Ibis Mojo HD3 - Review

Nov 17, 2014
by Mike Levy  



The name might be the same, but the bike is entirely new. The six inch travel HD3 is the third iteration of Ibis' long-travel trail machine, and it features a revised version of dw-link suspension and updated geometry that brings it more in line with the contemporary long, low and slack way of thinking. Those who follow the Enduro World Series may have already spotted the new, 27.5'' wheeled Mojo under Anne-Caroline Chausson, with her and other factory Ibis riders racing aboard the bike since July. EWS racers we're not, but we were lucky enough to get our hands on the new HD3 far enough in advance to put some serious miles on it over the last month in Sedona, Arizona, all in the name of testing. The HD3 that you see here is the 28lb X01 'Werx Spec' model that sees a 2015 FOX 36 160 FIT RC2 fork in place of a 150mm travel Pike, Cane Creek's DBinline used instead of the FOX Float CTD, and Ibis' own mega-wide 741 carbon wheelset, a build that adds up to a $7,600 USD price tag. The 5.9lb frame and shock goes for $2,900 USD with a Float CTD, and there's a $60 up-charge if you go with the DBinline.

Mojo HD3 Details

• Intended use: all-mountain / enduro
• Rear wheel travel: 6'' / 152mm
• Wheel size: 27.5''
• Revised dw-link suspension
• Removable direct front derailleur mount
• ISCG 05 compatible with removable adapter
• Optional poly-carb down tube cable guard
• Internal cable routing options
• Threaded bottom bracket shell
• 12 x 142mm axle
• Frame weight: 5.9lb (med, w/ shock)
• Weight: 28lb (large, w/o pedals)
• MSRP: $7,600 USD (Werx Spec)


Ibis HD review test



Frame Details

The HD3 has similar lines to Ibis' previous Mojo platforms, but the fact of the matter is that this is an entirely new carbon frame that's been designed from the ground up. Part of that re-design was to incorporate a longer top tube that's more in tune with the short stems that a lot of riders are preferring to run these days, with Ibis adding an extra 20mm in length on each size compared to the older HDR model. The new front-end also makes use of a ZS56 lower headset unit that allows for a larger gap between the top and down tubes, something that Ibis says adds strength in a critical area without requiring more material and therefore more weight. Speaking of weight, a medium-sized HD3 with a FOX Float CTD shock is said to weigh in at a relatively competitive 5.9lb, which is light enough to easily assemble a complete bike in the 26 to 27lb weigh range if you're looking for more of a lightweight flier than a rowdy trail bruiser.

Ibis Mojo HD3 review test Photo by Paris Gore
Ibis Mojo HD3 review test Photo by Paris Gore
  The HD3 frame is entirely new, with slacker, longer geometry and room for a water bottle in the front triangle. There's also plenty of options for running the cables internally.


As someone who does everything in his power to avoid having to wearing a backpack, I'm happy to see that Ibis has managed to create enough room for a water bottle to be mounted inside the front triangle, with a second located on the underside of the down tube. There's also an optional bolt-on guard that protects both the down tube and the rear brake line that runs along it from rock strikes, although it isn't pictured on our test bike. Also not shown is the ISCG 05 chain guide adapter that sits around the threaded 68mm bottom bracket shell. Yes, you read that right, the HD3 has a threaded bottom bracket shell rather than a press-in design. The frame also looks a lot sleeker than previous Mojos thanks to the bike's nearly hidden front derailleur mount that's tucked on the backside of the seat tube.
bigquotesWe think 6" of travel will be good for most people's riding needs. We felt that it struck the best balance for a climbable, enduro-style bike. For example, if we went a little bit more, people would be putting 180mm forks on them and then the frame would need to be heavier and slacker to handle that. - Scot Nicol, Ibis


Ibis Mojo HD3 review test Photo by Paris Gore
  The 6'' travel HD3 makes use a reconfigured version of the dw-link suspension that Ibis has long used.




The HD3's Suspension Explained

The new Mojo employs a reconfigured version of the dw-link suspension that Ibis has used in the past, and while the two short links that are synonymous with the layout are still present, there are some big changes between this new bike and previous Mojos. The most obvious of these is that the shock is no longer driven off of the swing arm, but rather by a large yoke that wraps around the seat tube. The pivot locations have also been altered, with the goal being to have the better small bump sensitivity while also improving pedalling performance. In other words, to have your cake and eat it too. ''The goal with the dw-link tune on this bike is to pedal well and have better small bump sensitivity,'' Ibis' Scot Nicol explained to me. ''The leverage rate is the same linear feel with a slight ramp at the end that we've always liked. It keeps the suspension feeling consistent so that you know what it's going
to do in a given situation.'' Nicol is also quick to point out the a bike's travel doesn't necessarily define how it's going to feel on the trail, with many bikes behaving very differently despite sporting similar travel: ''Variable leverage rates and shock tunes can make a 6" bike feel like 7", or the other way around. Since dw-link bikes tend to sit high in the travel and have a very linear feel to them, it makes the available travel feel very useable. We can keep the bottom bracket height lower this way, and we like what that does for the the way the bike performs.


Specifications
Release Date 2015
Price $7600
Travel 6
Rear Shock Cane Creek DBinline
Fork FOX 36 160 FIT RC2
Headset Cane Creek
Cassette SRAM XG-1180, 10-42, 11 speed
Crankarms Race Face Turbine Cinch
Bottom Bracket Race Face
Rear Derailleur SRAM X01
Chain SRAM
Shifter Pods SRAM X1
Handlebar Ibis Carbon, 740mm
Stem Ibis
Grips Lizardskins
Brakes Shimano XT
Wheelset Ibis 741
Tires Maxxis Minion DHF 2.3''
Seat Ibis
Seatpost Thomson Covert
Ibis Mojo HD3 review test Photo by Paris Gore







Climbing

Expectations tend to ruin things sometimes, don't they? I personally wouldn't have expected bacon on top of donuts to taste like they were baked in God's own oven, but they do. And a bike like the new Mojo shouldn't breeze up technical climbs like it's channeling a mountain goat in Five Tens, but it does. I always make a point of not going over a test bike's geometry before spending a lot of time on it so as not to colour my opinion one way or the other, and the HD3 is the perfect example of why that's the best way to do things: it sports a 66.6° head angle (or 67 with a 150mm travel Pike) but steers nothing like you'd expect it to when you're picking your way up any sort of rocky, rooty battle. I honestly would have guessed closer to 68° given how well the day-glo bike steers around boulders and roots at speeds close to a standstill, especially when compared to machines in the same travel bracket, but it turns out that Ibis may have somehow channeled the sign of the Devil to create a bike that defies its own numbers.

Ibis Mojo HD3 review test Photo by Paris Gore
  There'll be no more blaming the bike if you can't get up and over a tricky climb when on the new Mojo, with it pushing the limits of what's possible on a long-travel machine.


The Devil had nothing to do with it, though, with the credit going towards the offset, trail, and other geo figures that Ibis has nailed dead-on. Tight switchbacks can actually be steered through rather than needing to pick up either end of the bike, and a rider simply has to do less work to get the HD3 up and over whatever's in front of them, all without that front wheel 'push' that can often see 6'' travel bikes running out of room before the corner ends. The sharp-ish steering for a bike like the Ibis means that you can stay on the gas through tight bends instead of worrying about running into a momentum killer, and it's pronounced enough that I immediately went from having to dab a handful of times on one particularly tricky trail aboard other bikes to spinning up it like I actually knew what I was doing. The slack-but-usable geometry is surely the secret here, but I also have to put at least some of my success towards the 35mm internal width 741 carbon rims from Ibis that allow the bike's 2.3'' Minion tires to be aired down to an absurd 19 PSI without any burping or noticeable casing roll that would have had me scared for my life when at speed. That's a lot of numbers to take in, but the sum of them all is that it's probably your fault if you spin out while climbing, not the bike's, because it's certainly not lacking in grip thanks to the low tire pressure and the DBinline's Climb Switch feature.
bigquotesExpectations tend to ruin things sometimes, don't they? I personally wouldn't have expected bacon on top of donuts to taste like they were baked in God's own oven, but they do. And a bike like the new Mojo shouldn't breeze up technical climbs like it's channeling a mountain goat in Five Tens, but it does.


Ibis proves that a bike with 6'' of travel can be put together to climb technical pitches not just well, but well enough that I was happy to be on it for back-to-back days that each covered 70km of tricky Sedona singletrack. That fact blows my mind given that I normally would have rather reached for a pair of rollerblades before a 6'' bike when heading out for anything that long, and, for the record, I swear that I don't even own rollerblades. Times have changed, haven't they? While tricky sections can be mastered aboard the HD3, no amount of suspension sorcery can hide its travel when a fire is lit under your ass on steep gravel road climbs - it pedals decently, no doubt about it, but it's kinda what I'd expect from a machine in this travel bracket. Flipping the Cane Creek shock's Climb Switch obviously helps, but that'd be the case on any bike, so I have to judge them when left full-open. The verdict is that it matches expectations, which is to say that it doesn't pedal like it's a bacon topped donut.

Ibis Mojo HD3 review test Photo by Paris Gore
  The HD3 thrives on technical trails that ask you to actually steer the bike and pick a line rather than just lean back and hold on.


Downhill / Technical Riding

Bikes of the HD3's travel seem to be going in two different directions: the majority are still rideable as all-around machines, albeit long-travel all-around machines, but a few new examples are more like second generation enduro race bikes that are built almost specifically for that task. This new breed of bike - insert the Nomad, Sanction etc... here - pedal relatively well, but they can still feel like a lot of bike when you're not pointing down something really chunky. Where does the new Mojo fit into the picture, you ask? Ibis has aimed for and struck a nice middle ground that not only makes the bike easier to ride faster than some of the more extreme competition on all but the rowdiest of downhills, but has it being more lively without sacrificing much in the way of all-out plow-ability. All of a bike's numbers come together to form its personality, and it bears mentioning that the our large-sized HD3 test bike is 27mm shorter in total length than a large Nomad, and a whopping 49mm less than the big GT, and while the bottom bracket height sits just a few millimeters higher on the Ibis, its head angle is 1.6° steeper than the Nomad and and 0.6° steeper than the Sanction. What I'm getting at is that the HD3 is simply a hell of a lot more manageable on the very large majority of trails that don't force you to rub your crotch on the rear tire. It asks for a lighter steering inputs, it's easier to place, and it has a more lively temperament. In short, it's more fun to ride in roughly 95% of the places where you'd ride a mountain bike.

It's that remaining 5%, the bits of trail that a lot of mountain bikers might not ride anyways, that upset the HD3 a touch. Steep, awkward steps that don't look do-able are where the Ibis feels a touch pointer up front compared to some other, slacker e-word bikes, but I never found myself backing down from them, just being a bit more cautious than I might have been on either of the two bikes that I mentioned above. Don't get me wrong, the HD3 is still much easier to throw into the chunk than any other bike with less travel, and, if we're all being honest with ourselves, such sections probably only make up a few seconds of most of our rides, don't they?

Cornering on the HD3 doesn't take a heavy hand, with it being on the quick side of relaxed rather than asking for a lot of input from the rider. This means that you can really snake through the tightest of chicanes at a good clip without much trouble, and its handling feels more intuitive than overly quick relative to other machines with similar angles. It isn't as chopper-esque as some bikes, but that's a good thing: another degree taken out of the head angle would turn the HD into less of a 6'' travel bike that you can literally ride anywhere and everywhere and into something that might be a bit too focused on solely crushing only the steepest of lines.
bigquotesI climbed the HD3 up the worst of the worst, and then pointed it down lines that would be considered class three or four scrambles by anyone going up the same route on their feet. It's the bike's balance between those two extremes of riding that Ibis has somehow nailed.


Ibis Mojo HD3 review test Photo by Paris Gore
  The flip side to the Mojo's agility is that it doesn't feel quite as planted when the speeds pick up on rough, choppy ground. Sure, it can be ridden as fast as any other 6'' bike, but it takes a little more attention to do so.


There are no half measures when it comes to the 'Werx Spec' HD3's suspension, with the 2015 FOX 36 160 FIT RC2 fork and Cane Creek's DBinline shock on our test bike offering performance that would have been the stuff of dreams only a few years ago. The difference in performance between the 2015 36 and the already impressive 2014 model was noticeable enough that I was sure FOX had made some internal updates, and my suspicions were verified when I reached out to FOX's Race Program Manager, Mark Fitzsimmons. ''We re-valved the damper based on the feedback from the RAD 34 received from Enduro World Series testing,'' he explained when I questioned him about the refined feel. ''It now has less compression through the entire velocity range, but we focused more on lightening it in the low- to mid-speed velocities. We also changed how the shims opened by reducing the amount of preload on the piston face shim.'' FOX's suspension witchcraft is obviously working, because the 2015 36 is going to blow some minds when more riders are able to get on the fork - it's more forgiving, more supple, but still stays up high in its stroke.

Cane Creek's shocks get a lot of riders going on about them being too complicated, too hard to tune, and too intimidating. That's utter bullshit, though. The DBinline on our test bike, as well as Cane Creek's other offerings, are as simple as you want them to be thanks to the setup finder on their website that tells you exactly where to start from. You won't find that sort of help elsewhere. That means zero second guessing when it comes to getting the base tune spot-on, so long as your bike is on the list (most are), and you'll always know where to go back to if you don't like the result of your fiddling. The standard shock is a FOX Float, but our Werx Spec bike showed up with the DBinline option that we were stoked to see - I'd argue that it's able to offer a more controlled feel through its stroke without feeling like it's over-damped to the point of being harsh or stealing any 'pop' away from a bike. The back end is more linear than you might expect, however, so some riders may want to drop some volume spacers into the shock's air can depending on their terrain and what they want from the bike's suspension.

Ibis Mojo HD3 review test Photo by Paris Gore
  Suspension might not get any better than the FOX 36 160 FIT RC2 and Cane Creek DBinline that's on the Mojo.


Technical Report

• I've spent a good amount of time on Ibis' awesome 741 carbon wheelset earlier this year and came away with a good impression of them, and the mega-wide rims make a lot of sense for a bike like the new HD. The wide rim and Maxis 2.3'' wide Minion rubber is quite the combo, and it's pretty clear that it is more forgiving and has more traction on tap than a traditional tire and rim setup. This was especially appreciated when on Sedona's singletrack that seems to be either extremely chunky or covered in a layer of loose cat litter. Thanks to the 35mm inner rim width, I was able to run tire pressures as low as 19 PSI up front and 20 PSI in the rear without feeling any sort of excessive casing roll or a single burp (although Sedona's trails aren't know for their high speeds or corners), and a handful of rock strikes didn't have any effect on the rim's integrity or spoke tension. I'm typically not a huge fan of carbon wheelsets due to their cost and still questionable reliability, but at 1,650 grams for the set and a reasonable-for-carbon $1,299 USD price tag, the 741s are probably one of the few options I'd consider purchasing.

• Thomson's internally routed Covert seat post is pretty badass. There was literally zero side-to-side head wiggle on ours, and it ran through its stroke without any hiccups. Its rebound speed isn't lightening fast like a FOX or Specialized dropper post, but it's still quick enough that I never felt like I was waiting for it to come up on Sedona's constantly rolling terrain. It also doesn't hurt that the tiny thumb operated remote takes up next to no room on the handlebar while feeling spot-on when it's slotted up against your left-hand grip. The only bummer was a snapped cable mid-way through a big day on the Mojo, a problem that came about due to the microscopic set screw that anchors the cable at the remote being over-tightened down onto it by whoever assembled the bike before we received it. That said, the cable swap that we performed in the middle of the ride proved just how easy it is to work on the Covert.


Ibis Mojo HD3 review test Photo by Paris Gore
  The HD3's eclectic spec worked very well: the SRAM and Race Face hybrid drivetrain was flawless, the Thomson Covert post's infinite adjustment was appreciated on Sedona's rolling terrain, and Ibis' own 741 wheelset with Minion DHF rubber was just the ticket when scrambling up or down the dusty and loose ground.


• While I usually get on well enough with most of the seats on review bikes, the house-brand saddle on the HD3 gave me a small glimpse what life would be like for me in a maximum security prison. We're all different down there, so maybe it'll work for you, but it's pretty obvious to me that it is one of the few seats that simply doesn't get along with my underside.

• I hit on it earlier, but the bike's 2015 FOX 36 160 FIT RC2 fork is so good that I feel like I need to keep rambling on and on about it. There's been a lot of talk over the last two years about how great the Pike is, but the latest from FOX is every bit as controlled and supple as any Pike that I've had under me, and it's worth noting that, with external low- and high-speed compression, low-speed rebound, volume spacers, the ability to run a 15mm or 20mm axle, and travel that can be run at five different lengths in 10mm increments, it's also more adjustable that RockShox's premier offering. This thing is the ticket for those who like to tinker. There was a slight rattle coming from within the fork when it went from being unweighted to hitting smaller impacts, something that we also had with another 2015 36 160 FIT RC2 fork in our test bike stable, although it never led to any reliability issues.

• There are two water bottle mount locations on the HD: one on the underside of the down tube and one on the top side just below the shock, but there's not much real estate for a large-sized bottle when using the latter. My big Camelbak Podium bottle made contact with the DBinline's gold Climb Switch lever, which was a bit annoying. I'm pretty sure that not many riders use anything larger than the Podium bottle, though, so I wouldn't consider it a deal breaker.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe phrase ''all-around'' so often actually means that a bike gets by everywhere but isn't amazing anywhere, which is why I'm hesitant to use that sort of wording to describe what the HD3 is capable of. Ibis is forcing me to do exactly that, though, by creating a 6'' travel bike that I literally wouldn't hesitate to reach for regardless of the day's plans. What I mean by that is that the HD3 suits how and where a lot of people ride, much more so than many other bikes of the same travel. - Mike Levy


www.ibiscycles.com, @ibiscycles


297 Comments

  • 177 3
 Suddenly there is an influx of kidneys on the black market...
  • 16 24
flag HutchJR (Nov 17, 2014 at 9:12) (Below Threshold)
 ebola? oh just a bike
  • 77 6
 Ibis just broke the internet...
  • 26 0
 and this time, it's for something real...
  • 32 1
 Went to the Ibis website and it has crashed. Kim Kardashian, try as she might by pouring soda on her butt- Ibis has succeeded in yes @manchvegas, breaking the internet.
  • 25 1
 With a threaded bottom bracket! This bike is my wet dream!
  • 31 10
 Specialzied sues Ibis in 1,2,3.....
  • 15 2
 Would take this over Intense's offering and save 2500, great looking bike
  • 51 1
 If we don't stagger our sales of kidneys, and they all hit the market at the same time the price for kidneys will crash.
  • 14 36
flag pinnityafairy (Nov 17, 2014 at 15:29) (Below Threshold)
 Ill take a NOMAD please
  • 17 33
flag Rocky-Urban (Nov 17, 2014 at 16:21) (Below Threshold)
 Any bike over $5k should have a generous choice of colours. Great bike but fluorescent green is so early 90's and even back then it was tacky. Is this horrible colour the only choice available??
  • 4 3
 yup...and pivot.
  • 5 12
flag rickaybobbay (Nov 17, 2014 at 19:32) (Below Threshold)
 @manchvegas @b1k35c13nt15t Ibis Mojo HD3- Break the Internet, done right Suck it kim, like you did in that one video we all saw!!!
  • 8 5
 @Rocky-Urban I have to agree with the colour thing. If I'm dropping countless piles of my dollars I would like some choices
  • 3 0
 @Rocky-Urban and @lightningskull - It looks as if it's going to be released in a few colours so quit bitching. velonews.competitor.com/2014/11/mtb/ibis-unveils-enduro-ready-mojo-hd3_353311
  • 5 0
 So anything that isn't overtly positive fawning over the bike is bitching now?
Thanks for the info on the colours
  • 2 7
flag haljohnson (Nov 19, 2014 at 14:21) (Below Threshold)
 no constructive criticism allowed. sick of listening to the poors complain.
  • 2 0
 As if I needed more evidence of how awesome Ibis is. This is the only bike that is seriously tempting to unload my current 650B Mojo for.
  • 1 0
 I love the feel of every ibis but not a big fan of the looks.
  • 122 1
 Funny how excited I get by water bottle cages and threaded bottom brackets on a modern bike.
  • 55 0
 Your not alone. For whatever reason i feel like people think that carrying a water bottle isn't "cool", I honestly hate wearing a backpack for hydration if im just goin out for a short local ride.
  • 9 16
flag chrisingrassia (Nov 17, 2014 at 9:42) (Below Threshold)
 Good luck with a nice clean water spout with the bottle down there. I learned that the hard way.
  • 51 2
 why can't the industry revert back to threaded??? why??? why god why???
  • 30 1
 I buy bikes with threaded BBs. It just works. This is one reason I bought a Bronson over many other capable bikes from brands that don't use threaded BBs.
  • 15 1
 really wish my ripley had a threaded BB.. pressfit sucks! especially with no tabs..
  • 26 13
 I just don't get why 68mm shell while EVERY crankset with outboard bearings is made for 73mm. Those 2.5mm on each side could have been utilized for wider lower bearing spacing.
  • 6 3
 I think the rear tire is extremely close to the chainstay?? add a little mud or a bigger tire and theres gonna be a lot of rubbing
  • 4 2
 looks like enough clearance to me
  • 4 3
 @chrisingrassia Yeah, as much as I'd like to be able to just throw a bottle on the frame and go, sandy trails and water bottles don't mix.
  • 39 33
 @waki... Try using your brain before posting. Every external threaded mountain bottom bracket IS 73mm. They spacer them out in 68mm shell frames. Only road frames and cranks use dedicated 68 spaced cups. And the reason IBIS went with a 68 shell width is because it makes room for the
ISCG05 adapter (which takes the place of one of the 2.5mm of spacers run on the right side cup) as well as allow more chainline adjustment for when choosing to run 1, 2 or 3 ring crank setups.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=gP0yT5ZUCfc#t=60
  • 45 55
flag WAKIdesigns (Nov 17, 2014 at 12:42) (Below Threshold)
 deeeight, stop thinking about the size of your dick before posting. First part of your post - utterly unnecessary, I meant exactly that, a child would spot it. Then why would you run 68mm shell width to give possibility to run ISCG adapter?! Because some old grump has his old chain guide which is useless after N/W chainrings came along?! 3 ring chainsets - WHAT?! Go buy this to your bike, a banana holder:
cdn0.lostateminor.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/bike-banana-holder-1-990x500.jpg
  • 18 3
 well that was rude...
  • 23 7
 Sorry, but @deeeight is right here.
  • 17 4
 Waki, you can't be serious about chain guides being useless. What do I spy here :http://www.pinkbike.com/photo/11169397/ ? And on almost every other EWS race bike? And why leave out people who want to run a taco bash guard or build up a bike with old stuff that they already have?
  • 19 28
flag WAKIdesigns (Nov 17, 2014 at 15:22) (Below Threshold)
 Upper chain guides - useful, yes. Lower rollers? Not so much. Necessity for ISCG for upper guide? Not so much. Also, most frames have molded in ISCG05 tabs. Also there are ISCG05 adapters that come in place of the single spacer you find on 73mm BB. as for tacos, BB mount just doesn't work as the the whole guide will rotate under slightest hit. I don't know why is this getting sidelined by deeights personal issues driven insinuation, he is a pressfit lover anyways.
  • 6 1
 treesmoker Im with you I must have a bash guard or someone to give unlimited rings. I can't get the urban assault out of my system.
  • 4 8
flag pinnityafairy (Nov 17, 2014 at 15:30) (Below Threshold)
 chrisingrassia HYDRO PACK, lose the bottel
  • 3 1
 @properp - totally! That's what I use now after the bottle dust incident a couple years ago. Water bottle racks and mountain bikes are almost antithetical.
  • 28 21
 Again waki with showing how much of a moron you are ? And you truly are one, don't let people positive propping you fool you into believing you're right. People positived your whine because it amused them to do so. That is all.

I clearly (and the its in the actual review) stated that the mount is for ISCG-05, which is the current guide mount standard. Furthermore had you bothered to watch the video (which is the official Ibis instruction video for installing chainguides), it shows that the removal of one of the drive cup spacers is required in addition to it fitting over the splined mount in the frame (again as explained above in the video link i so kindly provided for the reading impaired). At no time did I say it was a BB mount guide. Perhaps you need glasses. Maybe your penis wouldn't look so huge then if it wasn't lost in a blur, along with your ego and stupidity.
  • 20 1
 @deeeight *Drops mic*
  • 15 0
 Can't we all just get along for the sake of the children.......
  • 12 0
 NO! MOUNTAIN BIKES ARE SERIOUS BUSINESS.
  • 9 0
 Hahhaha!, Waki and deeeight make me laugh every time! Come to Oregon and I will buy you both a beer. And it will be a GREAt beer also.
  • 13 31
flag WAKIdesigns (Nov 17, 2014 at 23:24) (Below Threshold)
 Deeeight - I don't need to read or watch a movie. I looked at the frame and saw no ISCG tabs. That means that whatever you mount there will be virtually a BB mount that will rotate under force, because outer bearing has not enough pinch force to keep it in place. Therefore you cannot successfully use taco bash on that frame AS i freaking said already. So what they've done is they tried to go around making proprietary ISCG tabs, introducing structural compromise in form of narrower bearing spacing/lower link width. And you are just repeating IBIS excuse to start an argument with me, nothing else. So you may be good at reading and storing information but your nitpicking limits your mental capacity to link more than two facts. Ah I'd forget: Hitler.
  • 10 19
flag deeeight Plus (Nov 18, 2014 at 0:11) (Below Threshold)
 And like the typical troll you are, you invoke hitler. Thanks for showing your true colors and losing an argument, yet again.
  • 11 2
 @deeeight For once, try making a post with no insult in it, ****head.
  • 2 10
flag deeeight Plus (Nov 18, 2014 at 1:28) (Below Threshold)
 @vanguard...made plenty but its pointless to waste anymore time bringing facts to a discussion with a troll.
  • 18 1
 @deeeight If you think he's a troll, why do you feed him?

The good points both of you contribute are lost in your kindergarten quarrels.
  • 4 0
 pressfit blows
  • 2 0
 @vanguard: you're so right. thanks
  • 2 0
 2010 S-Works Enduro had also a removable adaptor with ISCG tabs.
ep1.pinkbike.org/p4pb4257939/p4pb4257939.jpg
  • 5 0
 Waki - having actually owned an HDR with the exact same BB adapter - I can tell you that it is not like a BB mount, there are groves there to keep it from rotating - absolutely no functional difference between ibis design and built in tabs.. Other than the fact that you can remove the excess weight if you don't want to use a chain guide

digitalhippie.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/ibis-mojo-hdr-iscg-mounts-spline.jpg
  • 5 1
 @deeeight if you go through this thread waki actually just commented about the BB and then you threw a tissy fit. You sir, are the troll. I should be the troll police. This pretty much sums it up--

www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7LrViaPq7M.
  • 5 15
flag deeeight Plus (Nov 18, 2014 at 9:04) (Below Threshold)
 That's rich... he posted incorrect information... hence trolling. I corrected him with factual information... not trolling. That I pointed out he's a stupid moron is just stating the obvious given his repeated history of such posting here. Then he continued on trying to defend an indefensible position with more false statements about the bike in question. Again, the behavior of a troll. His last defence said all he had to do was look at the pictures of the bike, and not look at any videos of the frames. The video CLEARLY shows that the splined mount for the chain guide adapter is part of the frame construction and is located behind the BB cup and would be all but hidden from view with a crankset installed. In fact, in the second LARGE picture of the above review, you can just make out a hint of the silver splined ring around the BB shell edge, behind the crankarm, if you look really closely (or zoom in the image).
  • 3 0
 Alright alright. I'll stay out of it. You guys just got some anger issues man. I just don't see a reason to call upon hitler and calling people morons whatever over freaking chain guides and bottom bracket width. Just seems silly to me is all.
  • 3 10
flag WAKIdesigns (Nov 18, 2014 at 13:53) (Below Threshold)
 Hi again. Wow I feel stupid now, it really is different than BB mount. Sorry for it. As to Hitler, I apologize, wait I don't... it's just a surname isn't it? There must have been more people named like that aye? No... I just post it everytime Deeeight has issues with me, so he can call upon Godwins law. I just wonder how much he wanted to straighten my desinformation and how much personal attack he wanted to make? you must admit, you wanted to go on my arse, discussion and spraying sht all over the place wouldn't happen if deeeight reacted as civilised as others above. He definitely goes personal to many people here. So let me really go personal.
  • 2 14
flag WAKIdesigns (Nov 18, 2014 at 13:56) (Below Threshold)
 I wonder Kristan Aubergine, why are you like that? You are definitely projecting some load of frustration here sir, let me help you. You have so many bikes and no pics of you riding, nowhere, aaand you write sht loads, you highly probably suck at MTB, owning stuff and learning tons about it is what you do. You masturbate this way, you compromise for lack of skill and fitness. But as an old grump you have small chance to change it so you go on and try to make younger people feel dumb. Then you call people trolls, you clearly despise some people, in aggressive manner - are you then ashamed of how much you write, that you are so passive. You have gigantic knowledge, you know facts, but you can little, you can't really use that knowledge for anything else than trying to outsmart others on internet. Your posts here against me, show that you like to win arguments and you must pin your victory, as if it mattered to anyone else but you. You compensate your lack of creativity with it. That's also why you hate people not using "facts" because they can come up with conclusions without them, while you cannot. You must rely on external authority. Then you like retro bikes... well that is probably because you would like to buy and test as much as others but cannot afford new stuff. What happened 20 years ago that you are so into retro? Did a women left you? Did you finish studies and all friends went away? Your social disfunction didn't allow you find new ones and now the power of your complex is released on internet? LEt me guess - are you angry because you are shy in reality, cannot fight for your right? Do people use you often? And how does having no kids feel? So it was a woman long time ago and then a long stop aye?

Disclaimer - If he didn't block me like a child, this text would be solved in PM, not here. Ahh and I don't give a damn if it is 68 or 73... aaaand I wrote it very calm, no anger, slight notion of passion
  • 1 0
 tl;dr WTF???

No, really, Waki, this is a whole new level of LOL. I had a good laugh, really.

Now stop flaming each other, yes?
  • 4 7
 I'm not sure where he went for his info but he got my name wrong to start with and it went downhill in credibility from there.
  • 6 0
 Ding! And the bell ends the round. The participants retreat to their respective corners....
  • 4 0
 The Holy Roman Empire was neither Holy nor Roman Discuss....
  • 4 0
 still, the review is as favourable as it can get towards the Mojo.

I mean, what they write about the capability of the bike could be rephrased as: it might not keep up with those new Enduro bikes in rough terrain, but maybe chosing an All-Mountain bike for your riding is wiser anyways. Well...
And what has offering less reach got to do with "being more manageable"? It's just too short, thats all. I mean, even my Trek Remedy 2010 had more reach at the seattube same length. 431 is to little for me, but I won't be going for a 52cm seattube. Hardly a modern geometry, I'd say. No Ibis for me, then.
  • 2 0
 yo chiiiiill too many dashboard notifications
  • 2 0
 @spillWay--hilarious! You're the black kid in this clip-- www.youtube.com/watch?v=svarjAuB4bs

enjoy
  • 1 3
 Ok. Thanks a lot waki.i was almost done my build. Now I need to go out and find a banana holder
  • 69 2
 I was gonna buy one but since it has 152 mm of travel I wanted something a little more. I got a process 153
  • 6 0
 I wanted a slightly more 'trail' oriented bike, therefore the 150mm Bronson seemed like the better fit. If only someone made a 151 travel bike Wink
  • 3 2
 You can affix any acronym you like to the Mojo, it's always been a light, super efficient, long travel XC bike, tailored for those who value the climb more than bombing back down. To my mind, the very antithesis of a classic AM bike, like the Heckler, where you curse and suffer to get up the hill, then blast back down again, grinning like an idiot.

How are you finding the Process 153? I'm intrigued by this bike. Should note the build kit is very average for the price here in Australia, a common phenomenon owing to shameless, greedy Aussie importers, looking to maximize their profit margin in a market where your average consumer is already quite loose with anal penetration. The clever simply devise strategies to bypass local channels entirely and import directly from the US at 2/3 the cost. MTB Magazine said it was amazing, I take their word for it. Even viewed through the prism of an ultra-cynical, old school, gen X mtn biker, their knowledgeable, informative, earthy, wholly unbiased and completely honest YouTube reviews I cannot help but accept without question. They speak directly to me, after ride beer in hand, one rider to another. "Kona just got the basics so right, the geometry's absolutely dialed", I think they said. Would you concur with this statement? I think the Kona's still expensive for a push bike, but I know I'd rather drop $5k on a new bike than $10k, which I find impossible to rationalize.
  • 2 0
 I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks this way about Australian importers/distributors. The frame only will cost $4k AUD here, which is ridiculous. For those that will chime in about import duty (5%), taxes (10%) and exchange rate (15%), they are applied to what the distributor pays for the frame, not the $2,990 USD retail price. Also shipping in bulk is cheaper than solo and is about $200 a bike... Which in all does not add up to $4k

It sounds as though you know how to bypass the local channels @m0ngy.
  • 2 0
 @m0ngy
I love it. Its basically perfect. Got new brakes and converted from 2x to 1x and I love it to death! It eats trails like a beast
  • 2 1
 I don't think the Ibis is tailored for those who value the climb more than bombing back down as much as those who value the ability of the bike to perform at both well. I do not like climbing other than the fact that it keeps me in shape and allows me to access lower use and therefore higher quality descents--i.e. I won't choose to climb a paved or dirt road as a matter of principle, especially when there are relatively easily available shuttles. But, I do value all performance aspects of a bike. So, keeping in mind that everything is a matter of perspective, when comparing to similar bikes in its class, if I take a very small downgrade in descending performance (especially acknowledging that the bike is really unlikely to limit me here) in exchange for a notable increase in the rest of the ride (climbing, pedalling, endurance), then overall I view that as a better bike for my purposes. In other words, I'm not a single issue mountain biker.
  • 50 0
 60 more bucks to go from a ctd to a inline, yes please
  • 27 0
 For sure! I'm not buying a new Mojo, but can I just send them $60 and my Fox poo?
  • 9 2
 But then the Werx has the Fox? Fork better be berserk! Cause the Pike is phenomenal
  • 20 6
 THIS IS BULLSHIT: Suspension might not get any better than the FOX 36 160 FIT RC2 and Cane Creek DBinline that's on the Mojo. Wake up to the BOS Deville and Kirk Pinkbike. Why do you always ignore this brand?
  • 26 3
 Because there's so little distribution and support.
  • 7 1
 BOS is making a big push into North America. Art's cyclery sells their products and is now a service center. I can buy fluid and seals for my Deville from them when needed. I've got a Deville and a Kirk on a Mach 6 and it's sublime.
  • 7 1
 Bro, US media is BLIND to any euro tech. I asked 2 prominent bike reviewers/journalists on their preference between a YT Capra and a Kona Process, and neither had ANY idea what a Capra even was! So that is the deal. If it is not offered in the US, they don't even think of it as existing. So get used to it...
  • 7 0
 @OriginalDonk that's not what I'd call a "big push." A big push would be running throuqh QBP, BTI, J&B, etc or a contract with major frame manufacturer.
  • 2 0
 @sambs827 Not the best choice of words from my end but going from no BOS distributor in the U.S. to an actual BOS U.S.A. entity seems like a big step. Having a reliable online shop than can send me small parts within a few days makes their products significantly more attractive to me at least. I agree that going through QBP or BTI would help their accessibility. Not sure their French hands could pull stuff together to meet demand if it bumped up significantly. A large portion of their product is now OEM on YT and Orbeas so we'll hopefully see more and more reviews of long term performance. I've been pleased.
  • 3 1
 put your shit on a specilized mountain bike, get instant regonition as not being fox, get pushed off spesh because like 85% of spesh buyers want fox and only fox haha. the local shop owner I know said "there are so better companies and designs, but because of Fox's brand name recognition, whether or not theyr'e the best doesn't matter, they're just known."

but yeah, i'd like better, so if there is better, send that goodness my way.
  • 2 0
 and about YT, i'm waiting for those bastards to stop teasing and start pleasing so i can get the Tues Pro... frikin suuuch a great deal. take a Tues or an Aurum of the Demo in a heart beat, just because I can afford a good aurum, can't afford a good demo.
  • 4 0
 @trifecta - I've spent very little time on BOS' longer travel stuff, so I can't comment on it. That's going to change in the near future, though... I've got loads of time on their Dizzy XC fork (review soon) and will be getting some of their 6" stuff in the hopper soon.
  • 5 4
 I've said this before, countless times, its not pinkbike that's to blame if YT or others don't submit the bikes to be tested. They test what they have to test. If brands are afraid of putting their products up for review, that's their own damn fault. A lot of the time though the brands just feel its pointless to have things reviewed by certain publications, which is why for example, with all the carbon rimwheel brands around now, only a handful have submitted wheels to pinkbike for review. Why waste a set of wheels you could sell to a customer insted, when the majority of people who post comments will be negative and won't be the market to spend that sort of money anyway.
  • 2 0
 Yt cuts out the distributor as you know. If anything goes wrong under warranty with suspension etc it goes back to Yt in Germany. Imagine how long you would be without a bike !! My friends Capra had Bos fork issues on first ride after waiting 4 months for it .
  • 2 2
 Not to mention they don't ship to North America, and so not much point in having a canadian or american magazine review their bikes either.
  • 1 0
 American car magazines do reviews on European cars that are not available in the US all the time. Kind of a forbidden fruit type article, and just something different to write about. Also, the Capra has been getting crazy good reviews from established and respected publications like Dirt Mag UK. So you would think they would want to at least check it out...

dirtmountainbike.com/bike-reviews/yt-capra-headtube.html
  • 1 5
flag deeeight Plus (Nov 18, 2014 at 2:09) (Below Threshold)
 Car magazines operate differently, as do plane, boat and motorcycle companies. There the companies invite journalists to come to the vehicles, not sending the vehicles to the magazines... only thing close in bicycles are brand product launches usually in the fall where they invite their dealers and selected journalists to a resort for a weekend to show off many new models at once, and then every publication invited is getting equal access and will rarely devote more than a mini-review to anything (maybe a couple paragraphs) until they get one sent to them for a full test.
  • 1 0
 Not to get into a whole thing with you, as I understand what you are trying to say. But car companies most certainly do send their cars out to the car magazines (Car and Driver) and independent car journalists like Chris Harris (that do not write for magazines) for them to review, some for up to 10,000 miles and more. Some car magazines even go so far as to buy their own cars, run them, do some mods to them like chips, different sway bars, or things that their customers might do to the car, and then sell them after the review period (evo Mag). To give credit where it is due, Dirt Mag UK does this. They also test every bike with genre specific tires across the board. So all DH bikes are tested with the same tires and so forth, so as to take out any impact of tires. Which I think is genius..and lends to the credibility of their reviews..

So basically I think that my original comment is correct. US bike mags and bike journalists don't care about euro tech. If it is not in the US then it might as well not exist. Which in my opinion is a bad tact to take, what with twitter being worldwide, this thing called the worldwideweb and the like...
  • 3 1
 Why so much talk about an internet only cookie cutter FSR rip off bike? A friend of mine got one shipped to the states somehow. They are pretty but it's just a cheap specialized. I hope he doesn't have any warranty issues.
  • 13 0
 This hobby is funny to me. Reviews are so catered to crowds (generally speaking). We had this big wave of marketing geared towards super duper EWS Enduro Downhill Race machines. Everyone on every forum and site is running around squawking about LONG LOW SLACK BLAH BLAH BLAH. So then all the reviews are hyping the new rigs up saying they descend sooooo well, so confidence inspring, and have your cake and eat it too because it "pedals" so well. So now every fan boy thinks they need a handicap bike that instills so much confidence on the downhill and insist on bashing any bike that does not fit this criteria.

The thing is though is that there missing a HUGE point. * Pedaling and climbing are not one in the same* Just because a bike "pedals" well does not mean it will climb well. It might put power ot the rear wheel efficiently but that does not mean the bike will be a breeze to propel when the trail starts going uphill. So many people will try and substantiate how great their new "insert enduro brand bike name here" climbs but the reality is, that they do NOT climb well compared to other trail bikes. Yes they climb great compared to a downhill bike but it all needs to be kept in context.

Now ibis comes out with a great do-it-all bike (once again), and has designed this new version perfectly in my book. Exactly how I would of took the old HD platform and updated it (I've been riding the original HD for over 4 years now). All of a sudden all the editors and reviewers are now jumping on this new "hype" and are now claiming that this is all you need for 90% of trail riding, which is correct in my book. Its just funny to me because it is getting twisted like this is "new" news. Like now they have to let all the fanboys down slowly and let them know that the plow-bandaid-bike is actually not really necessary except for riders who live in key locations where such a bike is worthwhile.
  • 4 0
 No offense to Mike Levy, this is the best review I've seen on the new bike. Just hit a note with me
  • 2 1
 2013 Mojo HD 26" 160 FTMFW!
everything these days is all hype, imo
  • 3 0
 2008 Mojo Carbon, 2010 Mojo Carbon SL, and now really, really evaluating if I really need 2 kidneys.
  • 1 0
 Agree
  • 11 0
 I dont understand how people are riding 2.3 Minions on i35 rims.. I tried them on my i30 rims and it was very easy to lean past the sideknobs... The sidewall is literally wider than the tread...2.4 HR2 gives a much better profile
  • 2 0
 Good to know. I've been wondering if that was the case.
  • 2 0
 @wydopen - I've always found that the HR2s are too square for me, even when on a more traditional width rim.
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy - This brings up a question I meant to ask you, did you find that pairing the 2.3 Minion with the 741 Ibis rims resulted in a tire profile that is too square? Do you feel like you would want to go with a 'rounder' tire with the super wide rims?
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy If you still have access to some i30+ rims I would definitley try a 2.4 HR2 in the front.....I had taken some profile shots of both 2.3 Minions and 2.4HR2 on the wider rims and the wider highroller actually ended up less "square"..

Ive also done back to back testing and the Minion was borderline unrideable for me during hard cornering efforts while the HR2 stays hooked up...keep in mind this is on loose over hard and sandy type soil where traction is a minimum...I guess results may vary depending on riding style and terrain type but as someone who has allot of time on wider rims I would definitely recommend something wider than a 2.3..

I'm thinking the only way people are liking a Minion up front on these rims is that they are running such little tire pressure that the tire's profile doesn't matter as it is deformed enough that there is a large contact patch...I'm going to try the Minion again and drop the psi some..

According to maxxis they are going to address this issue for 2015
  • 14 0
 Bottle cage, threaded bb, DW link !! What's next 26" wheels !!
  • 10 1
 This review can be summarized: wide rims, light wheels, grippy tires at low pressure are AWESOME, the new Ibis is OK, and you should either ride a Fox 36 or a Pike.

I did thoroughly enjoy the review - and thanks to PB for posting it when other sites just relay a press release.
  • 8 0
 want one. so many bikes to choose from-don't envy anyone trying to make a decision these days. happy with my nomad, though...
  • 20 0
 I love my new Nomad too and frankly it fits my riding style better, as PB puts it in their review, "The Nomad... [is] a bike that wants to be pushed to the ragged edge, urging you to carry just a little more speed into that steep chute filled with a lattice work of roots, or down that nearly vertical rock face that doesn't seem to ever end." This does not seem to be the same case with the new HD3, "Ibis has aimed for and struck a nice middle ground that not only makes the bike easier to ride faster than some of the more extreme competition on all but the rowdiest of downhills." Pick a bike that suits your style, then get out and ride, and most of all enjoy it!
  • 10 0
 Man, this thing looks like a bicycle!
  • 6 0
 Ron Swanson? Is that you?
  • 10 0
 "Threaded bottom bracket shell" - so it CAN be done :>
  • 9 3
 its about effin' time ibis makes a specific 650b bike instead of slapping the wheels onto a mojo hdr. This is definitely on my xmass list for my wife to get for me. and itll look good next to my Ripley.
  • 6 0
 they were in the lab cooking this up. I forgive them. What a well sorted bike. Kudos.
  • 5 0
 I'm sure this new bike will be incredible but the HDR 650b was -- is! -- pretty amazing in its own right. Much under appreciated.
  • 1 0
 I agree, also, what sexy lines! That's what I love about Ibis .. easy on the eyes for sure.
  • 12 4
 Yup, a really great looking bike. It's about time slack&low sobers up a bit. Your brakes may eventually fail on Garbanzo EWS stage so that you will get to Gravy speeds for a brief moment, to justify slack geo, but the reality is the way Mike describes it: 95% if not more situation you don't need that freaking Barelish fork pointing.
  • 7 2
 I agree with you there Waki, a lot of these Enduro born superbikes are too slack for their own good, makes for a missle on the downs but at such great expense when it comes to slow speed and uphill handling. I think it's a delicate balance Ibis has taken seriously here.
  • 6 2
 Darkstar = WAKI translator. I enjoyed both comments. I will never hit Gravesy speeds but I can own a bike that can.
  • 1 0
 lol @ Spillway
  • 3 0
 "such sections probably only make up a few seconds of most of our rides, don't they" yes. yes they do... But aren't they the most memorable? How many times have you talked with your buddies "about that one hairy section" that you cleared? Or maybe you just walked it. Dunno.
  • 7 1
 Reignonme - There is simply no way Nomad3 or Yeti SB5 can ride something that this Mojo can't. I rode sketchiest stuff in my area on a 2002 XC HT... Also sense of fear is relative and trust me riding a EWS track on a HT is going to give you way more excitement than a 7" super bike.
  • 1 0
 I agree. Then that makes his statement misleading.
  • 5 8
 You make a Christmas list for your wife to get you stuff? Man, grow up.
  • 1 0
 Sounds like someone has a weak sauce Christmas. I too, make a list. Here's what's on it this year-- www.transitionbikes.com/2015/images/Bike_Frame_Suppressor_1.jpg

You should make a list too. Get in the spirit ya know?
  • 5 5
 blackthorne...you see my Mrs. spent the big bucks on my Ripley because she loves me, and the reason why she bought me my wonderful and expensive bike is because I properly give it to her...now if your a grown ass man you would know what im talking about.
Also I served in the U.S. Army with 1 tour in Iraq and 1 tour in Afghanistan not as a regular Joe but in the elite ranks of Echo Company 51st Long Range Surveillance (Airborne)(Rangers) and if you dont know what it is look it up big boy.
To make it clear I am grown up and have the balls to prove it, also only a boy would comment such a thing "Man, grow up"
  • 4 3
 Looks like your interpretation of grow up is about asserting sexual prowess and macho superiority, which speaks volumes about your ideals and insecurities. Also the assumption that I should be the opposite. But no, when I say grow up I mean I don't expect my wife to get me a shiny new toy for Christmas. I buy something for her and I'd rather she save her money to invest in the future.
  • 3 0
 lol...gotta love pinkbike. Hey if your ever in Vegas let me know and maybe we can go for a ride.
  • 3 0
 I must say you two had probably the best exchange I have ever seen on PB. Short and juicy. Im Jelaous
  • 1 1
 @blackthorne However the hell you got what you got out of our statements is impressive and takes a superb imagination. Go invest my son. We buy each other really expensive gifts, invest in the future AND donate to charity so suck it! Ha!
  • 1 1
 Reignonme: Wait what? You're like someone walking down the street who suddenly picks a fight with a stranger! Clap clap clap good job.
  • 3 1
 That makes no sense.
  • 4 0
 So many reviews overlook the climbing aspects of a bike and not even just that but fun slightly flatter trails too, I think its great that this article realises this and says the real 'gnarly' stuff is only a few seconds of most trail rides! Always loved Ibis and if things carry on this way I will do in the future!....shame I just cant afford one though, that said its not a crazy £8000+ you can pay for a new nomad!
  • 4 0
 Best quote by Pink Bike reviewer ever. Honest. True. And in our best defense. The last thing we want to end up with is a three position damper shock or some other ineffective and insulting untunable damping system. Keep keeping it real Pink Bike.

"That's utter bullshit, though."

"Cane Creek's shocks get a lot of riders going on about them being too complicated, too hard to tune, and too intimidating. That's utter bullshit, though. The DBinline on our test bike, as well as Cane Creek's other offerings, are as simple as you want them to be"
  • 13 0
 I've never understood why people are scared of the DB shocks. They come with factory settings, for Christ's sake, and you can get so much tuning advice on the Cane Creek website that there's no excuse to be nervous about them as far as setup goes.
  • 4 1
 they are very complicated and mysterious. to make your life easy get some flip switch shock you only have to worry about air pressure and rebound. keep selling those CCDB take offs on PB buy/sell, some day all my bikes will have buttery suspension.
  • 3 0
 Had a go on a 2015 Spesh enduro with the inline and when I got it the suspension was set up all crazy (0 compression and nearly closed HS/LS rebound). I never rode a shock with LS/HS R/C and it took me about 2 minutes to fix to an acceptable level and I'm not big on knob fiddling so unless you really don't know how to tune a suspension at all, I don't see this being a problem.

I don't want to get into a game of "who deserves what" but honestly, if you can't be bothered to turn a few knobs to get high end performance, you probably have no business on a 8k bike. I understand that CDDBs aren't the easiest shocks to learn on but there's plenty of bikes with CTDs if that's not your cup of tea. I feel like not speccing a 8k bike with all the high end goodies would be cheating buyers.
  • 5 0
 Couldn't agree more, but I will say that its Cane Creek's efforts to provide information about its products that makes that comment true. An average rider has a difficult time setting anything on their shock and fork. If Cane Creek simply sold you the shock and said go figure it out, I think it would have a lot of seriously disappointed customers. But the fact that they go out of their way to provide clear base settings for virtually every kind of bike is simply amazing and allows any user to get into a good setup without having to really understand the way suspension works, what they like, and how to modify it, while also allowing those with the necessary knowledge and skills to fine tune the ride even more.
  • 1 0
 True, having strong reference points when you start out is a great thing, as a lot of people don't even know what to look for when it comes to suspension behavior (we all started somewhere) so the extra help to get a decent shock response from day one helps a lot.
  • 5 0
 Why couldn't they incorporate the 8.5" x 2.5" rear shock configuration? Seems like a step backward to me to go down to a 2.25" stroke...
  • 5 1
 I know I'm gettin whooped for this.. but.. that's the first ibis I've seen that looks ready to really thrash.
(Disclaimer: I'm aware ibis make some of the best bikes available, I'm specifying aesthetics really)
  • 3 0
 The first gen Mojo HD was / is 180 mm fork compliant. Can't get much more thrash ready than that. Not sure of this model comes rated for a 180 mm fork.
  • 1 0
 @tobiusmaximum you are damned right IMO
  • 5 0
 That's a Mach 6 with better cable routing and location for the cage. Mach 6 cable routing has to be the dumbest facking idea
  • 3 0
 As always, Mike writes the best bike reviews in the business. One question did you take the neck rock roll in the third riding pic? That would be a vote of confidence in a test bike.
  • 4 0
 Thanks for the props! Not sure what or where the ''neck rock roll'' is that you're referring to, but I did take the HD3 down all of the mandatory and optional rolls.
  • 2 0
 Mike I like your reviews too, but you need to stop making excuses for bikes. Such as, putting too much emphasis on how it's a totally new frame and radically better even though it looks the same, as if to counteract skeptics before anyone's said anything, or being too figurative: 'it bombs the downhills, but climbs like a goat'... The thing about bike geometry and specs is that all a compromise for it's intended purpose, and it would be more informative if we can understand how well they found that balance compared to similar bikes.
  • 1 0
 Supposed to read 'the next roll', der on me. It's really steep and blind and it would be a little uncomfortable on an XC bike (see the pic on my profile). I rode all that stuff for the first time on a T275 and it was just perfect. I think slack is back.

Writing reviews that aren't biased by experiences on predominantly one type of bike would be really hard. There's so much to be said for set-up and all, but I've ridden the previous mojo HD and felt it was dead, thought the mach 6 was way too rearward biased, etc, but people who know what they're talking about just rave about those bikes. I measure everything against the feel of VPP which is where my bias lies. I read reviews in the mags and it is boilerplate blah blah blah marketing for the mag. There's never anything more provocative than 'well, we switched out for wider bars and a shorter stem' or 'we didn't like the saddle.' I appreciate Mike's thorough and thoughtful take. We have to assume he has to filter some of the marketing hype, some of which is probably true!
  • 1 0
 Teacher's pet?
  • 1 0
 Haha! Always.
  • 5 3
 It's not the suspension I want to get explain, but rather the trend to put shitty flat seat angles again, like in the 90s when the frames where too short. Except that now, the top tubes get ever longer. Which means that if the frame feels now long enough when standing on the pedals, it's just bloody too long when seating. I know, the value says 73, or 72 something depending on the fork... when the saddle is down. Those ridiculous offset; when you're tall, make you feel like you're having a 70° seat angle. Progress? No. Pity, I was interested in the bike.
  • 3 2
 Seat tube angle is engineered from BB to the saddle at the average riding height, not with the seat down.
  • 3 0
 It doesn't tell me how it will be for me. Seriously I start considering using a seatpost with offset but use it front side back. That's gonna look horrible but finally we'll have a comfortable pedaling position.
  • 2 0
 unless you use the Thompson, that's unsafe. It'll break at the clamp. Which is the specific reason Thompson makes their setback posts the way they do, because some people want set forward on Tri bikes.
  • 2 0
 Thomson adjustable seatpost has no offset. So it sounds like I better not try! I'll look for another bike then.
  • 3 1
 Though the XL in this bike is big for them, Ibis typically isn't building bikes for tall people. Don't lose any sleep over it. Go buy a Specialized Enduro, tall guy approved.
  • 1 0
 Yup, it would be pretty hard to make a dropper with a bent shaft, which is the only reason you can run a Thompson setback post reversed. If you're sliding off the front of the saddle, & can't fix it with sliding the saddle forward, tilting the back down, or different bars & stem to move you farther back, you need a different sized frame. Honestly, even if you were willing a to run a fixed post to get the set forward, you're going to run into other fit problems, almost certainly. What works for a very specific use case in Tri isn't going to apply very well to MTB.
  • 2 1
 EnduroManiac, how tall are you?
H
  • 2 0
 I do have to agree with @alexsin, If I was over 6' 2", an enduro 29er would be on my short list.
  • 2 0
 EM, i sort of agree with you here. A Kona Process (or Mondraker) goes the way to what you are asking for (a reach that is similar both standing and seated IMO) and where a Pivot, for instance, of any model goes the other way (slack ST angles and short reach...kinda 2009).

this bike seems pretty balanced (not the long front center but a more traditional, if you will, Seat Tube Angle and the reach number bumped up a bit) and that is probably why it was reviewed as such a great all rounder. The numbers are very similar to another very well regarded all rounder: the Bronson.

I also really believe in size proportionate bikes. If you're over 6'2" holy crap there are some filthy 29ers these days.
  • 1 0
 I'm 1m86, so somewhere between 6'1 and 6'2 I think. I currently ride a Nomad XL (the old ones) and could feel happier with something a bit longer but not too much.

@groghunter: I wasn't thinking of a kinked seatpost, but rather an offset of the head, say like a specialized command, and unlike most of the others: Reverb, KS Lev, Thomson, Fox.

29ers are an option, they have some great advantages and a few drawbacks. But the feel is just so different! I'll wait for a Mondraker Rune Carbon. If it's as sexy as the Foxy then it's even better Smile
  • 2 0
 @groghunter An Enduro 29er should be on anybody's short list if they're above 5 ft 10. It's a game-changer.

I really like the new ibis, but I doubt the seat angle will work for me with a 35 inseam.
  • 1 0
 @EnduroManiac My point is, you can't use an offset head reversed. That's the unsafe part, as they aren't designed to withstand loads in that direction. So the only way you can have a set forward post is with a kinked post. but that's essentially impossible with a dropper, for obvious reasons.

@Vanguard I guess I'm safe then at 5' 8" Razz
  • 1 0
 @groghunter you're safe and small.

You should test ride the 26" Enduro instead. Smile
  • 1 0
 @Vanguard Ha, I ride a El Guapo. So essentially already an Enduro, just with a different paint job.

That said, I can feel a real advantage on the 650b wheeled bikes I've ridden, my next bike will have tweener wheels. But the Disappointing Enduro 650b won't be on that list, with it's disappointingly small amount of BB drop.
  • 1 0
 @groghunter

El Guapo chain stays ~440mm
26" Enduro chain stays 419mm
(etc.)

So a paint job will not suffice.

650B advantages are noticeable, but small nonetheless. Smartest thing would be to get an extremely discounted 2014 26" Enduro.
Agree on the '15 650B model's shortcomings.
  • 1 0
 I'm actually looking at moving to a different suspension design: my short list at this point is a Devinci Spartan, & a Canfield Balance. I rode the Spartan Sunday, & was mighty impressed.

I was only being half serious with the paintjob comment, though I would argue that the similarities outweigh the differences, to a fairly large extent.
  • 1 0
 If you're looking for an all-round bike, try the Pivot Mach6, as well. If you prefer an outstanding descender, look at the Nomad, too.
  • 2 0
 I liked the Pivot Mach6 as long as I was standing on the pedals. But that seat angle...

@groghunter: no problem of pedal strokes with the Spartan ? I've tried one and it was horrible in technical terrain. It might have been set on the lowest position though. I didn't check that.
  • 1 0
 I didn't get a very long demo, but here were my impressions of the Spartan: Climbed about as well as my el guapo, maybe a hair better. that's not exactly outstanding, but serviceable for my terrain. came alive on the downhills. bike felt very composed, like everything that I threw at it was no big deal. I was definitely faster. thrived under body english, bike felt eager to throw the back end around if you wanted, without feeling skittish.
  • 2 0
 Geo and proportions are identical to the pushing three year old Turner Burner, which the frame can be purchased right now for near half the price of the Ibis. Granted its aluminum, weights a pound more and has 10mm less travel. Bet in climbs better, though, and feels more planted at speed due to the lower BB and slightly longer chain stay.
  • 2 0
 I think this is the bike they should have released as the 2nd gen. As a very proud Mojo HD owner, I'm in no need to upgrade any time soon, but the 2nd gen didn't quite do it for me. This however, would be right at the top of the wish list if I wanted to make a change any time soon. To those out there pondering, yes, these things pedal extremely well, so much so that it makes you wonder why you would bother with a hard tail if you like your down hills. With the Fox 36 they are bloody brilliant. Looking foward to a CC DBInline upgrade on mine. They are such a lively poppy and fun bike to ride. This version looks like it builds on all the right elements to deliver a ripper bike without going too long / low / slack.

The only caveat is that if you ride shore all the time, yep, that super slack HA on some other offerings would be preferable. For everyone else, pick your poison.
  • 2 0
 The nomad/sb6 style bikes are enduro race bikes, like xc or dh race bikes they cater to the extremes of that segment. How many people really exploit the short travel/steep angles of an xc bike? likewise the slack/long angles of the new breed enduro bikes? Very, very few in my opinion. Can't wait to see all the nomads riding mellow flow trails around here next year... Ibis has built a great looking trail bike... and it will not explode if you decide to race an enduro on it.
  • 2 0
 I've now logged almost 35 hours on my HD3 in Squamish and Whistler. It is spec'd exactly the way the one in the review is except it has RF SixC Cinch cranks and a KS dropper. I would say this review is about as accurate an assessment of the bike one could make. I would be hard pressed to take difference with anything said. If there was ever a perfect bike for me this is it.
  • 6 5
 I am in love with downhill bikes, but recently I can see more and more enduro bikes that look strong enough and can do an... uphill (!?). I am starting to consider a swap. I think that there should be one perfect bike instead of several specialised ones, so maybe a heavy enduro bike is the anwear. Afterall uphilling is just as common as a downhill. Just different direction. I still see nothing better then downhilling all the time, but any dowhill trail ends somewhere. What if there was a bike that could do all the downhill hucking and then be easy and fun to ride up the same hill?
  • 4 6
 just get a bike and ride it. You're going a tad bit too physiological on this. But yes, most 650b bikes can do what a lot of downhill bikes can do. Downhill bikes just can take a lot more. (harder drops, harder casings, and can handle faster speeds better.)
  • 1 0
 Just like you said: "too physiological".
  • 2 0
 Got my wording mixed up mate. I meant philosophical instead.
  • 3 0
 I feel like a lot of your "all-rounder" bike reviews end the same way… "we don't want to say it's an all rounder because that means it's not great anywhere… BUT IT IS!"
  • 10 0
 Which is either a testament to how f*cking good mountain bikes have gotten or to how much free food and craft beer they get at press camps. I'm going to assume the former; we got a lot of really, really ridiculously smart people in the industry nowadays making some kickass stuff, and I'm glad to see that it's getting nearly impossible to buy a bad bike anymore! ...Even if I can't afford them until they're 2-3 years down the line.
  • 1 0
 Well, having had the chance to ride this sweet baby, I would say that yes... This is the newest 'one-bike quiver' rig. Take it out. I dare you. Wink
  • 3 0
 I just tried to go on the Ibis Website but there are too many people currently on the server...this review worked wonders for Ibis
  • 1 0
 Ibis nailed this one! The bike looks sick! Been riding DW-link for a few years now and love how the suspension absorbed everything. This bike is starting to look like Pivots line up a bit. I'd definitely consider buying this in the future Smile
  • 1 0
 "While tricky sections can be mastered aboard the HD3, no amount of suspension sorcery can hide its travel when a fire is lit under your ass on steep gravel road climbs - it pedals decently, no doubt about it, but it's kinda what I'd expect from a machine in this travel bracket. Flipping the Cane Creek shock's Climb Switch obviously helps, but that'd be the case on any bike, so I have to judge them when left full-open. The verdict is that it matches expectations, which is to say that it doesn't pedal like it's a bacon topped donut."

While understand the importance of pedalling without the climb switch for the sake of trails that have ups as well as downs, the climb switch is there for a reason. Should be used in my mind, but I understand your rationale. Heavy hitting bikes have to have a leverage ratio that caters to rowdy descents and the switch is there to pick up the slack. Its a hell of a crutch and I'll gladly reach for on it on fire roads but might consider taking off on a technical ascent.
  • 4 0
 Excellent point. Imagine a 6'' bike that you don't even need to think about reaching for that crutch? That'd be sweet!
  • 1 0
 Soooooomewherrrrrre ooooverrrr the raiiiiinbowwww
  • 2 0
 Pedalling efficiency will obviously have a lot of importance for those racing the bike (ACC anyone? ). You don't want to take your hand off the bar each time you have pedalling section. An effecient bike can probably earn you seconds on a full day of racing.
  • 1 0
 Thats certainly a valid point! In line with racers who ride stiffer setups for speed.
  • 1 0
 This review can be summarized: wide rims, light wheels, grippy tires at low pressure are AWESOME, the new Ibis is OK, and you should either ride a Fox 36 or a Pike.

I did thoroughly enjoy the review - and thanks to PB for posting it when other sites just relay a press release.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy Quote: "My big Camelbak Podium bottle made contact with the DBinline's gold Climb Switch lever, which was a bit annoying." Could you have switched the shock's position, i.e. to facing upwards? Would that have had a big negative effect on the switch's accessibility? I'm asking because on shorter rides, I like the option of having a large water bottle, and having a bottle on the outside of the down tube is a no-go for me.
  • 2 1
 Is it only me who would rather see the strava, garmin, or any other log of the rides done on test bikes THAN all those tentatives the riders do to "describe" how a bike climbs or descends? I mean, information like the trails that where ridden, the time of year, the weather, the altitudes, the high gain, the speeds...
  • 1 0
 FOX's Race Program Manager, Mark Fitzsimmons. ''We re-valved the damper based on the feedback from the RAD 34 received from Enduro World Series testing,'' he explained when I questioned him about the refined feel. ''It now has less compression through the entire velocity range, but we focused more on lightening it in the low- to mid-speed velocities. We also changed how the shims opened by reducing the amount of preload on the piston face shim.''

- I fill the older damper with Maxima Racing Blue 7.5wt Smile Feels good.
  • 5 0
 Sploosh.
  • 3 0
 a mix of the Banshee Spitfire & Rune in carbon, what some of us are waiting on.
  • 2 2
 But can you run your brakes Moto Style without having the cable run against the headtube like the Nomad. Or have you sneaked something into the mix that allows you to run the cables in a Beautiful arch around the headtube no matter what side you prefer to run your brakes.
  • 2 0
 Mike, regarding the head tube angle that feels steeper than it is: could that be a function of the DW suspension that rides higher than the other bikes mentioned?
  • 1 0
 That seems unlikely if you consider running the same sag percentage (25-30%) on a given travel (150mm). You should have the same actual HA in the end when comparing bikes with similar starting HA and travel.

I think the real performance advantage comes from the combo of short CS, moderate front center and fork offset.
  • 1 0
 Is the sag really the same? What does "dw-link bikes tend to sit high in the travel" mean?
  • 2 0
 @Feldybikes,

Dw bikes tend to feel tall when riding them. Especially before the suspenison starts to cycle through its travel. More of a on the bike versus in the bike.

It takes a little getting used to at first, it will feel a little bit tippy at low speed technical descending.

But once you begin to the trust the bike, you don't really notice it.
  • 1 1
 I'm trying to figure out why I'm so excited about this bike and this is why: put 4 years between each update with a surprise launch and you can guarantee massive anticipation. Ibis is like the Apple of the bike world, you want to know what's coming next, and it's not always the best, but when it is, they deliver.
  • 2 0
 Sick people have no need to go on organ transplant waiting lists........ Always plenty of kidneys up for grabs in these comments sections.
  • 1 1
 Enjoyable review Mike, but how does PB manage to get a review of the HD3 out before the new Reign?? The Reign was released earlier (August) and still we wait. The HD3 in this build shows up other brands on pricing - its cheaper than the $8250 Reign 0 with some pretty good kit and carbon rims. Also think Ibis have the right idea re the geo, then again my 67 deg bike felt out of its depth on part of the trail I rode Sunday. It was only 50m of track of course but i would have cleared it more easily on a slacker bike.
  • 1 1
 another wonderful bike i can't afford. why not reviewing more human machines? i mean ferraris are good, but in the end i want to know if the new VW is good....some alu bikes in the middle range would be awesome. not everyone of us races enduro...
  • 2 0
 Lots of options out there for your Bruccio! It won't be spec'd the same way, but the frame build, mechanics and leverage ratios will remain consistent. Look at Transition's coming 2015 line - their models run as low as $3,500 for a bike spec'd with a narrow wide-mega range, Pike, Debonair Plus, Magic Marys, short stem, wide bars, decent rims and a shimano kit! Super solid, super reasonable for a brand new whip. Only thing it lacks is a dropper and your set!
  • 1 0
 yeah i know that Pasta. my dreambike would be a Tracer 27.5 or a Knolly...also i love the Capra and living in germany would be easy for me to get one...right now i'm rocking a specy enduro 2011.

fact is, if i spend 7000$ bucks for a bike i'm sure that it will be one hell of a ride! but how many of those bikes are sold in the world, in comparison to their cheaper alu siblings?
  • 2 0
 Good question! Luckily the benefits in spending above x amount of money on a bike are diminishing, little improvements here and there but its still a badass bike at that price point. $7,000 vs. $4,000 isn't the same jump as between $1,000 and $4,000 ya feel?

I just mean to point out as you understand that there are plenty of bikes at a more reasonable price level that even I initially thought. Just minus the XX1 Razz
  • 1 0
 Been looking for a new rig. Im torn between Bronson and this HD3 as of right now. I can get Bronson for a good price (about $5700 for X01). What do you guys think? I'm fairly tall (6'5), so the XL fit gotta be right.
  • 3 0
 This, and a GT350 please...
  • 1 0
 and those trails next door...
  • 3 0
 I think it is still more about the trails. The ultimate mountain biker should move every two years.
  • 1 5
flag spiderdonut007 (Nov 17, 2014 at 12:21) (Below Threshold)
 looks exactly like an enduro
  • 2 0
 Did Ibis decide to change the rear hub internals to the new racket system dt has instead of their crap pawls system?
  • 2 0
 I take exception to those wheels ... Failure-prone hubs. Otherwise, lookin good!
  • 12 0
 Going forward the rear hub is a DT 350 with 54 tooth engagement (7 degree). We also have 4 pawl 2x as strong drivers on the original hubs for a while now.
Hans
  • 1 0
 Build some derbys (same factory) w/ur hub choice for @$1200 or less.
  • 8 0
 Derby is a friend and we collaborated initially, but his rims are made in a different factory in a different country and are a different design. Hans
  • 1 0
 Thx for clarifying that.
  • 3 0
 Can you show us all the bikes being tested in sedona?
  • 2 0
 like we all wanted a nomad, then we were like "idk, that SB6c looks good too" now... now we just have no idea.
  • 2 0
 All three look like fantastic bikes, but I don't think this will be in the same league as a Nomad as a descending beast. Which is probably a good thing for most people.
  • 4 5
 No doubt. I am seriously bummed I bought an SB5c last week now. It will be for sale soon I'm sure.
  • 5 2
 People selling their HDR´s in 3...2...1
  • 1 0
 Yey!
  • 3 3
 Here they only show the one with green paint. But i cannot begin to understand how they approve to have one painted exactly with the same colors as the new nomad. Head of Ibis Painting Department, you´re so fired.
  • 4 0
 Because people will buy it? I know that's the one I'm getting.
  • 1 0
 When the Demo 8 came out they just used the exact colour schemes from the older Wilson models. It happens
  • 3 0
 Also, the Ibis is blue and red, not blue and pink.
  • 4 0
 Ok, its blue and red...but please...you instantly think of the Nomad with that color schemes. Don't get me wrong. The bike is awesome! the bike is very good looking! but of all the color palettes, you had to pick THAT combination?
  • 3 0
 Not to mention, Ibis had the baby blue color scheme on the regular mojo for from 2007-2010... What's old is new.
  • 1 0
 Please don't ride bikes with solid bright colors on unofficial trails! Thanks
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy Why are the bars slammed all the way, not enough traction otherwise? Just curious, seems like they're really far down.
  • 1 0
 The bike has a 160mm 36 on the front and I'm riding some pretty technical climbs, as well as loose descents, so some extra weight up front is nice.
  • 2 0
 Why is my wife throwing my cloths out the window ! I only looked ... Sorry no wifi homeless (
  • 3 3
 My Ibis MOJO Hd was such a sick bike, ended up selling it last month because 26" wheels are becoming obsolete. Was a sad day.
I ended up getting a Santa Cruz Nomad instead, which is also a very sick bike.
  • 1 0
 I also have the new Nomad and love it. Still ride the HD as a trail bike but the Nomad just shreds on the down. No problem with climbing on slow tech stuff either on the Nomad. I love both bikes and that's why I couldn't part with the HD, although my buddy keeps wanting to take it off my hands. Plus, THREADED BOTTOM BRACKET was a deciding factor to buy the Santa Cruz. Great decision on that Ibis! The wife saw me looking at some Ibis porn earlier and shook her head.
  • 2 0
 This looks all good! This is the geometry that I wish my Bronson had. Just a bit lower and longer.
  • 5 2
 DW-link FTW!!
  • 1 0
 geometry looks great on paper. so whats the better ride? mach 6 or new mojo?
  • 1 1
 Not to be "that guy," but I tested a Devinci spartan yesterday, & it should be on your list as well. amazingly composed bike, took everything you could give it, & begged for more.
  • 1 0
 I'm sure the ride is about the same. Just about the same bike
  • 5 3
 Eight. THOUSAND. dollars.
  • 5 1
 Suck it up princess
  • 1 0
 Just lamenting the fact that my wallet is a tad anorexic at the moment...
  • 2 0
 Ibis has done a good execution of the DW link. Them and Turner's.
  • 2 1
 Don't forget pivot. Smile
  • 1 0
 Wait....they call this an enduro/trailbike and it doesn't have ISCG05 tabs on it?
  • 3 0
 It does. Its a removable plate that slips over the BB shell just like on the HDR. Its a great replaceable system that allows you to use, not use, or replace bent tabs.
  • 3 0
 I stand corrected. Awesome.
  • 2 0
 mojo is one of the nicest bikes ive ever ridden.
  • 1 0
 Does anyone run a waterbottle down near the bb like that? Doesn't it get covered in dust/mud etc?
  • 1 3
 No doubt a great bike. With the seat pushed so far forward and the bars mounted so low as on the photo, no wonder this particular bike climbed well. The forward seat position would even help it descend super steep stuff too. Complete nightmare for anybody's power or knees if you had to pedal seated far on any non-steep terrain though. Not too helpful to write a review with such an impractical setup?
  • 3 0
 Perhaps the picture is deceiving. The seat angle on the HD is right in line with other offerings such as as the Yeti SB6C (73.5 deg), Santa Cruz Nomad (74.2), Santa Cruz Bronson (73 deg), Itense Tracer T275 (74.5 deg) ... blah blah. So it is by no means more upright than any of those bikes. With the old Mojo HD, if you have the seat post right up, with the fork extended at 160 mm, yep, the seat angle is too far back and you end up loading up the rear end a bit too much. When you reduce the travel in the front end, it feels about right. So from a bum on seat point of view, this would bring it more into line as to where it should be without having to drop the front end to get a more efficient pedalling platform. Not sure why the current set up would be so impractical.
  • 1 1
 As a cash rich time poor person, I welcome this flotilla of exceptional bikes that are now available. #goldenDays. Jokes aside the prices are mental.
  • 2 0
 These shock yokes are ugly. Please stop using them bike makers...
  • 2 0
 So 26" wheels are now officially dead in Mtb. Shame the two can't coexist.
  • 1 1
 Hey Scot Nicol but we want to put 180mm forks on them so where are frames for us ? Wink
  • 3 2
 Best looking bike that Ibis has made.
  • 2 0
 That is saying something... I demo'd a HDR on Porcupine Rim...if this is all around better...WOW.
  • 2 1
 While this new HD3 offers improvements in many aspects, it does not do so when it comes to the look. The previous Mojo / HD(R) design is iconic, it's most beautiful mountainbike ever!
  • 1 2
 We'll have to agree to disagree about that. I think the previous generation HDR is an unattractive bike considering what else is out there.
  • 2 0
 I must ride this trail.
  • 1 0
 Ah, that color tho...I was hoping solid bright colors were out!
  • 1 2
 The old mojo looked a little awkward in my opinion bit this thing looks plain sexy. Everything else seems awesome too, i want.
  • 1 0
 what's that stuff on the drive side chain stay?
  • 2 1
 I'm reminded of the Pivot Mach 6.
  • 2 1
 AWESOME!
  • 1 0
 Pretty nice!
  • 2 3
 Looks vey similar to the specialized enduro!
  • 3 3
 Too short.
  • 3 6
 Ill wait for the Yeti SB6c.
  • 2 0
 Bike is a ton better. Wait for the reviews.
  • 10 0
 @reed1 - I've got an SB6c here as well and have put a load of time on it. Very different bike, even if the travel is similar. Review soon.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy Haha I know you do. Waiting for the review.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy Why the 68mm bb size???
  • 2 5
 Correct me if I'm wrong but it kinda looks like an Endure to me...
  • 3 4
 Enduro*
  • 3 0
 Its the other way around. If I am not mistaken Ibis has had that look since 2005. Specialized Enduros didn't steal that look, design until 2010.
  • 2 5
 looks like a specialized enduro....
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