First Look: Ibis' Longest, Slackest, and Burliest Ripley

Apr 30, 2019
by Mike Levy  



The Ripley name has been in Ibis' catalog since 2011 when the OG model was introduced as a fun-loving trail bike for riders who were looking for efficiency and sharp handling. That first Ripley eventually got some geometry tweaks that created the longer (but still pretty short) LS model that was itself revamped in 2017 with a new rear-end for added tire clearance and rigidity.

That means that this entirely new bike is the fourth-generation Ripley, and with the most progressive geometry that Ibis has ever used and a very Ripmo-esque stance, something tells me it's also the most capable Ripley yet.

The bullet points read like a 'how to make your trailbike rip' recipe: The head angle is slacker, the seat angle is way steeper, and the reach is way reach-ier, too. There's still 120mm of travel out back, but those funky eccentrics have been replaced with compact links, and the lower one is actually lifted straight off the Ripmo.

It's still on 29'' wheels, of course, and it's also lighter; Ibis says they dropped 0.65lb off the frame, with a claimed weight of 5.6lb with a Fox DPS shock.

Ibis Ripley V4 Details

• Intended use: trail riding
• Wheel size: 29"
• Rear wheel travel: 120mm
• Fork travel: 130mm
• New carbon frame
• Revised dw link suspension
• 2.6'' tire clearance
• Sizes: sm, med, lrg, xlrg
• Weight: 26.07lb (as pictured)
• Frame only: 5.6lb (claimed, w/ Fox DPS)
• MSRP: $4,099 - $9,399 USD (as pictured)
• More info: www.ibiscycles.com


Ibis Ripley Photo by Dane Perras
The all-new Ripley looks a bit different, but it's still sporting 120mm of travel and 29'' wheels. Ibis has made their trail bike longer, slacker, and lighter.

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There are six complete bike options, starting at $4,099 USD for an NX spec and Fox's Performance suspension, and you can spend as much as $9,399 USD if you want XTR, more carbon fiber, and a Factory-level fork and shock from Fox. If you prefer to do it your own way, a frame and Fox DPS shock costs $2,999 USD.

Ibis also offers a bunch of different upgrade options, so if you want a set of carbon rims on your entry or mid-level Ripley, you can get 'em for much less than if you bought a set on their own.


Ibis Ripley Photo by Dane Perras
With 45mm of reach added across the board, the new Ripley is much roomier than its predecessors.


The Ripley Goes Long

It's probably fair to say that Ibis has been one of the more conservative brands on the geometry front over the years, and especially if we're talking about the previous three versions of the Ripley. To be fair, 2011 was about fifty years ago now when it comes geo, but a large-sized V1 Ripley had a 406mm reach back then, just for comparison's sake.

The revised LS model that showed up in 2017 at 428mm, but this new bike is the largest leap so far at 475mm for a large. In fact, Ibis says that reach numbers have increased by 45mm on average across the board, so they're more in-line with everyone else now.


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That evolution can be seen up front as well, with the OG Ripley's head angle going from 68-degrees to 67.5 on the LS model in 2017. Jump forward a couple more years and the new Ripley has a 66.5-degree head angle and is intended for 44mm offset forks. There's an even bigger change at the seat tube; 72-degrees on the OG to 73-degrees on the LS, to a much steeper 76-degrees on this bike. The chainstays have been shortened by 12mm to 432mm, too, which is right around where I like 'em to be.

So, 120mm-travel 29er with a 66.5-degree head angle, 76-degrees for the seat tube, and 475mm reach on a large Ripley. Ibis, is this really you? Let's compare.


Evil Following MB 29er with Maxxis High Roller II 2.5 WT 3C EXO TR Tyres
Transition Smuggler review
Evil's Following MB and Transition's Smuggler are both 120mm-travel 29ers with similar geo to the new Ripley.


Evil's much-loved Following also rolls on 29'' wheels and has 120mm of travel, and it gets a 66.8-degree head angle and 73.7-degrees at the seat when in the slackest position. A large has a 452mm reach, too. Transition's Smuggler is in the same small-travel, big-fun category as well, and it gets a 66-degree front-end, 75.8-degree seat angle, and a 475mm reach on a large.

Sure, I've gone on and on about how much I've liked Ibis' compact, nimble geo, but let's be real here: I'm in the (very small) minority, and they had to move forward, especially given the older Ripley's dated numbers. Ibis ain't the first to the fun, short-travel bike party, but they're here now.


Ibis Ripley Photo by Dane Perras
The bike still has 120mm of rear-wheel-travel, but the suspension layout has been revised for more rigidity and progression.


Updated DW Link Suspension

Every single version of the Ripley is known for two things: sharp handling, and a sporty, efficient ride. The latter comes from Ibis' use the dw link system, but are some big changes on this new Ripley. Previously, Ibis employed a dual-eccentric system where the eccentrics acted as very short links.

They originally went with eccentrics route because it let the design play nice with front derailleurs and made for a clean looking layout, but what the hell is a front derailleur? Never heard of him.


Ibis Ripley Photo by Dane Perras
Ibis Ripley Photo by Dane Perras
That lower link comes from the longer-travel Ripmo and is a big reason for the claimed increase in rigidity.


Without that concern, and because the upper eccentric limited seatpost insertion, Ibis decided to go with a more traditional dual-link layout that they're claiming has ''significantly reduced the frame weight and increases stiffness.'' It also makes for a bike that looks a lot like the longer-travel Ripmo, which is precisely where Ibis stole the Ripley's new lower link from.

The new link rotates on IGUS bushings that come with a lifetime warranty, while bearings are used in the upper linkage assembly. The shock is also metric-sized now, too, at 190mm long with 45mm of stroke.



Ibis Ripley Photo by Dane Perras
It looks a bit like the Ripmo, doesn't it?


The Little Things

Onto the details. Changing cables on the previous Ripley required you to remove bolt-on caps so that the opening was larger and you didn't throw your bike through a wall. It helped, that's for sure, but the job could still be a PIA sometimes. They're gone now, though, replaced with molded-in internal tubes so that you can push the cable in at one end and have it come out the other, no swearing required. The bottom bracket is threaded, just like before, and there's now a splined ring around the shell that you can mount a chain guide onto when you want to go down-country-ing.


Ibis Ripley Photo by Dane Perras
Ibis Ripley Photo by Dane Perras
Other details include more room for a larger bottle, internal cable guides, and a splined interface at the bottom bracket that accepts an ISCG adapter.


And speaking of having fun on short-travel bikes, Ibis has finally ditched their lengthy seat tubes to make room for long-stroke dropper posts. Word is that the medium to extra-large sizes work with 170mm (or even 185mm) party posts, while the small-sized bikes can easily run a 125mm to 150mm dropper.

Other things include a bit more room for larger water bottles, "standard" Boost spacing instead of that Super Boost thing, and a 1x-specific design.




The fresh Ripley is new and interesting, but does it still have the near-telekinetic handling and efficient suspension action that its predecessors could brag about? Has Ibis managed to add burliness to their 120mm-travel trail bike without taking away its fun-loving nature? We'll have a full review of the new Ripley within the coming days that answers those questions and finds out if the new Ripley is still a Ripley.


329 Comments

  • + 129
 Perfect geo, combined with light weight and DW suspension. I've got to try one of these.
  • + 5
 light weight indeed!
  • + 76
 The rent's too damn high!
  • - 4
flag ratedgg13 (Apr 30, 2019 at 10:14) (Below Threshold)
 @endlessblockades: seems awfully expensive given the build kits. Was pricing out a Ripmo vs some other "boutique" brands of similar travel and the Ibis was consistently more expensive for a worse build kit... Sorry Ibis, no customer here with that.
  • + 24
 The weight is a bit decieving, the 26lbs as pictured is a XTR build with carbon wheels, crank, bars, 34, DPS (one of the lightest shocks on the market) and Hans Dampf/Nobby Nic combo - which are pretty light for 2.6 tires as well.

The entry level build likely weighs close to 29-30lbs. Which is competitive for sure, but not revolutionary. That being said, even at a heavier 28lbs for lower-end no-carbon builds, this is still the perfect bike for most XC/TR riders out there.
  • + 6
 @PHeller: Fanatik lists a large frame with shock as 6.13 lbs.. Not bad.
  • - 16
flag OneTrustMan (Apr 30, 2019 at 10:45) (Below Threshold)
 @PHeller:
Still not bad.
But my XL Jeffsy CF Pro is around 28lbs. ( 2017 )
If I would buy lighter wheels I could bring it down at least to 27lbs.
  • + 5
 @PHeller: I was referring to the frame weight. My enduro bike is 31 pounds with carbon cranks, rims, bars, frame, and air suspension, so even 29 pounds is light to me.
  • + 17
 @endlessblockades: This is why I'm back in college at 37 years old LOL!!
  • + 21
 @OneTrustMan: Seriously?? You compare this to a YT?? Brother, you need your head checked.
  • + 3
 Weights are never what they seem... just built the large Eagle GX level bike over on fanatik (who weigh every part and frame size themselves). Came to 30lbs. Not heavy, but not light for a 120/130 bike either.
  • + 9
 downcountry AF
  • + 20
 @PHeller: The only thing that matters is frame (w/shock) weight. Everything else is choices.
  • + 2
 @OneTrustMan: Cool story bro
  • + 4
 @themountain: yes, in terms of refinement of execution in design, no comparison. In terms of weight, why not compare? In terms of component spec, why not compare? In terms of performance out on the trail, why not compare? In terms of price...no comparison.
  • - 5
flag DONKEY-FELTCHER (Apr 30, 2019 at 18:52) (Below Threshold)
 Dw bikes>hL bikes@OneTrustMan:
  • + 2
 @vonroder77: I say good for u on that one! That's awesome!
  • + 25
 @ratedgg13: I think you missed something. Ibis is consistently BETTER priced, and has better parts. You may be being "tricked", for instance Pivot has XO1 builds that seem nicely priced but have a bunch of GX stuff on them and mediocre wheels and tires, SLX brakes where Ibis specs XT, etc.

Honestly. their builds are the best in the business. I have lots of love for other bikes, and I don't even currently own an Ibis, but I can tell you that of all the bikes I've built and all the companies I've had to work with, Ibis is one of the best and their builds are second to none. Industry guys and wrenches with far more experience than I will tell you this. I'm only telling you this not because I'm an Ibis fanboy, but because I think bike companies who "do it right" should get recognition, and part of that includes correcting misinformation.
  • + 11
 handlebar is too narrow, should be up to 900mm by now.
  • - 6
flag vonroder77 (Apr 30, 2019 at 23:58) (Below Threshold)
 @bohns1: Thanks! Gotta try and get me that Dentist money LOL!!
  • + 3
 @trialsracer: completely agree. Part of the reason I ended up on a Ripmo. Got a pretty much stock gx kit and upgraded to Code RSC brakes and then later a Renthal Bar for fit. I’m a 200lber and usually trash house branded hubs very quickly, and I’ve even been happy with their base wheels (at the same weight as I9 enduro s wheels last year). Pivot builds stick too much with Shimano for me and they name their builds after their rear derailleur with everything else cheaped out. If I liked Shimano, I would have just got a NX on the Ibis and ordered an XT kit derailleur and shifter for just over $100. For less than $4300, you could have the equivalent of most brands XT builds.
  • + 1
 Yeah, this looks very good. Honestly, It was a love hate/relationship with my 2016 Ripley LS. Yes, lightweight, I could bunny hop very high, but peddle strike hell. Good peddle platform, but not the right seat angle for me while seated climbing.
  • + 0
 Perfect geo? What's the BB height? That ruined the Ripley LS for me. No good anywhere near rocks.
  • + 3
 @danlovesbikes: most of us are on too large cranks anyways; several biometric studies suggest that smaller cranks are more efficient and reduce knee strain/injury, plus most of us agree they help on the downs. I read a paper where researchers went down to as small as 120mm cranks and saw no reduction in output efficiency.
  • + 0
 @danlovesbikes:

this bike probably needs a 140 fork for a decent BB height.
  • + 0
 @hamncheez: output != torque though.

longer cranks = broader torque curve and longer power pulses - which folks with slow twitch muscles benefit from. JMO/JME
  • + 3
 @danlovesbikes they raised the B.B. slightly on this one. I’ve had time on both bikes and agree the B.B. was on the low side with the old model. This one seems to be just right and putting a 140mm fork wont hurt.
  • + 1
 @hamncheez: I just switched over from 175 to 165mm cranks (honestly every Ibis/low bottom bracket bike should come with 170 or 165 cranks) and I used to run 170 on previous bikes...My cadence is a lot smoother albeit faster than 175 but I do notice slightly more effort/strength is needed on those technical trails-y climbs over rocks/roots that require half-cranks. Very slight but noticeable. I just stand up and smash up those types of climbs now since the power is a lot smoother and I'm less affected by pedal feedback over bumps. Also knees definitely feel better on the 165 than 175.
  • + 3
 @danlovesbikes: It's 335 mm according to ibiscycles.com. Gen 3 was 330mm. This thing is basically a smuggler with slightly more fork offset and a touch shorter wheelbase.
  • + 2
 @hamncheez: I'd be inclined to agree with that based purely on my own experiences. I'm 1.9m and run a 170mm and it feels great.
  • + 1
 @geno91: yep, I only had a 120mm initially and it was a pretty awful experience.
  • + 3
 @mm732: I'd say so. My mate has the original Ripley with a 140mm and rides it well. My other problem was also my height. 1.9m hanging off the back of the bike on clumbs. Short stays with slack ST angle = me over the rear axle.
  • + 2
 @PHeller:

Are we still counting grams? Given that the components account for about 70-80% of a bike's weight, why should any of this come as a surprise? I mean, you can build up a 29er Enduro to be a 26lb bike, but not sure if it'd last more than 1-2 runs at Whistler!
  • + 1
 @FRguild: light and durable should be an option at this point if you are paying $$$ for it right?
  • + 2
 @FRguild: I used to run with foam grips to save precious grams... Riding has changed so much in terms of speed and technicality that those old bikes wouldn't last a run. I now have DD tyres and Cushcores in both wheels...
  • + 67
 My virtual brake lever squeeze test says this is about as perfect as a trail bike gets.
  • + 47
 NX on a $4100 build...ahhh "boutique"
  • + 18
 I can't disagree with you, that is more than a chuck of change. But, is there really a full carbon frame complete bike out there on the market right now, that was designed/released in the last year or two, that doesn't also have NX level components for about the same price? Outside of some direct-to-consumer brands, I don't think so. I'm not saying we as consumers need to passively accept these prices but are they really that surprising any of us anymore?
  • + 12
 @rkillianjr46: check out the giant TRANCE ADVANCED PRO 29 2
  • + 29
 GG has carbon and cheaper then Ibis in NX build @rkillianjr46:
  • + 15
 @naleski: That bike pretty much proves my point. It's $4500 but you do go a level up to GX. You get the heavier rhythm fork instead of performace 34 on this new ripley. Giant uses their house dropper and Ibis uses an KS. I can't comment on which is the better value there. Yes, Giant gives you their own carbon wheels which I suppose gives you some value too. But its a similarly priced and spec'ed bike otherwise. Trek has a fuel ex that's similarly spec'ed and similarly priced (and that's with an alloy rear triangle) Specialized has a full carbon stumpy that's also spec'ed and priced similarly. This Ibis is hardly the first full carbon frame with these components at the $4000 mark. I'm not happy about it anymore than anyone else. This just seems to be the norm though and has been for about the last product cycle or so.
  • + 1
 @rkillianjr46: Intense is probably considered direct to consumer, but an NX build sniper is like 3600 or something.
  • + 7
 @nlibot33: Yes it is. But they are direct to consumer, and their bike has an alloy rear triangle. Not at all a bad thing. Otherwise the spec sheet reads with components at similar or lower levels. If GG wasn't a direct sales brand I bet their cheapest complete bikes would be in the same price range.
  • + 4
 @pinhead907: True. Intense is a sort of hybrid of direct to consumer but also sold in shops. Before they changed their sales model though you can bet that sniper would have probable been over the $4100 of this bike. Probably also why intense bikes were almost always in monthly deal posts on this site.
  • + 15
 wow, $1500 to upgrade from NX to XT? Only difference is a carbon bar, Thomson stem and XT groupset (1 derailleur, 1 shifter).
  • + 4
 @rkillianjr46: intense alloy rear? No
  • + 10
 yep, and Guerrilla Gravity sells NX Trail Pistol with a frame made in the U.S. for $400 less.
  • + 6
 @mm732: I think he meant the GG has an aluminum rear triangle, which I believe it does. The Intense does not.

Reviewing my own post, the Sniper NX build is actually 3499 - $101 less than my initial guess ;-) The GX build is about 4500. Don't care enough to make a detailed comparison, but the GX Ripley seems maybe a decent price when bench marked against that.
  • + 10
 @rkillianjr46:
Giants in house dropper uses the wintek cartridge, same as the highline and some other higher end units. Giants carbon wheels come with a 2 year no questions asked (as long as it breaks when you were riding) replacement, and a tiered system so you pay 25% of MSRP if you break it riding within 4 years. It’s great value whether you somehow break them or not
  • + 5
 @pabiking: Plus a BikeYoke vs. KS E30i dropper, along with XT brakes, rotors, cranks, bottom bracket, and cassette vs. the SRAM stuff. Bit more than just a shifter and derailleur. I think that the carbon bar, branded stem, significantly better dropper, plus the XT group justifies the price difference.
  • + 3
 @rkillianjr46: before they changed their model, the sniper would have been appx $8000...before Jenson sold it for 54% off MSRP!
  • + 1
 @parkourfan: Yea not too shabby at all! Especially since most people will be upgrading that Trance29 Throwing a 140 fork on & It's light too.. so it's a close call being that they are almost the same "type" (not saying what kind of cat/country bikes these are in.. lol) but that Ibis is sooooo appealing and i'm sure i'd be upgrading the same features like drivetrain & 140 fork.. Two great options for a bike that does 80-90% of majority trails we all ride.
  • + 2
 @rkillianjr46: Intense has a carbon rear triangle.
  • + 3
 @pabiking:

plus better cassette, cranks, brakes, and dropper post. still a big difference.

and i don't see $700 in value over the GX which is what i think most buyers would get, and at a couple hundo less than the GX ripmo.
  • + 11
 @bicycle019: You can add the carbon bar and BikeYoke dropper to the NX build for $240, and a Thompson X4 stem is $115 aftermarket, which puts you at ~$4600. The XT build is $5600. An XT groupset is not worth $1000+ over NX - retail pricing is $800 (brakes included) vs ~$500 for NX Eagle and Level brakes.

In other words, you could get the NX build with the carbon bars and better dropper, then go out and buy a complete XT groupset and Thompson stem and still come out $200-$300 ahead of buying the XT build - and that's before selling off the unused NX groupset.
  • + 8
 @ChristophColombo: I think the main problem with any NX Eagle set is that you get saddled with that old school Shimano hub. So if you ever want to get a nicer cassette (the NX is a bit of an anchor even if you aren't a weight weeinie) then you have to get new wheels or get someone to relace a new hub into that. Fixing that isn't super cheap and kind of sucks for a new bike. I'm not a big fan of that XT build either. That XT cassette is just shitty and stupid for a nearly 6k$ bike. The 37t to 46t jump is idiotic. Shimano just smashed it out late so they could say they have a competitive cassette without doing anything other than bolting on a larger plate. GX build doesn't look bad at a glance. Those Deore brakes work fine.
  • + 1
 @parkourfan: As of Sea Otter announcement the Giant carbon frames also have a 2 year no questions frame replacement. As long as you damage it while actually riding or racing.
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: Ibis does sell replacement freehub bodies ($70) for their branded hubs, so no new wheels or hubs required if you want to upgrade the NX cassette. But I would agree that the GX build is the best option.

My comment was mainly directed at the guy claiming that the XT build was worth the extra money over the NX build though, which was just plain wrong.
  • + 2
 @Svinyard: Whats the problem with the jump from 37 to 46t? I usually just shift to the granny gear when Im tired- its not that big of a deal.
Yeah it doesnt shift that nice but who cares really- a 11-46 is about 30-40€ - the NX is more than doube (nearely triple) the price.
  • + 2
 @ChristophColombo: that was exactly my point. Their pricing between groups is bizarre. Frame only is $3k, but for $1k more you get a complete NX bike - could barely get a fork for that.
  • + 1
 @Leethal-1: yes I know. I was referencing the GG trail pistol frame as having an alloy rear
  • + 1
 @bicycle019: not a bad deal at all for those components. I still stand by my original point that most bike brands sell pretty similarly spec’ed full carbon bikes in the $4k range.
  • + 5
 @nlibot33: GG is a new kid on the block. If they had an EWS team and several NA riders on the payroll, and the staff to support those riders, they'd be more $$$. Not saying that's a bad thing, my next bike is probably a GG but because I like the product and where it's built. I'm not trying to save a few dollars.
  • + 3
 @pabiking: $1266 actually (the frameset is $2833 with the Performance shock), but yes, they're probably taking a bit of a loss on the NX build or pricing the frame-only option a little higher than strictly necessary due to perceived values. That's pretty normal. For example, Specialized sells the Stumpjumper frame for $3200, and the first complete carbon build, which uses the same frame, is $4500, also with an NX build.

The main issue is the XT build, unless they're preemptively pricing for the release of 12-speed XT. Pricing on that particular model makes no sense relative to the SRAM builds.

And again, I was responding to the guy claiming that the XT build was worth paying for over the NX build.
  • + 5
 @Svinyard: Ibis gives the option to swap the freehub for no charge prior to shipping. We upgrade a lot of nx builds to a gx cassette and better brakes for a pretty small upgrade fee all the time
  • + 1
 @OzarkBike:
Yup. Any of their ‘19 carbon components sold after April 1st. Stems, bars, frames, wheels, etc

The announcement comes after they redesigned all their carbon wheels and made them hookless as well, so I’m sure they’re expecting a very low failure rate to offer that no questions asked ride replacement option
  • + 1
 @pabiking: When you put it that way, it seems like a hell of a deal.
  • + 2
 @parkourfan: But only 2 years isn't much to celebrate when other brands are doing lifetime
  • + 2
 @pabiking: Frame only options are your friend...
  • + 1
 @ChristophColombo: go frame only and be done with it.. Then search for the component deals online and use some parts from the previous bike where u can.. I've saved substantially doing this with a sb130 build. Patience is key
  • + 2
 @NotNamed: I value smooth crisp flawless shifting.. But then again I'm old, picky and want what I want
  • + 1
 @ChristophColombo: And in all honesty, what do you think you will get for that second-hand NX groupset? $5??
  • + 1
 @bohns1: It's obvious then why you go frame-only and spec what you want. Seems like with most brands today, this one included, if you want something that shifts well, you're paying over $6500...
  • - 1
 @rkillianjr46: pretty much any Niner is several hundred dollars cheaper
  • - 1
 @nlibot33: GG's carbon bikes have an aluminum rear triangle... talk about reduced manufacturing cost!
  • + 1
 @Climbtech: I see takeoff NX groupsets going for around $100-$200, but it doesn't matter because you're already $200-$300 ahead on the deal. Anything extra is just icing on the cake.
  • + 1
 @bohns1: Oh for sure, most of my bikes have been frame-up builds. I was just making the point that the XT build was definitely not worth the extra $1500 over the NX build.
  • + 1
 @rkillianjr46:
Yeah NX really wouldn't be an option for me. Most of the time, I just buy a frame a transition parts over. Maybe upgrade a couple.
  • + 1
 @probikesupplynewport: this is freaking nice! I didn't know that! Good on Ibis
  • + 1
 @Climbtech: yep.. That's why it's frame only and then just move my existing xo1 /xx1 mix over
  • + 1
 @ChristophColombo: no for sure it isn't.
  • + 0
 @NotNamed: I mean it's a nearly 6k$ bike. It works but dang man, for that money I DEFINITELY want something mint that works REALLY well. They should have used a SRAM Cassette or Sunrace etc.
  • + 2
 @cortosis2009: that’s not what I’m seeing when I look on niner’s site. The full carbon jet 9 (which I would say is the most similar bike to the Ripley) with NX is $4200. And that’s with a rhythm fork instead of the lighter performance one. Again full carbon frames with an NX drivetrain and similar level components seems to be the norm for the industry today. I’m by no means endorsing that pricing model just pointing out that no one should really be shocked to see that anymore.
  • + 1
 @sutter2k: that certainly makes sense. If I didn’t go back to 29 for my most recent bike purchase I likely would have gone with a frame only and swapped parts. For what it’s worth I’ve been happy with the NX drivetrain in terms of performance so far. It’s at least equal to if not better than the SLX/XT mix I had on my last bike. Heavier? Apparently so but I can’t say notice it simply because the bikes are too different.
  • + 2
 @SherlockOoms: Considering that GG welds their rear triangles in house, the cost reduction probably isn't as much as you might think.
  • + 3
 @rkillianjr46: no they shouldn't be surprised.. These boutique companies have their demographic that are more than willing to pay the price of entry.
  • + 2
 @naleski: Yep! Not completely comparable bikes but my $3500 USD Trance advanced 1 is certainly not 57% (%price diff) less capable/fun than similar spec XT Ibis at $5600.
  • + 1
 @pabiking: blame Shimano for that. They charge a company like Ibis more than what you and I can buy XT from Chain Reaction. If you want XT, it’s better to just upgrade the NX yourself aftermarket.
  • + 1
 @whambat: Agreed. It shows just how screwed up Shimano's pricing model is when people are comparing NX to XT. Shimano's lack of willingness to control aftermarket pricing combined with their shrinking share of OEM sales is hurting them big time and is kind of hard to understand why they don't take action (besides apparently shutting down Chain Reaction sales to US and Canada). Combine that with the fact that Ibis is doing a little magic and selling the complete NX build at less than what a frame, wheelset and a fork would cost you...
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: a new freehub body which take 10 minutes to replace is only 60 bucks.
  • + 1
 @butters1996: I was gonna type: get rid of that pig that is the cassette and there's nothing really wrong with NX.
  • + 1
 @butters1996: I've seen that mentioned. Very cool!
  • + 2
 @whambat: It's actually not even that. If you use the aftermarket MSRP of XT components from when they were released a few years back, the whole groupset with brakes comes to $960. Even if you use that price, it's STILL marginally less expensive to buy the NX build, slap on the carbon bar and dropper upgrades, buy a Thompson stem, and buy an XT group than it is to buy the complete XT build. When I did my price comparison earlier, I used US retailers to get the $800 groupset price that I used - CRC sells it for $500.

Ibis doesn't get charged more than CRC for OEM components unless something is really screwy - CRC definitely gets better pricing that your local bike shop (their retail prices are roughly the same as the shop's cost), but bike manufacturers get better pricing than that. That's how CRC is able to get their prices so low - they purchase parts on OEM contracts due to their ownership of Nukeproof/Vitus/etc and sell the extras. Also, CRC is banned from selling Shimano to the US now.
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: You can get a replacement freehub for the ibis hub for $70 and then you're xd ready.
  • + 21
 Ibis is really on top of the game these days!
  • + 2
 They got the flag on SantaCruz area I guess...
  • + 19
 Fox Performance suspension on a $7K X01 equipped bike makes me sad...
  • + 7
 me too. so much to be sad about in today’s world.
  • + 7
 They probably wanted to put that part of the budget towards somewhere it actually increases performance.
  • + 5
 Not $7k.....
$6700 XO1 and Performance. $7100 for XO1 and Factory front/rear.
  • + 2
 You have options. You can get factory on an NX build if you so desire. If you go through an Ibis dealer, they will likely be happy to put Fox performance on an XTR build. Choices are nice
  • + 3
 The performance is actually really good from Fox. I actually think its way better than my Factory Fit 4 fork. Dont judge a book by its cover. You can also upgrade to Factory for a small fee. TBH i would put a dpx2 on this frame right off the bat.
  • + 1
 @Snowsed341: was looking at sizes last night, as I had the same dpx 2 thought. Fox doesn’t make a metric one that small. Would take some creativity, but I think it’s doable still....
  • + 0
 @mountainyj: there's so little difference between this and the ripmo, it's probably worth it just to do the ripmo for a dpx2 IMO. more bb clearance and you can still run a 140 or 145 fork if you wanted to.
  • + 4
 @mm732:

down-fork a Ripmo?

blasphemy!

up-fork a Ripley?

ka-ching!!!!!!
  • + 1
 @mountainyj: yep.. Like I be the dpx2 on my sb130.. Was just a bit finicky to get it to feel the way I wanted with spacers/pressures and what not.
  • + 12
 Ripley V4 vs SB100 vs Ryve115 stat!!!

(Just my opinion, but I think these three are different from Smugg, GG-TP, and FollowingMB. Sure the Geo is similar, but these seem more towards the XC end (w/o being XC) and those seem more burly Enduro-y (w/o being enduro).

Am I making sense...prolly not...carry on.
  • + 1
 I think you're right as far as those other bikes leaning more enduro, but I kinda think that's because they are heavy enough frames that they can't get xc-light. I put a gen 4 ripley next to a smuggler today - I tend to think the Ibis will be plenty durable (it's quite stiff, at least) and be able to keep up with those other bikes on the "enduro but not quite" side, while still being at home with a BC bike race type of build (xc but not quite). My .02.
  • + 13
 Ibis just kicks major ass!!! They nailed The geo on both the Ripley and Ripmo. 2.6 tires and no dumb ass superboost gimmicky crap.. well done!!!
  • + 2
 I just wish they had gotten the geometry dialed like this on the LS. It was still way too short, glad to see them finally get it.
  • + 13
 That's a downcountry MONSTER
  • + 7
 NAH! not country enough gotta have 2 water bottles in the main triangle
  • + 8
 I like. But I would have of just had a straight top tube. I don't see any advantage of the kinked top tube. Any gains in stand over mid tube might be a mm or two.
  • + 44
 The bend in that top tube is to increase clearance from your nut sack. If you don't see the advantage then you have bigger problems.
  • + 7
 @rh00p: I haven't slammed my sac in 10 years.
  • + 19
 @rh00p: " If you don't see the advantage then you DON'T have bigger problems."
  • + 4
 @endlessblockades: did it today, highly recommend it
  • + 10
 An unmentioned highlight is the BB has raised up a bit too.
  • + 6
 It looks like the perfect trail bike, extremely efficient DW link suspension, ideal geometry and travel numbers and lightweight frame. I wish ibis makes a 100mm xc/trail bike, same concept as the yeti sb100, I would be very interested on a bike like this for my home trails.
  • + 2
 I know, they talk about putting a 120mm Stepcast fork on it and racing it, but I think the BB might be too low for that, since you're usually pedaling through a lot more when racing. I'd have to compare it to other XC bikes though. Harder to tell since they did the geometry chart with 2.6 tires on.
  • + 1
 @TucsonDon: They raised the bb compared to the Ripmo. I bet it would feel great (it's only a 10mm drop in fork height, which will be much less at the bb, maybe 4mm). Run shorter cranks, most people would benefit from trying some 165s, imo
  • + 1
 I was hoping for a a full on XC killer to compete with the Blur ETC. since they dropped the hardtail I was kinda thinking they might go that route. Theyre staying true to their fan base here I think which is smart. I’d be very interested in seeing a progressive race bike from Ibis though.
  • + 1
 @plume: Dropped the hardtail? What about the DV9 they introduced a few months ago?
  • + 1
 @MtbSince84: dropped = released. Smile Since they have invested in XC a little there, my hope was more of the same. but these trail bike/race bike blends probably sell better. I think their bikes have always been XC bias, even the bigger bikes, why not embrace the progressive XC trend? A minority opinion for this brand, perhaps.
  • + 7
 The geo on this bike looks great, but the shock size being a 190x45 means aftermarket options are gonna be real limited, which is unfortunate.
  • + 6
 @mikelevy ...down country shootout is in order! please include Guerrilla Gravity Trail Pistol, Trance 29, Smuggler, Ripley and a bunch more please.
  • + 2
 Isn't this still a bit big for down country? I think of DC as 100/120 aggro-ish geo. This is a trail bike through and through.
  • + 6
 I'm drooling too... but I don't want to sell my V2 OG!!! Ibis need to do a real XC bike. "Need" is a strong word. These guys are doing just fine without my inputs.
  • + 1
 I sold mine yesterday...still feel a little regret.
  • + 0
 I am bummed. Just bought the LS 9 months ago and it is now obsolete. Bummer for a $6500 bike. Thought it would be 2 years before a redesign since my model was just redone. Had to wait a month to get it also. Frown
  • + 10
 @rcrocha: This seems like SUCH a different bike tho. If you like that Ripley a lot, this one probably handles a lot differently (maybe good or bad). The length, reach, HTA are a lot less sporty and more enduro-y. I wouldn't be bummed about it if you wanted that Ripley style of bike. If you didn't, you'd prob have just gotten a Smuggler or something tho right? This is just another Smuggler with DWLink, a very nice one at that. I know the resale stuff sucks but whatever, a new bike is always coming out that will hurt that =).

A bit different than buying a Factory Fox 36 RC fork and then having a new Grip2 come out a week later with new stuff that's just plain better.
  • + 1
 @rcrocha: The Ripley is gotta be the most frequently updated bike. New generation every 2 years since it was first introduced in 2013. The only thing that gets this frequent of refresh is electronics. Good for us!
  • + 3
 @Svinyard: Good point! I love my bike and I bought it over the Santa Cruz Tallboy specifically because it was snappier and more fun. That is probably still true vs V4. Vitamin P color is way better also!
  • + 1
 No, you’re right. They need a pure breed race bike - the Ripley (both ver) excels in the efficiency dept but they never felt like rowdy trail bikes. If they would embrace the pedaling characteristics and make a 100mm bike with more of a focused use I think they would crush. It’s all about the market, I’m probably wrong!
  • + 2
 @plume: I think their DWlink design is SUPER well suited for exactly what you described.
  • + 4
 Nice to see they copy and pasted the geometry from the Norco Fluid FS for this bike. That must make development a bit easier. You'd think with all that extra time they wouldn't have spent so long melting the top tubes of these bikes with heat guns at the factory - SHE UGLY
  • + 8
 I would say kill it with fire but it looks like they already did
  • + 4
 if Salvador dali sucked at designing bikes
  • + 12
 I would rather the Norco Fluid and $3000 of beer
  • - 1
 Ain't Dee Dubbya
  • + 8
 Not many SRAM brake fans at Ibis, apparently (good)
  • + 7
 Oops we were making our earlier models 2 sizes too small. Sorry bout that. Carry on.
  • + 4
 Looking pretty good! Finally they have some modern geo. Not as slack as Whyte's S-120 be great to see both up against each other. Just saw a review on the S-120 from Guy Kesteven. youtu.be/gi4JmIVfbcE
  • + 2
 Agree!
  • + 6
 For this type of money I’d go for a GG Trail Pistol and go head to head with this in the gnar and see who comes out on top
  • + 6
 But what about the 1hr climb before the 15mins of down? That's where Ibis gets the best of both worlds. Their version of DWlink is pretty sick for a trail bike. (I don't own one either)
  • + 2
 stays too short on the trail pistol
  • + 4
 @Svinyard: I think it would depend on the type of climbing. The Trail Pistol will build 1.5lbs heavier, but has a steeper STA. The Trail Pistol also likely has more anti-squat, so it'll be a little more responsive, even if its not quite as comfortable or doesn't have quite as much traction. Overall, I think the new Ripley would be a little faster on technical, loose climbs, a little slower on flat sections or smooth stuff, and fall behind a bit going downhill, where the Trail Pistol's more progressive geometry might inspire more confidence.

Honestly though, if you were serious about winning XC races, the Ibis wouldn't be your first choice, and if you were serious about winning Enduros, the Trail Pistol wouldn't be either. These are both perfect bikes for the majority of riders who don't race, but want a bike that make them feel like an all-around hero.
  • + 12
 GG: Frame weight: 6.5 lbs. (2,950 g) frame with hardware (Size 3, no shock)
Ibis: 5.6 WITH SHOCK.
  • - 5
flag PHeller (Apr 30, 2019 at 11:45) (Below Threshold)
 @strarzaq: Do the math my friend. 6.5lbs+400g is roughly 7lbs. 5.6lbs + 1.5lbs is roughly...7lbs.
  • + 6
 @Svinyard: I can vouch for that DWlink. Even compared to Pivot's DW, I think Ibis has the best version. I do think GG bikes are pretty sick though for different reasons than an Ibis and I'm hoping to demo a Megatrail this summer.
  • + 6
 @PHeller: The 5.6 lb Ripley weight is including the shock. It's about 5 lbs without shock.
  • + 2
 @hans-heim: Yep. The Trail Pistol weighs 1.5lbs more than it. Like I said.
  • + 5
 Trail Pistol is a great bike, and GG is a solid company. I've owned one and wrenched on several others. However, they just aren't touching Ibis' quality and attention to detail, nor is their suspension as dialed. I haven't seen a carbon GG yet (will have my hands on one by the summer to check out/ride), so I can't speak to that. TP is a bit burlier of a bike than this Ripley, so while there's overlap I'm not sure they're quite apples to apples

@ssip: that's because Ibis doesn't overdo their anti squat. Pivots is like 120%. Climbs like a beast in the parking lot, climbs like shit on the trail.
  • + 1
 @trialsracer: I mean some of us are willing to sacrifice some things for a cheaper frame made in the USA. Also, you had to be comparing aluminum vs carbon, unless you were comparing again alloy Ibis models welded in Taiwan.
  • + 1
 @trialsracer: hahahaha oh man! That's exactly what I thought when I demoed a Mach 5.5 and Mach 6 last month. Got on the pedals hard up the steeps and was like, "Is this really a DWlink???" lol Bobbed and didn't have that forward zip of Ibis bikes. Didn't feel that great over chunder either which I was not expecting. A bit underwhelmed having ridden the HD3, HD4 and owning a Mojo 3. Mach 429 might be different but didn't get to try it. Good looking bikes though!
  • + 1
 @ssip: 429 had the zip. Ripmo felt similar to that.
  • + 2
 @Svinyard: GG's climb amazingly well. The equal or better than the comparable VPP/DWLink bikes I have owned.
  • + 1
 @vikb: Interesting, I'm not surprised tho. It seems to be that a bike with a Horst link style can tuned for great pedaling but it swings the pendulum that way and takes away from the plush/downhill side of things. Of course they can be tuned to the middle of that or the other side two but the designers kind of have to choose which to favor and don't get to choose both. Like GGs different linkage settings they had for plush VS firm etc.

Ibis's DWlink seems to do pretty well on both sides while only loosing a little on the DH plush side. Hence why a fair amount of guys I know are pedaling HD4's uphill all the time. It does seem like the suspension gives up a little small bump compliance in my time with them but it pedals well like the climb switch is on AND still does great on the downhill chunder. Ripmo is like that at least... Not Uber plush like a sled but certainly effective while still going uphill like the damn climb switch is turned on.
  • + 7
 Black, just make it all black.
  • + 1
 Yeah, ibis should call pivot to help figure out some more places to put their logo on the bike...OR...pivot should call ibis about reigning in their logo placement.
  • + 5
 I side with ibis here@Sardine:
  • + 2
 Did anyone else notice that on Ibis' website they say "Over the past year, we’ve been manufacturing the size small Ripley V3 in our Santa Cruz, CA headquarters. The new Ripley small is made overseas and we have switched our Carbon 831 lab to development of a new US made model that will be built entirely in house." I thought this Ripley was going to be their new US made bike, but it seems they've got something else in their back pocket. I think I'm saving my money to see what comes next.
  • - 16
flag mrti (Apr 30, 2019 at 14:30) (Below Threshold)
 ... and I hope that they will keep it in the back pocket. I am still wondering who gave their designer her degree!
  • + 1
 I saw what looked to be a new ripmo a couple of weeks ago at UCSC
  • + 2
 @loplopk: The Ripmo isn't exactly a DH monster. It's an aggressive trail and amazing at that. Ibis is kind of known well for their HD4 long travel monster 27.5.

I wouldn't be surprised if they did an HD5 29er that was the real monster.
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: this. ripmo long-legged trail bike. not a firebird killer.
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: yeah, I think they could use a Ripmo HD. I love my Ripmo, but for EWS I think they could use a 160/170 29er more like a Wreckoning.
  • + 2
 Looks like a sweet bike! Starts above my budget unfortunately.

What I wanted to ask was: What's with the 2.6" tires on a lot of the short travel rippers?
Especially on a 120mm bike that should be agile and fun to ride on smoother trails? If I was using the tires as suspension...why not add move travel and still have "normal" tires?


FYI: I haven't ridden 2.6"s, but I've tried a fatbike, yes, I get it it's not the same.
  • + 2
 They're really great for shoulder seasons in my experience. Everything is a little damp and you just need some extra tire to deal with it all.
  • + 2
 I'm not a fan of 2.6" either. In my experience, there was just more weight and more balloon to pop. And they popped constantly, ruining a lot of rides. Back to 2.3" and my tire dependability returned immediately.
  • + 5
 This is my next bike, thank you ibis. You fixed all the problems with the old ripley!
  • + 2
 Finally Ibis... Finally!! That took way too long but welcome to the party; better late than never. I've owned two different Ripley LS bikes and the acceleration, particularly while climbing, is all that it is cracked up to be. I hope the V4 doesn't lose any of that snap. Pointed downhill, it looks like it'll easily exceed all previous versions.
  • + 5
 Slap on a DPX2 and a 140mm 36 on that and you'll have the perfect all rounder.
  • + 1
 Would a DPX2 fit with a waterbottle?
  • + 2
 Nope on the DPX2, they picked a stupid shock size: www.ridefox.com/family.php?m=bike&family=dpx2
  • + 6
 Would like a shoot out with this, a GG Trail Pistol, and Revel Rascal.
  • + 1
 So...

Its basically the functional equivalent of a Whyte S120/Transition smuggler then?

Glad to see the category expanding , but like others, find the price point of the ibis a bit out of reach. Maybe it'll make a good used bike sometime in the future then Smile .
  • + 1
 I felt that the Ripley LS was arguably the best climbing bike in the galaxy. Maybe I missed it in the text but not much mention of climbing prowess. Wonder if any of that was lost in the slackening, lengtheninging and other ings that took place.
  • + 2
 It climbs better now thanks to the STA and frame weight savings.
  • + 1
 I also wonder what this slacker/longer bike gives up compared to the last couple of Ripleys. Does the steeper STA really bring all that back even with this hta?
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: It's a definite trade off in nimbleness and agility at normal pedaling speeds on flat/undulating terrain. There is no free lunch.
  • + 1
 I think this rig is damn sexy. I don’t think I’d trade in my Ripmo for it or want to add it to the quiver, too much overlap perhaps as my Ripmo with the climb lever switched makes a good Ripley impersonation. Although, this with a 34 step cast would be all the xc bike I would need anymore, I’m psyched to try it at a demo. I bet you could easily get it under 25lbs with some still pretty trail worthy xc focused parts.
  • + 2
 At all the other manufactures prompting how their sizing is now reach based and not seattube length limited this is how its done - most of y’all still failed executing this properly like Ibis
  • + 1
 I love the ibis colors! This Bike looks awesome..Smile

I don’t know if I’d swap out my ripmo though...big descents, nasty rock and root gardens with scree...
It’s a not that far off ripmo geometry ... ( STA/ HTA wise) I like the extra squish when I do something stupid ..

I could run a 140 fork... same bike with less oh shit swish .. and running DD tires...may defeat the point of the ripley entirely.

They really need to lose the schwalbe rubber..

Too swap or not to swap ... that is the question..

Regardless .. ibis is awesome Smile
  • + 1
 They do offer the option to swap the Schwalbes for a DHF/Aggressor combo on their website.
  • + 3
 I would like to see more companies have chainstay lengths adjusted for frame size. It's the only value that makes we wary of this bike.
  • + 3
 no kidding, dang you pay enough for this. I think Norco is one of the few to do this.
  • + 2
 They do it on their other bikes. I wonder why they chose not to do it on this one. It's like ski companies that don't change their sidecut to keep the same turn radius in different sizes.
  • + 5
 Dang, stupid shock sizes saddle you with poopy shock
  • + 3
 +1 the whole metric/imperial divide is such a farce. Thanks bike industry for the controlled obselence all the time.
  • + 3
 Fortunately the Mcleod comes in 190x50 which can be modified to 45mm stroke.
  • + 5
 What the Stumpjumper ST should have been.
  • + 1
 Why'd you shorten the chainstays @ibiscycles ? Looks like an awesome bike anyway, but 440mm or 445mm stays and an extra degree off the HA and I'd be frothing for one.
Respect for the short seat tubes though, other brands should take note.
  • + 5
 XL riders are running out of options for bikes with longer stays; Intense Carbine and Yeti SB6. Most Norco's aren't too bad at 440mm though.
  • + 2
 @boonecycles: UK brands Cotic and Orange get why longer stays are good on 29ers, but that doesn't help if people want carbon. I think YT go a bit longer on their larger models - but they'll all quite long travel.
  • + 2
 Looks to me like this is just a short travel Ripmo? I’m an owner of a Ripley LS and ride mostly XC here in Oklahoma. I’m curious if I’d benefit from the new geometry for my type of riding?
  • + 4
 Slacked out geo is only helpful if you do lots of rowdy dh riding, for hilly and flat riding it won't help your riding.
  • + 5
 I'm thinking the Mini Ripmo will be a big win
  • - 4
flag charlie225 (Apr 30, 2019 at 11:14) (Below Threshold)
 WHATEVER MAN..!
  • + 1
 @charlie225: shut your hole sucka
  • + 1
 @acme54321: Buy one...ALREADY!!
  • + 2
 Mike,

is the DW Link Suspension basically the same as the one used on the Atherton/Robot bikes which I believe were the first to have Dave's newest version?
  • + 3
 Atherton bikes are still the only ones using DW6.

Normal DW-Link designs like Ibis and other similar mini-link designs (Santa Cruz, Niner, Intense, etc) all have a solid rear triangle that moves as one piece on the upper and lower mini links. The eccentrics on the previous Ripley were still acting as mini links in the same way. Yeti Switch Infinity is related too

DW6 on the Robot bikes added a pivot on the chainstay near the dropouts, so the chainstays and seatstays move a bit relative to each other instead of being a single unit. It is somewhat like a horst-link but with pivots at both ends of the chainstays! In the diagrams they showed on the Robot bike review that dropout pivot doesn't seem to move much, so the behavior is probably still closer to a normal DW-Link though
  • + 1
 @showmethemountains: What's the advantage of the dropout area pivot?
  • + 4
 @Svinyard: I'm not qualified to quantify that. So here is a Dave Weagle quote from the first Robot bike review on PB
"It's a pure dw-link, with anti-squat, braking-squat, etc.... squarely in the levels that have made that design so popular. The main reason for the linkage design was to support the unique challenges of building a configurable suspension for a 3D printed titanium lugged bike that's designed to be tailored to each unique rider's wants/needs. The DW6 design makes it comparatively easy to tailor things like chainstay length, leverage ratio, etc... all independently of one another - while still maintaining the dw-link pedaling and braking characteristics"
  • + 1
 @showmethemountains: You are missing one key thing here. The front of the chainstay actually has two short links connecting it to the main triangle. The bottom one is well hidden. These two links appear to mostly control the kenematics of the suspension and the upper rocker linkage's main role is to drive the shock. It's a bit similar to the original Ripley's eccentrics.
  • + 1
 @acme54321: I didn't miss that, you may just misunderstood my wording
  • + 1
 The original Ibis Ripley V3 frame's claimed weight with shock was 5.9lb. This post listed the V4 frame claimed weight 5.6lb but stated 0.65lb weight saving... Someone is doing their math wrong.
  • + 1
 "We'll have a full review of the new Ripley within the coming days that answers those questions and finds out if the new Ripley is still a Ripley. "

What happened to the full review?
  • + 2
 @sazaks - We decided to put a bunch more time on the bike - it's actually being raced in the BC Bike Race as I type this. Expect the review in a few weeks Smile
  • + 0
 Might as well buy a ripmo tho. Same front triangle basically. Tiny weight penalty and will pedal just as well. Just like evil following versus offering. Theres subjectively no downside to the 140mm offering. Theres just not. Trail bikes have changed. 120mm is outdated imho unless your a flat country woods rider - in which case you dont want a 66.5 deg head angle lol.
  • + 2
 I was just thinking the same thing. I bet you turn on the pedal switch and the Ripmo rides like a Ripley up and down. (weight aside). Prob close enough without the switch.
  • + 4
 There are plenty of areas to ride that are technical without the big hits.. I'm with you, the Ripmo would be my choice, but I totally understand why this bike works for a lot of people. I'll probably end up with both..
  • - 2
 Agree - riding in the mountains is virtually impossible on 120mm.
  • + 2
 Nah. Your modern 160 enduro sled is probably better at descending than a DH bike from 7 years ago. Your modern 120 mm trail bike pedals as well as your 100 mm XC bike from 7 years ago and descends infinitely better. Those 140 bikes are good at everything but great at nothing. If you can only own one bike and are willing to hit up some gnarly trails every once and a while sure the 140 AM rig is probably the way to go. It's why I own a hightower and not a hightower LT. But I'd own a blur and a Megatower if I could afford it.
  • + 0
 Agree - riding in the mountains is virtually impossible on 140mm.
  • + 3
 Looks nice enough...I wonder if Ibis figured out how to keep the paint on the frame with this one.
  • + 1
 evil went way to conservative with the MB, especially since the major concern of the fv1 was slack seat angle. but now there's the offering anyways
  • + 0
 The Offering seat angle doesn't fix much. Front end still lifts and wanders at times.
  • + 0
 Ive always liked the Ripley and here in Europe they are not that easy to find and buy them. Most likely the new Intense Primer will have similar geo, will be much easier to get online and wont disappoint.
  • + 1
 On paper it sounds great but I'm just not digging it. Swoopy, expensive carbon overload syndrome makes me feel a little meh.
  • + 1
 Saw one yesterday, thought it was a Ripmo. The bluish grayish color is amazing. Lower link sports a journal like the old Turners. Thing looks a brawler.
  • + 1
 So they bumped the GX build from $4899 to $5399 today.. just ahead of getting stock back.

Can' help but feel this is a bit a meh move.
  • + 3
 Mike vs Mike Ripmo, Ripley please
  • + 2
 Looks pretty solid. Light, short travel ripper. Great for anyone who doesn't need the bigger travel Ripmo.
  • + 3
 Looks like a carbon Banshee Phantom
  • + 2
 I’d take a Banshee any day.
  • + 3
 Always impressive Ibis! Stoked your using the links on the Ripley now.
  • + 4
 Its perfect
  • + 4
 It even has a threaded BB
  • - 7
flag mm732 (Apr 30, 2019 at 11:11) (Below Threshold)
 @vhdh666:

Threaded is over rated. Too much redundant metal. Adds weight.

Bbinfinite press in modules dont creak and are a lighter solution.
  • + 1
 @mm732: What's a BBInifite Press in module? I have a press in Dub BB on my Rocky bike but haven't heard of this.
  • + 2
 @Svinyard: bbinfinite.com - close-tolerance machined Bottom Bracket modules for all press fit sizes. i've got 20K miles on them with zero issues and zero creaks and they spin like ceramic.

truly a Godsend for press-fit bikes - makes them work like they were designed to.
  • + 1
 @mm732: Whoa! That looks interesting man...and it sound like you've hammered yours. What's the story on replacing the bearings? Do you still swap the whole thing? I have a carbon Rocky bike that uses pressfit 92 with dub cranks. I'm wondering about what happens after I replace the BB a few times and the material gets pressed out a bit. Does this solve that too? Is that even an issue or am I worrying about something needlessly?
  • + 1
 @Svinyard:

yea it will generally solve that too. just use the green loctite liberally.

i've yet to replace the bearings to be honest - i've just pulled the seals and re greased occasionally. haven't seen the need yet. you *could* press out the bearings, but probably best just to install a whole new module AFAIK.
  • + 2
 @mm732: I traded emails with them. It sounds super legit. They indicted that it's basically a hub thats pressed in. He said it's not hard to service like a hub and that it's wears a longer. I didn't get all the details on replacement but it seemed much different in that regard than a typical BB and more serviceable instead. Obviously the performance and issues are a gamechanger.

Do you think this is better than a Wheels Manf thread-together BB for a press fit? Those seems great but they didn't sell a Dub version when I built my bike.
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: 100% better than the wheels/praxis thread-in/collet types.

1) higher-quality bearings
2) better control over left to right alignment - this is their secret sauce IMO.
  • + 1
 What do we think of the 2,6 tires? I’ve got a banshee phantom really you don’t need that much travel ! Short travel 29er are to much fun!
  • + 2
 everyone copied the smuggler. smuggler is the OG dont forget that!
  • + 19
 Or was it the Process 111? Smuggler was the better bike though (I've had both).
  • + 1
 @chakaping: the process hits well below the smuggler in terms of agressive riding imo. have had a few smugglers and ridden a process . konas latest platform is much better though. also 5 years late
  • + 0
 Sooooo many bikes copied the Smuggler and just changed the travel or whatever (ripmo included). It's like every new bike has significant shades of that bike. I know other bikes were pushing geometry before the Smuggler but it was seemingly the first widespread bike to nail something that worked really well for most everyone. Good on transition.
  • + 1
 @shaunnyz: Kona fired their engineer back in 2002. Just rehired him in 2012, hence the update.
  • + 2
 @shaunnyz: I found the Process had a bit more swagger but the Smuggler was a better all-rounder, climbed OK (the P111 was horrible for pedaling) and could be over-forked and slacked out a bit easier with offset bushings etc.
The Process was out a year before the Tranny, way back in 2013. The real surprise is that short travel 29ers are still a bit niche really, when they're probably the most fun MTBs to ride most of the time.
  • + 2
 Ibis Ripley sitting pretty at 26.07 or just 54 Big Macs! Amazing stuff!
  • + 2
 Sweet Mother!! I want that thing so bad!!
  • + 1
 I'd like to see this with 650b wheels. It seems like the options for 650b wheeled bikes are far less than 29ers.
  • + 2
 Lots of room for a liter cage, and a big frame bag. Where's the Pork Chop?
  • + 0
 The way they mounted the rear shock (or the bottom eye of it) makes me nervous. Makes perfectly sense and is working the same way, but just cant look at it
  • + 2
 omg did dane perras take those photos they are so sick
  • + 1
 hahaha thanks Luke
  • - 2
 Sick trail bike!!!!
Everyone needs to get over the "high price" If you cant afford it maybe you should try a different sport. Any NEW bike worth buying is gonna cost $5k---$10k. In case you haven't been around for the last 10 years.... mountain biking has become insanely expensive!!!! Kinda always has been with all the replacing of broken parts and keeping up on proper maintenance schedules. I'm surprised to see people complaining about cost nowadays! Just be thankful for how far we have come with technology....back in the day (15-20 years ago) pro/top level bikes were $10k+
I am by no means trying to justify the cost of new bikes, I think they should be cheaper for sure....but probably not gonna happen when lots of people ARE willing to fork over $5k---$10k.

I also think new full size pick up trucks shouldn't cost $60k+ ....but they do!!!
  • + 2
 Longest, slackest ....yet neither long nor slack.
  • + 1
 Cool story, but 36er is just around the corner!
  • + 1
 It's like a longer travel Turner Czar with modern geometry.
  • + 1
 It's shitty geo for a 5 foot person!
  • - 1
 Ah this on the same day my SB 130 arrives. Yes I know they’re different bikes, but now I want both. Not gonna happen unless I win the lottery or become a dentist...
  • + 2
 You´re probably one when you get a brand new Yeti....maybe not that sucessful. Smile
  • + 1
 @themountain: I make 20 dollars an hr and can afford a new well specced MTB every few years. It's all about saving and priorities.
  • + 1
 @bulletbassman: lucky you...congrats Big Grin
  • - 1
 @themountain: huh? It was a joke and I did get a new Yeti. I wouldn’t use it as a determining factor of success; It’s just a bike.
  • + 2
 VS Trance 29?
  • + 1
 Just glad it's not an ebike...
  • + 1
 Expensive and boring, but a fine all around bike.
  • + 2
 Fuck evil
  • + 0
 Ibis has lost they damn mind, and me on the price!
I’ll buy a Yeti for that much money! All day long!!!
  • + 2
 those tires. bleh
  • + 1
 I think the Pivot Trail 429 looks cooler.
  • + 1
 The GX build weights in a painted large with 2.6 tires weighs 28.57 lbs
  • - 1
 Nice.... Can’t wait to read all the comments about how people are going to shred this bike so hard because it’s so late LOL.
  • - 1
 I said it when they first came out, I have owned one but I will it again....mountain bikes really do look sh*t with 29" wheels!
  • + 1
 Bushings tightened by pinch bolt? Holly crap.
  • + 0
 $4100 usd for an NX build. Are they high
  • + 1
 Its mega..
  • + 1
 Makes me drool...
  • + 0
 My smuggler is perfect and for the price you can keep that ibis
  • + 0
 The perfect bike doesn't exi...
  • + 0
 So... Where's the X-Fusion suspension????
  • + 0
 And I just got myself an Elsworth...
  • + 1
 skkkrtttt
  • + 0
 It's a trail ripper!
  • - 3
 So much money for that bike. I’ll take a YT CF Pro Race over this any day. That being said, heck I should test ride one. Haha
Good looking rig
  • - 1
 Cool bike....but that yoke looks flexy!
  • - 1
 What's with the bushings..no good.
  • + 2
 it's because that pivot barely moves.
  • + 2
 No probs on the Ripmo. Just stiffer and lower maintenance.
  • - 2
 seat anglol
  • - 2
 Fuck short seat tubes!
  • + 2
 Seriously, I’d have to run a 200mm dropper to ride this XL. It’s like extra large sizes aren’t being designed for tall people, but for average height guys wanting to size up.
  • + 2
 @adamdigby: why wouldn't you want a 200mm dropper tho?? OneUp just released the 210mm. It looks perfect and is cheap. I'm 6-4 BTW, when it gets steep my seat is still quickly reminding me that 170mm isn't perfect lol.
  • + 2
 @Svinyard: Longer droppers are great, but they put a TON of leverage on the frame...especially for a big boy like me. This either does not end well for the frame or the dropper. I am on a 21" Chromage Rootdown with a 170mm One-Up dropper and still have 3" of non slidey seatpost showing..lol.
  • + 1
 @pedalhound: I'm about the same on my RM carbon Instinct with that same post BTW Wink . Is it that bad to have that much sticking out? I'm not hip to the physics of it. I'm 6-4 but only 190lbs kitted. I'm considering the 210mm if I can swing it, is that a bad thing tho?
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: It's not bad, just be nice to have a bit more drop! I will be looking at a new 210 post soon...don't know if I want another OneUp though as I find it a bit finicky.

I just am not a fan of shorter seat tubes...I get the reasoning behind it, but for taller riders, it makes it hard to get a seat post that is long enough.

As for physics, think about it this way. When you are trying to loosen your cranks, you usually need a longer 8mm allen key...the extra length gives you more leverage to loosen the bolt, heck sometimes I even have to grab a handlebar or something to make it even longer! This works because all that extra length puts more force into the bolt. Now let's take that same idea and apply it to seat posts...as our seat tubes get shorter, the post has to get longer, as the seat post gets longer...this applies more leverage\force on the frame and to the seat post..you put my 260lbs at the end of that long lever...things are gonna break!

This is why I am not a fan of this new short seat tubes movement, this happened back in the freeride days too and it sucked then as well!
  • + 1
 @pedalhound: Gotcha, thanks man. Yeah my OneUp is finicky this spring. Is a bushing thing, I think I've got it worked out but we'll see. The new Version two posts (210) have a new bushing setup etc and some other fixes that fix all that stuff apparently. Hard not to like OneUp and those guys, I'd be game for a second post if it was their V2. Good people
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: For me it's how the cable attaches to the post, been a PITA since I got it. It works great most of the time, but once in a while it just becomes a suspension post...it will not stay down. I have to move the cable around the seat tube feed and that usually fixes it...but...ugh...silly design IMO.
  • + 1
 @pedalhound: that's happened to mine. I just had my barrel adjuster too tight.
  • - 2
 Sick
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