Hope Tech Enduro Wheelset - Review

Dec 24, 2014
by Matt Wragg  
Hope Tech Enduro Wheelset

Hope Tech Enduro Wheelset

Hope have been making hubs for nearly 25 years. Over that time they have evolved to a point of near perfection; from 90s classics like the Ti-Glide and Big-un, through to the BULB, before settling on the Pro II, which has been refined and worked on for around a decade to give us their current Pro II Evo hubs. Throughout that time their hubs were laced to every type of rim imaginable, but their pairing to the Stan's Flow and Arch rims came to be the archetypal combination, especially in the UK where they still do more than half of their business. For a company like Hope who have been diversifying massively over the last few years, expanding their range well beyond the brakes and hubs the company was built upon, it seems inevitable that at some point someone would look at those rims and say, "I reckon these would be better if..." That conversation was about three years ago now, and after two years of development and refinement they launched the Tech Enduro and XC Wheelsets. Unlike much of their lineup, the rims are not made in their factory in the UK, but in the Far East. In their recent From the Top Interview with Pinkbike, Hope founder, Ian Weatherill explained that, "We've changed the rims quite dramatically. We’re already selling someone else’s rims that were made over in the Far East anyway - like Stan's rims - so we might as well have our own. Actually, our rims are improved on those and actually better."




Construction

We tested the burlier Tech Enduro wheelset - which are designed to stand up to the rigors of what Hope describe as "enduro" racing and riding. In other words, they are intended to be tough, reliable wheels, but lighter than a set of full-blown DH wheels (Hope don't offer the rear wheel with the 150mm spacing for a DH bike). They are available in 26, 27.5 and 29" diameters, with an internal width of 23mm that stays consistent between the three sizes. The rims are made of 6061 T6 aluminium and are welded and eyeleted. Inside the rim is a triple cavity construction that Hope says helps make them incredibly tough - in the simplest terms, there are two walls within the rim itself, dividing the interior into three sections and helping to support the outer structure. 32 well-proven Sapim Race spokes connect the rim to the hubs. And those hubs... Many of you won't need an introduction to the Hope Pro II Evo; if you do the headlines are: Reliable, nicely machined and a decent weight. The front and rear can be configured to virtually any axle combination you can think of within the realms of standard hub spacing, the freehub uses their distinctive machine gun-sounding 4 pawl system and you can choose either standard lacing or straight pull for the spokes. The 27.5" version we tested weighed in at 923g for the front and 1061g at the rear with straight-pull spokes. Going down to 26" saves you around 20g per wheel and up to 29" adds around 40g per wheel.
Details:

• Purpose: Trail/all-mountain/enduro
• Material: Aluminium rim and spokes
• Diameters available: 26", 27.5" and 29"
• Axle options: 9/15/20mm (front); 135x10mm/135x12mm/135x10mm bolt-in/142x12mm (rear)
• Width: 23mm internal
• Spokes: 32 Sapim Race spokes, front and rear
• Tubless: UST compatible
• Weight wheels only: 923g (front) 1061g (rear), 27.5" rim/straight pull spokes
• MSRP: $606.48
• Availability: Now
• Contact: Hope Technology

On The Trail

These wheels saw some serious abuse during our time on them. Mounted to a 160mm bike, over the three months they were tested they spent a week in the French Alps on the lifts, alond with the six day Trans-Savoie stage race and a three week stint in Whistler, where they took in everything from the bike park to all day missions.

There s nothing particularly revolutionary about Hope hubs - they re just the bicycle hub refined to a point close to perfection.
  There's nothing particularly revolutionary about Hope hubs - they're just the bicycle hub, refined over the years to a point close to perfection.

There is little to report on setup for these - we mounted them tubeless and had no problems getting the tires seated. However, the rim strips that come with them proved to be less than durable and needed replacing fairly quickly as it shifted out of place and started leaking air. What was impressive was how well the wheels held air, and even at low pressures we couldn't get them to burp. It is also worth mentioning how easily you can switch axle configurations on these - you can pop them apart and change them in a matter of minutes. Also, on the "How easy are they to live with stakes?" the fact that they are a regular set of wheels, with regular spokes, means you should be able to go into any bike shop to replace spokes if you damage them.

We're not going to say too much about the hubs themselves here, because the Hope Pro II has been around for a long time now and has been refined to a high art. The sealing is top-notch stuff as they are designed to thrive in the deep mud of the British winter. Maybe they don't have quite the elegance of Chris King or the high end DT Swiss offerings, but they are beautifully machined with a definite solid, well-made feel to the engagement - and you're going to be left with quite a lot more money in your bank account. They don't require much maintenance and when they do it's eminently simple for anyone to do at home with a basic set of tools. One thing worth thinking about with Hope hubs is how quiet you like your bike. We tend to be big fans of the distinctive machine rattle that comes from Hope freehubs, but appreciate that not everyone is so inclined.

Again at the rim they are simple but Hope have been meticulous in their approach to making sure they are in their eyes done correctly. One of the biggest differences between these and the Stans Flow rims they are influenced by is the eyelets on the spoke. While this may add some weight Hope feel that the extra reliablity justifies the weight.
  Again at the rim they are simple, but Hope have been meticulous in their approach to making sure they are, in their eyes, done correctly. One of the biggest differences between these and the Stan's Flow rims they are influenced by is the eyelets on the spoke. While this may add some weight, Hope feel that the extra reliability justifies this.

For the uphill portion of the ride it is hard to talk about these rims without mentioning the weight. At nearly 2kg they certainly aren't featherweights - most enduro racers run wheels that weigh around the 1700g mark (for 27.5"), some 2-300g lighter than the Tech Enduros. That certainly makes a difference to how light your bike will feel and how easy it is to put the power down. So when you look at the word "enduro" that these are marketed for, you need to have a think about what that means for you and where you ride. That extra weight has been put to use though, and on the downhill-oriented durability scales they score very highly indeed. Throughout our time with them we couldn't dent or bend them, no matter how hard we tried. On a race like the Trans-Savoie you are racing tired on fast, rocky terrain, so subtlety and finesse go right out of the window and your bike takes one hell of a beating. Even a whole week of that kind of extreme abuse didn't phase the rims, and after quick check round with the spoke key after and they were ready for the next adventure.

Issues

While they were undoubtedly impressive on the durability front, they did need a little attention to keep them true. Fairly on in our time with them they did lose a noticeable amount of spoke tension. After that it was like any set of wheels, you just need to the occasional turn of the spoke key to keep things sweet.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotes"Strong, light, cheap - pick two." That old adage rings as true as ever with these wheels. When you put these alongside many of the factory wheelsets that offer similar levels of durability, the Hope Tech Enduro wheelset is around 200g heavier, but you come away with an extra $400 left in your wallet - so the question is one of priorities. If you're a rider looking for a reasonably-priced set of wheels that will stand up to a world of abuse and don't spend time counting the grams, then these are a great option for sure. What's more, the heart of these wheels, the hubs, are more or less a masterpiece and it's hard to rationalize buying a more expensive hub, especially in the UK where they have always been several hundred pounds cheaper than their high-end competition. Easily serviceable and reliable as a clock, we know many riders who take Hope hubs through multiple bikes and rims, so if you decide you want a higher-end rim down the line you have a solid, adaptable base to build from. - Matt Wragg


www.hopetech.com


129 Comments

  • + 73
 Huge thumbs-up to Hope for their "Classic" wheel building! They took a great hub, used a solid rim, used normal spokes, used normal nipples, and built a SOLID wheel. Sooo many companies get only 3 of 4 of those right, at best. For example: Specialized Roval Traverse: Good rim, good hub, Normal nipples, Straight-pull spokes and 16/8, 24 hole, radial/two-cross lacing, WTF?!?! You blow a spoke or ding a rim and you're lucky to find a Specialized dealer that even knows how to order what you need.... Just a guess, but I'll bet 4 out of 5 bikes shops in my town have a Black DT Swiss Champion 274's in stock for $1.50... I'll bet the only Specialized dealer in town wouldn't even have those spokes, and CERTAINLY wouldn't have a spare rim. (Hint: I know that because I work there, but we do have about 100 DT 274's in stock.)
  • + 1
 Lol you're my hero because I've already broken something like 10 of these shitty things. Now I have a big stock to repair my wheels ...
  • + 28
 These rims really got my hopes up
  • + 9
 Another tup for easily available parts, with so many new "standards" I was begining to loose my bearings.
  • - 22
flag tjet (Dec 24, 2014 at 5:02) (Below Threshold)
 Wow, enduro wheels...
  • - 3
 Tell me someone where to get a not expensive casette on the spider for all 8-9-10 cogs ?
'Cause alloy freehub will die soon under heavy loads of independent steel cogs.
  • + 4
 Hope will put a steel cassette on your hope hoops if you ask when buying its no extra cost, then you can run any cassette and the pawls have a nice solid base that lasts longer
  • - 5
flag bikecustomizer (Dec 24, 2014 at 11:51) (Below Threshold)
 Oh, yeah, Hope will for sure.
I think you mean steel freehub ?
But then the weight will increase.

Actually, It is not only about HOPE hubs. I have other brand also with 7075T6 freehub and they don't provide steel freehubs option.
But actually I do not need steel freehub.
I need lightweight alloy freehub and a all-10-cogs-on-spider casette for affordable price.
I can't find anything besides that CNC machined of solid alloy cassettes for 150-300 bucks. Just unreachable.

While if to set some shimano with only 5-6 cogs on spider the rest 4 small cogs will chew-in the alloy freehub in their contact places.
There is some ideas on the net about to insert steel strips between the cogs ang freehub but it is of a somewhat ugly DIY...not right.
  • + 2
 The steel strips would be your best option fella, though if your wondering American classics hubs come with an alloy freehub body with the steel strips prefitted
  • - 5
flag bikecustomizer (Dec 24, 2014 at 12:03) (Below Threshold)
 Are you putting me on? Smile
Yep, I know Am classic and it's steel strips. I even think abpout to make this by myself on my hub. It is not easy, however.
The best would be cassette option without any too crazy modification.
  • + 4
 the best options are 1: cough up the dough and buy a cassette thats not a heap of shit or 2: buy wheels that have steel freehub bodies. It really is that simple. An XT cassette isnt that expensive and has many of the cogs on an alu carrier. The small cogs that arent on the carriers have much less leverage anyway so they do very minimal damage to the splines.
  • + 1
 The small cogs still dig on a hell of a lot, and steel is the only way for me, secondly it also helps stop problems like the freehub body snapping/cracking and the pawls digging into the body and becoming loose.
  • - 4
flag bikecustomizer (Dec 25, 2014 at 1:51) (Below Threshold)
 @D-Owen
Yep, I know about XT-casette. But only 5-6 cogs on spider.
Leverage is less then of big cogs but the forces applied mostly is a lot higher , isn't it ?

@ dezmtber
>The small cogs still dig on a hell of a lot.
Truth.
There are already a marks on my other steel freehub wheels. So I just imagine what will be with my alloy freehub wheel.
I climb a lot.

Seems the two options:
- cough up the dough - an expensive one
- steel freehub - a cheaper one, but where to get the steel...they only make an alloy for now. May be other brand hub will suite.Need to investigate.
( It is cheaper to buy yet one same rear hub )

Bad options actually. Frown
Seems an alloy freehubs are only for that who just rolling down the hill.
  • + 2
 Buy the hope hub with steel freehub, you wont regret this ever, you can run deore cassettes, and if your a really heavy climber then like me you have plenty of power to overcome a few grams extra cassette and freewheel, and then drivetrains that last very little time with the incredible chain stretch that comes with stong riders wont matter as much as if you were running £100 cassettes.
  • + 29
 Actually, 23mm is my preferred internal width actually.
  • + 77
 Any more than that makes your eyes water.
  • + 5
 That made me laugh pretty good
  • + 10
 @bigburd. You win this thread!
  • + 22
 Loving hope and spank right now for making good wheelsets at amazing prices. Now to decided between the two...
  • + 12
 im running hope hubs and spank rims.mean as
  • + 0
 Just installed a set of spank Oozy Evo on my stumpy a week ago.
I am pretty happy. Rims are strong, they roll way faster than my previous set of wheels (rovals with Hope hubs).
Something else i felt is that my bike is more robust? Why? I dont know yet.
..it doesnt wable anymore...and i feel more xonfident.
The only downside is that the spank are not tubelss ready, but they are tubeless compatible.
if price is your problem i would go for the spank.
Oh i forgot...the freewheel bearing noise is load and beautiful
  • + 4
 ive got hope 2 evos laced to oozy 295 bead bites. performance wise its great, light, stiff, but durability, not so much, on my first ride i put a dent in the side of the rear rim, right next to the S of spank, and ive flat spotted them a few times, but i think that was because my rear tyre might have a slow leak and i was running it at too low a pressure i wouldnt recommend the oozy 295 as a rear rim, perfect as a front one though. if i could do it again, id go with the same hubs but wtb i25s KOMs or mavix EN821s or 823, dont remember
  • + 3
 I'm on Spank race 28 enduro totally awesome wheels.
  • + 1
 Hope hubs, spank rims, you can't go wrong. Hubs last forever through multiple bikes and axle fads. Rims are cheap and strong as hell for the weight.
  • + 13
 hope hubs mavic rims
  • + 5
 whitebullit knows whats up
  • + 1
 I flat spotted the bejeezus out of an ozy evo rim this fall for no particularly good reason. Not as durable as people seem to think.
  • + 1
 @tinfoil @GumptionZA What type of riding were you doing with the oozy's. They are a light trail rim. All the rumors of their strength lead people to think they can huck to flat on them and they will be ok. Thats what the race28 or subrosa's are for.
  • - 1
 XC riding. I drifted into a catcher berm at pace with 40psi in my tire. There was a rock in the berm that I must have hit but it knocked it way out of true and put a huge flat spot in it. There was also play in the hub from the beginning. I'm definitely not easy on wheels but this was a pretty mellow rip and I didn't make a mistake or even leave the ground. Not impressed.
  • + 7
 well maybe if you had a little give in the tire it would help... 40psi is crazy. i dont even run 40 psi in my car tires..
  • + 1
 ^this
  • + 0
 I'm not certain you understand how tires work. Or, for that matter, bicycles.
  • + 0
 I think you must be speaking of yourself. 40 psi is absurdly high. At that pressure your ride will be harsh because your tire is deflecting off of objects rather than having compliance. You will also have less grip. It's been proven that lower tire pressure for a mtb will increase grip and have lower rolling resistance. Hence why people like to run a tubeless set up in order to run lower tire pressure than a tube set up. Even running tubes max psi is around 35. You sir need to re-educate yourself on Mountain biking 101.
  • + 2
 You're absolutely correct, but your points have nothing to do with the conversation about rim integrity. The idea that running too high a pressure (and one that is well within the realm of what mtb wheel systems are designed for) will make more of a difference to the rim than rider weight, riding style, trail features, frame design, suspension setup or tire choice is pretty ludicrous.

For the record, I threw some extra pressure into my tubed setup because I was in the mood for a longer ride and I connected two riding areas with a decent amount of pavement, where lower pressure does not equal lower rolling resistance. My experience with the rims has not been good. They aren't what I hoped they would be and I don't think my expectations were unreasonable.
  • + 1
 ok i didnt read that last bit.

i do fairly heavy trail riding, think ztr flow before ztr arch kind of thing.

i at the time of most if not all of my flat spots, putting the slow leak i think i might have in my read tyre into account, id say probably 1 bar.

there are also multiple dents in the side of the rim, heres the link to a pic of the biggest one:
media.thehubsa.co.za/forum/uploads/monthly_12_2014/post-60584-0-95705600-1418470567.jpg

tyre is a rock razor with a super gravity casing
  • + 1
 I've used stan's flow and spike race 28s for the past 3 or 4 years, which are the same size and weight. The stan's are soft in comparison. Same rider, bike, tyres, and tracks... my stan's rims are rooted. Those oozy rims are a hundred grams lighter though I think. I run 80psi on my stp at the skate park with wtb rims and no problems
  • + 1
 @Tinfoil, you need to remember everyone on pinkbike is a DH god. No one rides anything other than 26" DH bikes

40 psi isn't obsurd. I run 38 on my 29er XC with racekings. Prevents sidewall squirm and makes the bike more predictable while sliding. Also nice because I ride my MTB to the canyon. (5 or so miles)
  • + 11
 only an extra 200g? I eat t-bone steaks that are heavier than that!
  • + 18
 If i don't put mayo in my sandwiches before i pack em into my Camel i save 200g.
  • + 3
 Switch to hot sauce. Weighs less and tastes better!
  • + 3
 if i were to take a HUGE dump before riding, you're looking at like 1 1/2 kilo's hahaha
  • + 10
 K.I.S.S. Thanks Hope for making a simple wheelset that works well. Salute
  • + 6
 23mm is narrower than most new rims targeted at the enduro market. It would have been interesting to hear Hope's reasons for not jumping on the wider-is-better bandwagon.
  • + 1
 Whenever I am a looking at the shape of the Schwalbe 2.35 tyres on my rims with 27mm internal width I feel that this is max. I think it depends vastly on the sidewall stiffness of the tyre. I have nothing to support that argument, history will judge.
  • + 1
 I have the Lightbike 33mm internal width rim with Conti trail king protection tires. they have a thick side wall. I was running 11psi in my front the other day. I usually run arouund 14 psi. in the front and 22 in the rear. Soft and Tubeless
  • + 1
 PS on Hope EVO pro2's
  • + 3
 another Hope 2 Evo happy customer. going on a few years now on 2 different bikes. had CK's before this, and while super nice... they need adjustment and maintenance if you look at them wrong. the Hopes have never skipped a beat and hardly ever need to even be touched. love em'
  • + 2
 Hope Pro2 Evo, Wheelsmith double butted, WTB i23, hand built by LBS for $550US. Horsewhipped for 1500 miles and 130000 feet ascent/descent this year. Not once has a spoke key touched them. Nothing magic about it; simple, quality parts, built by a skilled human.
  • + 5
 I'd be mighty impressed if these hopes were actually better than stan's rims as they claim.
  • + 6
 considering the fact that they are eyeleted and quite a bit deeper i would bet they are. That and in all honesty Stans rims are nothing that great. I have been a wheel-smith for 5 years and have never been impressed with any pair i have seen. Other than the fact that they are very light. They are very flexy and have hardly any depth to the interface that the bead of the tire grabs, which makes it so you cant run a pressure any more than about 35 without fear of blowing the bead of the tire. Not saying they are terrible but they but they don't live up to the hype that surrounds them in my opinion. I am positive that a company like Hope can greatly improve upon a rim that may be good, but does have allot of flaws.
  • + 1
 Totally agree. Same experience with Stan's arch EX 27.5. Wheels needed to be trued again just after putting the tire under pressure. Impossible to run below 1.7 bar without burping for a 80 kg rider.
  • + 1
 Been on flow 26"/hope combo for 3 years now (with tubes). The stans are a little flexy but they've held very well to the punishment. Only problem I've had so far was a flatspot on the rear, but I got it by landing slightly short on a 40' jump so I'll let that one slide, user error. Haven't had to true them much. Honestly, for the price/weight, I've found the value extremely hard to beat and I was probably going to replace my flows with flows ex when the time come, until now... Just not too sure about the 23mm width after all that wide rim hype.

TL;DR: not perfect but for 600$, they performed far beyond expectations.
  • + 1
 .agreed-stan's aren't all that. the arch ex was a stock item on my i9's, not that impressed. some tires work great, others not so much. i9 is now making it's own rims. the hope hubs are nice, and standard parts are a plus for many people. reasonably priced too. putting eyelets on the rims probably accounts for a lot of the 200gram weight difference between hope and dt swiss et al. eyelets improve strength, and in my experience, makes wheel building and truing less of a hassle.
  • + 4
 eyelets are for machine building, given that they loose trueness right after first rides tell the truth: bad machine building.
A lot of quality rims do not use eyelet at all and do not suffers from failure from absence of it.

I think it's a pity for hope builing wheel like these, it can ruins their reputaton: heavy machine built wheels that loose trueness fast, and not cheap.
  • + 2
 Stop and think about hard brass hard coated in chrome, being forced hard against soft alloy and not against hopes hard steel eyelets nicely riveted to the soft alloy as rims should be made. I remember only a few years ago halo rims being slated for having no eyelets in combat rims how is this any different to what stans rims are and a lot of other new rims
  • + 1
 I've got over 3k miles on my Arch EX 29" set and they have been awesome. They are indeed a little flexy though, but they have kept me happy.
  • + 1
 I've blown a few vee rubber tires off my stan's arch ex's, haven't had a problem with contis or schwalbes.

Pitty, as I liked the vees for the cost/performance. If these allow the cheaper tires to not blow off, I'd be all about them.
  • + 1
 Just picked up a new set of these with the pro 4 hub and steel free hub, WTB 26mm tubeless tape and Stans valve took about 3 minutes a wheel to make tubeless and a Maguc Mary & Nobby Nik inflated and held air immediately so pleased with the easy tubeless conversion.
  • + 1
 Had a set of hope hoops before some of the worst rims I've ever had! Not tightened properly and after riding some bog standard rims for years which came as stock on my bike I "upgraded"and within the week they had buckled into unrideable condition!!
  • + 1
 Hope hoops were built with 3rd party rims. Most likely was builder error.
  • + 2
 I agree the build quality of hope hoops is not particularly good, in terms of spoke tension balance and lateral/vertical trueness.

In a previous job our company distributed stan's into the UK for 8 years. As a MTB specialist we did lots of custom wheel builds. Common choice for all mountain bike was hope pro ii hubs on Stan's flow rims in 26". We never had issues with our builds, and customers satisfied. We built a good reputation. However we were not very profitable, as wheel building is a competitive market, we had to price our wheels competitively, and DT Swiss almost doubled the cost on their spokes/nipples.

A decision was made to start stocking the hoops complete wheels, which we could sell out of a box = more profit. Easy, but the wheels often required reworking before sale, or within a couple of weeks from new, which cost us time/money.

Last set of hoops I bought for my road bike required some serious time to put right out of the box. I don't claim to be the best wheel builder in the world, but I've built close to 500 pairs of wheels with many satisfied customers and use a park spoke tension meter so I know when things are not right.

Building factory wheels is tricky to get right, as the first casualty of cost is time spent, and reduced quality control. This is not specific to hoops, but many OE wheels on complete bikes are shockingly bad, problem with hoops is we are not talking OE pricing. Really tricky to produce a competitively priced domestically built wheel set. I admire hope as a company and they do make some great stuff, but wheels?
  • + 1
 I have been running these on my giant reign 1 27.5 Using Conti trail king pro apex 2.4 tyres, 18 psi front 22 rear, no pinches no burps no dings even though I have felt a hell of a lot of rock edges. I would highly recommend them with the steel freehub body also if your looking to buy a wheelset to outlast any other buy quite a few years, I am looking to use these for the next 3-5 years with basic maintenance and bearing replacements.
  • + 1
 I've had a set of hope pro 2 for a few years and have had the freehub warrantied twice. I'm thinking if I keep the wheels I'll get the steel one, cause from my experience the aluminum body sucks. I'm hoping mine's a lemon, cause Hope as always struck me as a company just trying to make some quality low-gimmick stuff, and I really appreciate that their new wheels keep funny spokes etc. to a minimum.
  • + 1
 I have had these wheels for 4 months now, wouldn't say they were that cheap in the long run after conversion kit, rim tape etc. Awesome wheels though feel very sturdy. The hubs speak for themselves!
  • + 1
 Prices have come down though since about 6 months ago, I paid £390 for my Hope tech enduro SP 27.5 wheelset 6 months ago but now I have seen them for around £310 for a f&r wheelset in any of the 3 sizes which is an absolute bargain. Also they now do the SP hubs in colours instead of just the black only option like when I bought mine I could only choose black in SP hubs. They're great wheels, run mine with tubes though.
  • + 0
 A wheel is no better than how it's built. I don't care how good the hubs or rims are: if it's some crap machine build (not that all machine made wheels are crap) then you're gonna be in hell.

which is the case with my current hope pro evo 2 and Stan's Crest. piece of junk that needs to be rebuilt.
  • + 2
 I struggle to see how these are better than the Hope/Stans Flow combo. Better for Hope because they take more margin, sure.
  • + 2
 Interesting that you list the weight with straight pull spokes, but you review a wheelset with regular j-bend ones.
  • + 3
 these wheels are a bity heavy for enduro
  • + 2
 Anyone know if you can buy just these rims? If there cheaper than Stan's stuff I'd consider getting one...
  • + 3
 Love the Hubs, but wow those wheelsets are heaaaaavy....
  • + 6
 The Hope riders were burping air a lot using the Stans Flow rims so Hope decided to develope their own rims instead. Hence the Enduro rim which eliminated the problem.
  • + 3
 meh...always feel like it kinda gets lost in translation when u put a couple of 1000+ grams tires on em with yer choice of tube/sealant. prob just me.
  • + 4
 More like they were selling a lot of Stan's rims so thought they would make more money with their own...
  • + 0
 No mate . Got some genuine inside info on that one. Hope don't actually make their own rims they just designed them put then together.
  • + 1
 just saying, after a year of riding the whistler bike park, my stans' on pro2 evo's, are still true as the day I had them built, best investment I made.
  • + 2
 I got negative props. Yeeeees!!!!! Merry Christmas
  • + 1
 i stopped reading at "Hope don't offer "

hope doesn't offer . please do not destroy the kings English
  • + 5
 "Queen's English" surely?
  • + 5
 the more I am exposed to British magazines, the more I see them referring to companies as if they were plural, i.e. "Hope have" or "Hope do not", rather than "Hope has" or "Hope does not". It's making its way to North America it seems.
  • + 2
 COLLECTIVE NOUNS GOT EM LIKE HUH
  • + 1
 the problem is there target audience have deeper pockets and expect a lighter product.
  • + 1
 Nah, lots of people ride stans on hopes, which come at around the same price and weight (compared to flows, as this is an enduro wheelset). Stan's are good but not perfect and the main criticism is that they usually are a little flimsy so these will appeal to a lot of people.
  • + 2
 Running these on my Sultan...sweet as so far...
  • + 2
 I wonder how flexy they are as a 29er wheel
  • + 3
 Take my money
  • + 1
 Somebody had better pinch me with that price tag!
  • + 0
 I see the Christmas comment deleting fairy is up to her old tricks again !!!
  • + 1
 I run these wheels on my Newmad... Can't fault them for the price! Wink
  • + 1
 I wonder who makes Hope rims, they look similar to Mavic EN423...
  • + 1
 Except these are welded instead of Mavics pinned..
  • + 1
 I'm gonna gave a guess and say Sun Ringle ... just a guess
  • + 1
 Not double wall triple wall, there's the difference.
  • + 1
 Do you mean the triple cavity?, the 2015 Mavic EN423 is the same design...Thats why I said they look similar, the shape looks the same plus both use silver eyelets, same 23mm internal width and same aluminium series, but could just be a coincidence...
  • + 1
 I have a question for Pinkbike, have you seen a Hope 150mm SP rear hub?
  • + 1
 They don't make a 150mm SP hub, only in 26" j bend.
  • + 1
 @silverfish1974 I know. I assume the 150mm SP is new when I saw part no. Hub 136 in the PDF by Hope.
  • + 0
 It's unfortunate they are not producing 150x12 rear wheel. Mine is Pro II Evo laced on ZTR Flow EX. F.L.A.W.L.E.S.S
  • + 2
 Dear santa....
  • + 1
 I've got the hope hubs on my flow rims on my spartan carbon, love them !!
  • + 2
 Hope carbon rims?
  • + 1
 Let's hope not. (Excuse the pun)
  • + 1
 ^^^and it's basically new. bah!!!
  • + 0
 HOPE the rims are as good as they're hubs Wink
  • - 1
 *their. I Hope some good humored folks help keep this pun train rollin down the singletrack(s)!
  • - 1
 unless you buy these wheels...all Hope will be lost!
  • + 1
 BOOOOO!!!
  • + 1
 so disappointed haha
  • + 1
 Hope for life!
  • + 0
 Doesn't anyone check their grammar and punctuation anymore?
  • + 6
 That is what I was thinking.
  • + 4
 Painful to read that's for sure. So many errors!
  • + 1
 grammar nazis
  • + 1
 ...so maybe they had Thier Christmas Party and thought, a let´s post something :-)
  • + 1
 Being able to spell stuff correctly is not cool anymore. Kids prefer to talk using no vowels instead... bruv.
  • + 1
 Nothing can stop the raise of Intiglish - the stiff upper lip shall tremble!
  • + 2
 Dat spellin' tho
  • + 0
 ...
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