Huhn Cycles Unveils Additive Manufactured Steel '4X/Enduro' Hardtail

Feb 9, 2021
by James Smurthwaite  
Photos: Madeleine Burkhardt

Ralf Holleis and his Huhn Cycles brand shot to prominence last year when he built his 3D printed Moorhuhn frames for the European Bike Challenge. Using additive manufacturing, he connected steel (and later titanium) tubes with 3-D printed lugs to create full-suspension frames with silhouettes simply not possible with traditional tubes-joined-to-tubes construction.

His work picked up plenty of fans and one of them has now commissioned him to design a custom hardtail that combines additive manufacturing with traditional bike building methods.
Details

Frame Material: steel (Reynolds 853/ 316L)
Intended Use: 4X/Enduro
Travel: 130mm
Wheelsize: 27.5"
Head Tube Angle:64° (static)
Seat Tube Angle: 72° (static)
Size: Custom
Price: €2,400 (custom geo plus 2 colour paint)
More info: huhncycles.com


The result is La Fleche (The Arrow) a short travel, hardcore hardtail that is designed for trails, pumptracks and bike park riding - we'd call it hardcountry or downcore but we can't decide which portmanteau is more painful so we'll stick with the wordier description for now.

Ralf had been hoping to build a hardtail for a while so was delighted when the former 4X racer customer contacted him. The wheel size and travel were set by the customer and then Ralf sat down with him to discuss the geometry that would best fit his specification. They settled on a 64° head tube angle, 72° seat tube angle and reach of 453mm. Of course, this is at static and the bike will steepen up when it is sagged

Whereas most of the joints were 3D printed on Ralf's other projects, on this bike only the seatube junction and headtube use that method, the rest of the bike is fillet brazed. Ralf says that these two areas make the biggest difference in terms of strength and they allow him to create a more swoopy aesthetic.

The lugs on this bike sit at the seat tube junction and for the head tube for strength and aesthetic reasons.

For the full build, the customer fitted the bike with a 130mm RockShox Pike, a SRAM XX1 groupset and a Magura Vyron wireless seatpost.

The Huhn feather graphics return on this hardtail frame

Ralf is taking more custom orders at the moment although there is currently a five-month waiting list for a frame. The frame with custom geometry and 2 colour paint comes in at €2,400 with an €800 deposit.


170 Comments

  • 167 0
 hardcountry, downcore, you know its getting good when bikes sound like niche music genres
  • 55 0
 This bike is perfect for a good trail mosh or gnar dive.
  • 65 0
 I‘m looking forward to technical death downhill
  • 12 1
 its all about the progressive.
  • 26 1
 I'm guessing Cushcore is too mainstream now?
  • 22 0
 Hardcountry is my new favorite riding genre! I shall preach it nonstop while on my hardtail.
  • 12 1
 air hardened metal is all the rage in 2022.... maybe blink 853 for some of the ladies Wink
  • 13 4
 @MTBrent: pick a riding genre and be a dick about it.
  • 6 0
 Shred against the machine.......shredcore for life!
  • 3 0
 Harduro...?
  • 1 1
 Is downcore straight edge ? Does it have enough pop ?
Does free-improv ridding style work well with hardcountry?
  • 1 1
 If bikes were musical instruments, then the hardcore hardtail should be Jimi Hendrix’s Fender Stratocaster....sooo much feedback...... shhrrriiieeeekkkkkk!!!!!
  • 2 0
 Black Metal Mullet Downhill/Freeride is so next year.
  • 2 0
 I am waiting for an atmospheric cosmic blackened doom metal bike to be released for pre-orders.
  • 58 3
 Sooooo can someone explain to me why they would use additive manufacturing here instead of just welding the steel tubes together for reasons other than aesthetics and getting to claim that they used additive manufacturing?
  • 21 2
 I think you just explained it yourself. It sounds and looks cool. Also it could save production costs in the long run and reduce wasted material.
  • 18 0
 AM is a hot ticket to win office bingo in many companies
  • 24 2
 Because inventing new ways of doing things is the mark of a species that evolve. If it wasn't for invention we'd still be unwashed, unshaven, and using a club to the head to get the ladies back to our cave.
  • 13 0
 @Pamlico: reminds me of a billboard I saw in sanfransisco that just had the words “5G” “blockchain” “AI” “IOT” and a company name on it
  • 19 2
 I work for an orthopedic implant manufacturer (no I won't tell you which one) and some of the engineers I've spoken to about additive titanium manufacturing mention that they're finding those parts to be significantly stronger than their traditionally machined counterparts.

This seems to carry over into stainless as well if this article is anything to go by www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/10/3d-printing-doubles-strength-stainless-steel (cited article here www.nature.com/articles/nmat5021)

And I remember reading somewhere that some materials scientists in Texas were successful in developing a technique for making the "strongest" steel in an additive machine, I don't remember what their parameter for "strong" was.

I know that a weld is not necessarily a failure point, if done correctly. But those are QC points and that means they're inherently prone to human error - before, during, and after welding.
  • 50 0
 @CASCAN: which orthopedic implant manufacturer though???
  • 9 2
 @imnotdanny: Tubes and welding are pretty low waste. Most of the powder bed fusion printers that Im aware of have a reasonable amount of waste as you cant re use all of the powder. Also the prices are still eye wateringly high. The last parts I had quoted for printing that were actually very similar to a head tube, were around 10x the cost of getting them investment cast in a prototype process. Strength was higher and tolerances better for the printed parts though. You can do some rad stuff with printers, but I'm really not crazy about metal printed parts unless its for prototyped stuff or you're making some crazy low volume high priced stuff (like most of these frames). Its cool but its just not a process that scales well.
  • 1 0
 @tbev: I was thinking more compared to machined parts. You might be able to melt down and reuse those shavings though, which theoretically makes them zero-waste. I don't really know a whole lot about this though, I was just speculating. It is interesting how much stronger they are though.
  • 8 0
 The 'because I can,' factor is strong with this one. To be fair if he can make it look like that who are we to tell him no?
  • 4 2
 @CASCAN: so you need to melt the metal, spray it to create small balls, cool them, heat them up with lasers, cool them fast (not sure how they are doing this because e.g. gas cooling is not possible) and continue. And dont forget that you need to do all of that in an inert atmosphere.

sound REALLY inefficent. normal 3d printed metal parts are around 20% weaker than cnc cut parts, do to delamination or cracking
  • 12 2
 Because if they don’t used 3D printing it would cost $500 instead of 2400 Euro...
  • 4 0
 I want to know when we'll have die-cast frames.
  • 2 0
 @Bloodshot0: wow it's crazy how much bikes have changed in 11 1/2 years
  • 2 0
 @A-HIGHLY-EDUCATED-PROFESSIONAL: try Google Kirk Revolution
  • 1 0
 @Pamlico: I'm interested Smile
Tell me which ones!
  • 1 0
 @tbev: Making AM for aestetic or prototypes reasons is a good starting point but not cost efficient (especially on BtoC market). Doing AM because traditional processes are technically not sufficiant is better. I've never seen very interesting innovation in bike industry using metal AM except internal lattice structures. But, you cannot connect by welding the "innovative" lug with standard tubes for lattice continuity. Kinazo design made a full Ebike using one of the bigger AM machine and .... no innovation...

ttps://manufactur3dmag.com/slovakian-firm-uses-3d-printing-design-custom-electric-mountain-bikes/

Reduce manufacturing time, doing some custom geometry, give carbone frame design to steel/Ti frames are concrete benefits but not enough to make a real innovative scalable production.
  • 2 0
 @Bloodshot0: Totally agree about the inefficient whole process of AM starting from metal ingots to powder then powder to metal part, then heat treatment, then machining ....

About AM mechanical properties, we talk about bikes frames and not aircraft landing gear. Even if mechanical sollicitation are huge (especially when you are fat Smile ), the mechanical properties are sufficient. Atherton guys ride ther Hard line with AM + carbon frames. I have more worries about the glue they use than the titanium AM parts...
  • 2 2
 @BostonMullit: "using a club to the head to get the ladies back to our cave."

don't kink shame your mom!
  • 1 0
 @benpinnick: wasn't that the magnesium one? What a blast from the past.
  • 3 2
 @mariomtblt: he can’t say, but the rumor is that he works in the cock extension department
  • 8 1
 @rbarbier12
Of course we can :-)
If you use the additive manufacturing like @CASCAN said, the additive manufacturing steel can be stronger than traditional tube-to-tube welding systems. So, the additive manufacturing gives you the possibility to add strength to parts like a heavily loaded headtube. Because of that, we use it.



.... and yes, we like some aesthetic, too! :-)
  • 3 0
 @HUHNcycles: Thanks for the response! As a result of this change in how the headtube, toptube, and downtube are bonded, do you find that the total amount of material in that region of the bike can be reduced?

Btw, absolutely gorgeous bike! Wish you guys the best!
  • 3 0
 @rbarbier12: We wouldn´t describe this decision as a exclusive matter of saving weight. For us this process means that we can take the balance between strength, weight, design and durability to our next level.
Thank you for your feedback !
  • 3 0
 One benefit of printing lugs as opposed to welding tubes together is a larger surface area of the joint and a smoother transition, reducing stress risers. Potentially.
  • 3 0
 @BostonMullit: some girls still like it like that
  • 1 0
 @Chnoux: think global conglomerate, but not the one that did an acquisition of Alstom
  • 1 0
 @jj12jj: BINGO! Don't forget "agile", "synergy", ....
  • 1 1
 @tbev: for the right application it absolutely makes sense, but not sure that bikes are the right application here... on the other hand it is also very intensive development as you are creating new alloys and your deposit rates, temp control etc is critical to successful outcome. To me this bike is drop dead gorgeous but in truth the builder probably did it to prove / show that they could do it, not because it made economical or design sense.
  • 2 0
 @CASCAN: from what I have read, and as my tiny bit of knowledge leads me to believe, you get much smoother grain/consistency in the powdered metals, which makes for a more even and stronger material if nothing else changes. Improved control over the material properties, and the cool shapes that are possible with AM and PMs, just makes sense to go that way.
  • 1 0
 @HUHNcycles: and call me crazy, but a stronger material allows you to build LIGHTER frames if you don't need the added strength of the same material quantity.
  • 1 0
 It can be significantly lighter than welds when done to a high standard. Similar to how a carbon frame's one-piece joinless construction means more strength and therefore weight savings.
  • 1 0
 @HUHNcycles: It looks like you are using 316L for the additive parts and Reynolds 853 for the tubes. How can 316L be stronger than an welded/air hardened 853 fabrication?
  • 1 0
 @SprSonik: good you know the basics. then you should read about cold working/forging and how it changes the properties of steel. You can't to that with 3d printing.

There are a lot of cases where 3d printing is great but not with a simple construction like the BB area of a bike, at least if you want a cost effective process.
  • 1 0
 @Bloodshot0: Pretty much what you said. Foraging and extruding improves properties and can even add strength in anisotropic ways which is awesome for engineered products. 3D printing can have small grain size (can also have a lot of defects that come along with that like kissing bonds) as well as can use a lot of really bad ass materials like Inconel.

At the end of the day though, Huhn is doing some dope looking shit. I dont know that its better from a materials properties sort of way, but they certainly are taking advantage of the printers ability to make nicely surfaced components. If they tried to cast those parts, they'd either be super heavy or they'd have a ton of porosity due to the thin wall nature of things like head tubes. There are some casting methods that would probably allow them to make parts like they have designed here at scale, but holy cow is the tooling expensive.
  • 2 0
 @mariomtblt: He works for ToothTron. It’s right down the road from PenaTrobe and InnoTech...
  • 1 0
 @DirtbagMatt: How'd you find me so quick? Who do you work for?
  • 1 0
 @Bloodshot0: Agree.... for today. Think turbine blades and your right on point. That said, in a few short years I can see it replacing more conventional manufacturing methods that today we think it can't replace in a cost effective manner
  • 48 0
 I'm an XC nerd, but man, that is the best looking bicycle I have ever seen on Pinkbike. Well done, Mr. Holleis.
  • 3 0
 Agreed - as well as being attractive it just screams 'fun' too.
  • 3 0
 Thanks @LeDuke :-)
  • 30 0
 Do we need another enduro hardtail? Not sure. Do we need more 4x? Heck yes!
  • 5 5
 I don't even know what the hell an "Enduro Hardtail" is. Its like calling a beer a "Session IPA." They are contradictory categories smashed together by some marketing wanker.
  • 5 11
flag noone1223 (Feb 9, 2021 at 16:45) (Below Threshold)
 @tgrummon: IMHO, an enduro hardtail needs to have long travel (150mm Minumim). to me, this is still a XC bike
  • 2 0
 @noone1223: One hell of an XC bike that you would ride though, right?! Or if we are going to get really sticky about it, a trail/all mountain bike.
  • 3 8
flag Hiben (Feb 9, 2021 at 21:40) (Below Threshold)
 if ur spending this much, there is no reason to buy a hardtail (excluding dirt jumpers)
  • 1 0
 @tgrummon: Delicious though
  • 2 1
 @tgrummon: Nothing contradictory about Enduro and Hardtail.
  • 28 0
 So if the La Fleche was made of Ti, it would be La Fleche Light??
  • 4 0
 Dammit! Beat me to it (so to speak).
  • 1 1
 La Fleche léger?
  • 2 0
 @MattN: found the Quebecoise!
  • 3 0
 @mammal we should think about that ;-D
  • 14 2
 Damn, only $3692.60 Canadian for a steel frame. I think I found out where my Reynolds 853 tubing went. Lol. To the highest bidder.
  • 1 5
flag gorideyourbikeman (Feb 9, 2021 at 14:31) (Below Threshold)
 like no one asked for this lol.
  • 7 0
 With a little savvy shopping that money would buy the tubing, small parts, notcher, frame jig and TIG welder.
  • 2 0
 @Andykmn: Don’t forget the Paterek frame manual.
  • 2 0
 @Andykmn: Then you can call it a thriftcountry bike too, for extra points.
  • 1 0
 @gorideyourbikeman: well, if you read the story, someone definitely asked for it!
  • 1 0
 @conoat: fair enough.
  • 13 2
 enduro not cool anymore
time to bring back 4X tracks, Cedric Gracia's backflips, and Blur 4X back from the dead
#Make26GreatAgain
  • 4 0
 One of the best looking ht's I've seen on PB. Colour is beautiful too. Of course it's a boutique frame at this price and nowhere near most people's budget, but that doesn't change how good it looks. To you guys that wonder what's the purpose of an "enduro" ht... hardtails like this have a huge range of use, can handle almost any trail and make great bikes for exploring new trails. They offer a very playful and connected feel by having a rigid rear, yet allow you to ride silly stuff due to the geo. They are not only meant for smooth surfaces, they are a lot of fun to maneuver on technical terrain. I use mine to explore rocky hiking trails and it's great. As a bonus it's lighter than the equivalent fs, which is nice when I inevitably have to carry it on my bike on unrideable terrain. No it's not faster than a bike with rear suspension but it's a very rewarding ride. Both are great ways to have fun anyway.
  • 7 4
 Man I am still just a loss for why someone would pay that much for a hardtail bike if they're riding enduro. Like if you have several bikes, money for more, and a passion for collecting eccentric rides then sure. But it seems like you sacrifice performance for talking points on these bikes, one way or another.
  • 6 0
 For the same reason, and by the same people that buy $400 leather man-purses.
  • 3 0
 @SlodownU: BINGO!
  • 2 0
 I did spend quite a sum on my hardtail, but most of it went into the wheelset.
  • 4 0
 Darn, with this super short seat tube, and with the saddle slammed down all the way I would even take it to the dirt jumps. Looks like a super allround bike if you're into dirt jumps and trails.
  • 1 3
 Additive manufactured parts are not so strong as forged one due to inconsistent grain structure. There is possibility that it cant handle DJ.
  • 5 0
 How much is the one colour paint option? I feel like the 2 colour paint is what’s pushed it out of my price range.
  • 1 0
 Hi @LDM81 ,
if you want to have one colour or a raw steel / titan look, drop us a message: info@huhncycles.com
  • 1 0
 @HUHNcycles: I would love to see a raw version.
  • 2 0
 Playful 27.5 wheels. Not just a steel frame . A Reynolds 853 frame. I follow these guys on Insta. Armchair engineer bike porn. Going back to innovation and leading the path in tech. The attention to detail is outstanding. We all have our personal taste. This frame melts my heart. Everything Huhn builds is extraordinary.
  • 3 0
 @Sshredder Your feedback melts our heart! Thank you! ;-)
  • 2 0
 the most fun i ever had on a mountain bike was on a new schwinn Cimmaron i bought in the eighties for $450 .
it was a steel frame beast with NO suspension , but was a total blast to ride because i didn't care if i crashed it and stopping
was crap shoot . sometimes you were able to slow down enough to make a sharp curve and sometimes not . Of course the speeds we were traveling were nothing compared to today but thats all we knew and it was super fun.
  • 3 0
 This is what I always used to want when I rode more 4X - a 4X bike that I can take up the woods and screw around on. Hopefully this catches on and 4X can have a bit of a resurgence!
  • 5 0
 Does Huhn mean chicken?
Nice bike.
  • 4 0
 Yes, in German.
  • 2 1
 72 seat angle measured unsagged, while almost all the modern hardtails out there are like 75+, also unsagged. It's annoying how some brands do the sagged measurements or rely on the sag to define the geo. Everyone just measure the unsagged measurement so we can compare apples to apples. The only place I see the benefit of a slacker seattube are on fatbikes or other bikes where you may not want a dropper.
  • 1 0
 That Moots review where everything was listed at sag made my eyes twitch.
  • 2 0
 I don't get sagged geo. When you're climbing your forks are pretty much topped out so its unsagged anyway. And 72 degrees, what's this 2005?
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: glad we are all on the same page here.
  • 2 0
 @mtb-thetown: IIRC Cotic do it as well which bugs me. They do list the geo of their bikes with different fork lengths so you can convert back but its still annoying.
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: They really aren't doing themselves any favours.
  • 5 1
 Been done rode hardtailz fo years. No way Imma give up a soft ass tail fo somma dat hard shit. Dayum!
  • 1 0
 Absolutely beautiful. Sort of reminds me of my Transition Throttle, which is an absolute blast. However, these are not enduro bikes and using it for that purpose is silly. They are fancy hardtails for riding relatively smooth undulating trails at crazy speed by people who just enjoy that style of riding. It's not a budget bike, but an extra bike for someone with an enduro sled that prefers a steady diet of steep rough downhill tracks that not every ride can deliver.
  • 2 0
 True words but Connor Fearon won a local enduro (maybe 2) on his Kona Honzo so that probably makes him silly.
  • 1 0
 @watchtower: I have nothing against riding silly bikes, and actively encourage doing silly things on bikes for fun. Fearon, a master of his craft, was racing against the local boys and wanted to step up the fun and challenge for himself. Good for him. That is some great silliness we should all love. Taking things too seriously is no fun.

He also has a big full squish bike for big mountain riding and serious EWS races. I have no idea how technical those tracks he raced on the HT were, but I bet they were not as rough as most of the EWS tracks.

To me that example really just proves my point. Some experienced riders have bikes like this for fun, but they are not a cheap substitute for a real big mountain bike which is how they are sometimes presented.
  • 1 0
 @HUHNcycles: How does the strength of this type of frame compare to a welded one? Someone else said "Additive manufactured parts are not so strong as forged one due to inconsistent grain structure. There is possibility that it cant handle DJ." That doesn't seem right to me, since the layers are all melted together so grain structure shouldn't matter, but I'd like to hear what you think.
  • 2 0
 How come they didn't dry the water off, I mean, at least finish the detailing ... Nice looking frame, but the price, wowza!
  • 2 2
 full suspension priced hardtails. cool. isn't this like third one this week? Pricing does not have to be a bandwagon. make a fram thats affordable for the demographic looking for them. That would actually be surprising, amazing, and or what your looking to get of us reaction wise and maybe just maybe actually get a amazing hardtail out there.
  • 4 0
 Five-month waiting list; that's fast for 2021!
  • 3 0
 Sexy AF. Looks amazing, Mr. Holleis! Beutiful color, too...
  • 2 0
 Thank you @rosemarywheel ! :-)
  • 3 0
 X7 Derailleur 10 speed wop wop wahhhh hahaha
  • 1 2
 This is a thing of beauty. But hard tail is dead, I've destroyed at least four of them. They just can't handle North Shore steep compressions. 2 snapped head tubes, a crumpled down tube, and a rear stay that actually broke off near the BB. Yes I also broke a Clavicle in one of these wrecks.
  • 2 0
 I'm curious what hardtails these are that you keep snapping.

I suspect you wouldn't break this one.
en.nicolai-bicycles.com/frames/argon-glf
  • 6 0
 You're just way too gnarly for enduro hardtails dude you obviously need a downcore bike.
  • 3 0
 quit buying your bikes at Canadian Tire!??
  • 1 0
 That bike is beautiful. Steepen the Seat Angle by a few degrees and it would be perfect for what I want. Although I do like my 29er HT nowadays. Love it
  • 3 0
 Looks kinda like a DJ
  • 2 0
 totally does eh? especially with that clean cockpit. i ride my DJ as a trial bike from time to time. its really nice having such a rigid setup in a lot circumstances. i could see appeal of a DJ style bike that is designed to be more trail capable.
  • 1 0
 @deepstrut: it would probably be a really good all-arounder
  • 3 2
 Hey PB, the hardtails constantly show travel in the details, but shouldn't that be based on your inseam?
  • 2 2
 I don't understand why fork travel should be based on inseam. one person can have a 100mm hardtail for XC rides and then a 140 hardtail for trail rides. They list the fork travel when discussing frame details so you have a reference point for geo, i.e. if the geo chart says 65 deg head angle, it means the bike has a 65 deg HA when it has a 130mm fork on it and the reader can infer that the angle would be more or less steep if the reader instead installed a shorter or longer fork. .... I feel like you must mean something different when you say "travel".
  • 2 0
 @onawalk: ...right over his head. Ya, being a hardtail frame I was referencing rear travel, and that is 100% in your leg length on a hardtail. Smile
  • 5 0
 @jgainey: ah so that's where that breeze came from. I need to get my funny bone checked. Seems to be on the fritz.
  • 5 3
 Making a 4X bike when 4X is dead, bold strategy Cotton.
  • 3 0
 Is it? Quite a big 4x scene round my neck of the woods.
  • 4 0
 4x ain’t dead #4xfamily
  • 4 0
 @petebuild: maybe not in the UK, but out here it's as alive as Epstein #ded
  • 2 0
 @labrinsky: yep, Massive in Eastern Euro an UK, murcia went full enduhro
  • 1 0
 While the price of this thing is a tad high, there is definitely uses for 4x bikes as trail bikes that can also be dirt jumped on tight courses. There is a middle ground between a dirt jumper and a modern hardtail that has yet to be explored.
  • 1 0
 @phops: maybe an older style hardcore hardtail? i got back on an MTB 2007 an there was plenty of bikes around like your'e describing. Back before the extremes of 'long,low&slack'
  • 2 0
 In germany we say Tiefeinstieg and it‘s for elderly. Nice bike though
  • 2 0
 It's a truly beautiful frame. That blue color really looks good, too.
  • 2 0
 Hot damn, that’s the best looking hardtail I’ve ever seen...
  • 2 0
 This guy cannot make an ugly bike if he tried smh, all W's no L's
  • 2 0
 Nice! But, that ain't no 4X bike
  • 1 0
 Its as rare as hens teeth on this site....but damn its nice when ya’ll cover real bicycles!
  • 1 0
 With standover like this you can be Huhn as a horse and not have to worry about racking yourself.
  • 2 0
 @Banan725135650 this one should make you wet!
  • 1 0
 What the hell is that lil turkey chilling on the headstem for?
  • 7 0
 It's tired. let it rest.
  • 2 0
 It’s a chicken. Huhn means chicken in German.
  • 2 2
 Mmmmmmm a tasty looking segment of frame.

+1 for use of the word portmanteau, which itself, is a portmanteau; like Orgasm.
  • 1 0
 Prohibitively expensive but nice looking.
  • 1 1
 Couldn't put my finger on it at first, but what this desperately needs is a Lefty up front. Pike is kind of "hmm".
  • 1 0
 The noise I make when straining too hard on the shitter HUUUHNNNNNNNNN
  • 1 4
 Needs a higher top tube / seat tube junction
This straight line from headtube to dropout just does NOT look good. Make it higher, and you don't need such a long seatpost. And who really needs to lower their saddle THAT low?!
  • 2 1
 Pretty dope looking Zaskar
  • 1 0
 Cool frame , UGLY tires .
  • 1 0
 Great price for a steel frame.
  • 3 3
 Taking the piss with the price.
  • 1 1
 Where is the bottle cage bots?
  • 1 0
 Needs wider bars
  • 1 0
 Titty McTits-alot.
  • 1 0
 NASA
  • 3 5
 Oh god when will the skin wall fad end?! At least oil slick was a cool fad.
  • 3 1
 I think it can look pretty good on the right bike with the right color scheme. Now, what really needs to happen is for Maxxis to sell white-logo OEM tires to the public. That yellow can fuck up a color scheme real quick. Not that I've ever had a bike nice enough to come with Maxxis tires from the factory...
  • 2 0
 @imnotdanny: 100% this!
  • 1 0
 Could be worse it could be the Mullet Bike fad, or even worse the Gravel Bike fad!!!!
  • 1 0
 I have skinwalls and oil-slick-railed-saddle on my bike because both were the only colors available in 2020. Luckily I can't see either of them when I am riding.
  • 3 5
 Why wouldn't you want full suspension on a enduro bike
  • 2 2
 aLSo wHy WoUlD yOu WaNt a BikE ThAt IsN't A 29'eR!?!?!?
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.018444
Mobile Version of Website