Intend Releases Its 'Regular' Blackline Ebonite Fork - Across the Pond Beaver

Sep 11, 2020
by James Smurthwaite  
Intend Blackline Ebonite

Everything is upside down for Intend as it has released its first 'regular' fork after building its reputation on inverted designs. We've seen this fork teased over the past few weeks on custom European builds and we can now announce full details of the 140-180mm travel Ebonite Blackline fork.

Intend Blackline Ebonite

The first question out of anyone's mouth will surely be, 'why has Intend gone regular?' Well, as Cornelius Kapfinger, the engineer behind Intend, puts it in the press release, "An upside-down fork is not for everyone. The performance may be fantastic, but the design might not tick everyone's boxes." Or, put a bit more saltily, "The characteristic steering qualities [of an inverted fork] may save lots of strength and the braking stiffness may be on the highest level, but it is hard to beat a myth like lateral stiffness without a huge marketing budget or large OE-sales."

Intend Blackline Ebonite
Details

Wheelsize 29“ only
Spring Air
Travel 140 – 180mm (internally adjustable via c-clips)
Axle 110x15
Max disc diameter 223mm
Offset 44mm
Stanchion diameter 35mm
External adjustments Lowspeed Compression, Lowspeed rebound
Spring adjustments Air pressure, automatic pressure adjustment between positive and negative air sping. Progression adjustable via volume spacer with 3 different setups
Weight 2280g
Price €1,659
More info intend-bc.com

Put simply, a regular fork is what most riders are used to and if you can't beat them, join them. Instead of moping about some riders not liking his designs, Cornelius set out to design a regular fork with all the performance characteristics of his inverted designs.

The result is the Blackline Ebonite fork. The key details here are 140-180mmm travel, which is internally adjustable via c-clips, 35mm stanchions and 29" wheels only. Cornelius says it's best to think of this fork as straddling the gap between the Fox 36 & 38 or the RockShox Lyrik & Zeb. He recommends it for everything from trail to freeride with or without electrical assistance.

Intend Blackline Ebonite
Intend Blackline Ebonite

Intend Blackline Ebonite
The steerer tube of the Ebonite is made with double-wall thickness, 6mm at the crown and 3mm at the top 1 1/8" section to increase stiffness.

The air spring technology is the same as on the Intend models Flash and Edge with the positive and negative chamber filled simultaneously via a mutual valve. A volume spacer can be used to adjust the fork's progression by placing it in 3 different positions and changing the size of the positive chamber. As with all Intend forks, the Ebonite doesn’t use the usual x-ring as a seal but a pneumatic seal instead. Cornelius claims this unique feature reduces the friction within the air spring significantly and gives Intend forks a coil-like feel.

Intend Blackline Ebonite
3 different progression tunes are possible via volume spacer.

The damping can be tuned via external low-speed compression and low-speed rebound adjusters and Cornelius has worked with the Ibis Fidlock Racing Team on the basic setup of the fork that should allow almost any rider to find their perfect tune.

Intend Blackline Ebonite
The Ibis Fidlock Racing Team worked with Cornelius to establish the base tune of the fork. The silver edition is for sponsored riders only, it's black or bust for the rest of us.

Cornelius was aiming for maximum compatibility when it came to seals and lubrication so Fox Gold Oil is used for the lubrication of the casting, Motorex 2,5W for the damper and, last but not least, the dust seals are D35 SKF Seals just like the ones that are used in all RockShox forks all over the planet.

Intend Blackline Ebonite
The fork undergoing, and passing, FBPE testing.

Intend Blackline Ebonite
Some parts of the fork are now engineered in Asia, which helps bring the cost down.

The fork is only available in black and only for 29" wheels at the moment. Cornelius says you can still run it for a 27.5" bike but you should reduce the travel by 10mm from what you were running to keep the ride height within 10mm. The fork weighs 2,280 grams, which is 120 grams lighter than the Flash but the regular design does increase the unsprung mass. The fork is also €2-300 cheaper than Intend's inverted forks at €1,659.

More info, here.






156 Comments

  • 130 13
 Imo that's by far the coolest looking fork currently available. The reduced, simplifed shapes, precise edges, sublte machining marks and black anodizing plus the champagne colored stanchions really give it a raw, industrial, purposeful kind of beauty.
  • 69 2
 I would pay even more for a model with Cornelius Kapfinger sticker.. the coolest name in the whole bike industry
  • 7 1
 Yes a kind of neo retro look make it clean for sure.
  • 5 0
 Agreed. Almost looks like it was completely hand made.
  • 26 2
 It looks like a 2010 White Brothers Fluid fork. I would say retro antique styling before purposeful kind of beauty.
  • 2 0
 @usedbikestuff: I thought that too!
  • 17 13
 Looks as exciting as the plumbing under my sink
  • 32 6
 @pakleni: Dick Pound
  • 1 0
 @usedbikestuff: agreed! I miss my fluid 135, that fork was great.
  • 2 0
 @MrBurger: I love a good solder joint or are we talking pvc Wink
  • 2 2
 @lehott: Why are we talking about the former WADA President?
  • 6 1
 @pakleni: sounds like the bad guy in a James Bond film.
  • 4 1
 @chriss78: I’d say it leans more inspector gadget than 007
  • 2 0
 Want it in Raw Al color!
  • 3 0
 @lehott: pound beaver
  • 2 0
 @MrBurger: I know. If this were made by Suntour, people would be shiting all over it.
  • 1 0
 OK, but it's .25kg heavier, and 60% more expensive than the RS and Fox offerings. Is it worth the weight and money in regards to ride quality, or is a fashion thing?
  • 3 0
 @hllclmbr: No definitley not. But if value for money was a factor all of a sudden, no one would buy FOX or RS anyways. It would probably be all SR Suntour all the time. The only "advantage" a Pike has over an Auron, is the Rock Shox badge
  • 68 1
 Missed a trick - Should have called it “Double Inverted”
  • 31 0
 Unverted fork?
  • 3 0
 non-inverted, like the GIbson "non-reverse" Firebird.
  • 66 5
 Probably would have been easier just to make fork guards for the USD forks....
  • 10 1
 Savage... but so true
  • 7 8
 You missed the point. The perception they were trying to overcome wasn't just that USD forks are slightly more prone to damage on the sliding surfaces. It was the whole idea that a USD fork can never be as stiff in the right places and directions as an RSU fork. Fork guards do nothing to help that, just ask DVO (or was that XFusion... one of them had the carbon guard/bolt-on-arch for a USD dual crown fork, and it still just didn't sell).
  • 4 0
 @just6979: that was DVO, it didn´t help with flex in significant way and emerald fork came out when even in DH everybody was obsessing about weight, where it didn´t score any points either.
  • 37 0
 Need a head-to-head of this vs the EXT Era!
  • 13 0
 Throw in one of the inverted intends as well for comparison.
  • 21 0
 It'd be interesting to know how he's attaching the arch to the lowers, and how that compares in stiffness or strength to more traditional one-piece castings
  • 9 0
 The arch gets screws from the backside.
You can see it here at 6:09 (german video from the intend engineer)
www.youtube.com/watch?v=wL4HDZm6mZ4&feature=emb_title
  • 5 0
 I thought the same, wondering if it will creak. Love the look though
  • 7 0
 @davemays: Shouldn't creak. He said the screws are torqued to the max and get loctite for never ever coming loose. The fork achieved all the standards in fatigue and max load testing for a gravity fork
  • 18 1
 I think it's the 4 parts under the arch on the picture with parts everywhere. maybe bolts, maybe rivets, maybe maybelline.
  • 10 0
 The fork is 5lbs., so some of the strength probably comes from not making the castings paper thin. There is nothing wrong with a little more weight if it lives up to its performance promises.
  • 3 0
 Back to 1994/95 and removable archs (Manitou/Mag21/Marzocchi and others).
It reduces manufacturing investment (clever approach), but I'm missing all conventional vs USD forks... never saw a moto market prefering conventional forks over USDs...
  • 8 5
 My thoughts exactly - The intend stuff is nice but he isn’t a wizard, there is a reason people don’t bolt the arch together on a fork and it certainly isn’t cost.

The hype train is so strong it won’t matter anyway.
  • 3 3
 I had all the same thoughts. There's no way that's as stiff as a cast one piece design, at least not without being way heavier - and it's unsprung weight. Also odd that a fork with 35mm stanchions slots "between" the Fox 36 & 38. As for the creaking, nothing "should" creak - but the more bolt/interfaces you have, the more opportunities for creaking.
  • 7 6
 @gtill9000: it’s like knowingly engineering something to be worse than cheaper current designs because that’s what’s available to you and then attempting to pass the choice off as a benefit.
  • 9 12
 @justanotherusername: lmao ah Marzocchi did it for many years just fine. You don't even sound like you have a clue what you're talking about. It definitely is just a matter of cost its way cheaper to mold one piece then then three pieces. One mold is cheaper than three and then there is no extra assembly time with a one piece lower which save a lot. If you're gonna try and call bullshit at least have something legit to say not just " there is a reason they don't bolt them together and it's not cost" because you are literally saying nothing there. I J
  • 6 1
 @gtill9000: Just because it's claimed to slot between the 36 and 38 doesn't mean it needs 37mm stanchions. These ones might be thicker walled, or a different alloy, or maybe their ultimate stiffness is lower but that doesn't matter if it call still handle the same forces.
  • 5 0
 @justanotherusername: What about this is knowingly inferior? Engineering things like this requires lots of trade-offs. A big one-piece cast lower is relatively expensive until you get to the scale of Fox or SRAM (big initial cost (R&D, mold creation, etc). They obviously determined that the bolt-on arch is stiff enough for their design (whether their design is appropriate for you and anyone else is something else completely), while keeping the costs in the ballpark of reasonable. I don't see anywhere that they claimed this arch design is better, just that's it's super good enough.
  • 3 2
 @justanotherusername: "there is a reason people don’t bolt the arch together on a fork and it certainly isn’t cost"

Actually it is cost. There is a large initial cost to get a casting supply chain going. The reason Fox and SRAM don't use bolt-on arches anymore is because they can afford not too. And if the absolute stiffness of a one-piece casting is also large, then that's just a bonus and can be taken advantage of to save materials and weight, but it doesn't mean that a bolt-on system is automatically inferior.
  • 1 0
 @dominic54 "and how that compares in stiffness or strength to more traditional one-piece castings" and to the USD fork. Remember, the axle system also adds to the same strength and stiffness areas that the arch does.
  • 3 0
 @TDMAN: Its a question of scale. On a bike, there is always the balance between weight/strength to be mindful of since we are the motor. On a moto, the balance can be skewed more towards strength/stiffness because there is more of a tangible benefit from the increased stiffness an inverted fork provides given the forces generated by operating weight, speeds, and cornering forces. Also, an increase in weight can be overcome with more power, which is easier to generate.
  • 2 0
 @faul: under appreciated comment
  • 4 2
 @mhoshal: ah you again with your angry ignorance.

Marzocchi stopped using them 20 years ago.

The intend fork doesn’t use a ‘mold’ it is cnc machined.

Do you have any idea of the cost of developing a casting of the complexity of the fork lowers? - Getting it right first time and the post cast machining to required tolerance?

I would guess it would come to more than the entire turnover of Intend as a company to develop the fox 38 lower to the point of production ready manufacture inc tooling.

Intend machine the fork as that’s what they can afford to do, they couldn’t dream of creating their own cast lower for their sales numbers.
  • 2 2
 @just6979: you just summed it up yourself - it’s knowingly inferior to a cast single piece lower, it being ‘good enough’ doesn’t remove the point, does it?
  • 4 2
 @just6979: just following your ‘it is cost’ you misunderstand me - I absolutely understand the reason the intend is a machined part is due to cost. I was stating that others use the a single part casting despite its cost and development implications.

Intend are using what they can afford, and what they can afford just isn’t as good as the single piece casting, basic engineering. It may be good enough, who knows?
  • 1 0
 @SlodownU: I understand, but having a Lefty and knowing how it is rigid with only 1 leg... if only it had good internals.........(it's an old 140 Max).

Single crown forks are nice, but for Enduro or Ebikes, it would be nive to have triples in the region of 2500/2600grm.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: you re right, it isn´t cost, it´s a fact that you cannot bolt much to soft cast magnesium lowers other than a fender lol. And they are expensive enough without that despite being produced in 1000x higher numbers in Taiwan.
  • 1 12
flag mhoshal (Sep 11, 2020 at 15:27) (Below Threshold)
 @justanotherusername: no shit retard I know intend uses CNc but noone else does dipshit, use some common sense. We are talking about manufacturing as a whole not just one company you stupid tool. You know nothing it cost way more to cnc that cast magnesium lowers lol you know nothing.
  • 1 0
 @TDMAN: I'm not sure motorcycles are relevant here. MX bikes and MTBs have a lot in common, but one important difference is that MX bikes actually have a lower weight limit, I suppose to level the playing field in competitions and prevent anyone from having a big advantage by outspending the other riders and getting a super light bike. MX bikes use inverted forks and they can still be stiff enough because they need to add some mass to make the bikes heavy enough to satisfy the weight limits and compete on. There's a reason upwards of 99% of MTBs use conventional forks and upwards of 90% of MX bikes use USD forks.
  • 4 2
 @mhoshal: you need therapy my insecure and angry friend.
  • 1 3
 @justanotherusername: insecure?? How do you get that lmao and angry yes when I live in a world full of retards!!
  • 1 0
 @lacuna Yes! I was thinking it reminded me of an earlier fork, in a good way.
  • 12 1
 "the Ebonite doesn’t use the usual x-ring as a seal but a pneumatic seal instead."

This sentence doesn't make any sense, because the x-ring seal _is_ a pneumatic seal in this usage. It seals a pneumatic spring.

I mean, shit, lots of things just use an o-ring for a pneumatic seal.Does that mean that this fork just has a simple o-ring for the piston seal?
  • 12 0
 So nothing particularly interesting regarding damping or spring. Just a nicely machined fork.
  • 3 0
 Well, the spring is supposed to be super supple due to a different pneumatic seal on the piston, but agree that information on the damper is very sparse.
  • 4 3
 The usd fork wasn’t meant to be particularly ground breaking in any sense other than being very free of stiction, this appears no different.

Lots of hype though and very little bitching about cost with intend stuff....
  • 10 0
 Looks like it’s out of down hill domination on the ps1
  • 2 0
 I was a marksman with the water bottle
  • 1 0
 Great game, can't believe we don't still ride dh in hiking boots
  • 1 0
 @nordland071285: I actually bought an old PS2 just to play Downhill Domination with my daughter...
  • 4 0
 However good this is, unlike the USD forks, it doesn't have a USP - it's just another top-end, long travel, single crown fork, in a market crowded with really good products with an established service base. You've got to be pretty brave to jump into that shark pool.
  • 2 0
 That was my feeling, if you've got the money to buy an Intend fork then you want it to be USD and a bit out there. Just look at Trust forks, I've not seen a good review but people bought them. If they were a standard design and performed that badly they wouldn't have sold any.
  • 1 0
 @DC1988: people bought them? Who? I never saw one on someone's bike who wasn't paid to ride it. I'm all for linkage forks, but if people were buying them Trust would still have their lights turned on.
  • 7 0
 Looks good in raw finish....
  • 6 3
 "but it is hard to beat a myth like lateral stiffness without a huge marketing budget or large OE-sales."

so you're saying actual performance doesn't matter, it's all about the marketing? my god where is this world headed, people obviously don't like their electricity and tap water
  • 3 6
 Also, "If you can't beat them, join them." WTF, you aren't trying to beat them?

Lot's of cliches getting tossed around incorrectly in this PR piece. Drags down the whole thing.
  • 6 11
flag baca262 (Sep 11, 2020 at 6:30) (Below Threshold)
 @halljam: the world is being taken over by retard logic, it won't end nicely. retard logic didn't build your house, but this statement is quantum physics to many.
  • 4 0
 It reminds me a bit my good old Magura Wotan from 2008.
It's an amazing fork and a good example of German engineering: it looks boombproof but it's so overcomplicated...
  • 5 0
 I can't be the only one missing a High speed compression adjustment in a top end fork? Otherwise looks super interesting.
  • 3 0
 Used to seeing cast mag lowers, these ones look so thin— like, same diameter as the upper tubes. Hard to understand that there’s room for bushings and seals in there?!?

Regardless of that, beautiful fork!
  • 2 0
 "The steerer tube of the Ebonite is made with double-wall thickness, 6mm at the crown and 3mm at the top 1 1/8" section to increase stiffness."

Increase stiffness over what? Because every decent single-crown fork for at least a decade has had a thicker walled steerer at the crown.
  • 5 0
 More photos of that Nicolai please!
  • 4 0
 How does that arch attach? Are we about to witness the rebirth of the aftermarket brake (fork?) stiffener?
  • 1 0
 Pretty sure it's bolted on. There are four bolts with what look like inset heads right next to the arch in the breakdown pic. Either that or it's bonded and those bolts do something else...
  • 6 1
 Holy shit its $2,000 USD. !!!!!!!
  • 2 0
 Intend is where proper machining/engineering lies, just a dream to work on. Those shaved lowers wow, just enough space for the bushings, wish they were a lil lighter than 1kg tho.
  • 1 0
 It is super nice looking and I presume torsionally very stiff because of the way the front axle is attached.

Wonder if Cornelius will throw the Ti front axle and axle clamp bolt on it for a bit of trickness?

Lastly, we always discuss Intend chassis' but I never hear about the valving, which is what is most important.

Would like to see a review of say the Era, the Ebonite, the Mezzer & the Zeb as those are the 4 forks I'm interested in purchasing.
  • 1 0
 Looks cool, IMO. They should hire me to do the internals. I will f*ck them right up. To be honest, I had a really great idea for suspension awhile back, but I can't remember it. Kind of like professor Farnsworth on Futurama, "great idea, came to me in a dream, can't remember shit ever" Big Grin
  • 4 0
 At this point im surprised we havnt seen carbon lowers in mtb
  • 4 0
 Suntour has it on their top of the line XC forks.
  • 3 0
 Oh, but we have... www.bikeradar.com/reviews/components/forks/suspension-forks/pace-rc41-xcam-review

DT swiss continued them for a while after they purchased from Pace. Quite recent history.
  • 1 0
 German-A has some carbon forks aswell. www.german-a.de
  • 1 0
 I was running Pace RC37 MX back in ‘98. You should check them out, they were actually pretty decent. The main problem with carbon lowers is the way it deals with heat build up (not very well) they looked cool though :-)
  • 3 0
 I was looking forward to the Maverick DUC Carbon uppers. Sniff. Sob.
  • 1 0
 rockshox collaborated with specialized around 97 to made a judy carbon fork. around the same year sunn also made a carbon version of obsys fork. obviously neither was any good by modern standards
  • 2 0
 German:A??
  • 1 0
 Manitou xvert carbon. Those were the bomb dot com
  • 7 3
 Ill take a Mezzer or two please (-:
  • 6 10
flag just6979 (Sep 11, 2020 at 7:56) (Below Threshold)
 Then go get one and STFU. Stop wasting your time here commenting on stuff you don't want, and do something valuable and earn the stuff you do want.
  • 6 5
 @just6979: Sorry buddy I didn't mean to trigger and anger you. I should know that pinkbike users have have tempers of spoiled five year olds being told no. Next time ill show restraint with my thoughts.
  • 2 0
 That is a nice looking fork, wow! Any idea if that's a key between the steerer and crown? I can't tell from that CSU picture..
  • 1 0
 That's a good question. Maybe it's just the lighting, but it really looks like there are flats or small keyways milled into that steerer.
  • 1 1
 "but the regular design does increase the unsprung mass"

Would be super interesting to see the difference. Sure the lowers are a bigger tube on this one, but they're also mostly empty, the walls are probably thinner, and they're shorter, than the stanchion. Add the arch in (BTW, is that bonded? Bolted on from the inside?) and even then it's still got to be pretty damn close. I have a feeling if it was a huge difference then we'd know exactly how much less the USD one is.
  • 1 1
 OH, just saw the bolts in the parts pic. Arch is bolted on like a 90s fork... So he's kinda faking everyone out: the right-side-up fork is still relying a lot on the axle for torsional and lateral stiffness, just like the USD. Hahaha.
  • 2 2
 I wonder how the arch is attached to the legs? I wish Suntour Durolux looked more like this.
Shame . The inverted fork worked perfectly. Looked awesome.
But people all want the same thing. So he made the same fork as Rock shock and Fox.
The inverted fork is for people with imagination and innovation.
This fork is for the Sheeples.
  • 3 0
 Did you actually just say "sheeple" unironically?
  • 3 2
 @thegoodflow: shhhh you will upset the Sheeples.
  • 1 0
 With the arch not moved forward some this could be a problem with large size head tubes. That and I wish it just had black stanchions. With that said it’s still a cool looking fork.
  • 2 0
 I've never seen someone go through so much trouble to avoid offering stanchion guards. Cornelius - I woulda bought your USD forks, I just need stanchion guards.
  • 2 0
 Bridging the gap between the 36 and 38... Half a year ago we didn't even have a 38. I wonder who is going to finally bridge the gap between the Ebonite and the 38?
  • 3 0
 I thought they didn't Intend to bring a right side up fork?
  • 2 0
 "Some parts of the fork are now engineered in Aisa, which helps bring the cost down." spellcheck boys
  • 1 0
 also -- engineered or manufactured?
  • 2 3
 "the basic setup of the fork that should allow almost any rider to find their perfect tune"

Well, that's just straight up bullshit. Without at least HSR, and probably HCS for many people, a "perfect tune" for "any rider" is by definition not attainable. Yes, a good base tune will get really damn close for the average sized rider, but without being able to fully tune rebound to match the spring, it's not even close to "any rider".
  • 1 5
flag Muckal (Sep 11, 2020 at 11:00) (Below Threshold)
 You know, i'd claim that more than half of the riders don't even know what compression or rebound does, let alone low vs high speed. Why confuse people even more? Another 30% never reach shaft speeds that require high speed damping. 10% are fast without giving a about the dials and the rest will have a custom tune anyway. So what?
  • 1 2
 My opinion is that you should purchase a Fox fork with lots of knobs, with not one good setting between them. I don't think you'd know a good valving tune if you rode one so they should just make the knobs extra pretty but do nothing at all. Good luck.
  • 1 0
 @Muckal: You don't have to "reach shaft speeds" for high speed rebound to have an effect, just need to go deep into the travel. That's why it's sometimes called end-stroke rebound. So it effects _everyone_ who uses most of their travel, and should match the spring pressure for _each of them_.

Realistically, the only time you can talk about someone not riding hard enough to need damping is compression damping. Yes, the argumen could be made that if they're not riding hard enough to use the travel, yeah maybe end-stroke rebound control won't matter. But it is not hard to misjudge something and bottom out and need that damping.

It's no more confusing that the recommended PSI. There is a little chart, put in that PSI, set those rebound clickers, go ride. Adjust if you want, or not. Either way, know that you now have damping adjusted to match your spring.
  • 6 3
 Those champagne-colored stanchions are ugly as sin
  • 1 0
 If these pneumatic seals are that good at reducing friction, then I want somebody to sell them as retrofits for existing forks.
  • 2 0
 I wish I hadn’t been brainwashed to think that those stanchion colors look cheap.
  • 2 0
 Ill not pay 1698$ on a 2280g fork with 35mm inner tube. Though I'm a fan of intend.
  • 1 0
 Are all those parts glued against themselve or pressed? Especially steerer against crown....
  • 2 0
 @noahcolorado it reminds me of the old machines White Bros forks
  • 2 0
 Cool stuff. I like the photo showing what's made where.
  • 1 1
 Well to all the guys saying it was trickstuff you were wrong I knew it was a new intend fork. It's just pure beauty craftsmanship.
  • 2 0
 "Germany (Europe)" Who was getting confused about that?
  • 1 2
 It’s a fork, it looks like a fork, it probably works like a fork.

It’s heavy, it’s expensive, so what.

They inverted fork was cooker, just needed some stanchion protectors.
  • 2 0
 Most of the good stuff is made in Aisa these days.
  • 3 0
 I can't seem to find Aisa on the map at all....
  • 1 0
 Chuna produces tons of low quality products though.
  • 2 0
 Rounded off the top cap bolt just looking at it.
  • 2 1
 Reminds me of the old Totem, I like it.
  • 1 0
 The machining looks really good on Intend parts
  • 1 0
 I like how they put the "Europe" beside Germany ... :/
  • 1 0
 cheeky
  • 3 1
 I know, like I'm too stupid to understand they are 2 completely separate locations.
  • 1 0
 Great name. Appreciate the name people
  • 1 0
 reminds me of the last White Brothers models
  • 1 0
 How is that arch attached?
  • 1 0
 How can a fork be any good without loads of acronyms?
  • 2 0
 Every word is an acronym if you try hard enough.
  • 1 0
 $2700.00 Canadian dollars
  • 1 1
 I wonder how do they fit the arch to the fork legs, doesnt seem like its going to be stiff
  • 1 0
 Machined lowers and crown vs. some high production mold, YES PLEASE
  • 1 0
 Same type suspension design as formula, dvo.
  • 1 1
 Lots of new forks these days to consider. Where to start?
  • 2 2
 Looks like an X-Fusion from 3 years or so ago.
  • 2 0
 So?
  • 2 2
 @just6979: So what... I was making a statement.
  • 1 1
 Love the old-school design. looks rad!
  • 4 6
 No 27.5? Adios.
  • 6 1
 "you can still run it for a 27.5" bike but you should reduce the travel by 10mm" - last paragraph
  • 1 1
 @sb-jetski: One can adjust the travel but not the extension range. What do you want an extra 20mm of useless tire clearance at the top for, accompanied by an extra 20mm of fork height? Unless you're so into this fork that you'd be satisfied by Mr. Kapfinger's extraordinary solution: Only increase the fork height by 10mm by reducing the travel by 10mm. Wow!
  • 2 0
 People still ride 27.5 front wheels?
  • 1 0
 @thegoodflow: On my hardtail, trail bike, and commuter
  • 3 0
 @thegoodflow: There are dozens of us! Dozens!
  • 1 6
flag ricochetrabbit (Sep 11, 2020 at 13:48) (Below Threshold)
 Yeah they do @thegoodflow:
  • 5 2
 @ricochetrabbit: oh look, a trump supporter... gross. 2020 has been great so far... I'm almost tired of all the winning.
  • 1 0
 tfw you don't mass produce your forks and idiots in a PB comment section think you have the capacity to do both 27.5 and 29" models at any decent rate

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