Industry Nine MatchStix Multi-Tool Axle - Review

Dec 14, 2016
by Mike Levy  
Industry Nine MatchStix thru-axle multi-tool


Industry Nine are best known for their wheelsets, exotic creations that are handbuilt using spokes and hubs manufactured in their Asheville, North Carolina, factory. Flying a bit lower on most people's radar is I9's $160 USD MatchStix multi-tool and axle combo, which is also made in the same facility and is designed to ensure that, as long as your front wheel is still on your bike, the vital tools you might require will be there as well.

The MatchStix thru-axle multi-tool consists of three elements. First, the handle, which is available in eleven different anodized colors, functions as a chain tool, spoke wrench (common 3.23mm), and a bit holder. The chain tool is driven by a 3mm bit that's attached to the axle core (more on that below), and a 5mm bit is permanently installed into the handle as well.
MatchStix Details

• Thru-axle w/ integrated multi-tool
• Compatible w/ Fox and RockShox 15 x 100mm and 110mm
• Integrated chain tool, spoke wrench, 5mm hex in handle
• Included bits: stainless steel 6, 4, 2.5, 2mm hex, T25 torx
• Manufactured in Asheville, North Carolina
• Weight: 103-grams (Pike, Boost)
• MSRP: $160 USD (chain breaker handle, axle, bit sleeve, 6 bits, end cap)
www.industrynine.net / @IndustryNineOfficial

All of that attaches to the end of the axle via an interference fit by way of an O-ring that's recessed into the handle, and there's another O-ring on the opposite side that helps to hold in whichever of the removable bits you may need to call upon.

Industry Nine MatchStix thru-axle multi-tool
I would have called it the 'Smuggle Skewer,' but that's just me.


Industry Nine MatchStix thru-axle multi-tool
Industry Nine MatchStix thru-axle multi-tool
The handle pulls off and is also a chain tool, 5mm hex, and spoke wrench.


The axle itself, which is available to fit Fox and RockShox forks with 15 x 100mm or 15 x 110mm (Boost) spacing is butted, with extra material removed from its center where it isn't required, and Industry Nine has anodized the sizing and torque directly onto it to prevent to prevent any confusion.

Wondering how the hell I9 managed to fit four different bits, as well as a spare chain link and valve core remover, inside of the axle? The answer is a combination of cleverness and... rubber tubing. The stainless steel bits - you can find replacements and other sizes at any hardware store - all slide into a short section of clear rubber tubing, with room for four in total. You can access the innermost bits without having to slide all of them out thanks to small slits cut into the tubing, and the tool snake is pushed onto an insert before being slipped down the center of the axle.


Industry Nine MatchStix thru-axle multi-tool
Industry Nine MatchStix thru-axle multi-tool
The opposite end of the axle works as a valve core tool, bit holder, and home for a spare link. It plugs into a clear rubber tube inside the axle that holds four bits that can be popped out of slits.


This short insert, which can also be used to hold a chain link (not included) is held in place by way of another O-ring, and it's used as a handle for the 3mm bit that drives the chain tool. I have a feeling someone at I9 is really, really good a jigsaw puzzles.

A complete MatchStix multi-tool axle costs $160 USD, which is, I'm sure you know, a lot of money for a multi-tool. Park's MT-40 retails for $54.99 USD and includes more tools, but there are way less expensive options than that as well. It's also a lot of money for an axle - a replacement Maxle Ultimate for a RockShox fork is around $75 USD. But if you need (more like want) both an axle and a multi-tool, and like fancy things, the US-made MatchStix's price might not look crazy to you.

The Boost-compatible MatchStix setup for a Pike weighs 103-grams on my scale, which includes all of the bits, while the stock Maxle Ultimate weighs 77-grams. A true comparison would obviously depend on which multi-tool you're going to be leaving at home if you bought yourself a MatchStix axle.




Performance


I replaced the Maxle Ultimate Boost axle on my Pike with the MatchStix thru-axle and, just like you'd hope, it threaded right into place without issue. The anodized handle's interference fit onto the axle is quite tight to keep it from rattling off - I don't see how it could given that I struggled to pull it off at first - and you can clock it so it's in-line with the bottom of the fork or vertical before snapping it back into place. The O-ring might wear out over time, making for a looser tolerance, but it has been fine for the handful of months that I've had it. One odd thing to note is that the other end of the axle, the insert that is home to the bits, protrudes out from the side of the fork by about three-quarters of an inch. This makes it easy to grab ahold of, but not that pretty looking.

Views: 4,958    Faves: 11    Comments: 4


Okay, so you need to fix something? First, you pull the tool handle off the axle (the axle itself actually stays in the fork) and then, if you need to use a bit other than the 5mm that's on the handle, you slide the tool snake out of the opposite end by tugging on the tool-core plug. Getting the bits out of the rubber tube is easy; simply pull and bend the rubber tube up and over the bit until it's sticking out of the slit that Industry Nine cut into it, then install whatever it is that you need onto the handle.

It takes less than a minute to get everything out and ready which, if you're concerned about such things, is probably about the same amount of time required to remove your pack and fish out your multi-tool.


Industry Nine MatchStix thru-axle multi-tool
Industry Nine MatchStix thru-axle multi-tool
The axle itself stays in your fork, while the handle pops off and the tool snake is pulled out of the opposite side.


Using the chain tool is a bit finicky because you need to drive the tool with a 3mm bit by sticking said bit into the end of the tool-core plug and use that for leverage, but it gets the job done and that's all most of us are concerned about when we need a chain tool.

It all goes back together in the opposite way, all while the axle itself is still in your fork. If for some reason you lose the handle, you can use any 5mm hex key to install or remove the axle. And if you want to be a gram geek on race day and go tool-free, you can leave the handle and tool snake out of the axle completely. But that'd be silly, so don't do that. The handle, while just a bit shorter than what's used on the stock Maxle Ultimate, provides more than enough leverage as well.


Issues

The MatchStix's tools are all functional and get the job done, which is all you really need most of the time, but I'm personally not a fan of having to pull off the tool/axle handle and slide out the axle's innards (you can leave the axle itself in your fork) everytime I need to make some sort of adjustment. Also, I'm clumsy as hell and dropped the bits onto the forest floor on multiple occasions while trying to get the right one out.

The chain tool is completely functional, but it's also kinda awkward to get everything together and lined up. And unlike a traditional chain tool that has teeth of sorts that hold the chain in place by going into the female sections, the MatchStix's design sees the chain sit in a recess in the handle that doesn't quite do that same job as well - you need to pay attention to make sure everything is lined up correctly and hold it there with your thumb while you start to push the pin out.



Pinkbike’s Take:
bigquotesIndustry Nine's MatchStix thru-axle-cum-multi-tool is really freaking cool, and it's a clever, well-made piece of bling. That said, it doesn't do anything better than a relatively inexpensive multi-tool you'd carry in your pocket, and it's actually more of a hassle to use in most circumstances. I get it - the tools will always be there when you need them because your axle is always there - but this one's a hard sell for me when I've had zero issues slipping a little multi-tool in my pocket or bag for the last twenty-something years. - Mike Levy


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147 Comments

  • 143 7
 That is some pretty cool engineering, I must say. But..$160 vs my $18 multi-tool. Nope. Must suck being such a pussy that a small multi-tool is too much weight for you to carry on your back or in your pocket.
  • 99 7
 It's a matter of being "enduro" enough. Enduro is a lifestyle man, gotta do everything you can to carry less and have more on oyur bike while saving weight and preserving functionality. Also you have to wear convertible half-lids with crazy goggles/glasses and only wear a backpack on rides over 5 hours...
  • 93 0
 @Lookinforit: crap, i totally forgot "enduro" Ill take 2. Then tape one to my downtube so i dont have to take the other one outta the wheel.
  • 33 7
 What we really need is a bike that does an exploded view of itself on command. Riding along, a bearing fouls, press the, "exploded view" button, place a new bearing in, press the, "exploded view" button again, and the bike reassembles. That would be the best.
  • 64 3
 @Kramz: that's why I keep my SWAT compartment full of C4. With just a flick of a lever on my handle bars, my bike is completely disassembled in the blink of an eye.
  • 5 2
 Amen Jason475, Amen...
  • 11 1
 @Lookinforit: i´m absolutely no ´nduro bro, but i would buy it just for the cool idea and nice peace of engineering. So far it will fit none of my oldschool 20x110 forks though...
  • 1 3
 @nakos: Wow, that's clever! Take one of the bottle cage bolts out and connect a pump hose to it. You can now use it to quickly inflate your tires.
  • 2 0
 @Kramz: I would buy that bike. Big Grin
  • 3 4
 @Kramz: Just wait untill Tony Stark decides to take up mountain biking and designs his own bike.
  • 10 0
 @Lookinforit: It's only a matter of time before someone goes full enduro and designs a multi-tool that fits in your bum (e.g. the "dark secret multitool"). Nothing is off limits for next level enduro.
  • 8 0
 @nakos: T ools W renches A llens T orx
  • 5 0
 @Rasterman: ya, so weird that a rattely handlebar multi tool, without a 5mm or chain tool, that needs a proprietary tool to remove from your Handel bar, failed... So strange.
  • 1 2
 mcgyverduro one hitter
  • 1 1
 I would have called it (the Keister axle), or the keisterer,,something like that,,,it is pretty dirty to smuggle tools in there
  • 2 0
 @jason475 im with you man...have an even smaller multi-tool i put in my pocket when I ride without pack...it's so small I sometimes think I forgot it or it fell out...

Cool engineering, but largely useless
  • 74 5
 Is there a bowl hidden somewhere in there? It seems like there should be.
  • 57 2
 I wish.
  • 37 1
 Lettuce not forget how complicated that would make using this tool.
  • 7 0
 I think this is what your looking for
pentabike.net/?product=black-n-brass
  • 9 0
 @aaronfpeet I think Blackburn's Switch Multi-Tool has got you covered. AKA the Blackburn One-Hitter, the shaft of the handle is hollow with a larger opening at the non-tool end that you can pack up. Thanks, Blackburn!

www.blackburndesign.com/en_ca/tools/switch-multi-tool.html
  • 2 0
 Somebody mentioned these in another thread...haven't tried myself
m.lowes.com/pd/4-in-x-10-ft-Solid-PVC-Sewer-Drain-Pipe/3133147
  • 10 0
 I've smoked out of a through axel before!
  • 15 0
 @nfstreet4life: It's probably most enduro to have a series of pre-rolls tucked into your handlebar; indica incase of crash, sativa for during ride, hybrid for after parties.
  • 5 0
 @nfstreet4life: Maxle Stealths actually fuction as perfect roach clips if you have a fattie
  • 2 0
 @mnorris122: exactly what we did lol
  • 7 0
 There better be a bowl in my existing axle, cause I'd have to be high as shit to spend $160+ on this
  • 2 0
 Bottle opener maxle?
  • 1 0
 @j-t-g: Thats a cool multi tool from Blackburn
  • 5 0
 @JC9won4: but the axle stays in the fork. The axle stays in the fork. The axle stays in the fork and oh ya the axle stays in the fork.

That's basically what I read from this article lol
  • 2 0
 @nfstreet4life: Is that what they call packing an axle?
  • 1 0
 @mhoshal:

haaaaaaaa!! the comment section will make certain you're aware of this
  • 4 0
 @mhoshal: Yet there are still loads of comments asking why the hell they'd ever want to remove their fork axle and wheel to use a tool.
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: People are so silly sometimes.
Love your reviews and writing Mike!
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy: Some people will read properly only if it's tattooed on Kim Kardashian's booty. Even then they're likely to complain if it's not in braille.
  • 1 0
 @truffy: That's a great line. I might have to "borrow" that!
  • 1 0
 @truffy: You sir win the internet today. lol
  • 16 0
 Aren't we all trying to reduce un-sprung weight?

Guess it's pretty cool for people who don't have SWAT though.
  • 1 0
 @theg-man

true point, extra weight on the front wheel is not what we are aiming for. I prefer the Syntace solution though, almost no additional weight in the rear.
  • 3 0
 I don't think a few extra grams would be such a big issue. Probably most people won't be able to tell the difference.
  • 2 0
 Imagine if you installed this into the new Olins fork.... It would be a tank????
  • 1 0
 @Caiokv: I don't know buddy go read the new ohlins fork review everyone over there is whining about extra weight!!!
  • 1 0
 @mhoshal: I saw it, but ohlins' weight difference is bigger than the axle's, and is somehow distributed along the fork body. But what I am trying to say is that it would be really hard to actually feel such difference. I know that I wouldn't at least.

Of course lighter is better when there are no compromises, but 100 extra grams of unsprung weight are not supposed to make such a big deal.

For example, when a tire is new it has much more rubber than when it is worn out, but I highly doubt anyone would adjust their suspension to compensate for it, actually I believe it to be barely possible to feel the difference.

Now take in account that the mass difference on a tire is much more impacting than on an axle, since the tire's mass is rotating far from the rotation axis, while the tool axle is not rotating, and lies exactly on the center of the rotating axis, thus having much less impact on suspension kinematics.

But like many said above, I would rather just carry my good, old and inexpensive multi tool on my backpack.
  • 2 0
 I was being sarcastic. Not everyone is already fitted with a Pike or 36. The Olins fork would be a weight reduction for some people running older forks. I was just adding to the nonsesnce. You can also just take a small sip of water from your Bottle to reduce the ride weight 90 g.... I think it's a cool idea, but so is the one under the bottle holder
  • 14 1
 Takes you longer to put the tool together than actually fixing your bike.

But first you must remember where all your tools are since there are so many options these days to hide stuff aways IN your bike (not meantioning at your bike).
Hmm, what bike am I on today? Did I put the screw driver under my rain coat in the SWAT opening in the fraim? Is my tublesee fixer salami in the handle bar? My chain tool in the axle? The gas cylinder under the sattle?
Or my tranditional multi tool in the backpack? Hipbag? Wearable under-armour with water blatter and stash pocket under the shirt making me look fat vest?

Soooo many options! Requires a lot of discipline packing, remembering, unpacking and cleaning, then repacking. Puh!
  • 15 0
 I carry all my tools inside my stantions.
  • 6 2
 @DJ-24: I try to keep my tool in my pants...
  • 6 0
 @WestwardHo: That's surprising seeing as you're a Westward hoe.
  • 12 2
 I can't help but think they're employing 1 too many engineers if someone has enough time on their hands to design this.
  • 2 0
 I heard they are also working on a 9mm qr version
  • 6 0
 Looking at that allen bit attached to the handle, looks like it would be tough to fit in a lot of spots on the bike that are recessed or otherwise hard to reach, am I right on that?
  • 1 1
 After looking in to it more and watching the video it doesn't seem too bad. Cool idea but seems finicky and very expensive!
  • 1 0
 You are absolutely right! Try reaching the Torx bolt head that is recessed inside SRAM rear derailleurs. I find my standard multi-tool just reaches most bolts with most of it's tools having a 1-2" length. This looks somewhat useless.
  • 6 0
 Back up tool in case you forget your pack at home? Maybe buy I believe this is the ultimate enduro tool, so you can race in almost your underwear without having to carry anything for trail side repairs during race runs.
  • 8 1
 Where can I find some Enduro certified underwear?
  • 1 0
 Skids are not Enduro.
  • 6 1
 The fact you have the option to ride without a backpack on a smaller ride and not have to worry about a multi tool rattling around in your pocket is just a brilliant idea! The only downside to this other than if your clumsy like myself is the price, but when a standard maxle comes in at 75 -80 its not that much of a jump to get such a well designed tool ! thumbs up from mee! buaaap
  • 8 0
 I thought this was going to be a pipe... Talk about missed opportunity.
  • 6 0
 I was thinking a kazoo would be rad.
  • 8 1
 I know it's insanely expensive, but it's also really freaking cool.
  • 13 9
 Silly me, all this time I've been carrying a multi tool in my pack when I could have just taken my wheel apart to fix my bike!
  • 5 1
 Did you not read the article? It clearly says, the axle stays in the bike, you just pull the tool out
  • 2 10
flag OnkleJoachim (Dec 15, 2016 at 8:36) (Below Threshold)
 @bman33: and yet another person who doesn't understand sarcasm
  • 5 3
 @OnkleJoachim: actually understand 100% . However, you missed on your sarcasm since you went the wrong direction. IF the wheel really did have to be removed or taken apart, you would have scored. But, not so much
  • 5 1
 I'm going for the Topeak Multi tool that's fits to bottle cage. Mainly because I'm sick of leaving my current one in the bloody car most times..
  • 3 0
 Carrying a slightly heavyer and more accessible multitool is my choice. After 10 minutes in a ride, the mud stuck on my bike will outweigh any multitool, or even 10 multitools.
  • 3 0
 There are people here posting things who are blind and can,t read.............try to read the article and look at the pictures before writing stupid comments .(sorry for my bad english)
  • 2 1
 I personally use the specialized swat tool multi/headset chain tool - pop it in pop it out in seconds. 160 bucks seems steep for the I9 tool but when you compare it to the cost of the Specialized SWAT stuff -its not that far off. Thank goodness I got my specialized stuff at half price - apparently the riders of Williams Lake likes stashing their stuff.

For tools I think it comes down to personal preference. Considering I run extralite axles (the really light expensive ones) - I do not think this will be on my wish list.

Some gear weenie will certainly get off on this tool...... but not I. As always have faith in Mike Levy (thanks for the 9poin8 review) to say it like it is!
  • 1 0
 It's a sick idea and I'd totally buy one just for the novelty if it cost about a quarter of what it does. I'm not sure that the execution of the tool with all the small parts to get lost is the best but I know the space is very limiting
  • 1 0
 I'm a guy that rides with nothing but my phone for tunes and emergencies. I can't stand carrying anything, it's not just the weight it's the faff of it all, I don't like a sweaty back and I don't like landing on stuff in my pockets. I only take water when it's absolutely necessary and even then I stash a bottle behind a tree rather than carry it.

But the idea of stashing tools permanently on my bike even though I'm very lucky and never seem to need them while I'm out does appeal.

Anyone got any cool diy hacks for stashing stuff? I don't mean just taping stuff to the frame Razz or even some other tools that do the job better than this one?
  • 2 0
 What about the axle hole in Saint Cranks? Surely someone could come up with something that sits in there.
  • 2 0
 @tremeer023: I've been trying to figure something out for the crank axle. Not sure if there are any products already out there. The hollows in the bar ends and the axle etc seem like good stash spots.
  • 2 0
 @ThomDawson: Between bars, crank axle, and a saddle bag you could carry a lot of stuff
  • 1 0
 I have it and it works really well. I am a stickler for bike maintenance and try to address most problems before they occur. An "issue" on the trail can be dealt with easily with the Matchstix tool and for those who look after their bikes frequently the odds of you having to use it are lower anyway. The freedom of nothing on my back and nothing in my pocket...I like that.
  • 3 0
 looks like you can keep few grams in there and light it whenever you need it. #420
  • 3 0
 Cool idea but not sold on relying on a 3mm allen key to drive a chain tool. Sounds like a recipe for rounding it off to me.
  • 3 0
 That's old news.....my seat turns into a Margarita machine way cooler might not fix your bike but fixes your attitude
  • 1 0
 Cool, but like others have said, the SWAT or Topeak multitool on the bottle cage gets the job done cheaper. I guess the chaintool/spoke wrench on the matchstick would be nice, but not worth the extra $100 for me.
  • 1 0
 This is some serious James Bond shit. I could see myself getting one, especially if I continue to do longer back country trips where tools seem to go walking, always nice to have a backup.
  • 2 0
 Lol this thing looks like a pain in the ass. But since its expensive, it must be enduro therefore i must have it even if i dont like it. ...take my money.
  • 6 3
 I will stick to my carbon fiber Lezyne multi tool
  • 1 0
 Thanks to you, I just bought one! Exactly what I've been looking for.
  • 4 0
 but i have a lefty
  • 1 0
 i'll be waiting for the chinese and taiwanese to rip this off, and over the past few years their cheap machined aluminium has been getting pretty good.
  • 1 0
 Considering almost everything is made in China or Taiwan anyway, including the expensive stuff, that's not surprising.
  • 3 0
 If your axle breaks do you need to carry a spare one in your backpack Wink
  • 1 0
 What a PITA to pull that out anytime you need to adjust something. The weight difference is negligible if you get a maxle stealth and lightweight multitool.
  • 2 0
 Very cool tool but not 160 cool I can think of alot of other crap I can use 160 for.
  • 1 0
 Cool.... but expensive as hell. I guess if you're replacing your axle already it might be worth it. Other than that... hell no.
  • 1 0
 I saw this in person and even got to test it at Interbike. Great idea and the guys at I9 are awesome, but like other have mentioned I'm happy with my multi-tool.
  • 3 1
 im not tired of stashing a multi-tool
  • 2 0
 Trollishly: What!!! No 20mm option????
  • 1 0
 @IndustryNineOfficial: 20mm? Take my money.
  • 3 0
 My proto pipe is cooler.
  • 3 0
 how much for what now?
  • 2 0
 Cool, but... $160 us? Nope.
  • 1 0
 Cool, but pricey. I'd rather spend $100 on Seasucker's Hogg for 'cool, but pricey'
  • 2 0
 A truely German coment @Muckal
  • 1 0
 I don't quite get why, but nothing 'truely german' is cool these days, either you are left wing or a Nazi for sure, no love or even concern for your country allowed...
  • 1 0
 @Muckal: Man I get it, seems that way in many places in the Euro Zone right now - and rapidly turning that way here in the states. I hope you didn't take my comment as a critique of Germany or German culture. I was trying to be cheeky about the German tradition of loving fine engineering for the sake of it. My fiancee is from Germany, Heildelberg and Bitsberg, and she is constantly pointing out this small quirk. We plan to get over there for an extended visit sometime in the next few years. Probably do some riding and try out some of the local two wheeled examples of fine German engineering.
Cheers! or Prost I suppose!
  • 1 0
 @UncleAnti: no way did i feel offended. My guess on what you wanted to say was right anyway Wink rumour has it the locals at Heidelberg built a supreme DH trail on Koenigsstuhl (local hill). Haven't been there myself but pics look awesome. You might want to look it up Wink
  • 1 0
 The industry went all carbon to make bike lighter, now they're selling these to put weight back on? Genius!
  • 1 0
 Good point. It's never been about the total weight of bike and rider, otherwise saving 6 lbs wouldn't matter. So the importance of carbon must be saving weight on the bike. Then why take the tool off yourself and put it back on the bike?
  • 1 0
 a section of tube can secure your multi-tool anywhere you like! Biker Haiku
  • 1 0
 Does it make really loud noises when you slide the toolkit out of the axle so everyone knows you are there?
  • 1 1
 Great concept! BUT won't that void the fork warranty if something's to happen? $160?
  • 9 0
 No because if your fork breaks you put the factory one back in before enough return it
  • 1 10
flag drivereight (Dec 15, 2016 at 13:58) (Below Threshold)
 I take it back, this concept is dumb! Let's point the obvious, 1) we have to remove the wheel to use it! 2) Added weight on bike 3) price! 4) Removable handle...no way I'm putting this in my pockets, bad place to be in a event of a crash! My keys are already scary enough! 5) Voided fork warranty....My current multi tool inside my pack which cost $30 is a no brainer.
  • 11 0
 @drivereight: I say in the review about four times that you don't have to remove the wheel, or even remove the axle Smile
  • 1 0
 I have to buy two of these if I ride two bikes?
  • 1 0
 Great idea but the handle and tool housing just 'pop' off. Genius.
  • 3 2
 The article wasn't very clear...do you remove the axle to use the tool?
  • 8 1
 "you pull the tool handle off the axle (the axle itself actually stays in the fork)"

I thought that was pretty clear.
  • 3 3
 @truffy: You clearly don't understand sarcasm.

" First, you pull the tool handle off the axle (the axle itself actually stays in the fork) and then..."
"The axle itself stays in your fork, while the handle pops off..."
"It all goes back together in the opposite way, all while the axle itself is still in your fork."
"...slide out the axle's innards (you can leave the axle itself in your fork) everytime I need to make some sort of adjustment."
  • 1 0
 @jetter: Ha! It seems several people didn't finish reading the article and posted 'you have to take your wheel off to use it'.
  • 1 3
 @jetter: "You clearly don't understand sarcasm."

I understand it very well. But they way it's written makes it difficult to tell the difference between sarcasm and stupid.
  • 1 0
 I'm a buyer. thanks for the info, pinkbike!
  • 1 0
 too bad my Suntour Auron fork isn't threaded, I like this setup!
  • 1 0
 Sorry fellas i'v got a big hands ^^
now seriously, you'r genius!
  • 1 0
 were is the rear axle tool? that one i might be able to use, maybe
  • 1 0
 Great Out of the Box thinking
  • 1 0
 Would be better inside handle bars...
  • 1 0
 That price is insane. 102 grams of alluminum for 160$
  • 2 2
 Make one for 20x110 RS Lyrik and your sold on me! Love it!
  • 4 6
 If this saves broduro riders from having to keister their multi tools then so much the better. Biggest bunch of butt hurt riders don't need any more reasons to grumble.
  • 4 1
 that was pretty funny but I downvoted you for your own apparent butthurt about their butthurt.
  • 1 0
 @pipotte quand même fou
  • 1 0
 Bien pensé mais c'est cher et c'est pas mal compliqué à sortir! J'aime mieux le bon vieux ParkTool
  • 1 2
 Eternal sunshine of a through-axle and pinch-bolt...
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