind the times.


Hope HB211 geometry



Build


There's one build kit to choose from, and of course, it's dominated by Hope. The suspension is from Fox via a 36 and Float X2, the dropper post is a Reverb from RockShox. The gear shifter, chain, and derailleur are XX1 11-speed from SRAM. The saddle is from Fabric and will be a custom Hope edition for the production bikes. Maxxis supply tires. Everything else is all from under one roof: grips, bar end plugs, handlebars, stem, top cap, headset and spacers, hubs, rims, cranks, seat clamp, chain guide, cranks, chainring, bottom bracket, hubs, cassette, and brakes – can any other brand boast this spread of product?


Hope hubs have gained a reputation as the benchmark over the years.
Hope hubs have gained a reputation as the benchmark over the years.
The Tech 35W rim is Hope s latest hoop. A 35mm internal width with a chunky cross section. This isn t simply a narrow rim that has been stretched to a super thin limit.
The Tech 35W rim is Hope's latest hoop. A 35mm internal width with a chunky cross-section. This isn't simply a narrow rim that has been stretched to a super thin limit.

The rims are the only component made in Taiwan, to Hope's specification, as finding rim manufacturers in the UK is, well, basically impossible.



Hope brakes are a love hate affair.
Hope brakes are a separating subject, a love/hate affair with many riders.
Hope HB211
The rear brake caliper is a custom version of the Tech4 caliper.


Of course Hope spec their own Cranks chainring and specific HB211 chain guide.
Of course, Hope specs their own Cranks with 30mm axle, direct mount chainring, and specific HB160 chain guide.


The Hope handlebar is the second carbon component to come out of the Barnoldswick factory.
The Hope handlebar is the second carbon component to come out of the Barnoldswick factory.
Hope HB211 - First Look
Stem, top cap and spacers are all from Hope.



Suspension Design


The rear triangle of the HB211 is machined from aluminium.
Parts of the rear triangle of the HB160 are machined from aluminum, then bonded together with tubes.


Hope are open and admit that all suspension is a compromise, rather than marketing they have found a perfect solution. They went with a four bar, horst style link that provides fairly neutral characteristics all around. The only thing that isn't neutral is a lot of progression that should work well with coil shocks or large volume air shocks with minimal spacers inside.


Views: 25,578    Faves: 12    Comments: 4









We headed to the Serre Chevalier region of France where the HB's main engineer resides. Guillaume uses the epic alpine trails here as his local test bed, and what better place to get to grips with the bike.

The HB160 gets on with most tasks well, the geometry isn't fully new-school, and of course, me being me, would say I would like a degree or two added to the seat tube and a couple knocked of the headtube, as well as a few more millimeters in the reach and chainstay. But that's not the point. The geometry plays well with all types of riding and is comfortable enough for long days, climbing and descending nearly anything put in front of it.


Hope HB211


Neutrality is key is key here as Hope themselves suggested was their goal. But after stating they wanted to stay on the conservative side of things, the HB160 is still more aggressive and capable than many bikes aimed at the same genre of riding.


Hope HB211


The standout feature for me was the rear suspension; the back of the bike has amazing tracking characteristics across rough cambered ground and corners. The progressive suspension allows the pilot to take commanding and aggressive approach. Driving the HB into corners and through compressions is superb, and picking up speed is natural as the chassis spurs onwards.

We are looking forward to getting some more time on an HB160 on our regular test tracks, a bike that needs to be lined up against some potential rivals.


Hope HB211


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe HB160 is more than a bike. It's for a collector, a connoisseur, an enthusiast that wants a piece of history. It's born from working man's heart, soul, art, and life work. More importantly than the ride, it's a joy to possess, admire, and show to your friends, and eventually your grandchildren when it's hanging on a wall, pride of place.
Paul Aston


HB211






About the Reviewer
Stats: • Age: 31 • Height: 6'1” • Ape Index: +4" • Weight: 75kg • Industry affiliations / sponsors: None • Instagram: astonator
Paul Aston is a racer and dirt-jumper at heart. Previously adding to the list of non-qualifiers at World Cup DH events, he attacked enduro before it was fashionable, then realized he was old and achy. From the UK, but often found residing in mainland Europe.



319 Comments

  • + 123
 Looks great, but if Cannondale had put this many 'new ideas' into a bike every one here would be screaming, instead Aston lauds the introduction of another proprietary hub standard. Dont' get me wrong, i am not trying to defend cannondale, just pointing out how much of a home court advantage Hope enjoys on this website.
  • + 5
 That was my first thought too.
  • + 11
 Home court?
  • + 10
 "Home court" implies that the website and the bike company are from the same country.
  • + 33
 I think Ashton is aware of what he's saying.

"Confused and frustrated by numerous weird brake mounts across the industry, Hope arguably made it more confusing by creating another one themselves."
  • + 102
 I'd much rather be locked into a Hope-defined proprietary standard than a Cannondale-defined one. I expect my Hope cranks, BB, and hub to outlast many others.
  • + 89
 First off, Hope should enjoy high praise from all sorts of people/sites because they make a rad product (*raises fanboy hand*).

Second, Brands like Cannondale make bikes for the masses. So presumably, you'd think they'd spec components that would be readily available to the masses (i.e. using "standards" aftermarket component manufacturers can use, as well) and easily fixed/upgraded should the buyer need/want. When they don't do that, flaming rightfully ensues.

Hope clearly market this bike as a package deal with their own components using "better" designs, and are not forcing other brands to use their hub spacing (cough*boost*cough*trek*cough). I think it's awesome. Almost total integration of components on a bike designed by said *component* manufacturer. Sounds and looks like a home run to me.
  • + 47
 WTF? How can a non-british website be the home court for a british bike company?
  • + 42
 Cannondale don't stock spares for things fifteen years after they went out of production (or even three), Hope do.
  • + 1
 Is it proprietary though?
  • + 22
 Cannondale are a bike manufacturer who have made components, Hope are a component manufacturer who have made a bike. I'm pretty sure all the components will be up to scratch and supported for years to come.
  • - 11
flag stumpymidget (Aug 21, 2017 at 11:16) (Below Threshold)
 @DC1988: You're new to this aren't you?
  • + 17
 @stumpymidget: commonwealth FTW
  • - 3
 @richard01: iS IT JUST A ROAD HUB.?
  • + 1
 Im still confused by this "home court advantage". Please elaborate?!
  • + 6
 It's much worse on Dirt. Anything british instantly gets lots of tolerance and each default is transformed into a touch of character.
  • + 9
 @EnduroManiac: Except I am pretty sure PinkBike is Canadian based, not British.
  • + 15
 @ridehard84: Yabbut in British Columbia. So exactly the same.
  • + 15
 "If you care about the fact that you can't insert 'Component X' here or there, then you have missed the point of this bike."

And here you go...
  • + 11
 @ridehard84: Nobody ever said Pinkbike is UK based. But Paul Aston is British
  • - 5
flag ridehard84 (Aug 21, 2017 at 13:19) (Below Threshold)
 @EnduroManiac: @the-gringo suggested it when he used the term "home court advantage". By which he is implying that Pink Bike is a British bsed entity.
  • + 10
 @ridehard84: Or maybe it's just a figure of speech.
  • + 1
 @ridehard84: here's your lesson in the history of British colonization: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commonwealth_of_Nations
  • + 37
 "Home court" = people on this site like Hope stuff. No need to make it hard.
  • + 7
 I don't think you understand what a 'standard' is. This is by definition 'non-standard'. It's highly unlikely Hope are introducing any of these new dimensions with the intent that they become a Regional Standard, National Standard, or an International Standard. I understand your gripe is with the excessive changes to what is considered 'normal' (e.g. the proliferation of boost sizing). That's not what this is. There's no intention for the market to adopt the new sizing and it become a 'standard'.
  • + 7
 @ridehard84: I think he means that 99% of pinkbike users like Hope, so them releasing a bike with a bunch of proprietary parts will be a slam dunk (to continue the analogy) while a company like Cannondale that is not as well loved gets destroyed. It doesn't have to do with origin.
  • + 12
 If you're desperate to be one of the 500 people a year to get your hands on a £7,500 Hope bike, which is entirely marketed on the engineering philosophy of Hope and decked-out in every Hope component out there, you probably won't mind only being able to fit Hope components to it in the future.

I actually like what they've done with the rear hub and brake mount, the only real problem being that they've taken a totally different (but more efficient) route to the existing standards, so we'll not see any of those improvements in the mainstream any time soon, without SRAM, Trek and everyone else having to admit that they've got it wrong.
  • - 8
flag High-Life (Aug 21, 2017 at 14:39) (Below Threshold)
 Hope paid enough for the article that the PFBB got actually called out as a feature!
  • + 1
 @High-Life: But it's got threads on it so it must be good!
  • + 0
 @MTBrent: Britain/British Columbia, who's counting? Haha, pisspiss.
  • + 2
 @EnduroManiac: Like when UK car magazines review a Lotus! Or a Ford hot hatch. You can pretty much knock half a star off the rating they give it to get the truth.
  • + 4
 @stumpymidget: This is the third time I have seen you post about the awful usage of "home-court", which clearly is a huge issue. Is this really the worst thing you have encountered today? If so, stop complaining and be appreciative of the fact that you have had a decent day.
  • + 2
 @Smevan: Giant and Specialized have done similar offset rear ends on DH bikes over the last 10 years to get a zero dish wheel out of a standard 135mm wide hub. I reckon it's a bit silly to go to an all new slightly narrower one. The brake mount looks like a sensible idea though.
  • + 4
 @stumpymidget: Paul (who wrote the article) is British

I assume thats what he meant.
  • + 1
 @stumpymidget: the reviewer is from the UK
  • + 1
 @JamesR2026: Cannondale have done a similar thing as well, on the new new Jekyll. That several companies have come up with zero dish wheel designs and we're still lumbered with Boost, etc, is pretty stupid.

To be honest, I did wonder if Hope could have done it with 135mm spacing, but then you'd still only be compatible with 135x9mm QR hubs, which have already been made obsolete by 12x142mm and now 148mm is replacing that. If they'd have made the rear 148mm though, the asymmetric end would probably push the chainstay right into the driveside crank, but without the asymmetry, you couldn't have the zero dish on a standard 148mm hub. The only solution was to go narrower.
  • + 1
 @Smevan: Hope already makes 12x135mm through axle hubs. It's only the end caps that change between 135 and 142.
To be honest though, the 135mm hub/6mm offset rear end on my old demo 8 doesn't have great heel clearance on the drive side, so narrower is better. Apart from that, offset rear ends make plenty of sense.
If you look at the difference between the flange spacing and how that affects spoke lengths between 142mm and 148mm spacing, Boost is an absolute hoax!! Maybe it is better for plus bikes but for a regular 27.5/29er I can't see the benefit. I think Pivot's approach of using a 157 rear end and 83mm bottom bracket is better though, and didn't introduce another new standard.
  • + 1
 @MTBrent: It has been predicted that mtb may go the way of the motorcycle mfg to mfg proprietary--ness. However, If anyone can pull off this first leap it would be Hope. Trek could too and so could Giant and Spesh, but they prefer to swing their big D and push the whole industry towards their new idea rather than just make it for themselves. One could argue either way as to what would benefit the masses and the industry the most.
  • + 3
 Hope is allowed to do proprietary things because they don't aim to make money off of everything.(like the majority of the bike brands today) They are one of the most respectable companies because they do awesome things like trying to keep all production in the UK, unless it's very hard/expensive, they pretty much do things for a valid reasons, not stupid sht like boost 158 that no one needs
  • - 1
 I completely not accept products made out of standards. What if Hope bankrupt for example? You'll pay 7.5 GBP end up with something that you cannot use, because of broken hub or crank. I know they made great products, but they can do so following some standards, do they?
  • + 1
 @JamesR2026: I feel stupid for not knowing 142 just had different end caps - all my bikes still use 135mm QR and I never thought to check :s

I suppose what it comes down to then is that Hope saw there are a lot of proprietary hub setups out there already, decided they could do it better and didn't worry too much about the "new standard" thing because they're supplying all the kit themselves, selling in small numbers and other people are already doing it.

I know that zero dish/ equal spoke tension is supposed to make the strongest wheels and that, from that point of view, Boost doesn't really fix anything. American Classic have done their own version of Boost, which tries to get zero dish by pushing out the disk-side flange 6mm, instead of widening symmetrically and that seems like a good idea.
  • + 1
 @stumpymidget: Don't you guys still own Canadia?
  • + 3
 @herzalot: Nah we just fly over in the Summer and steal their women. They cannot resist the accent.
  • + 1
 @Smevan: Yeah, Hope hubs is they are really modular. The X12 end caps change a 135x12 hub into a 142x12 or a 150x12 into a 157x12. To change from 135QR or 135 -10mm bolt up to 142, you can change the axle and end caps.
I'm actually a big Hope fan and have a bunch of hope stuff on my bikes. Haven't run their brakes since I had a set of the original 4 pots in the early 2000s though! Didn't get on with them, but would like to try a set of their modern ones.
  • + 1
 @JamesR2026: I've got Hope wheels on both my bikes and do like the modular setup they have, but have only ever taken advantage of it to switch between 9mm QR and 15mm thru axle forks. I'd like to try Hope brakes, but my SLX's have never given me any trouble, so it'd be a pretty expensive vanity purchase.
  • + 1
 @MTBrent: you nailed it Sir...
  • + 82
 Intended use: Mountain Biking
  • + 15
 Yes, because if someone writes: "Enduro specific" I get so offended!
  • - 19
flag glenno (Aug 21, 2017 at 11:55) (Below Threshold)
 I HOPE this sells well..........
  • + 17
 @glenno: way to obvious mate.
  • - 1
 district nurse by five ten...great.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: argh! Triggered!
  • + 0
 Thank you for saying what I thought was the obvious point of the write up...
  • + 60
 "I'm glad that a company finally sorted out the waste of space found at the rear axle of nearly every bike on the market. Instead of making it wider, you can just make it better."

Here here!
  • + 13
 Didn't the big S also do this stuff before with their offset 135mm rearends?
  • - 3
 I'm pretty sure we can all do this to some extent by using a boost fork/ frame with standard 100 and 142 hubs with the correct spacing. Many wheel builders agree that symmetry trumps bracing angle. I've only briefly looked into it but I think it can be done with hope hubs and wolf tooth boostinator adaptors.
Granted it doesn't account for wasted space but I may make better use of the space in boost setups?
Anyone bothered to do more research than me?
  • + 1
 @hirvi: the big S tried to improve the 142 hub
the difference, compared to a "normal" 142 hub is huge ;-)
  • + 2
 @hirvi: Giant did it before Specialized. Some time around 2003
  • + 1
 @JamesR2026: That's basically the same time, my 2003/04 big hit had an asymetric rear.
  • + 1
 @groghunter: Ah ok, yep that is around the same time.
I had a giant DH comp with an offset rear end around 2003 and then went to a 2005 Demo 8 which also had an offset rear end.
Didn't know Spec had done it earlier on the Big hit.
  • + 1
 @JamesR2026: I believe the demo 9 had it as well.
  • + 1
 @groghunter: I still ride that bike. Unbreakable.
  • + 40
 Kinda like a Leica camera for bike nerds. Rare, expensive, lots of proprietary shit and not necessarily better than anything else on the market.
Some one with a fair bit of disposable income will buy it and then tell everyone how much better it is than anything else they've owned (and they've owned it all).
  • + 8
 I bet it'll be a dentist......
  • + 0
 Dustfarter - Leica M10 is much necessarily better than everything else in it's genre... but if we were to make an analogy to Leica this frame would have to cost like 12k
  • - 2
 @phdotd: why does everybody cry about expensive bikes? Somebody has to buy them so that they can be sold 6 months later for half the price. Quit whining you bitch.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: As an owner of Leica and Sony A series cameras I respectfully disagree that the Leica's are better in the genre.
The lenses are another story.
  • + 0
 @Dustfarter: which Leica do you own?
  • + 1
 @phdotd: Praise to the dentists for buying this stuff so I can buy it from them second hand but unused.
  • + 41
 DVO suspension would look damn fine on this bike! Isn't that the only reason why bike manufacturers do a black/green colour scheme?
  • + 28
 You're right, it would look absolutely diamond.
  • + 26
 Black and green has me jaded.
  • + 13
 It would stand out like a Garnet in a sea of dull pebbles.
  • + 15
 something something emerald
  • + 1
 At least you can fit a new fork in this bike. Whit this bike you should be happy not to have one, but to have an option to change.
  • + 22
 I hope they make one of their most excellent manufacturing video's based around this bike. I show their videos to the apprentices in our machine as an example on how to be, and how a shop should look. These boys know what's up.
  • + 6
 and they make some pretty good bike kit as well.
  • + 19
 Like this you mean vimeo.com/230406411
  • + 5
 @usmbc-co-uk: cheers. Awesome video. It is amazing how much work there is just in one frame.
  • + 13
 @fartymarty: I love the whole concept and I love the evolution of hope as a company and a brand. Its nice to have a UK based firm turning out high end stuff like this. Its never gonna be like the stuff that comes from China but thats sort of the point, UK built by men who sound like they could quite easily narrate a cricket test match
  • + 2
 @usmbc-co-uk: thanks for the link. To be fair, when you watch the movie and you realise the level of investment in machinery, expert staff and how many days it takes to produce a frame alone...7.5K might just cover the costs. I wonder how many they will have to sell to start getting return/profit. Or is this like a Veyron where VW lost money with every sale?
  • + 1
 @usmbc-co-uk: Yes. I dunno how I didn't know about that. Thanks man!
  • + 12
 Don't want to be the one to piss on the party but am I the only one here that noticed you put your apprentices in a machine?
You can't get away with that sort of treatment in Europe.
  • + 5
 @usmbc-co-uk: this video made me finally appreciate this bike and what it takes to make it. Not just another mass produced boutique brand frame.
  • + 2
 @dh1stan: Yeah well, it keeps them from crashing our machines if they're in them.
  • + 1
 @usmbc-co-uk: whoah. Engineering boner.
  • + 2
 @usmbc-co-uk: That poor french guy, they've ruined his English accent Big Grin
  • + 18
 Hope are based in Lancashire not Yorkshire. Other than that, belting bike. Looking forward to see where they take this. Hope make products I don't mind spending money on. They generally make things right and back it up with great customer support.
  • + 10
 But brew is still the Yorkshire word for Tea, it's ours you can't have it!
  • + 5
 @Fix-the-Spade: My Lancashire relatives say "brew" too, so you'll have to share it - don't go all "War of the Roses" on me.
  • + 2
 @mtbsince84 @Fix-the-Spade: I'm from Lancashire. Yup I'm sure brew is pretty much used over all of the North of the UK. Some good bike related stuff happening in both counties. Red & White Rose unite ey!
  • + 3
 @iijonnyii Well, it depends on the definition of Yorkshire and Lancashire, if you use the local government act of 1972 to define where it is, then yes, it's in Lancashire. It did spend the preceding 1,098 years in Yorkshire though, so it depends whether you're considering it's historical location or it's location defined by an arbitrary line drawn on a map in the 1970's!
  • + 2
 @wesu: Good point. Though Hope initially started in Nelson & then Colne, both in Lancashire. They use the Lancashire rose on the website, you can't claim them I'm afraid Wink
  • + 2
 @wesu: wow very interesting. Thanks for that!
  • + 2
 @iijonnyii: Haha, I'm not claiming anything, at the end of the day they're all arbitrary lines drawn on maps, as long as Hope keep making cool stuff I don't really care where they're based!
  • + 1
 You 'nartheners' - it's flat 'ats 'n' whippets 'n' racin' pidgeons wether thee's fromt Yurkshire ur Lancurshire
  • + 2
 @Flanimal: flat 'at?? I think you'll find it's called a flat cap!
  • + 2
 @wesu: beggin' pardon gaffer!
  • + 14
 I'm actually quite surprised it's 'only' £7.5k, I was expecting it to be 5 figures! Dream bike right there... mmmm.....
  • + 2
 I think for what your are buying it is bang on for the money, look at over top end carbon bikes (stick with European to get ride of import tax) and the competitions of mondraker dune would be similar. Take about American brands like Santa cruze, yeti, trek, intense spech ect and they are charging a lot more. The only thing I would say at 14kg it's not super light like the others can be and there is not much that you could change to get the weight down.
  • - 1
 @mattvanders: I have looked up out of curiosity, and in CRC and other site for the fork and shock, with the exact same spec, it cost 4600 euros (the build), until the 9000 euros announced in another website, they are charging you 4400 euros for the frame with the chain device. For the sake of comparison, a Hight tower CC frame is 3600.
So no, they arent charging you less.
  • + 1
 @mattvanders: I actually lifted this bike up and couldn't believe it was that heavy....where is the weight?
  • + 1
 @Travel66: at the very top in details section. When think it's only a front carbon end with alloy cnc rear end and no carbon wheels, it's on point but not for the cost
  • + 13
 Awesome: "The front triangle is carbon, laid in Barnoldswick in return for British wages, safety standards and income directed into their local community"
  • + 10
 Offset frame spacing, and narrower hubs, will be the next Boost. Mark my words.

"Our engineers discovered that with our new "Svelte" (tm) hub spacing, we could increase stiffness blah blah blah and save blah blah while still blah blah.
  • + 1
 I love they have completely ripped up the the rule book on hub width and started from scratch and reduced it to 130
  • + 9
 While squeezing out a six coiler this morning I was thinking I needed a bike with another hub standard and proprietary brake mounting to make it really unique. Thanks hope for stepping up on this one!
  • + 8
 Eat less fiber.
  • + 12
 "I'll take Aluminum for 4000, Alex...."
  • + 2
 ...and carbon for the remaining 3,500.
  • + 26
 aluminium*
  • + 10
 HB211? Why is it called that when it says HB160 on the top tube? Did I miss something in the article?
  • + 6
 glam shots are probably a production bike, while they tested a proto/prepro called the 211.
  • + 14
 Yes you did. Go back and read.
  • + 6
 It's named after the Rolls-Royce RB211. The B stands for Barnoldswick
  • + 6
 @ComradeD: Exactly, unfortunately for RR, development of the RB211 caused them to file for bankruptcy. I presume Hope are not anticipating the same fate!
  • + 2
 From what i remember, the rb211 was the engine simon sharp worked on for the majority of his time at rolls royce, so it was the proto name as homage to him and a bit of tounge in cheek Yorkshire humour (h for hope instead of r for rolls)
  • + 2
 @dugglesthemuddled: this is true, but out of that mess the Derby boys also got the RB211 on the 747... arguably the finest 'save' in engineering history.
  • + 1
 and now the article is changed to 160.... Wondering if there is a HB211 (as in 211mm) DH bike waiting in the wings?
  • + 1
 @abzillah: Still not seeing it... care to point it out in the article?
  • + 1
 suck squeeze bang blow she says
  • + 1
 @gtrguy: I think it's safe to say they are now calling it the 160 because that is how much travel the bike has.
  • + 1
 @Katakalism: yes, that is self evident. However, when the article was first posted, every spot where it now says HB160, it instead said HB211
  • + 4
 "Everything else is all from under one roof: grips, bar end plugs, handlebars, stem, top cap, headset and spacers, hubs, rims, cranks, seat clamp, chain guide, cranks, chainring, bottom bracket, hubs, cassette, and brakes – can any other brand boast this spread of product?"

Yeah... and even more stuff...
Ritchey? You know... Tom Ritchey?
Extralite?
FRM?
Campagnolo?
Shimano?
White industries?
Paul?
E-13?
Etc etc etc
Or the real WTB from the 80's to mid 90's, before an hired lawyer fired the founders -that is the "rumor"- and turned the company from producing diamonds to producing plastic? Yeah the old WTB stuff... top of the top.
  • + 1
 I think he means they make all of it in their factory with their workers who are on their books, on the same site as their office and and warehouse. A lot of companies may have a portfolio of parts, but how many of those parts did they actually manufacture themselves?
  • + 0
 @jaame: you are right... then
Extralite
FRM
White industries
Paul
  • + 1
 @RedRedRe: None of those example are really comparable though, especially as all of the brands you have listed dont really supply 'mainstream' parts - Hope mass produce their products, those guys listed above only fill the niche market.

Also, none of them have a full carbon production line in-house to produce their own frame either, parts maybe, but not a full frame and growing componentry line.

Hope cannot be compared to any other company in the industry - There are others companies that own a frame and component brand (Trek with Bontranger) but nobody does it all in-house in their country of origin.
  • + 7
 They made the bike they wanted the way they wanted it to be. I’d take one.
  • + 5
 The cynic in me, reads pink bikes take as, oh this is lovely look at all the shiny bits, However it doesn't ride well. Sorry if that's not right, it's just how I read it, it is certainly dripping with parts for my bike...
  • + 5
 I think the meaning you took was the exact oppossite of the words written down. I'm not sure how the words comfortable, amazing, superb and natural can appear in the ride section and you can arrive at a negative conclusion. It's interesting/amusing how sizing has shifted to quickly that an XL bike with 47cm reach and 123cm wheelbase is considered short, three years ago it would have been bigger than anything that wasn't a Mondraker. It does look gorgeous though.
  • + 0
 @stooky This reviewer will slag anything that isn't long-low-slack endurbro one trick pony. Just ignore it.
  • + 3
 @Fix-the-Spade: Reviewer raves about the handling in the ride section and also states "I would like a degree or two added to the seat tube and a couple knocked of the headtube, as well as a few more millimeters in the reach and chainstay." It would seem that these changes would definitely alter the handling characteristics - never been a fan of his reviews.
  • - 1
 @Fix-the-Spade: dude sorry I was only talking about the bit at the end of the article. The bit that says pinkbikes take.

If you think I have time to read the whole article you sorely mistaken. :-)
  • + 2
 @scottzg: I have no issue with the reviewer. I find all reviews by any mountain bike mag the same. really is there any difference between bikes these days.
  • + 4
 Also for tight techy trails the typical new ews race fred bike geometry is not ideal. BIG LONG sleds are not good for everything but they will let you go faster than your skills allow
  • + 3
 Not trying to get in the line of downvote fire, but does anyone else agree that this bike is not that interesting? It's a super premium price tag that uses an incredibly conventional suspension design and some proprietary standards (improvements though they may be). I just don't see this being worth 3 times the price of, say, an NS Bikes Snabb T (another bike that sells itself on having a no-frills Horst Link with emphasis on durability).
  • + 5
 To some people, there is huge value in being locally made. I have recently started trying to buy american made whenever possible (especially if it is colorado made as that is local for me) because it brings jobs home. i bet the majority of people buying this bike will be british and already hope fanboys thatwere running mostly hope components to begin with.
  • + 2
 @adrennan: You're probably right. Given the outcome of the Brexit vote and the Trump election, there may well be similar cultural phenomena at play.
  • + 1
 @WaterBear: you are missing the point. By supporting companies within the US (for me since that is where I live) I am keeping money in this country which is ultimately good for my country and I am supporting better employee treatment which all matters to me
  • - 2
 I agree, nothing special, besides the unnecessary new "standards". But hey, if they sell enough of these, they might be able to finally afford some decent milling machinery and then they will be able to do smooth surfaces instead of this grooved mess. Very 90s, though.
  • + 4
 @WaterBear: I think it's a bit lazy to dismiss the enthusiasm for a UK made bike as protectionism. A lot of the loyalty towards hope products, especially their hubs, has been hard earned through durability, maintainably and good customer service.

Also they've really gone for it with this bike. You can argue that the frame itself isn't that radical, and debate new standards, but it took some guts to undertake a project like this. It's a proper endeavour.
  • + 1
 @adrennan: That's how people think, but the situation is a lot more complicated, methinks. Since the United States is first and foremost an information / technology economy (as well as many other things that are not manufacturing), it makes sense for us to give up our own manufacturing for favourable trade terms with regards to more profitable economic sectors (like information and technology). Since off shore labour is even cheaper than the next cheapest alternative that keeps manufacturing inside the US (automation), this benefits the US consumer in a roundabout way - we get cheaper goods than if they were made by machine. Since we would probably gain only a small number of jobs by automating manufacturing, it's probably a net win to get cheaper goods instead.

As for supporting better employee treatment, I'm all for that. Previous US administrations have tended to lean on trade partners like China to improve their worker protections - but I generally believe that the best thing for worker treatment in such countries is to actually employ their workers.

Long story short, there are a tremendous number of variables at play. Someone who applies mathematics to economic models would be the real person to ask these questions to, but simple answers like yours and mine are probably not even close to the whole truth. The world is too complicated for that.

@elbandido77: All I was saying is that there is a strong protectionist bent over there, like there is here. I have Hope hubs on my bike and I like them. No hate for the Hope implied.
  • + 1
 @WaterBear: so i will give you an example. I live in denver and work as an engineer (foundations and such). if i buy from guerilla gravity along with others in the local community (also based in denver), there is a chance that they as a company need to build more space to keep up with demand or they employ more people locally to manufacture frames in my community and those people can now afford homes in my community. this keeps more money local and there is a chance that they require my services for new development and the money indirectly gets back to me, so it is good for the local economy. but thats just my 2 cents. i believe in voting with the almighty dollar if i want to see change in my community.
  • + 2
 @adrennan: I (think I) understand what you are trying to say. "Buy local" is just not a practical solution for the entire United States, for reasons as described.

But hey, our specialities are not in economics. I could be (and usually am) wrong.
  • + 3
 Pretty cool. It takes this kind of experimentation to get somewhere. I'm surprised they're selling it though. Even if I had the money I wouldn't buy it though. (Actually, the only carbon frame I'd get would be that Robotbike.co bike.) There are just too many stones left unturned or maybe too many ideas that didn't make the cut that I expect they'll keep progressing for a fair while and introduce new standards on the way. What springs to mind right now:

Why no integrated dropper seatpost like that thing in Liteville bikes? The current dropper is still kind of an afterthought designed to fit frames originally designed for rigid seatposts. Now that they assemble it with a dropper anyway, better get it integrated right away.

The current (conventional) PM brake calipers are designed so that when braking, they push against their mounts. The bolts are loaded by a bit of shear, but not much. These new mounts are designed for the rider who does happen to swap rotors every now and then, but isn't organized enough to store them together. That's a nice concept. But the consequence is that the bolts are now subject to pure shear. The Lego type bosses may help some but eventually the 8.8 quality steel bolt is much stronger and fatigue resistant than the machined aluminium used. And it is getting much worse when you're stacking spacers to go from 160mm up to 203 (or whatever their maximum is). Such a tall tower will also subject them to bending. Granted bolts were also subject to shear with the IS2000 type brake mount, but you'd never get such a tall stack of spacers. So for a next iteration I can imagine they'd use some stepped interface so that the caliper has something to rest against.

That said, I don't think buyers of these bikes will have to be too worried about obsolesce. If you really need a new hub, a replacement brake caliper or just spacers, they'll probably machine some for you.
  • + 2
 Hope just makes amazing stuff ,but I'm curious, for a product that sweated every mm, why don't they list bb height and standover? I'm with Paul on a few things too. The reach and tt could be 1/2 inch more, a degree on the seat tube. I'm ok with a ha at 65 or 65.5 but I'd opt for shorter cs. Chainstay seems to be the most personal fit thing these days for individual sizes and body dimensions though. I'm sure the quality is there. I'll take 2. One for wall art and one to destroy on a daily basis
  • + 2
 I have started with Hope in 1997; the original C2 on an Orange Patriot with Pace up front and Hope Sport Hubs. The only items still alive of this bike are the Hope Hubs and the C2's. I sold the Hubs and they are still going on a mates Big S&%t. Every aspect of the HB160 addresses issues I have had for years. Especially the rear end and the 130mm. And lets be honest with ourselves, this will be the way of the Bike Industry in future. I watched a friend have his 2013 V10 get stolen and buy a new full V10 this summer. Shall we say there were a few blond moments but essentially none of the items we used to take the p£$s were his fault. Even the XD hub to single speed conversion was just not available. Time spent wrenching is not riding and if hope support this like the rest of their products this or its offspring will be the next bike; even if it is made of plastic fantastic not. PS the Enve wheels and Sram stuff on the V10 are shockingly poor on a 10k bike.
  • + 2
 If i had the money, i still wouldn´t buy this bike for few reasons. But i bet it is one of awesome ride.
As a guy who rides and races a lot, component compability and availability is my main concern when buying a new bike/frame.
Special rear brake, rear hub and chainguide are major things, yet still components that can break.

What i like this bike, is solution to pressfit bb and aluminium chainstays. Carbon driveside cs is actually not so good, how matter how good you try to protect it chain will still beat it.
  • + 2
 All other criticism aside, I am happy that I have now seen a MTB manufacturer use a 1K carbon weave for the show ply on the frame. The costs are up there but, the structural advantages are worth it IMO. I bet HOPE spent a lot of time in the details for this frame.
  • + 2
 I am so happy someone went this route, especially Hope. I've never owned a single piece part that they make but have always admired everything they build and how they go about it. Have gotten to ride their brakes on other's bikes and love them.
  • + 1
 Okay... so first off I haven't read every comment. It may have been covered, or perhaps previously and I live under a rock (:

The bottom bracket... to solve the creaminess of a pressfit bottom bracket, they've pressed it into a threaded shell...
So, why don't they just use a threaded bottom bracket?

I may be stupid here as is very common for myself, but it made me wonder ????????‍♂️????
  • + 1
 Nice bike but I'll stick to my Antidote Carbon Jack, just as unique but with a decent suspension platform.. virtual pivot is where its at, move on from fsr or horst link (it really isnt that great).

Am I the only one that thinks this is a bit plain jane?
  • + 1
 I don't know man, like I said before, if you have a million dollars it seems reasonable to spend $12,147CAN on a bicycle, but honestly I've basically just been hovering above the zero mark my whole life. Also in paying that much for a bicycle, I feel like my expectations would never be met.
  • + 3
 Love it. Love the vertical integration and the holistic approach to building a bike where every component is deisgned to work together.
  • + 5
 Steel City Media doing a sick g33k out here vimeo.com/230406411
  • + 2
 There are some companies looking to launch a new bike every year no matter what. Other companies like HOPE are state of the art, they don't hurry, they just build the best. Thanks!
  • + 1
 I love hope stuff through and through and from a visual and engineering perspective I love this bike but I would still much prefer my mojo geometron that I have now kitted out with all the hope components! I just wish hope had pushed a little further with the geometry on this and made it in my eyes a more impressive special bike
  • + 2
 I can't help thinking if only hope had bought marzocchi, it could be all be own brand bits (excepting gears...).

Not seriously serious. But I was hoping (ahem) at the time that they would buy marz.
  • + 1
 Hope did an in-depth, 13 minute making-of video. Worth a watch and explains a few of the weirdnesses, like the bonding in the aluminium rear triangle and the 130mm rear spacing.

www.facebook.com/hopetech/videos/2125725794135908
  • + 1
 So...Much...Want. but one major problem. Its too damn gorgeous to ride. I'd spend hours just fussing over the details and intricacies of the machining and layup and forget that i was supposed to be riding the damn thing. Another one is the cost, to be expected of course and far more justified than many other bikes and i know this thing would be damn reliable. But half the fun of biking is upgrading. You literally cannot do anything to this (bar change dropper maybe). It does put it into perspective though i think the price, while still steep is far more realistic than many other bikes. Now this or Robot bike.........
  • + 5
 They need to make a downhill bike!
  • + 3
 The chainstays look like what Antidote did with their first Lifeline frame. I wish Hope more luck than Anti guys had before they went full carbon.
  • + 1
 An example of a Veblen good? If it cost half as much, it would be less desirable. The frame doesn't bring much new to the table for the price. For me it would be truly interesting when they produce a 'made in the west' frame at volume, and a reasonable price.
  • + 4
 Gotta love how Paul Aston is death gripping those Hope Tech3/4 brakes on criticizing Hope's geometry numbers.
  • + 1
 Just finally bought my dream bike 2017 Nomad CC top of line fox suspension, xx1 drivetrain, etc...AND i still want THIS...im beginning to wonder, will i ever see a new bike and not want it?! Hahah

i want a new 2018 nomad btw...anyone ridden both this years and last? thoughts?
  • + 1
 I seem to remember in an article for Mountain Bike UK Hope said they could produce a carbon framed bike for much cheaper than their competitors? Am i missing the point here but Orange is ripping people off with their overpriced under specced bikes and now Hope are on the band wagon. Everyone was complaining about the price of foreign bikes because of the hefty import tax so this thing should be at least 20% cheaper. Take a leaf out of Whyte's book Hope and sell something that is actually value for money.
  • + 1
 nicely designed but its just too short. im only 5`6" and ride a medium canyon spectral which has the same reach as this large size hope bike. and i cant size up due to the huge 475mm seat tube. that is definately a deal killer unfortunately.

i would need a 70mm stem to get the reach i want.
  • + 3
 Manufacture arguably the best threaded BB in the world.

Design a press-fit (and proprietary solution) on your new bike.

Makes sense to me.
  • + 3
 Nice, now I can have a bike where pretty much every. single. part. Is from the same brand. Thats'll make it easier dealing with the warranty department.
  • + 3
 THIS is how bikes should be made. I don't care how this one rides in particular; the important part is the attention to detail
  • + 3
 Wonderfull bike for a bike geek but a terrible option for the average joe. And I HOPE this is the last new axle standard that anybody invented.
  • + 3
 nah they will make a 135mm one and call it boost
  • + 2
 They are only planning to make 500 a year, charge £7,500 for it and basically only offer rotor size and anodising colour as options though, so they know this is not an "average Joe" bike.
  • + 1
 @Smevan: the radial rear brake mount lets you go to a larger rotor with simple spacers. (lego style possibly). All that because is a true radial (direct line from center of wheel). A quote directly from the article: " At least this one sits perpendicular to the axle, so a simple spacer can be used to change the disc size instead of hunting through boxes of old mounts to get the right one."
  • + 1
 @bman33: Yep, I'm aware you can change the rotor diameters easily later on, if you want (and didn't actually even imply that you couldn't, but never mind). My point was that this is a specifically "Hope" bike, built for Hope fans, in small production runs, kitted only in Hope stuff where possible and at a very high price of entry, so yeah, not a bike for the average rider, but that's an entirely intentional decision Hope have made.
  • + 4
 Nearly all house brand parts? Sounds like a cheap build
  • + 0
 This bike is DOA. Looks like a first generation sb5c but ugly. All the propietary crap. Seems like someone missed the train and came to a party after the cop already busted it up. Come on man!!!! This is coming from a dude with hope brakes and wheels. Stick to components please. Please don't raise your prices to make up for this abomination.
  • + 1
 Where do I sign up to buy one? I've already put one of my kidneys up for sale in the buy/sell section, I've got another one and it'd be a shame to miss out on owning one of these beasts!
  • + 3
 Made down the road, with love. Anyone want to buy a fully functional kidney?
  • + 2
 The kidney market isn't what it used to be,these days. On the other hand,the liver is on high demand. How much do you want that shiny new bike?
  • + 1
 For me the reach is too short for the seat post, I could only run a slammed 125m dropper with a short stack height. Love the bike otherwise, I'd want the option to use a longer dropper for my money though
  • + 4
 You say Yorkshire but Barnoldswick is in Lancashire...
  • + 1
 For 7.5k i would like to see an ElevenSix on the back, and a Factory Transfer post. Or full Ohlins...That geometry will be very balanced and appropriate for general UK riding.
  • + 1
 Gotta hand it to hope, the support i've had off them in the past has been excellent, even with second hand parts..if i could afford one of these I'd get one! Saw some prototypes at steel city, proper head turners!
  • + 1
 They should make another video of the manufacturing like they did on the hubs,but for the entire bike so I can see where the 10 grand went.i want one
  • + 2
 Really hate when companies cheap out and use this many house brand parts...
  • + 2
 Lovely bike you got there HOPE. Respect for making everything but the mech, suspension and seatpost!
  • + 2
 And chain, but yeah, what a machine!
  • + 1
 and spokes
  • + 1
 @Mooka: pretty much any rubber component too
  • + 1
 @Luneec: don't forget brake fluid! I think they are trying to cheat us!
  • + 1
 @Milko3D: Pretty sure the still use Sapim spokes
  • + 3
 For 7.5k your expect bang up to date geo ! Still looks nice
  • + 10
 Who says up-to-date is the best? All the numbers look solid. If you want a bigger bike, size up.
  • + 4
 @bman33: But how? There is no XXL.
  • + 2
 @jollyXroger: you must be a tall guy.
  • + 14
 From Vital's article on the bike for a less hype/trendy view from PB:

"Rather than jump blindly onto the “lower, longer, slacker” bandwagon, Hope took a long hard look at what they ride and how they like to ride it, and ended up with quite conservative numbers when it comes to reach and overall length of the bike. Favoring a lively, maneuverable, and comfortable bike that is as much fun to ride on tight switchbacks as it is on the open trail, the HB.160 wasn’t intended to be a pure race machine (although it has already proven itself on the race track with a couple of UK National Championships and some impressive EWS stage results to its name)."
  • + 6
 Hope are probably being realistic though and understand that outside of Pinkbike nerds like us and a few journos and pros the majority actually want a conservative, neutral bike - I share the same view as you but what does it matter? though I absolutely love it because of the way it's been made im not ever going to buy one but plenty will, and they will maybe prefer a more conservative but arguably easier to ride bike.

It's certainly going to be a huge increase in turnover for Hope and they must be on the verge of attracting huge investment interests now like intense / Santa Cruz - the question is would they ever sell out?

Fantastic bike and achievement from Hope though, they are a world one off that's for sure.
  • + 1
 @Racer951: I agree with you. Also that PB poll not so long ago showed people being on the conservative side with their numbers, if I remember correctly. After all Hope knows their target customers for this bike and there is always bigger money at the conservative end.
  • + 4
 @jollyXroger: I'm sure they know who their paying customers will be - all well and good making a bike with longer and slacker geo to extremes but often those are not the people with £7500 for a bike (me!)

I personally prefer a different geo but as stated I'm not a potential customer, I also think that some ultra long / slack bikes are too much, I know of someone who sold a Geometron because it was simply too much, he is now rather happy on a mainstream geo bike.
  • + 1
 @Racer951: Funny you should mention Geometron, because I can see some of these solutions being implemented there quite easily, now that the products are available. It would be a bike that is closer to the realms of possibility for customers whose bike budget is much lesser than £7500.
  • + 1
 To be fair, Enduro MTB mag recently did a round-up of what is the "new normal" for enduro bikes and the Hope fits very closely: 74 degree seat angle, 65.5 degree head angle, 160mm travel, just with slightly longer chainstays (435mm, over their test average of 431mm) and wheelbase (1228mm over their test average of 1210mm). You can argue that their aren't any disadvantages at all there.

The shortness in reach is pretty much the only off-trend thing in the geo, since it's around 20mm shorter than average.

enduro-mtb.com/en/mtb-geometry-new-normal
  • + 1
 @Smevan: I have already, in the past, argued disadvantages of these sub 74deg ESTA and 435mm CS numbers for taller guys, from my first hand experience. The fact is, industry is taking notice, seat angles are getting steeper with ESTA moving upward of 75 deg and reverting from those 430mm or shorter chainstays, for 29ers. Which is all good for us on the taller side of the sizing spectrum.
  • + 2
 @jollyXroger: I'm 6ft 2", riding a slightly dated hardtail with a 72 deg seat angle and 425mm chainstays, so I know what you mean. There are still some things I'd like to look into, but there's already a lot of solid reasoning out there for longer chainstays (like improving climbing behaviour, but also equalising weight distribution between the wheels for more even grip in a neutral riding position).

In this case though, I was really just replying to @Kimbers , pointing out that the geometry is actually pretty much on average for the current crop of enduro bikes, although it is a bit shorter in reach.

There do look to be a lot of interesting geometry experiments coming up though; maybe they'll remember the tall guys this time
  • + 1
 Retracted
  • + 4
 I wish I was rich
  • + 6
 I wish I wasn't poor
  • + 1
 Haven't had anything in my mouth since 3 hours - literally starving here #undersiege
  • + 3
 Why what's your name?
  • + 1
 The only reason I wish I was single! I'm already at s-1 bikes in the basement.
  • + 2
 @lRaphl: get rid of her.
  • + 1
 @BenPea: Well...it would look a bit too weird if I was walking in the streets while talking to my bike...I'll keep her! Smile
  • + 3
 I Hope this bike rides well
  • + 1
 Given reviewers comments, wonder if Hope could do a slackset and a new linkage to slacken bike for all those who prefer it longer and lower.
  • + 3
 I'll take a capra pro and a tues pro for the same price thanks
  • + 4
 Happy snapping, dude.
  • + 1
 It does look a bit like a posh capra! If money were no object this would be on the shortlist though...back in the real world: ^ this
  • + 2
 Always been a fan, super happy they've finally got a bike of their own to go with their mtb legacy.
  • + 3
 Hope are the dogs bollocks, this is gonna be a great bike.
  • + 2
 What I understood from this article is that this is a bike to have, not to ride. No, just no
  • + 3
 Intended Use: Mountain Biking
  • + 1
 This isn't aimed just a Hope, but rather everyone - consumers as well....... 10K on a bicycle?? Some of us have more dollars than sense.
  • + 8
 Very simple solution. Don't buy it. This is a hyper-boutique option aimed at people who feel it's worth purchasing for some reason. They may love Hope products, they may want to support UK production given the wages, safety standards, and economic considerations. There are plenty of lower cost options out there for you.
  • + 8
 Intense / Yeti / Santa Cruz charge the same if not more for a Chinese frame dripping in mass produced Chinese parts.

This is made in the UK dripping in quality Hope components and will come with legendary Hope support, if anything it's a bargain.

Way too expensive for me but so is a Ferrari, doesn't mean it's wrong to make it because we can't afford it - plenty of options out there for us still.
  • - 1
 That's quite a lot of cash. But there's a lot of disposable income floating around in the uk right now (until the bubble bursts) and bikes are peaking their heads over the mass-market parapet. Also, the 98 million Brits who come skiing in my back yard every year will soon have to replace their winter habit with a summer one and these here mountain bicycles, given that we'll be fooked for snow in about 20 years.
Hope just have to review their prices and maybe diversify and hope that people buy their rigs and not e-bikes for the same price. But maybe they have enough fans. Good luck to them.
  • + 1
 Obligatory link to geometrygeeks for geo comparison... geometrygeeks.bike/bike/hope-hb-160-2018
  • + 1
 OK, getting lottery ticket and if I win I'll buy one and everyone can be jealous.
  • + 2
 reach is too short Frown great looking bike though
  • + 2
 You had me at raw carbon and team green.
  • + 2
 Ladies & Gentlemen, we have reached Peak Dentist
  • + 1
 US$9600???!!! TEN months of salary as a Bike Mechanic here in Chile... No thanks!
  • + 1
 690 lucas a month as a mechanic? That's incredible! I was on minimum wage
  • + 1
 @dicky1080: En Junio cumplí 10 años en la misma empresa, y empecé ganando 3 gambas...
  • + 1
 @Fenrisvarg: 3 gamba 10 años atrás fue re bueno también!! Yo hice un par de meses no más cuando llegué a Chile, por eso sueldo mínimo. Donde trabajas tu?
  • + 1
 Question for Hope, couldn't you machine different rear triangles for different geometries and suspension characteristics?
  • + 0
 The problem is not the bike cost, is that WE get paid the same amount year after year, if not less. So nobody can afford this stuff anymore.
  • + 3
 That is one sexy bike :O
  • + 2
 To much pedal kickback...
  • + 2
 Everybody's dream bike, so well made.
  • + 0
 not mine
  • + 3
 That is a very sexy bike
  • + 2
 I'd like mine with a pinion please!
  • + 1
 I hate to be "that guy" but the real triangle detracts from that gorgeous bike. Just put a carbon rear triangle on there.
  • - 4
flag drbelleville (Aug 21, 2017 at 9:07) (Below Threshold)
 the actual bike the HB160 will.
  • + 2
 @orastreet1: I eat my words its aluminum.
  • + 0
 Down vote me all you want - would you buy this over a Santa Cruz or Intense with a full carbon frame? Can't beat the Hope brakes though...
  • + 1
 @orastreet1: Sure you can, Magura MT7's
  • + 0
 I searched the comments for exactly this! As much as Hope's machining is top notch the rear triangle looks like a prototype married to a final production carbon front triangle.
  • + 3
 Dear Santa....
  • + 2
 Where's all the usual comments about press fit and water bottles?
  • + 2
 I Hope one day I own one of these
  • + 0
 Just curious, couldn't they have machined the mold out of multiple pieces and then just welded them together and sanded out the welds instead of buying a bigger CNC?
  • + 1
 for the 26'er guys this would be the best option to head to
  • + 1
 It's £500 cheaper than a 2018 S-Works Enduro. I know if I could, I would!
  • + 1
 Just when you thought you couldn't afford their Hubs alone!
  • + 1
 Thing of beauty, nuff said...
  • + 0
 HB.160 are you guys misinformed???? Hope just released the HB.160 video.

...yes please, i want one!
  • + 0
 I stopped reading after '130mm hub spacing'.
Yet ANOTHER hub size? Yeah, Hope can SUCK IT!
  • + 1
 You can rear up on why they did that and you can suck it.
  • + 0
 Great looking bike!I was expecting a little bit more detail in the ride review.
  • + 1
 DVO suspension would match the green anodizing...
  • + 1
 another bank breaker bike! I'm calling out santa...
  • + 1
 10.000 USD ....... yes, sure .....
  • + 2
 it's basically hand made.....
  • + 1
 @ColquhounerHooner:

yes, you're right.

but (Nope)∞
  • + 2
 $8k bikes are so 2016
  • + 1
 its 7.5K in pounds = 9.6K US
  • + 2
 @poah: ..............and it's now 2017 and bikes cost $10k
  • + 0
 @offtheedge: only overpriced boutique bikes
  • + 1
 That headset spacer alignment..... I love the rear end.
  • - 1
 Please stop calling bikes carbon if only half done! For $10k bike you'd expect even the rear swing arm to be made of carbon too!
  • + 1
 coming soon to the whatever happened too... conversations the hb160
  • + 0
 £7500 for a bike... LOL.
Will stick with my cheap old mega TR frame thanks.

It does look nicer than my Tr though.
  • + 2
 In perspective its cheaper than the higher end Intense and Santa Cruz bikes and they do not have bespoke parts.
  • - 2
 Who ever did the join on the head tube needs shooting. If you buy a premium hyper car, the carbon is flawless. It should be the same for a premium hyper mountain bike. Otherwise, a nice bit of kit.
  • + 1
 Hope, get a slack 29 model out soon. Everyone else is
  • + 0
 $10k for that bike! LOL. Yeahhhhhh
  • + 1
 STOP IT!!! ????
  • + 0
 "designed, TESTED and manifactured" .... Yes, he is, why not?
  • + 0
 Merida 160. Carbon front triangle, alloy rear. 3300gbp no brainer.
  • + 1
 Hnnnnng
  • + 1
 Looks pretty damn clean.
  • + 0
 No FD mount ?
Not interested.
  • + 2
 Good. Now gtfoh and never come back
  • + 1
 Proper!
  • + 1
 Hot fire
  • - 1
 Let's see, 9300.00 buucks, press fit, carbon not a 29er , blah no thanks
  • - 3
 Paul does the best reviews on pinkbike. You can tell he can ride too
  • - 2
 one for the hope fan boys only
  • + 2
 Or, you know, just anyone who can appreciate a work of art?
  • - 1
 its just a bike
  • + 1
 ...and no bottle mount
  • + 1
 @Jack-McLovin: and engineering.
  • - 1
 Uninspiring suspension.
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