Inside Commencal: 20 Years After Starting From Zero

Oct 30, 2019
by Ross Bell  



In 1998 Max Commencal was left with two choices: buy back his own company that he was pushed out of, or wipe the slate clean and start afresh. “I preferred to start from zero. I didn't want to give money to those guys...” he explains having turned his back on ten years of work at Sunn, leaving him to stare at a blank canvas. He added the first brush strokes in the form of Andorran investment, which led Max away from the south of France and into the principality tucked away in the Pyrenees.

Commencal remains in Andorra some 20 years later with Max still at the helm of the office, which is within earshot of the World Cup track, although it's not likely you'll find any of the close to 60 employees in the office come race day. Racing is an integral part of day-to-day life at Commencal with them enjoying World Cup success with racing royalty like Anne-Caro, the Athertons, and of course the current crop of Commencal Vallnord racers who are a near-permanent fixture on the WC podium.

The company has gained some real momentum in recent years with Max quick to point the finger at the decision to sell direct online and cut out working with dealers in 2013: “The bike shops were more interested in the bigger brands than us...they were always asking for more and more... always asking for the cheapest bikes. So I said 'stop' I will go online and sell my bikes online” he explains before adding, “Now we have no more filters between the end consumer and us.” They've subsequently expanded into America, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand in quick succession, going it alone without any in-country distributors. Selling direct, of course, helps to keep the prices lower which is another way in which Commencal has got such a strong foothold in the market at the moment.

Look through the line-up and there is a distinct absence of carbon in the Commencal portfolio. They did offer the likes of the Skin, Super 4, and Meta in carbon for a few years, but after visiting the manufacturer in China, Max decided to put a stop to it all. “I was so disappointed to see the bad, bad conditions for the workers... young people with the carbon dust, with only a poor paper mask. The owner was saying 'No, it is like this'... I wasn't comfortable with that.” That was the end to carbon at Commencal, but it wasn't just the humanitarian side that leaves the company as aluminum advocates. As Max explains, a carbon mold is expensive and leaves little room to tweak and change the design, something which Commencal are constantly playing with, especially with their race team.

Life at Commencal is a family affair; it's not only Max's name above the door and on all the bikes with two of his children firmly involved in the company. It's a tightly knit bunch in the office and out of it too, their race teams seem to share the same family-like structure too, coincidentally or not... the enduro team run by the Ravanel's and the downhill team by the Ruffin's. There's plenty of faces from the office in Andorra popping up at the races across the World too, not least Max: “I like to sell bikes everywhere. I am proud to be present in America, Canada, New Zealand, Australia. I like the competition. I like to work with top riders to help them. I think it's the real DNA of the brand. Travel. Sport. Work.” They recently celebrated their twentieth anniversary and look to be in a very strong position for the next twenty. As I ask what the future holds he replies through a smile, "I'm not so young now! Honestly, I don't know... What is clear is that I enjoy what I'm doing a lot, two of my children work with me. I have a super nice team actually. I really like to work with them, to travel with them. When I come here I don't feel like I'm going to work, it's a pleasure."

Commencal is based in the principality of Andorra, nestled away in the Pyrenees a stone's throw from the World Cup track.


The ground floor of the office is a showroom where riders can get a close up look at all of their products.

Advertisements for the Supernormal, the first Commencal bike back in 2000.

Anne-Caroline Chausson and Commencal joined forces once again in 2017 after plenty of racing success in the past.

The Athertons are another name synonymous with the Commencal name and history.

The Commencal Vallnord DH team has been at the forefront of WC racing in recent years with riders like Pierron, Nicole, and Daprela.

bigquotes"In 98 the company [Sunn] was big, there were 200 people with a lot of success in competition, but I was no longer alone in the company. Some shareholders entered in the company and they pushed me out... So it was hard during the first days. My lawyer told me this is impossible to accept, we'll try to find money and we will re-buy it from the others. Then after one night, I came back to see him, I said if you are able to find some money I'd prefer to start from zero. I didn't want to give money to those guys. The money he found was in Andorra, the condition was that I was the major holder and impossible to touch. So I was 60% of the company and I still remain 60% of the company."Max Commencal

A new bike starts as sketches on the table of designer Thomas Moret, after they have already decided on the goal of the new bike, whether that be something like better suspension kinematics or better geometry.

Thomas said it can take anywhere between 6 months and over a year from the first sketches to having the first sample in their hands.

Things can then be taken to the computer where the design really starts to take shape.

A test rig that makes sure the frames coming in from Taiwan are to the correct geometry and specification.

3D printing can be done in-house which gives the engineers and designers an early opportunity to have the product in their hands, giving them a better understanding of the aesthetics and functionality while also helping them to spot any potential problems sooner.

bigquotesThe hard years were in 2010 / 2011 when it was very difficult to sell to the dealers and they paid you 90 days after. Since we went online we are free, we can do what we want. We have no more filters between the end consumer and us. The end consumer can have an engineer on the phone, all the people on the phone... All is much much easier. It has been a good idea for us. I don't think it's a good idea for all the brands because I still think that 80% of people prefer to buy a bike in a store.Max Commencal


An idler pulley has long been integrated into Commencal's Supreme DH bike design.

This was the first mule that the engineers experimented with the idler on.

A prototype linkage for a Meta. It's pretty common for their riders to be seen trying different linkages on the race circuit.

This raw frame is an early iteration of the current Meta.

Another reason why Commencal like working with aluminum over carbon is the ability to quickly change and tweak frames.

The team in Andorra consists of around 60 employees but there are close to 80 total across the world with Commencal now working in America, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand.

They also offer a pretty extensive range of kids' bikes too.

The designers and engineers work hand-in-hand, step-by-step through all the various stages of the new frame, from the kinematics and geometry right down to the smaller details like cable routing and frame protection.

In these shots are computer details on the new Meta Power.

The Commencal design and engineering team from left to right: Nicolas Menard, Arthur Quet, Jerome Huet, and Thomas Moret.

When deciding on colours close attention is paid to make sure the various designs will suit the components they will be specced with, whether that be SRAM or Fox etc.

The colourway that the Commencal enduro and downhill team used in the 2019 season, it's now a colourway available on the 2020 bikes.

A variety of old colour samples. The grey and orange tube in the hand of product manager Matthieu Beaube is the design used on the Supreme 29 in 2018.

Various old and experimental frames and rear triangles racked up and laying dormant.

bigquotesI don't like being expensive to be expensive. I don't like looks for nothing. I like the sport. The way we have chosen to sell direct is the best way to have the best price. After that I like to travel, I like to sell bikes everywhere. I am proud to be present in America, Canada, New Zealand, Australia. I like the competition. I like to work with top riders to help them. I think it's the real DNA of the brand. Travel. Sport. Work"Max Commencal


A prototype Supreme with various shock mounting positions as well as a reach adjust headset.


Just because the riders didn't race it doesn't mean they didn't try it... A Supreme in mullet mode.

The engineers will try various components themselves before deciding on the specification the production bikes will have.

The workshop handles everything from warranty requests to new bike builds and everything in between.

bigquotesIf you today you have a good price on the internet in one country then you can't have a higher price in another one. Worldwide we must be roughly at the same price. If you sell directly in Europe, not one distributor that wants to have his own margin will want to work with you in the US or Canada. So you have no choice but to go by yourself. And it's what we did. At the beginning, it was a little bit scary but in the end, it works. We are thinking about how to be present in Asia, not so simple... It's not so simple... For the moment we want to stay strong in the seven places we are, it will be the strategy for the next one or two years.Max Commencal




Thibaut Daprela's race bike getting a once over in the workshop in the run-up to the 2019 Andorra World Cup.
Various linkages used by the Commencal Vallnord team.

Lunch time laps in the Vallnord bike park for some...

... while others hit up the Commencal Spot down the road.

The Commencal Spot is a bar and restaurant directly opposite the finish of the World Cup track.

bigquotesIf you follow an accounting logic, then for sure. Don't make downhill bikes. The cost for the engineering, the moulding, for the tooling, for the communication that you have to do. For the quantities you will sell, it's not interesting to make. It's much more interesting to make enduro bikes. But I do not consider the business like that, for me, the business is a total thing. But for us, at the moment everything is growing. All the categories are growing.Max Commencal


It'd be rude not to have a few laps on the pump track!

If you watched the World Cup you'll have seen how dry and dusty the conditions were in Andorra this summer. A bit of water on the pump track was essential.

Pierrick Lannes showing us how it's done.

Pierrick ripping turns on the Absolut.

The man behind it all. Max Commencal watched his company hit 20 years old this year.



161 Comments

  • 118 1
 bloke know's to build a dh bike
  • 34 2
 Yeah to be honest most of their bike’s are pretty good. That range of kid’s bike’s must be the widest on the market.
  • 99 15
 @jaame: @thelastrun: Apostrophes are not used like you think they're used. On the other hand, who am I to stop you wasting 4 apostrophes just for the fun of it?
  • 19 0
 Not sure what he's better at, designing DH bikes, or spotting DH talent. His ability to put great riders on solid bikes they can win on is pretty uncanny.
  • 4 0
 @jaame: I purchased the 24' for my daughter and added an air fork. It is truly an awesome bike, and very well built.
  • 4 0
 Commencal FTW.
  • 9 0
 @sergeyeremin: *Apostrophe's
  • 4 1
 @windsurf360: at least someone get’s it
  • 1 0
 @windsurf360: Apostrophe’s apostrophe?
  • 1 0
 @jaame: Ye’s, look’s like he doe’s! Big Grin
  • 86 0
 Seems getting out of Sunn was the best thing that happened to him. Barely even know Sunn exists. They have a couple of pro teams but I wouldn't know where to buy one of their bikes, have never seen one on the trails or even seen them reviewed. Max now has a company that sells globally and has won all sorts of championships. Good on him. Badass bikes too.
  • 24 0
 That’s what you get for shitting on the main man!
  • 10 1
 That to me, resonates with the story of Erik Buell the Harley engineer,who set up his own bike brand Buell motorcycles.
The bloke knew how to design bikes,sadly the story went sour when he got taken over by Harley and they eventually shut down Buell production.
I've been fortunate to own both brands,still miss my Buell and my 26" Supreme,both badass bikes.
  • 4 0
 @Beicpinc: Those Buell bikes were ace looking, brutally beautiful.
  • 1 0
 @Beicpinc: damn I miss my sb12s. With some wide Renthals fitted, it pretty much had the same riding position as my Orange 224 of the time, but with a dirty great big v-twin for good measure - haha. The now inlaws were soooo impressed when I fitted the ironically named Stealth Engineering exhaust. All that popping and banging - sweet. I think I need another...
  • 1 0
 @Beicpinc: Buell's still kickin'! www.erikbuellracing.com
  • 4 0
 @Beicpinc: Listen to the Two Enthusiasts podcast episode on Buell, one of the hosts was a mechanic on their race team and thoroughly tore apart things like the braking setup Buell designed, stating they had to replace the fork lowers every weekend because the uneven force worked the casting loose.
  • 24 1
 If you're having bike problems I feel bad for you Sunn...
  • 6 0
 @High-Life:
I've got 99 problems but DH ain't one...
  • 1 0
 @High-Life: I got 99 problems and a Max ain't one.
  • 1 0
 @Senduro: Radical!
  • 1 0
 You've never heard of Sunn?? The team that brought us Anne Caroline Chaussone, Nico Vouilloz, Cedric Gracia and Fabien Barel??

Sunn is a legend of it's own in MTB, but it lives on today under the Commencal name.

(The bikes that are sold under the Sunn name today has practicly nothing to do with the original company)
  • 2 0
 @High-Life: 99 problems but a bike aint one
  • 48 5
 I agree with Max. Chinese Carbon is unnecessary for many reasons not the least of which is supporting child labor in horrible conditions. Good to see that he has a conscience and avoids the short term/bottom line mentality that plagues
business today.
  • 23 2
 90% of riders won’t shred any harder on a carbon bike anyway.
  • 36 12
 What makes you think aluminum frames are made in better work environments?
  • 16 1
 @SleepingAwake: the general assumption would be that eaten factories are less likely to fully mitigate work place hazards. The hazards associated with carbon frame production take more mitigation than aluminum, so there work environment is more like to be hazardous. If I built a bike from asbestos would you assume that work environment was better or worse than one where carbon bikes were being built?
  • 9 2
 @catweasel: i know what you mean and agree, but i think it is short sighted if you think carbon means child labor but aluminium is no problem. Acid etching for paint prep, painting itself, anodizing, welding fumes, metal sanding dust are all nasty things, and on the other hand proper work protection when working with carbon prepregs is not super hard either.
  • 38 0
 @SleepingAwake: The article made the distinction that carbon frames are made in China and aluminum frames are made in Taiwan. Working conditions in Taiwan are far better than those in mainland China. Taiwan doesn't have issues with child or forced labor to start with.
  • 15 15
 @SleepingAwake: aluminium frames last longer and are probably going to be resold right up until failure if that actually happens at which point the aluminium will be scrapped and recycled where there’s a good chance a carbon frame won’t last two years and can’t be recycled when it cracks.
  • 3 4
 @smithcreek: oh i completely overlooked that. But in my experience this is not true, i think most high quality carbon frames come from Taiwan which has a long history with bike and racquet manufacturing... at least the manufacturers i was in contact with
  • 12 2
 @thenotoriousmic: carbon has a much better fatigue life than aluminum, but this has nothing to do with child labour
  • 4 0
 @SleepingAwake: yeah I imagine whether your working with aluminum or carbon any far eastern factory is probably a hazardous place to work. While I'm no expert carbon manufacture has a lot of potential for toxin ingestion/absorbtion/inhalation which is hard to protect against. The effects are often chronic rather than acute and so more easily ignored. A lot of conjecture all round really but I do get your point that the difference in working conditions may be far less than some people lead us to believe. The environmental argument is a whole different kettle of fish.
  • 7 4
 I just came here for the virtue signaling. Still a huge carbon footprint shipping it from Asia though!
  • 9 4
 @wibblywobbly: nope not really. Shipping by sea is actually really efficient. Can everyone please stop just making assumptions and sell them as the truth? It is so much more complicated. And if it isn't, you probably didn't consider all the factors...
  • 6 1
 @SleepingAwake: shipping via sea is very efficient on a per-mile basis, but there a lot of miles between China and EU/US, so it's still worse than shipping more locally on a less efficient platform.
  • 5 2
 @SleepingAwake: has it though? Where’s the evidence? They don’t seem to last very long do they? And why are they making the swing arms out of aluminium for durability then? How many 2019 carbon frames are still going to be on the second hand market in ten years time compared to aluminium?
  • 2 0
 @dthomp325: except that the raw materials most likely come either from asia our Australia anyway
  • 4 0
 @SleepingAwake: Plus they still get shipped by truck to get to your region's distribution center, and then to your house, so you have the same transport pollution if it was produced locally + sea transport.
  • 5 1
 @thenotoriousmic: not sure about anyone else but broken/failed frames get hung on my wall, not recycled! (up-cycled maybe?)
  • 3 0
 @Obidog: for now maybe but sooner or later it’s going to end up recycled though unless your planning on passing down your broken frames to your children and grandchildren. Haha. Wink
  • 2 2
 I know worker protection are questionable in china. However your thoughts of child labor is really idiotic, it seems to you wielding or laying carbon fibers or painting are just as simple as shoveling coal or lawn mowing. If you ever think or look at small indi brands at west, you would know the skills required for bicycle production are not for a child. Or you just think Chinese children are some magical creatures.
  • 3 2
 I don’t have a problem with child labour in countries where the child is contributing to the family and would otherwise be using resources and not going to school anyway. China is not such a place, but I would like to point out that we should not assume all child labour is bad, and we should not judge other people in other countries by our own standards.
Regarding the health hazards, I would say I think carbon is worse. Most of the aluminium manufacture process is automated yes? You have welding and painting in which someone is going to be inhaling fumes, but I feel sure the carbon process is worse and for a longer period per frame.
  • 1 0
 @SleepingAwake: have you seen how nicolai builds their frames, and plus most alloy frames can be built locally with local labour
  • 1 0
 @luke-wood: id like to see how they make their frames. Absolute works or art.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Ha, yep, family heirlooms. They need to see why Dad/Grandad walks with a mighty limp and has a medical record comprised mostly of x-rays and MRI scans!
  • 1 0
 @SleepingAwake: google de vinci bikes canada ?
  • 1 0
 @bdcain: why do you mean ?
  • 1 1
 @thenotoriousmic: fwiw, I’ve cracked an aluminum frame after about 1 season of riding in 1 crash. I’ve had carbon frames last me years of more aggressive riding and many worse crashes on rockier terrain with no problems.

I don’t think there is much evidence for aluminum lasting longer than carbon, or the other way around. Both have no fatigue limit (like steel does, which is part of what makes steel such an attractive material for bike frames), so theoretically, both could fail in fatigue as far as I know. Additionally, though neither has a fatigue limit, but are known to be durable and last quite a long time under cyclical loading when manufactured properly.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: while I have nothing against any material, and for many reasons including cost Aluminum is still awesome; but, I’ve broken aluminum and steel frames but my last two bikes are carbon and are doing just fine. Besides, carbon, like steel, can be fairly easily repaired and don’t have to end up going to recycling.
  • 1 0
 @whambat: my Santa Cruz fell off the back of my car at 110km/h on the freeway. There was no damage at all. Carbon is strong as hell. I still don’t want another carbon bike though. It isn’t worth the extra money in my opinion. It doesn’t do anything that aluminium doesn’t do, and there is always that doubt in your mind about scratches developing into cracks, or chips from being dropped on a rock. I saw a carbon chainstay marked to f*ck from pedal rub on a shuttle truck earlier this year. I would not be worried about that at all if it was an alloy bike but carbon... that had me worried.
  • 2 0
 @jaame: you can ruin a alloy frame with heal rub as well but you make a good point. There’s no definite advantage to running carbon, it’s significantly more expensive and more likely to fail ether due to carbon not being as tough or manufacturing defects (You decide). So what’s the point? What am I getting for my money?
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: one of the main advantages of carbon is that it's easily repairable. Alloy is one and done if you crash, carbon is a $200-400 fix, and where I live it's even local, just drop it off and pick it up a week later.
  • 1 0
 @jaame: I’d have to agree with you about the cost to performance value of aluminum for the most part, with the exception being XC race bikes with riders that are light enough to make the difference. Being 200lbs, I probably don’t notice the extra mass of aluminum vs carbon much. That said, I still don’t think is durability or recyclability is a reason to for people to worry about carbon.
  • 24 7
 Ahh....the Meta 5.I remember the 100% failure rate we had on every frame we sold.Good times.
  • 14 0
 Always interesting to see which CAD software the guys run. Creo seems to have quite a strong following in the bicycle world..
  • 1 0
 Yeah it does seem to be a common software in the bike industry. When I applied to Specialized internship program they said they use Creo as well.
  • 13 0
 Love these types of articles!
  • 8 0
 They need to work a bit on their shop system Wink Buying from them was a big pain in the ass for me:
- credit card (Mastercard) - did not work
- paypal - did not work ...
- eventually a bank transfer worked

But it was preorder, so their system did not validate stock. So after a few month of waiting they told me they would not have the frame Big Grin

Eventually, they have sent me a 2020 model and communication was really good.
Bike is built like a tank and it is very well thought technically (Meta AM 29).
  • 6 1
 After 3 weeks of waiting on the bike that supposed to be ready for shipping I decided to contact them and ask "what the f@%# is happening with my bike?" They went this time (it's not the first time that I'm waiting for ever) with "delivery to the foreign countries could take a little bit longer" excuse.
So folks, if you live outside of Andorra it could take a little bit more time for the bike to come. Especially if they didn't even send a goddamn bike.
  • 5 0
 @pakleni: my Furious frame got lost in transit altogether. I think their shop is fine, but the carrier they use is not reliable. Eventually they sent me a new frame and all good, but process took nearly 2 months. So yeah, gotta work on their online sells further.

Some of the best-looking bikes for sure!
  • 5 0
 @yxbix: Same for me, the carrier(GLS) lost the frame. Commencal sent a new one but it also took around two months.
  • 6 1
 @yxbix: I've got also "lost in the transit" excuse. Twice.
This time I told them straight away that they already used that excuse with me so they went with "foreign countries"..

Btw; bike is still on the way.. ????
  • 5 0
 Ordered 2 bikes recently. The first one has a delivery date of nov 15th and arrived 4 weeks ago, so 6 weeks ahead of schedule. The other bike was ordered friday, arrived the following tuesday. So I really can't complain. And yeah, GLS wouldn't be my first choice either, and the tracking information is in french and useless. But the pricing for shipping is transparent and pretty fair and I can really not blame anybody for me being able to have a few good rides before the winter.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, one more thing - they have sent me the bike using French Post (Collissimo) which meant no f*kg tracking (French post site is a nightmare, there was a tracking record, but mostly empty). For the money I have spent, I would prefer a real carrier (GLS, Fedex, whatever).
  • 4 0
 @yxbix: GLS, the carrier is just rubbish. They are bad at tracking, bad at scheduling, bad at delivering and bad at not breaking stuff in transit.
They couldn't even find my address (busy street in urban area), even after confirming that it was correct multiple times. Ended up shipping to a friend's place...
Commencal really should contract a better delivery company.
  • 2 0
 No problems for me, was sent out quick. 2020 Meta AM 29.. would recommend, unreal bike and still pedals sound with its weight.
  • 2 0
 Couldn't agree more. I LOVE my Meta AM 4.2, but buying it from them was not fun or easy at all.
  • 1 0
 In 2017 i was thinking of buying a new META or Nukeproof MEGA 275. In the end i went for MEGA because the shipping cost for the bike from Andorra to Croatia was somewhere around 150 euro. I tried to contact Commencal store in order to select different carrier but they didn't reply to my emails... i was then worried about customer service if they don't reply to emails and went with my usual shop, the CRC. I didn't regret it.
  • 3 0
 @NiloB: Fortunately, I live about 15 mins. from Commencal's US location in Golden. Can pop right in a get what we need pretty easily
  • 1 0
 I had no issues getting my Meta AM 29. I ordered during the winter, thinking it would be a bit less busy for them. It took a couple weeks, but there was several feet of snow on the ground outside my house when I ordered so it didn't really matter. The guys in their CO distribution HQ were easy to deal with, answered questions by email and phone pretty quick. Bike is so good, and even bikes I've seen on sale at the end of the season can't match the spec on the Meta for the price I paid. Only complaint is the e thirteen wheels are kinda crap, and they were poorly built by Commencal - no thread locker, not tensioned well so spokes constantly getting loose.
  • 7 0
 I gotta say,,,, ordering my 2019 Meta tr frame and a couple of bits from Commencal was so stress free,,,,
Fast delivery,, good communication,,no Dramas at all,,,,,
A proper forward thinking geo frameset,,,,
Well done Commencal,,,,????
  • 12 0
 Here, take some of these mate,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
  • 6 0
 Commencal's headquarter's looks like a place a mad wizard/witch would have a laboratory to conduct all forms of alchemical combinations and spellwork. The next thing we'll see is the hidden dungeon underneath their headquarters to hold captive employees from companies like Trek and Specialized to stay one foot ahead in the Game of Patents.
  • 5 0
 On my case probably the best bikes out there. Been a customer on their downhill bikes since the V2 all the way to V4.2 Supreme. On the other hand probably the worst after sales service that I've ever experienced on every single case I've had.
  • 3 0
 Totally agree on "the best bikes out there" (even though I have a SC now). Was a customer since meta 55 and have owned 2 bikes. I had great after sales assistance on various occasions, but over the years it's got worse. Plenty of my friends have bought Commencals but due to the company's workload there are various mistakes and bad communication. (They even sent a dh frame instead of a am frame to a new buyer!!)

That's too bad, they should really work on this matter, because as we mentioned before they are probably the best bikes out there!
  • 5 0
 I was on a guided holiday in Andorra a few years ago and catastrophically blew up my bike on the second to last day. With a word of Spanglish from our tour operator, the Commencal guys lent me a (then) new fangled Meta 650b franken-mule for the last 24 hrs of riding. Had prototype Formula fork on it, and a shock that wasnt the right length pumped up too hard so the 650b wheels didn't clash on the 26" wheel frame. Rode like a complete bag of sh*t (proper commicals ride brilliantly in my limited experience)

The important thing is i rode.
  • 1 0
 sounds fun af
  • 7 0
 "near the dh track,but you won't find the staff there on race day"...surley some mistake?!?
  • 7 0
 The office. Poorly worded but that's it.
  • 3 0
 I think it means not at the office. I also had to read it again...
  • 7 0
 Can anyone explain why Perron has just posted this?

www.instagram.com/p/B4PcyUTIJ3G/?igshid=wui68dfeeogy
  • 1 1
 O_O
  • 8 0
 Jean girard playing the game of team rumourzzz at high level
  • 4 0
 Gwinning?
  • 5 0
 "scsyndicate:
This voids our contract ????"

LMAO
  • 4 0
 @zede: I want to see a Jean Girard inspired race kit for Commencal Vallnord team next season. I'm sure they would be able to make the Perrier logo into a Pierron or Pompon logo.
  • 2 0
 Look at both pics... looks like a bet. "Get on that intense, post it on intsa and i'll give you $20". "Hold my champagne..."
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: read the comments. Also no commencal branded clothing. Doesn’t look like a world champion here, clearly undercover. I bet he turned some heads though.
  • 5 0
 @Dropthedebt: it will be the ad campaign for the new Perrier intense bubbles
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Pants say commencal... he's clearly joking.
  • 4 0
 Ordered my Meta AM this summer. Placed the order on a Wed night, had the bike at my house Friday evening. Took it to Whistler a week later. It kills the Slash 29er it replaced.
  • 1 0
 What spec build did you have in the end? I’m on a Slash29 looking for next weapon
  • 2 0
 @enduroFactory: I tried the slash with coil front and rear then fox x2 and was always tweaking it. I just couldn't get it to feel right. It always seemed to blow through the travel or be too harsh, never really felt planted. The meta it was air up the fork and shock, tweak the rebound and LSC ever so slightly then ride and it feels great. More planted and stable, but also more responsive to rider input and pedal strokes. It feels how I always wanted the slash to feel, but with much less work or fiddling.
  • 1 0
 @jselwyn: thanks for reply, do like the meta Am29 just the weight I’m not keen on with a large Slash 9.9 under 32lb
  • 4 0
 Im not (yet) on a Commencal bike, but anyway i'm grateful that Max rised a company which represents such good vibes for the sport and the riders. Always fascinating to see what they are doing!
  • 6 0
 Nice articleSmile And thanks commencal for the Supreme SX, best bike ever!
  • 2 0
 Nice article, thanks!

By the way I have an idea how to make carbon molds cheaper (in the end, when you are using only one expensive which is able to be used for all the frames in line up in all the sizes) and way more flexible in question of changing geo etc. It is pretty simple, I just don´t have the money to make it.
  • 3 0
 I tested that Supreme in the alps a few years ago, incredible rear suspension design. When I dream of a DH bike, I dream about the Supreme...
  • 2 0
 I fell in love with Commencals when the first Furious came out. With the split top tube and that aqua blue colour! I'm saving so hard right now to buy a new Furious. Can't wait until I have the funds!
  • 2 1
 I just checked their web and found out that they produce also skis. I'm not aware of any other bike producer to go the same direction... so maybe PB could get some comments from Max on that move. BTW: If I need to buy new ski I'd rather give money to bike brand than to Atomic, Volkl or Head...
  • 1 0
 If I remember well, Elan was trying to get into bike business as a ski brand. Same for K2. And Rossignol is also trying to get into biking business these days through Felt bikes. Hard to say if someone tried to make it other way. But it totally make sense. However I think they make it in collaboration with someone – not surprised if these are still Faction skis as previous.
  • 11 0
 Scott maybe...
  • 2 0
 @Romyche: ahaha, yeah true. Facepalm Smile
  • 2 2
 They don't really produce their own skis, they're just rebadged faction's.
  • 1 0
 @MtbSamuel: and Factions are in reality made in small company in Czech :-D

But honestly, I don´t get the question, what do most of bike shops sells in winter ?(I am not talking about winter in south cali)

Yes, boards and skis...
Scott is one, but if you go deeper you could fine lot of bike and ski companies are under the same holder.
  • 1 0
 @alwaysMORE If I need to buy new skis, I´d surely trust renowned ski brands ( Atomic, Volkl, Salomon, etc...) more than any bike brand. I think it´s very simple and logical. Or let´s turn the tables - If you were a ski enthusiast and liked for example Salomon skis, would you buy a Salomon bike?
  • 1 0
 Bought my '17 Meta AM 4.2 on a Sunday from Commencal Canada, and it was delivered to the opposite end of the country that Friday. The bike has been largely flawless. Any small warranty issues have been dealt with quickly, and they are very helpful, providing support over the phone and via email when required. Could not be happier with the bike. It's bombproof, fast and has been ridden all over eastern Canada, Moab and more.
  • 2 0
 I admire the commitment to manufacturing in aluminum, but am confused as to why the DH race team is running carbon components - seems a bit inconsistent in terms of messaging.
  • 1 0
 Loving my first Commencal, the TR29. Was sketched at first but then very impressed with the quality and simple details that work great. Of course a few things I would like to change but that's been with every bike I've ever owned. No issues getting bike in US, everything went fast. Great story! Dream come true it seems for Mr. Commencal... Well done!!!
  • 1 0
 My first bike getting back in the game was a Commencal Combi Disc....I think 2007. Also had a Meta 5.5 Pro at one point but sold her to go travelling. Always have a soft spot for Commies.
  • 2 0
 This idler pulley prototype with monarch plus shock is beautiful ! What a hell of a bike ! Any chance to get something like that as a trail bike version ?
  • 4 0
 All neat, clean and very cool, but where is the factory ??
  • 1 0
 un pò più in là Wink
  • 2 0
 wow, this is hands down the most bad ass HQ I have ever seen! these guys are doing it right. Max, you are the man! I greatly appreciate the Alloy offering!
  • 3 0
 Max is the Mac. I like his petty ways of not wanting to give them money and starting from zero again. Gangster.
  • 1 0
 Our founder, Mike, shook your hand at Interbike 2010, Max, and rode the Animal / Atherton DH v3 for 4 seasons. He regrets selling that frame. Should be handling on our wall in our shop garage. Keep up the good work.
  • 1 0
 All those prototypes, all that testing, and the stays always are massive in width and rub my calfs on every one I've ridden. I'm not some track sprinter built guy either. Good bikes otherwise.
  • 4 0
 Just got a 2019 Meta TR. I am loving it.
  • 1 0
 Commencal is a dope company, they really make great bikes for a good price and they actually spec there alloy frames with decent parts. def seems like a company that has it figured out
  • 1 1
 Wow THAT frame! with The Commencal design and engineering team from left to right: Nicolas Menard, Arthur Quet, Jerome Huet, and Thomas Moret. under it, I registered a design in 1994 of a very similar design,
I would really like to know how well it would ride?
Since the design is just a variation of GT RTS design will not getting any lawyers in evolved
Would just like to see that frame in action, got any clips?
  • 1 0
 I own a 2018 meta v4.2, love the bike, but now I want to put my 9y/o son in one, but it is impossible to decide the best model or size, since there is no place to test ride... any ideas?
  • 1 0
 Clash jnr?
  • 2 0
 They sell here in Japan through a distributor, the proces are double the commencal site.
  • 3 1
 I'd be really curious to see a Commencal XC bike (or..."downcountry"... or whatever)
  • 1 0
 Meta TR, kind of? It's 'overforked', but the rear i still 130 so downcountry territory.
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: Yeah the TR British edition was almost my new bike. I ended up with something a little bigger travel, would love to add an "aggro" xc bike like 120mm ish front and back. I'd love to see Commencal's take on a bike like that.
  • 2 0
 @ratedgg13: I have the TR british. There's nothing xc about it. It's burly as hell!
  • 2 0
 Awesome look into a company making some pretty intriguing bikes these days. Loving the look of the new Furious!
  • 1 0
 Esse cara é foda!! Fanzaço dele deste os tempos da Sunn, com MiniMig e Gachet. Babei quando a Supernormal saiu em 2000. Thanks Max!! You are an inspiration.
  • 2 0
 You should give the buyer the option to buy any of those sick colors during the A La Carte purchase
  • 1 0
 Commencal's showroom up the road from me in Golden CO is a welcomed addition to the front range. Already planning on getting my kids next bikes there when the time comes.
  • 2 0
 Yo that YS 747 sparkly blue paint. Make a bike with that
  • 3 1
 when will there be a real 5 year warranty to the entire frame ?
  • 2 0
 Isn't it that today?
  • 1 0
 @Startgas: Only 2 years for furious and supreme and only two years for anything else than front triangle for others models ....
  • 1 0
 @ratm54: Aha, interesting!
  • 1 0
 Was here after Andorra WC, top staff and looked after everyone very well. Thanks for the hangover.
  • 2 0
 I bet theres a new meta coming out soon
  • 1 0
 Max is a badass. The old Sunn DH bikes and race team were so far ahead of their time.
  • 2 0
 Soon gonna be Max Commentai Wan.
  • 1 0
 Seems like passion for the racing is still the fuel behind this bike brand. Thanks Max!
  • 10 10
 Man, that Supreme is such a hot bike, I just can't get over the fact they're using Pressfit instead of BSA Frown
  • 6 7
 Parktool RT-1 & Parktool HHP-3.

Here you go.
  • 7 2
 @qreative-bicycle: This solves creaking pressfit bottombrackets how?
  • 3 1
 Yeas, PS is such a stupid idea... I own a Meta for a year now and it does not creak though. But BB removal will be a nightmare.
  • 5 4
 @fiatpolski: Creaking doesn't always mean bad conception. You're gonna blame a chain from rusting as well?Just take care of your bike.
  • 5 1
 @qreative-bicycle: No matter how much I take care of my bike, creaking from pressfit can always happen. That's why I prefer BSA.
  • 10 3
 Never had a creaking pressfit when I had (and have) creaking BSA bottom brackets...

Plus from a point of engineering the width of the PP92 is a lot better to design a bike (especially on hardtails with short chain stays and big tires...). And no need to rework the thread for the manufacturer nor the consumer. For me pressfit is a win-win.

But yeah, BB removal is tricky. But no more than a semi-integrated headset after all...
  • 3 1
 3 years on my 2016 meta v4 with the same BB. Gotta say it's been pretty good.
  • 2 0
 @fiatpolski: have you tried a threaded pressfit from Wheels Manufacturing?
  • 3 0
 @fiatpolski: BSA can creak and it´s not too rare occurrence really.
  • 1 1
 Odd... He didn't once bring up his distaste for carbon fiber, wonder why...
  • 1 0
 I’ve been riding their 2019 HT for a year now. Love it!!
  • 1 0
 glad to be rippin a Meta AM V.4
  • 1 0
 CAD working on a notebook? Never !
  • 1 0
 The design office in Andorra is dreamy
  • 1 0
 Please*
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