Intense Primer 29 - Review

Aug 2, 2016
by Richard Cunningham  


Intense released the Primer 29 with minimal fanfare to select journalists earlier this year at their 2017 Sedona product launch. The star of that show was the ACV, which was the Temecula, California, brand's first Plus bike - and for good reason - it looked mean when it was standing still, and its 2.8-inch semi-flotation tires seemed tailor made for Arizona's red rock trail Mecca. The moment an ACV returned, another journalist was chamoised up, waiting for a test ride. By contrast, there was always a handful of Primer 29s in the lineup waiting for riders.

The Primer is a sweet looking machine. Its sleek carbon fiber chassis has a classical profile that communicates lightness, efficiency and a measure of confidence - but with its 29er wheels, 130-millimeter-travel rear end and modestly modern geometry, it appears too balanced, too sensible to capture the imaginations of the sport's emerging cult of self-ordained gravity gods. It would be easy to categorize the Primer as a gentleman's trail bike, targeted at the accomplished rider who has a taste for finer things, and it could fulfil that role quite well. We would soon discover, however, that there is a beast lurking beneath the Primer's mild-mannered profile. The Primer 29 may in fact, be the best performing trail bike that Intense has ever made.




Primer 29 Factory Build:
• Frame: Carbon, front and rear. JST dual-link rear suspension, carbon upper link, Boost 148mm hub spacing, 29" wheels
• Angular contact/collet bearing system with replaceable grease Zerks
• Adjustable travel: 4.5" to 5" (115mm OR 130mm)
• Fork: Fox Factory Float 34, 130mm
• Shock: Fox Factory Float EVOL
• Internal cable routing system
• 192 press-fit bottom bracket
• Drivetrain: SRAM XX1 Eagle (tested with XX1 11-speed)
• Wheels: DT Swiss XMC 1200 Spline
• Dropper Post: RockShox Reverb Stealth, 150mm
• Brakes: Shimano XTR 180mm (F), 160mm (R) rotors
• Sizes: Small, medium, large and X-large
• Weight: 25.43 pounds/11.56kg (medium, as tested)
• MSRP: $9499 USD (with SRAM Eagle)
• Contact: Intense Cycles

Intense Primer 29 2016

Meet the Primer

Twenty nine inch wheels are enjoying a sort of "I told you so" comeback within the ranks of accomplished trail riders. Intense's Carbine 29er established itself early on as a capable all-mountain trailbike in every respect, but its chassis was a little more flexible than some desired. The Primer 29 chassis is visibly improved, taking advantage of the wider Boost hub standard (originally conceived to improve 29-inch-wheel designs) to make room for wider tires, shorten its chainstays, and add lateral stiffness to both the wheels and the frame. A pair of shock-mount positions offer either 115 or 130 millimeters of rear-wheel travel and up front, the Primer 29 is designed to handle forks with up to 140 millimeter strokes.

Intense Primer 29 2016
Reportedly, SRAM did not have enough 12-speed Eagle drivetrains in stock to supply Intense when they launched the Primer 29, so test bikes were outfitted with 11-speed XX1 transmissions, powered by Race Face Next cranksets.


Four models: Four build levels are offered, ranging from $9499 for the top-line Factory model, to the most-affordable $4599 Foundation model. All share the same carbon chassis, but the two top offerings, the Factory and Pro are molded with thinner walls, using higher-strength material. The Factory and Pro builds sport SRAM's latest 12-speed Eagle drivetrains, while the second-tier Expert and Foundation models are equipped with either Shimano XT or SRAM GX 11-speed transmissions. Our test rig, a medium-sized Primer Factory Build was produced before SRAM was officially shipping Eagle groups to OEM customers, so Intense was forced to outfit it with an XX1 11-speed drivetrain. All Primer models are equipped with RockShox Stealth dropper posts.

Carbon chassis: Intense has been in the carbon game long enough to become one of the preeminent players, and the Primer's chassis bears witness that they have. The finish is beautiful and its tubes and junctions are profiled to optimize the benefits of carbon composite construction without bowing to the needless swoops and exaggerated angles that the craft has currently deemed fashionable. The frame itself is visibly stronger, with oversized swingarm tubes, a widened bottom bracket area and a reinforced seat mast. Stand-over clearance is ample, the cables and hoses are routed internally, and there is a dog-leg bend in the downtube to make room for a single water bottle there. Intense pegs the weight of a medium-sized frame and shock, complete with its seat clamp and rubberized downtube and chainstay protectors at 2690 grams (5.93 pounds), which is svelte for a trailbike in the mid-travel category.

Intense Primer 29 2016
The lower link is aluminum. It houses the bearings and features a grease fitting to extend its lifespan.

Intense Primer 29 2016
Boost hub spacing makes room for enduro-width rubber. Internal cable and hose routing is clean and simple.
Intense Primer 29 2016
The upper link on the pricey models is carbon, and it also houses the bearings. Two shock positions offer 115 or 130 millimeters of travel.

Intense Primer 29 2016
A six-millimeter Allen key is inserted through the cap in the drive-side of the axle to unscrew it. The axle slides out from the brake caliper side.


Suspension upgrades: The carbon fiber swingarm is a modification of the VPP dual-link configuration dubbed, "JS Tuned Suspension," which is said to produce better pedaling performance, in addition to the supple ride that has made the counter-rotating links so popular. Taking a cue from Ibis, Intense moved the pivot bearings to the links - a feature that slims the frame and also strengthens the pivots. The upper link is carbon on the two high-end Primers and aluminum on the more affordable models. Bearings have been enlarged throughout and the higher-stressed lower link features adjustable, angular-contact bearings that can be greased through a Zerk-fitting. The aluminum lower link is tucked inside the frame, which makes for a very clean profile and offers some additional tire clearance.

Intense Primer 29 2016
Those who have yet to experience the latest iterations of the Fox Factory Float EVOL shock and 34 fork are in for a treat. The Primer 29, with a 130-millimeter-stroke fork and 130-millimeters of rear travel could do no wrong in the rough stuff.


New numbers: Geometry wise, the Primer is contemporary without being freakish. It's longer up front, with a medium-size top tube measuring 23.5 inches (597mm), and it sports a steep, 75-degree seat tube angle. For those who care, that works out to a 431mm (17") reach on the medium size frame. (The XL has a 477mm/18.8" reach). Curiously, its 17.25-inch chainstays are a bit longer than expected, especially considering its steep seat-tube angle. Being a 29er, the Primer's wheelbase is relatively long, but not off the charts by any means. The medium-size is 45.5 inches (1156mm). Throw in a modestly slack, 67.5-degree head angle and the Primer 29's numbers suggest it will be long enough to be stable in the rough stuff, and nimble enough in the steering department to feel relatively playful at single-track speeds.

P12017 geometry


Stand-out Components

A conversation with Intense CEO Andrew Herrick revealed that at some point, a meeting was called and the staff were asked, "What kind of components were on their personal bikes?" And, "Exactly why do you insist upon using those items?" The next question was, "Why then, do we spec different components on our production models?" From that point forward, Intense began to spec their bikes with wider variety of parts, items which were representative of rider preference without regard to brand loyalty or penny pinching in the interest of profit margins. The Primer 29 is a an apt reflection of that fateful day, with its Fox suspension, Renthal cockpit, 150mm RockShox Reverb Stealth dropper post, SRAM transmission, Shimano XTR brakes, DT Swiss carbon wheelset and Schwalbe tires. It looks like a custom build, and it has the harmonious feel of a purpose-built bike.

Specifications
Release Date 2016
Price $9499
Travel 115mm or 130mm
Rear Shock Fox Float Factory Open Mode Adjust EVOL
Fork Fox Float 34 Factory 130mm Boost
Headset Cane Creek
Cassette SRAM Eagle 12-speed 10 x 50t
Crankarms SRAM XX1 Eagle, 34t
Chainguide NA
Bottom Bracket 92mm press-fit
Pedals NA
Rear Derailleur SRAM XX1 Eagle
Chain SRAM Eagle
Front Derailleur NA
Shifter Pods SRAM XX1 Eagle
Handlebar Renthal Fatbar Carbon, 760mm
Stem Renthal 60mm
Grips Intense lock-on
Brakes Shimano XTR 180/160mm rotors
Wheelset DT Swiss XMC 1200 Spline
Hubs DT Swiss 240 Boost
Spokes DT Swiss
Rim DT Swiss XMC 1200
Tires Schwalbe Nobby Nic 2.25" x 29"
Seat Fabric Scoop Radius Pro
Seatpost RockShox Reverb Stealth 150mm
Intense Primer 29 2016





bigquotesI was climbing better than I had been able to all week, and was breezing technical sections which previously, I had to piece together and remain focused to master.


The first time I rode the Primer 29 was at the Intense launch in Sedona, Arizona. My legs were shot from a week of riding that began on the boulders of South Mountain near Phoenix, so I wasn't expecting much. I had planned a short ride, but I was so impressed by how effortlessly the bike worked its way up and down the stepped, uneven red rock trails that I didn't return until the last rays of light were peeking from behind the cliffs. I was climbing better than I had been able to all week, and was breezing technical sections which previously, I had to piece together and remain focused to master. Was the Primer that good? I withheld judgment until I could get the bike home and onto more familiar trails.

The Primer 29's suspension required a different suspension setup than I used for the longer-travel enduro sleds that I had been riding most of the year. Although the actual diameter of the Primer 29's wheels was not much larger than their 27.5-inch hoops, the Primer rolled noticeably better over the chunder. As a result, I could set its fork and shock springs a little stiffer and use more of the suspension to mute larger impacts. I settled upon 25-percent sag in the shock and slightly more than 15-percent for the fork. Low-speed rebound seemed to work right five clicks out on the shock and six clicks out on the fork. The resulting ride was surprisingly smooth. Even with the firm tune, the Fox fork and shock provided a generous amount of control and sensitivity in the mid-stroke and no real harshness over the chatter.

Greg Lambert Photo Intense Primer 29 2016

bigquotesOnce the Primer is committed to the corner, its steering feels lighter at the handlebar and more neutral.


Back home, the Primer 29 put in an equally impressive performance. Its steering was responsive with only a hint of the lag that big-wheel bikes typically exhibit when its rider needs to change directions repeatedly. And, its pedaling had a brighter, more efficient feel than any Intense I can remember riding. I had to remind myself occasionally that I was riding a 29er.

Much of the Primer's easy handling springs from the centralized position that its 75-degree seat tube angle enforces upon its pilot. Comparatively, less fore-aft movement is necessary to brake hard or to maintain traction on steep terrain while climbing and descending. The frame's moderately longer front center and larger wheels ignore most bomb holes and vertical step-downs that are usually cause for concern - so I found myself bracing less for impacts and flowing more easily through rocky sections. The potential downside of steep seat angles, however, is that the saddle position at full extension is notably taller over the bike, and it occupies the same place that the rider needs to be while descending. The Primer 29's 150-millimeter-stroke dropper post was a necessity and I found that I used it more frequently than I would have anticipated.

Setting up for a berm, or a sharp turn requires a quick counter-steer to snap the bike into a lean - about the same or slightly less of an effort than a slack-angled enduro sled takes - but once the Primer is committed to the corner, its steering feels lighter at the handlebar and more neutral. Its front tire feels as if it is always in contact with the ground which allowed me to feel around for traction while cornering on sketchy or variable surfaces. Push a little harder and both the front and rear wheels drift in a very predictable manner when they break traction.

Climbing, especially technical ascents, is simplified by the Primer's suspension kinematics, which suppress unwanted shock movement to the degree that I never needed more control than the middle position of the Fox shock's low-speed compression lever. Intense founder and designer Jeff Steber may have overdone it a little bit, because when the lever is slammed to the nearly locked out position (which I never found the need to use), pedaling forces seem to cause the suspension to lift slightly with each stroke, which feels very foreign. Whatever tweaks Steber made to the Primer's VPP-based linkage, it pedals exceptionally well in the other two positions, so I have no complaints.
Greg Lambert Photo Intense Primer 29 2016

Our medium sized test bike weighed a bit more than 25 pounds - which is quite light - and yet the Primer's frame is laterally stiffer than Intense's very popular Tracer 275c and bests the 29-inch-wheel Carbine. There is no telling how much its wider Boost hub spacing adds to that equation, but it all adds up, and the bike reaps benefits in all aspects of its performance from that extra measure of rigidity - especially on the downs, where it makes off-angle landings, rock gardens, and off-camber sections easy work.

I handed off the Primer 29 to PB test rider Harold Preston for "gravity evaluation" who, after smashing some Strava times and dropping in on some healthy DH lines, was surprised to discover that it only had 130 millimeters of wheel travel on either end. The suspension offers so much control that, like Preston, I also assumed that the Primer had much more travel than it actually does. It would be interesting to ride the same chassis with a different brand of suspension to evaluate how much of the bike's big-bump performance is indigenous to the chassis and what percentage is attributable to Fox's latest damping trickery.

Greg Lambert Photo Intense Primer 29 2016

bigquotesMuch of the Primer's easy handling springs from the centralized position that its 75-degree seat tube angle enforces upon its pilot.


Technical Report

Stout rocker arms and new bearing placements: No need to tighten the rocker retaining bolts - ever - (once, a recurring issue for Intense), and way more stiffness in the chassis.
Nobby Nic Front Tire: The Primer 29 is far more capable in the turns than its Schwalbe Nobby Nic front tire will allow. It works well as a rear tire, but we switched the front to a 2.3-inch Magic Mary, which made a huge improvement.
DT Swiss MCS 1200 Spline wheels: Lightweight, fast accelerating, and a good width to support tires in the 2.25 to 2.3 inch range.
Seat tube height: Riders with inseams at or under 30 inches (762mm) may not be able to run a 150mm-stroke dropper post on the medium frame size.
No chainguide tabs: The frame has a "bottle-opener" top-mount front derailleur boss, but ISCG tabs are conspicuously missing.

Greg Lambert Photo Intense Primer 29 2016


Pinkbike's Take:

bigquotesThe magic of the Primer's uncanny performance cannot be traced to any single aspect of its construction, geometry or component selection. Instead, it is all of those things that make it work - which has me wondering if this bike was a successful design exercise, or a bit of an accident that worked out brilliantly in the end. Either way, it kicks ass. I had to pry the Primer 29 from my fellow test rider's hands to get it back. It's been a while since I've enjoyed riding a trailbike this much and longer still since I'd fallen for a 29er. - RC



View full size and additional images in the review gallery.



About the Rider

Stats: Age: 38 • Height: 5'9” • Weight: 170lb • Industry affiliations: Owner, iMountainbike
Harold Preston hails from Johannesburg, South Africa, a skate boarder who discovered mountain bikes when he made his home in San Diego, California, in 2000. Preston is an all-mountain crusher, a well-respected rider among the area's gravity community, and a mentor to a number of youths who have done well in national and international competition.


MENTIONS: @intensecyclesusa / @SramMedia / @lambertphoto / @schwalbe


Must Read This Week

255 Comments

  • + 211
 Apparently I'm too poor to be a mountain biker nowadays. Gonna have to take up Formula 1.
  • + 131
 Me Everyday:
1. Checks Pinkbike for cool new bikes.
2. Checks Bank account.
3. Crys.
  • - 139
flag bikerguy24 (Aug 2, 2016 at 8:30) (Below Threshold)
 @moefosho: i think you have spelled cries in correctly. also thos bike would have been much better with 26
  • + 132
 @bikerguy24: Looks like you spelled "incorrectly" and "this" incorrectly. This is Pinkbike though. Wink
  • - 112
flag bikerguy24 (Aug 2, 2016 at 8:41) (Below Threshold)
 @moefosho: looks like you spelt spelled incorrectly (spelt)
  • + 27
 @bikerguy24: 26 is done bud!
  • + 56
 @bikerguy24: looks like you spelt your name wrong. you seem more like a spellerguythatshouldputmoretimeintoridingthannitpickinggrammaronacommentboardguy24
  • + 26
 @bikerguy24:

Has a 650B featured bike on his profile.
  • + 4
 leave it to intense to make the most bad ass 29er, not a fan of 29ers except for xc but if i had the the mulah i would actually buy that bike.
  • + 4
 @bohns1: What is DJ using now?
  • + 7
 @bohns1: 26 ain't dead!!!
  • - 1
 @sam14thomas: Its pretty damn close.. Stop hanging on...
  • + 3
 @XCMark: OK ill give ya that.. But in every other aspect it is done..
  • + 2
 @bohns1: Probably gunna hang on till next year
  • + 8
 go commencal: aluminium certes...but a superb rig for 3 times less than this one...
ang with a true good paint job
  • + 4
 i was lucky enough to be asked to ride for a team that reps intense. even with the team discount(wholesale) im still looking at the price of a used civic to get one.....

i took @barth1003 advice(last year) and snagged a commencal meta sx. i rode it side by side with the intense carbine 29. the commencal was WAY more fun for the style of riding i do. the carbine was stupid fast but boring. it didnt wanna wheelie everything or jump off any little bump like my commencal does.
  • + 0
 @sam14thomas: at least not for us
  • - 4
flag ctd07 (Aug 2, 2016 at 14:35) (Below Threshold)
 @bohns1: I'm sorry but only idiots say 26" is done, maybe watch rampage this year, or any fmb event, 650b spread like wildfire as everybody wanted to try something new and nobody wanted to be left behind, now everyone's had a chance to try it, I expect a slight resurgence will occur with the more gravity orientated people, I myself took my old 26r for a spin the other day and fell in love again, my next bike will be 26 no questions!
  • + 4
 "192 press-fit bottom bracket." Oooooops...
  • + 3
 what 10 grand is a great deal!! hahaha, for that much I would buy a new Honda
  • + 2
 @ctd07: I guess there's a ton of idiots out there man.. Keep hanging on...The industry has determined what will be... A resurgence? Highly unlikely.. Rampage will be more and more 27.5 as time progresses.. We shall see.
  • + 8
 Save up for 5 years to get a bike, ride it for a month, bend the rim severely, save up for another year to get a rim. There's my life plan.
  • + 2
 @cptstoney:
2 different philisophies, but IMO both are good in their respective domain...I just disagree with the price on an intense
  • + 55
 This is a commercial, not a test.

(And it sprinkled with nonsense such as: "boost allows enduro width rubber" or "I never needed more control than the middle position of the Fox shock's low-speed compression lever" ... which probably means that you do not need a lock-out to climb efficiently, great!)
  • + 7
 Which means you are paying for stuff that you are not going to need or ever use.
  • + 0
 Another thing I can't figure out is why richard is doing the writing and getting credit when it is clearly not him doing the riding/testing of the bike. Maybe the tester doesn't know how to write?
  • + 5
 Seriously, so many 160mm bikes pedal great without touching the knobs that the fact that they had to use the lever seems like a downside... The being said every Intense I've ever ridden has pedaled amazingly well, so I'm kinda questioning the reviewer now. Actually, I find myself questioning a lot of what RC says in his reviews.
  • + 50
 @makripper: I actually do the test riding on every bike I review, but to ensure that the review represents more than one opinion I either trade off with another PB editor, or give the bike to a trusted test rider. The reviews are better for it. Harold Preston has ridden almost every test bike I have written up on PB. He looks way better on the bike than I do, so we often use him for the photo shoots.
Cheers,
RC
  • + 14
 @RichardCunningham: good on you for fighting your corner mate! These guys are only jealous as you get to spank the newest and most bling kit to death and they don't! :-D
  • + 9
 @cunning-linguist: Exactly I don't know why people expect reviews to say that the reviewer didn't like it. Especially considering that most reviews are on the top tier spec of any model (which is kind of a disappointment, as I would like to see the mid level price point featured on most reviews, but that is another issue). I think PB proved the best balanced reviews of any source. In fact, they have said on various ocassions that a top tier bike is "not all that" or "requires refinement" or "better suited for xc (haha)"
  • + 2
 Would it please be possible to avoid words like "sled" and "hoops" just once in a bike advert *cough* review
  • + 0
 @BeardlessMarinRider: you say this, although you probably coin these terms on most rides or at the pub when talking bikes - I like the informality. And you know what, it somewhat proves that the testers are more like Joe public (all of our blood is blue anyway, right?). Being that MTB is more of a lifestyle than a hobby, most of our friends are formed through bikes. I'd encourage these reviews to be read in the context of talking to a friend and getting advice from them. As these guys have a wealth of experience which they are willing to share, which is commendable.
  • + 7
 @cunning-linguist: I have never, and mean ever, met anyone who describe a bike as a sled or a whip or wheels/ rims as hoops in the real, non internet, world. Info is good but this kind of language is so cliched for bike reviews. Not the end of the world but hey Wink Smile
  • + 1
 @BeardlessMarinRider: furry muff! I appreciate the honesty, but these type of words only make their way into the mainstream from people like us. The term plough is being used a lot in these parts to describe a fast long travel trail weapon at the mo. Horses for courses I guess. I can't agree more though on using words that don't actually exist such as steeze. That grinds my gears...
  • + 5
 @cunning-linguist: Arrrgggghhhh you said "weapon". You must be testing me Smile So long as a review doesn't go to "gnarpoon" levels I think I can cope Smile
  • + 3
 I couldn't be bothered reading anything written.$9500US. I will never even consider this bike.....ever.
  • + 3
 @BeardlessMarinRider: gnarpoon :-) that's new to me! Love it!!!!!! You've made my day with that little nugget!
  • + 0
 @RichardCunningham: We love this bike! @intensecyclesusa delivers again!
  • + 37
 Is it called "Primer" because of the color?
  • + 1
 Yes primer is a very nice color!
  • - 1
 Am I the only one who finds these mountain biking "fashion trends" ridiculous? Few years ago every other mountain bike was lime green, now everyone goes for orange, what will come next?
(Perhaps I should write an article called "Orange is the new lime green")
  • + 5
 Intense has all of their bikes named after bullets, guns, etc. Tracer (Bullet) Uzzi, Carbine, M16 (Rifles) ACV (Amphibious Combat Vehicle) Only exception is Spider, possibly referring McLaren 12C, or some other sports car.
  • + 0
 @Extremmist: fashion trends sell bikes
  • + 8
 Fashion trends are everywhere, and all sorts of people react on them. With pleasure. Because we all like changes and nobody wants to be a boring fk to stay true to God knows what standards of social behavior. If my 4 year old jersey gets damaged and I need to buy a new one, I will not spend three weeks to find a similar one. I truly pity a partner and coworkers of a dude who never changes his style. Because if you think that style doesn't matter and react negatively to people who look like they care about their style, it means that you actually DO care about your style which is looking like someone who doesn't give a damn about style. You see being mindful about own looks as a weakness, therefore you try to be mindful to neglect it. It all takes same effort. So you get schisophrenical and paranoid, you become what you hate in the first place.
  • + 4
 @siderealwall2: Or maybe the little bug with eight legs.
  • + 4
 @Extremmist: it's why i stick with black every year...
  • + 1
 @bohns1: My aluminum, single-pivot, non-boosted bike is black.
  • + 3
 I would drape myself in primer if it was socially acceptable
  • + 1
 @bohns1: So True! Stealth never gets Old! My only colored kit is 3 years old and looks completely outdated.
  • + 1
 @siderealwall2: what about the 951? I'd like to think it's named after the OG Porsche 944 turbo... Prob just the Intense HQ area code though.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: whoa. Dude. Like, enlightening and stuff.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: for some unknown reason,I've always pictured you in a hand knitted pullover not a jersey knit.
  • + 1
 @ReformedRoadie: you'll never go wrong that way.. That and it never looks dated..
  • + 1
 @freebikeur: Well on a positive, Scott still uses crazy neon color schemes.
  • + 1
 It's because they liked Banshee's Prime
  • + 1
 Endurbro and trail bikes are all about the latest standards and BNG
  • + 0
 @BeardlessMarinRider: oh really? 35 bars, keronite, Kashima, ti coil springs, air springs, countless dampers and suspension platforms, shim stacks, cutting mud tyres, dedicated X0 DH drive train, race pyjamas, helmets tripple circumference of the head, tank tops, key chains hangimg off baggy pants, riding gloveless... Ekhem ekhem
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Fair play Smile You can add goggles with open faces, suspension travel inversely proportional to age, battle of the widest rims to most effectively remove side knobs, casual use of the words like "whip" or "sled"... we could go on and on. Pretty sure you could fill a small novel Smile
  • + 2
 @BeardlessMarinRider: you have to admit that between 2008 and 2011 it was the DH that had the highest hype ratio from all 2-wheeled vehicles. People living in non mountaineous areas had DH bikes and were hitting dirt jumps with them, pushing bikes up 300ft hills and talking about DH practice. We still have a few dorks here, who got trapped in that era and never got out. And they laugh at Enduro because if they are to pedal, they have so mad skills they use 2005 XC bikes. The classic example of schisophrenics bashing the main stream, latest toys. By 2008 they were all about the latest. Now they ride junk, saying they need no better but they behave like the worst elitist pricks from the golf club as soon as they can smell that you are not into their hardcore DH thing, or don't even ride a moto bro.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: agree on that front.what makes it insufferable to me is people over a certain age trying to dress up in the latest clobber,talking like a 19 yr old and behaving like a cock when they should really know better.unfortunately for me at 20 yrs I couldn't afford a decent bike now I can and I embrace all the latest technologies because to me they make a certain amount of sense.years ago I would readily have said its a marketing bollox.youll never see me out riding in a clown suit..just good old t shirt,jeans,kneepads and samba'sSalute
  • + 1
 I think they where out of inspiration, saw the Banshee prime 29er and said "that's it, all we need is to add a letter ! "
  • + 3
 @aharris: I find pastrami to be the most sensual of the salted, cured meats.
  • + 30
 Love the pull quote: "I was climbing better than I had been able to all week, and was breezing technical sections which previously, I had to piece together and remain focused to master." Really? There wasn't any other bike available to ride those sections properly? In this day and age, most bikes have morphed into hugely capable machines. For this statement to be accurate, there'd have to be only $200 Walmart specials as alternatives lying around.
  • + 16
 or my 1989 Diamondback Topanga with a sweet u brake.
  • + 1
 I'm English.what are they then?
  • + 3
 At near 10g it damn well better make feel like "I was climbing better than I had been able to all week!"
  • + 22
 Enough of this crap. Time to spend the next 4 days getting psyched up for MSA. Start the coverage!
  • + 5
 Agree with that - so many capable bikes today from various manufacturers now its hard to believe it is so much better but Dirt also seem to think it is the 'fastest trail bike' available too. A genuine, timed head-to-head with different bikes in as much as possible a controlled manner would be brilliant to debunk this stuff.
  • - 1
 but it looks cool
  • + 1
 @kubaner: couldn't agree more. Weather might not be ideal here (little bit of rain), but it'll be crazy!
  • + 12
 @Racer951: A comprehensive numbers-driven, "who's truly fastest" test would be gold. Solicit one bike for each category (DH, AM, XC) from EVERY manufacturer. If a manufacturer doesn't want to participate in one or all categories, they simply don't have to.

Get 20ish journalists of varied riding backgrounds to ride each bike on a timed category-specific trail/loop, then average the 20 runs per bike. Open the stats book and break it down by wheel size, travel, etc. if you want, too.

Rank 'em, present 'em, and let the consumers draw their own conclusions.

All numbers. No BS.

For those of us that enjoy racing the clock in between beer rides, it'd be prefect.
  • + 4
 @Racer951: Dig it. 5-8 test riders, all on the same courses, with 4-5 different whips. I'd love to see, head to head, the results with a few test riders times. Maybe, just maybe, no bike is really head and shoulders better than any other. I suspect that these days bikes are so refined for their intended purpose, that the 'ultimate' bike is hugely subjective based on rider and terrain.
  • + 2
 @TamKid @MTBrent - Would be awesome wouldnt it.

GlobalMTB seem to have done similar things with plus size bikes and Soho Bikes did a DH V Trail V 29er experiment too with interesting results but it would be great to see a comprehensive test pitting bikes on the same terrain, maybe using a control tyre and a suspension expert such as Mojo present to ensure there is the best performance possible for the rider out of each bike.

I doubt though this will ever happen, I suppose it is a lot of work and there is a lot of bias in the industry more than tha though it could be potentially upsetting for some of the more expensive brands, imagine a direct-sale £2.5k bike being faster than a £8k Santa Cruz or Intense, I expect it could happen, too.
  • + 2
 Literally have the same shpeal here.
Friends Fuel EX 8 rumbles through rocks and is a load of fun. Is a 29" 120 bike.
Thought to myself: "Damm, this is fun, gotta look back into this space"
So do all the bike companies... Specialized, Evil, Pivot, etc
I put my money where my mouth is with an Evil Following I'm getting delivered soon.
People realize that an extra 1.5" of wheel space give the bike a better rollover. Who knew?
Lots of 140/150 tweener wheeled bike are very capable, yes.
Over the last year there have been so many capable 29" 120/130 bikes out. They all rip!
But this was the low hanging fruit for Intense. "Make the carbine LLS and give it a paint job"
We already had the carbine. besides geo All we added was another axle and a mm or two on pivot placement.
  • + 2
 @TamKid: you gotta have many more riders if the results are to be valid
  • + 1
 @MTBrent: never gonna find enough journalists that can ride gnarly terrain for that kinda test.
  • + 3
 @skelldify: The beauty in a test like that though would be getting slow guys out on bikes too, a pro / very skilled rider can adapt to shortcomings more and on the flip side also make the most of aggressive geometry. A shlowmo like 95% of the rest of the riding world will find things more difficult and may be slower on a more 'progressive' bike or a bike with strange braking traits.

It would be seriousy good to do though, pick a decent trail centre that has plenty of testing stuff and go to town, spilt parts of the trail into segments - DH (tech and bike park style), uphill and then a longer 'up and down' section - All on the same tyres, all with well setup suspension.

Even though it wouldnt be scientific I imagine with 20 riders you could still get meaningful results - enough to debunk some of the potential brand bullcrap in the industry anyway!
  • - 1
 @Racer951: Exactly. That's why I mentioned "varied riding backgrounds," and that's where the averages really come into play. Although the rider's skill would vary, the averages over the course of 20 riders/runs (or more if possible) on each bike would render skill irrelevant. As long as you kept the trail, timing system, and tires the same throughout each test, and set the bikes up as spec'd from the manufacturer, I think you could end up with extremely telling results.

It'd be much like Bike Mag's Bible of Bike Tests, but on a grander scale. And instead of qualitatively chatting about the bikes over a beer (which also has its merits), you simply have numbers to compare at the end.
  • + 0
 ..
  • + 0
 @Racer951:

Car and motorcycle (motocross) magazines do these kinds of track tests all the time.

However, the controls are way easier when the energy source is the same, i.e. gasoline vs. various sizes, shapes, physiology, skill levels, fatigue level, etc... of human power.

I suspect that

1. Gathering a large enough variety of riders in one place to be able to eliminate human power as a variable would be very challenging, and

2. The industry is probably OK with current reviews that conclude "this felt like the most fun bike..." or "this felt like the fastest bike..." and manufacturers are not especially motivated to facilitate or participate in the process of finding out which bike actually is the fastest rider-independent bike of them all.

And that's a bit of a shame I think.
  • + 2
 @MTBrent: They did something fairly similar in an episode of soho bikes on YouTube. There testing focused on enduro bikes vs. dh bikes as well as wheel size. Results were really interesting and was run by Warner.
  • + 1
 @h-beck83: Well shit then I volunteer my hack services! Wink
  • + 1
 @TamKid: you ad me both
  • + 22
 "The Primer 29 may in fact, be the best performing trail bike that Intense has ever made." - shouldn't that always be the case though? What's the point of a company bringing out a new bike if it's worse than the old one Wink
  • + 4
 Well, ya know, no one knows how good it is until they get some journalists' opinions.
  • + 4
 I missed how this is different than the Spider29...... anyone?
  • + 3
 @WasatchEnduro: 7mm shorter chain stays, boost, and a very enduro pain job... I think I'll stick with my Spider 29 though, it absolutely crushes trail, no boost required.
  • + 22
 Press fit BB... Why ruin a bike like this!?
  • + 0
 192 pressfit??? That is bigger than my fat bike!
  • + 30
 My press fit on my Giant Reign in so perfect, no noise no flex and no play... dont understand why people dont like it...
  • + 30
 @mudmandhbrazil: Because those people read it sucks in the forums....
  • + 5
 @mudmandhbrazil: I second that, 5000 km on my Reign and never had a creak
  • + 2
 @GhostInTheTrail: I'll third that.. dunno how many km's but bought in October 2014 and still running the same BB (Admittedly when you feel them, they are on their way... but still!!) Noise-free and play-free!!
  • + 18
 Pressfit f*cking sucks. If the cups/bearings aren't installed perfectly from the factory with appropriate use of a retaining compound, it's gonna make noise. If you put enough power through the bike to make the bb area flex, it's gonna noise. If it makes noise when you aren't hammering, you have to buy a whole new bb, as removing the cups/bearings destroys them. Then you need to spend $60 on a tiny bottle of Loctite 609 pressfit bearing compound, and use a $200 bearing press to install your bb. f*ck pressfit, I hate it.
  • + 9
 My complaint about press fit BB is that it skips a step in manufacturing and saves the company money but they keep raising their prices instead of giving us a break. Some companies are going back to threaded BB because there was nothing wrong with it in the first place. Plus, home mechanics want threaded BB for easy maintenance.
  • + 4
 i have pressfit on my s works enduro and after building it up, not even on the second ride, already has some weird noises coming out. companies seem to be anti progressing
  • - 4
flag ColinD (Aug 2, 2016 at 9:09) (Below Threshold)
 @pigit77: When your BB makes weird noses on the second ride its either mounted incorrect of a faulty BB/shell (as in manufacturing fault). THat isnt the fault of PF BB's.
  • + 0
 FWIW, press fit BBs are one thing Intense does very well. My Carbine has been silent since day one. Id still prefer threaded for ease of replacement, but if you're going to have a press fit BB, Intense seems to do it better than most. Their suspension linkages on the other hand, well, at least the warranty is good.
  • + 2
 @mnorris122: loctite? If you're having to use loctite the issue is poor frame tolerances, not the pf. I always install using GREASE, no creaking, never been a problem
  • - 1
 @dtm1: PTFE grease to be exact (assuming carbon frame).
  • + 2
 It seems like people who have issues with pressfit are riding bikes with poor tolerances or don't know how to install/adjust them properly. I'm on almost 2 hard seasons with my PF30 on my Enduro with no issues. Before that I had Cannondale's and Niner's with 0 creaks...all carbon. But it only takes a few on the internet to gripe before the issue is viewed as "widespread".
  • + 1
 @dtm1: Loctite 609 is a product from Loctite that is specifically made for pressfit assemblies that will latee have to be disassembled. It's hella expensive but works better than anything
  • + 2
 @adrennan: "92" that would be a big BB, fer sher
  • + 1
 @mnorris122: yes lad, it's the only bad point on my new commencal - it's f*cking dog shit. Only way to describe it, why don't we have threaded headsets too? Unless you're a total mong, you can't fook a thread up. My whole bike is silent apart from a creaky BB and its brand new! More than a bit annoying as I love the thing. If they did an update with a thread I'd buy it in a heartbeat.
  • + 3
 @ryan83: nah man, unless you weigh two tenths of f*ck all, or ride very gingerly, it'll creak. Mine is steel not carbon, but I've had the same issues with alloy, carbon and steel ones. All fitted with loctite & or copper slip (trial and error) and I've ended up selling them as it just annoys me. Threaded doesn't have an issue and I fail to see any benefit of press fit unless on a roadie.
  • + 2
 Nothing wrong with mine (three years in).
  • + 2
 @dtm1: Amen! Non issue for me as well.. Don't even understand the issue..
  • + 6
 Press fit and no ISCG tabs equals a total fail!
And WTF are they thinking with that cable routing under the BB?! With all the flexibility that carbon fibre imparts to bike design that was the 'best' place thye could find to locate them.

"A conversation with Intense CEO Andrew Herrick revealed that at some point, a meeting was called and the staff were asked, "What kind of components were on their personal bikes?" And, "Exactly why do you insist upon using those items?" The next question was, "Why then, do we spec different components on our production models?" "

How about asking the questions "Does anyone (who still wants a job at Intense after answering this question) think that cable routing under the BB, in the same area that we add a frame guard, is a good idea?". "Does anyone that actually rides hard not use some kind of chain device?"
  • + 2
 @amrskipro: Chain devices are good for sure but newer derailleurs and chainrings very rarely lose a chain -- in all riding conditions.
  • + 1
 @RichardCunningham: all this banter and my stupid correction with no votes is what you respond to. I like it. haha.
  • + 2
 @amrskipro: 100% agree re no iscg and the cable routing. What an undersight.
  • + 3
 @ride4austin: well said. I bought an expensive press fit bb (aluminum) and it was extremely difficult to remove. Most frame nowadays do lno have enough room to apply proper extraction tool to gradually pullout the bb (etc using threaded type of tool), so most ppl and shop just hammer it out.

i hate press fit and hate company promoting it as next best thing but really just save them money.
  • + 3
 @mudmandhbrazil:

Take it out to service it and put it back in.


I'm not a fan of anything that needs to be smashed out with a hammer, especially in carbon frames. Shimano recommends you replace the cup everytime it's been removed.
  • + 1
 @WolfStoneD: mine is perfect
  • + 8
 You can argue till the cows come home whether PF BBs work for you or not, but the simple facts remain that A: they offer ZERO improvement over a threaded BB, and B: They can be extremely problematic.
  • + 20
 Love to see a comparison with this an Evil Following and a Jeffsey. Perhaps a transition as well.
  • + 4
 I'd love a shootout with Niners new offerings; the geo is very close
  • + 2
 Toss in the new fuel ex as well.. Such a banger.
  • + 14
 Seems like alot of redundancy in the Intense lineup, unless i'm misunderstanding each bike's mission. the M and Uzzi stand alone in their categories, but then moving down the line, there's:

Tracer 275 (6")
Carbine 275 (6")
Carbine 29 (5.5")
Primer 29 (5")
ACV 275 (5" plus)
Spider 29 (5")
Spider 275 (5")

That's four 27.5's and three 29's all within one inch of travel of each other. Seems like overkill. However, I love Intense bikes and this means plenty of clearance and one-season-used bikes to pick up in fall 2017, so i'm looking forward to that!
  • + 3
 Carbine 275 is gone. Spider 29 will be dropped, I think. But, I get your point. Seems like they would offer one short travel, mid travel and long travel option in two wheel sizes, plus their M-16 in aluminum and carbon. Of course, then there's the plus-size confusion.
  • + 6
 with your comparison the Primer 29 and Carbine 29 look almost identical. Reality is the Carbine 29 is designed around a 160mm fork and the primer around a 130mm fork. Big difference in bikes there.

As someone else said, the carbine 275 is going away, and I'll bet the spider 29 is on its way out too. That will leave you with two longer travel enduro bikes designed with a 6" fork in mind, 29 and 275, two trail bikes designed around a 5" fork, 29 and 275 and a plus size trail bike. Works out pretty well.
  • + 1
 @bdamschen: ...and now all we need is an Uzzi Carbon, thanks. Wink
  • + 3
 @TheRaven the current Spider 29, with a 140mm fork, absolutely rips; truly an underrated trail bike. Underrated = big discounts though, so I'm not complaining Smile
  • + 10
 "A conversation with Intense CEO Andrew Herrick revealed that at some point, a meeting was called and the staff were asked, "what kind of components were on their personal bikes?" And, "exactly why do you insist upon using those items?" The next question was, "Why then, do we spec different components on our production models?" From that point forward, Intense began to spec their bikes with wider variety of parts, items which were representative of rider preference without regard to brand loyalty or penny pinching in the interest of profit margins. The Primer 29 is a an apt reflection of that fateful day, with its Fox suspension, Renthal cockpit, 150mm RockShox Reverb Stealth dropper post, SRAM transmission, Shimano XTR brakes, DT Swiss carbon wheelset and Schwalbe tires. It looks like a custom build, and it has the harmonious feel of a purpose-built bike."

Pretty rad.
  • + 8
 Nice bike. But i can't help but recall, only a couple years ago, the talk was..."suspension is so good now, get the longer travel bike. It pedals great, but also soaks up the big hits!". Now, it's "suspension is so good now, get the lower travel bike. It pedals great, but also soaks up the big hits!" But there is one constant...my mediocre abilities that no amount of suspension can fix! Smile
  • + 9
 Can't help being surprised by the number of frames with too long seat tubes to actually run a 150 mm dropper when 170mm+ droppers are actually making their way to the shops now.... Pity.
  • + 5
 i dont get the thing with too short seattubes nowadays
  • + 1
 @funkzander: Wut? Did you read the comment that you replied to?
  • + 2
 @passwordpinkbike: yes :-) for my taste the seattubes are getting a tad too short recently
  • + 1
 @funkzander: that's probably cause you run a size too small then.
  • + 5
 I love how when a new bike is being tested, they always find a way to make the "older" versions sound lame - but when they tested the old bikes, they NEVER mention it? Like this -

"but its chassis was a little more flexible than some desired" Referring to the Carbine 29. Now I didn't look it up, but I'm betting that the Carbine 29 test didn't have ANYTHING like that in it.
  • + 3
 You read my mind. Was just about to post the same observation. I remember the reviews said that the Carbine 29 had a long wheelbase and so it was very stable but wasn't very agile, but I don't remember anything about the chassis having excessive flex. You notice this about reviews...seems like you have to wait about a year after the initial ride review to find out what the people REALLY thought about a bike.
  • + 5
 These reviews are great. The only downside is I feel like I am viewing the car on the showcase floor and then going out to the lot to look for a more affordable piece. Except, all I am thinking about is the advanced climate control only available in the showroom car.
  • + 5
 "The potential downside of steep seat angles, however, is that the saddle position at full extension is notably taller over the bike, and it occupies the same place that the rider needs to be while descending."

This is an excellent point, thanks for the insight.
  • + 13
 I wish there was a way to make the seat drop out of the way on the descents.
  • + 3
 @MTBrent: ...Which the article discusses in the next sentence. However if you expect to do a lot of pedaling in rolling terrain, or want to minimize weight while embracing the simplicity of a fixed seatpost position, geometry with a slacker seat tube and steeper headtube will perform better.

This is one distinguishing characteristic between XC/Marathon/Trail versus All Mountain/Enduro/Freeride.
  • + 1
 @MTBrent: I know right? They say that like someone might not run a dropper seat post, then follow it up with "the dropper post was a necessity."

Everyone uses a dropper post these days, and the bike comes with one!
  • + 8
 For 10k, I would expect a Fox36 on that mojammy.
  • + 1
 mojammy!
  • + 4
 And to wash itself...and the dishes.
  • + 4
 Pinkbike still seems obsessed with labelling bike wheel sizes with intentions and stereotypes. It's refreshing to read Dirt's stance that for most trail situations 29 is there go to choice now. Especially considering this, the evo, evil, segment , smuggler etc. While Dirt was in print it was THE authority of gravity MTB I know things have slipped since its demise and online only presence but I still trust their judgement over the demagogic Pinkbike journos.
  • + 0
 Screw you Dirt, I won't do what you tell me! 29 is the go to choice because it's not what they were pushing last year.

29ers aren't more fun on my local trails. Feel less nimble in twisties and jumps. I don't really give a crap if it's a few % faster on the fireroad climb.
.
  • + 3
 @tigen: my new fuel ex 29 jumps just fine/ Table tops and the nine/ Turns twisties on a dime...
  • + 4
 Waiting for a Tracer refresh, but I have a feeling they are pushing the Tracer closer to the Uzzi into Nomad territory leaving a gap in the 150mm-travel 275 wheelhouse that so many of us enjoy. Intense has introduced three or four new bikes this year (Uzzi refresh (or was that 2015?), Spider 275, ACV and Primer). Rumor says at least one more on deck. Look for 140mm travel 275? Temecula is on fire!
  • + 2
 why not buying a bronson2 instead?
  • + 1
 There was no 2015 Uzzi, at least not officially. The 2014 model is the last iteration which could accommodate 26" as well as 27,5", the 2016 Uzzi is 27,5" only (sadly, imho).
  • + 3
 I recently purchased a Intense Carbine 29er and couldn't be any happier! I don't give two shats about trends and other peoples opinions. I've had an aggressive hardtail, to freeride machine(s) to downhill killer -all 26ers, about 20 years on these bikes! I need performance, speed, efficiency, and an all around Brawler. For me at 5' 9" this is the Bike, Got 100 miles on it in last couple weeks while working full time.
  • + 6
 Nice in grey primer..seem to remember a lot of negativity when orange released their new bike in same shit grey colour.
  • + 3
 What's with the apparent push to get rid of iscg tabs? I was reading this ad - I mean 'review' and kind of nodding - it sounds like there's a lot to like here, then I saw "no iscg" and stopped.

I get that some people don't need guides, that's cool, no one is forcing you to run one. But what could the possible downside of having tabs and not using them be? Are people that insecure about the 0.5g that it adds to the frame?

Giving up the ability to run a frame-mount bashguard just makes no sense to me.
  • + 2
 Agreed- these shorter travel bikes more suited to tighter terrain at lower speeds probably need them more than someone smashing high speed jump lines and big mountains on a 170mm bike. But putting metal threads in a carbon frame is another expense on the frame
  • + 1
 @AyJayDoubleyou: huh? But I do smash big mountain jump lines at crazy speeds... All on a 120 rear/130 front.. Its the year of the 29 goddammit!
  • + 7
 I feel like I'm being talked into this bike.
  • + 5
 FD mount. Really? How about optimizing the main pivot width instead?

Concerned citizen.
  • + 1
 With no ISCG tabs, you could use that FD mount for an upper guide. Or mount a bottle opener there as RC said.
  • + 4
 Please Intense, add a threaded bottom bracket to your bikes. I have no desire to be like everyone else riding a typical Santa Cruz.
  • + 2
 Lovely bike but the colour scheme is way O.T.T. I shall remind my wife later that if she ever sees me leave the house with a carefully selected outfit to match my already overly colour co-ordinated bicycle, she should change the locks on the house.
  • + 2
 Beautiful bike, but I'm getting a little tired of hearing that the bikes are spec'd according to what the emoloyees of the brand are riding. Even at this level in the market, the variability of riders huge and anyone that is buying at this level most likely has the means to build it up however they choose. Why not ask the average rider what they would want IF they had to pay full retail?
  • + 5
 Anyone gonna call out that Banshee have had a 135mm agro 29er in their range for 3 years, and it's called the Prime?
  • + 2
 Who was the pink bike writer who earlier this year wrote the article on this being the year of the 29er? Seemed insane at the time, especially with all the buzz about the new 27.5" standard that people felt was being forced.

Truly prophetic words though! Truly is the year of the 29er.
  • + 3
 No frame only option!? Not a fan of the cable routing under the bb without iscg tabs for a bashguard (bb mounted ones just annoy me). Otherwise, first Intense that would make me consider selling my Following.
  • + 2
 It's good to see the wide range of component manufacturers, selected by merit for their individual components. I'm sure there will be a bit of a premium to pay, but surely it's cheaper in the long run!?!
  • + 1
 No ISCG = no chainring defence+no lover chainguide (which prevents chain from a huge hesitations). I don't have money on such an expensive bike but if I had I would choose the one with ISCG 05. Except ISCG absence bike is perfect!
  • + 3
 Looks exactly like a scott genius but 2 times the price can not see the justification to pay that when you can get a scott genius ????
  • + 1
 I guess it "IS" the year of the 29er... because everytime they review a 29er, even when it's been sitting around collecting dust for several months, it's the best bike EVER....

And when they test a new bike that's not a 29er they tell us how they wished it was a 29er because it would be so much better....
  • + 1
 I'd like to give one of these new Intense bikes a go but, like always, I can't get over their prices. And I already own expensive bikes. Looking at the Pro build....non kashima suspension, skinny aluminum wheels and 340 hubs...for $7k? There are a number of modern 29ers with similar geo and better spec. Give me a break.
  • + 1
 I got the Pro model bike and loving every ride! Definitely an amazing trail bike, specially for my neck of the woods (South FL). Handles great and rides extremely well in technical trails, and taking some jumps is no issue for this bike.
  • + 3
 OH oh. Chromag has had a primer available for a couple months already. Someone's gonna have to change the name.
  • + 2
 Intense really seems to have nailed it with the JS tuned suspension. Maybe when I can justify a new bike Jenson will have some of these on closeout.
  • + 4
 "Old man likes short-travel 29er" -- film at 11
  • + 2
 WoW that looks like an amazing bike, im looking for a trail bike and will probably buy this one it will go with the colour patter of my kit aswell!!!
  • + 1
 You won't regret it if you decide to buy this bike. Very capable bike.
  • + 2
 Click on article, look a bike's pic: Nice looking geometry.
Scroll down to spec and price ... WTF?
Ok, go straight to comment section.
  • + 2
 How on earth can yt sell a bike with almost the exact same spec for half the price and still make money. These big brand manufacturers are looking a bit silly to me.
  • + 3
 No-one with a 30" inseam would need a 150mm dropper post, 125mm is way more enough.
  • + 3
 If you haven't ridden a bike like this you should. The speed these 29ers carry is insane
  • + 4
 And another $10k monstrosity.... I give up
  • + 3
 It's nice to see a seat angle that doesn't put you nearly over the rear axle at extended post climbing height.
  • + 0
 Do you hang off the back of your saddle while climbing? I like a good amount of setback, yet at full extension (>30") the nose of my saddle is only ~2" behind the BB center, or 15" or so in front of the rear axle. Obviously the center of the saddle is going to be a few inches further back, but that's still much closer to the BB than the rear axle, and most of the weight is on the nose of the saddle anyway when climbing something steep.
  • + 1
 No go on the cable routing below BB. I get the whole form over function but not sure that is where I would put my cabling for 10k.
  • + 3
 But does it "Climb like a XC racer and descend like a Downhill racer?"
  • + 1
 every bike does!
  • + 0
 I guess the designers read my post about using angular contact bearings and grease zerks... hopefully this catches on everywhere (unless there are riders out there who enjoy replacing pivot bearings every season.. anyone?)
  • + 9
 yeah man. it was totally your post. : )
  • + 4
 Intense have been adding grease ports for years?
  • + 2
 @steviestokes: ...and the bearing still need to be replaced occasionally.
  • + 2
 everybody is all about the new 29'ers and all I want to do is find 26" dropouts for my Rune
  • + 1
 Why are we back to talking about top tube length when it comes to fit? The reach is thoroughly AVERAGE, at best. There's nothing wrong with the size, just saying ;-)
  • + 0
 Dear Bike Industry,

Some of us are short! I will never ride tires that exceed my inseam. I will ride my 26" bikes until they all break, then I am moving to a different hobby if there are no options to fit our heights.
  • + 1
 You could also go custom then it would not be an issue, but price still would be? I understand your point I am short also. But will have to upgrade my 26er in the near future once wheels, forks and tires stop being produced, which is already happening.
  • + 1
 Just how short are you? I am 5,8" and love my 29er, hands down the fastest trail bike I have ever ridden, not quite as 'playfull' as a smaller wheeled bike but my fun comes from speed not skids and manuals (probably because I cant manual properly on any wheel size :-( )
  • + 1
 27.5?
  • + 4
 Tracey Mosley is 5'4 and seems to be doing pretty well on a 29er.
  • + 2
 So don't buy a 29er.
  • + 0
 Buddy, i am 5 foot 1 inch. And i am doing fine on a Transition suppressor, retro-fitted with 27.5 inch wheels. Small size obviously. Bought as a frame, and built with stuff i had lying around.
  • + 1
 Looks like a Santa Cruz 5010 from 3 years ago. Identical aside from the useless ability to dump the travel of the frame down to 110mm.
  • + 0
 Don't knock it until you try it. I had a Tracer back in the day and I used it alot
  • + 2
 @CodeBlue: What does it matter that you had a Tracer back in the day?
  • + 1
 @warmerdamj: It matters because I would use the adjustable travel on different trails. Personally liked it
  • + 3
 What's the benefit for leaving off ISCG tabs?
  • + 5
 I dunno, but it doesn't outweigh the downsides. Some of us ride in harsh, extremely rocky terrain and take our trail bikes to bike parks.
  • + 2
 @NoahColorado: who knew that real riders want it!?
  • + 3
 Primer? I guess they stole the name from Chromag...
  • + 0
 I'm a big fan of this 115 or 130mm travel in the back. Being used to hard tails I've always liked having a little less squish in the back and more upfront. Nice to have options with a single frame.
  • + 3
 192 press fit bottom bracket?

Is this for former equestrians?
  • + 3
 10 k wtf....... Save human lives instead
  • + 1
 nice looking bike, however for the niner I 'll choose canfield;
I do like intense specs, even foundation build have good specs
  • + 2
 Im sorry but what about the tracer 29er', isn't that the exact same thing??
  • + 2
 I really don't get these high prices in mtbiking any more. I quit.
  • + 3
 10k ...no thanks
  • + 2
 31.5" standover height for a size small. OUCH!!
  • + 1
 Intense is honest about stand-over height - they take the measurement from the center of the top tube, where your (in the case of a male) ball sack actually impacts. The medium Primer measured 27.5 inches at the lowest point (where the cheater brands claim their stand-over) and 31.5 inches at the mid point. I think the small and mediums have the same TT, just a different seat mast arrangement to standardize the shock placement.
  • + 3
 @RichardCunningham: Cheater brands ? "Elementary Watson." Hence, standover is just as it represents and not an equation of where the ballsack lands but rather for the ability to gain footing is a precarious situation . Not all ballsacks sag equally,so therefore ample room is required.
  • + 2
 ewwwwwww
  • - 2
 One of the benefits of boost spacing is being able to run a second wheel set, one size down in plus format. With that in mind, are the Primer and the ACV essentially the same bike a la Salsa Pony Rustler and Horsethief?
  • + 3
 Incorrect. Boost hub spacing does not mean that a bike can use multiple wheel/tire sizes.
  • + 1
 @ridedh1313: Perhaps I shouldn't have spoken in a blanket statement. There are however, examples of bikes with boost spacing that are marketed as being able to take two wheel sizes.

-2017 Niner RIP 9 and Jet 9 come in 29" or 27.5 plus builds
-2017 Salsa Horsethief/Pony Rustler. Salsa freely admits these bikes are the exact same frame with two different builds - one with 27.5 plus and one with 29" wheels
-2017 Pivot Switchblade comes in 29" or 27.5 plus builds. Granted, this is Pivot's own "super Boost" spacing, but I think the example stands
  • + 1
 @jdeg: You are correct. There are bikes that are Boost spaced and take both wheels, but just because it is boost does not mean that it can take both. That was my point.
  • + 2
 10k USD ha ha ha
  • + 2
 Pressfit? No thanks.
  • - 1
 "Riders with inseams at or under 30 inches (762mm)"

Someone is not very familiar with metric sizing... THAT would be one SERIOUSLY giant person (at least the metric one).
  • + 5
 Mmm actually that is correct, 30 inches are 762mm..my inseam is 35 inches (889mm) and I'm 6'2..and I'm quite sure I'm not a giant.. Big Grin
  • + 1
 are you a midget, living in a colony of midgets and have never seen an average-height person?
  • + 1
 @Weens: Well, I said "someone" was not very familiar with metric sizing. I guess that someone is me Smile Still true. Big Grin
  • + 1
 Palmer must have picked the colors.
  • + 1
 The most beautiful socks i ever seen. ^^
  • + 2
 27.5 ain't dead! Smile
  • - 3
 Why are they trying to rape us with 29ers? This could have been such a cool bike with a normal wheel size. Everyone under 185 cm on a 29er looks like a clown riding a large unicycle. And don't give me that "it rides so much better than a 27.5" BS.
  • + 3
 That is a ridiculous statement though, 'coolness' over performance on a £7k bike? - Surely at this end of the market performance is paramount, no?

27.5 has barely any performance benefit over 26", I think 1 second per minute in timed training found by Vouilloz. 29" wheels on the other hand are completely different and offer a very different ride.

So what if you think a 29er looks odd, they are here to stay because in certain situations they absolutely work better than a 27.5" wheel.
  • + 3
 I'm sorry that all the bikes aren't designed specifically for your needs. Wait, no I'm not. Like, I'd be glad to explain this all to you, but seriously now, get a grip.
  • + 4
 Your comment is exactly why bike manufacturers listen closely to the pros feedback.
  • + 0
 Plus from me! But in my opinion the thing is in maneuvering ability rather then in clown appearance....

Racer951: "So what if you think a 29er looks odd, they are here to stay because in certain situations they absolutely work better than a 27.5" wheel."

What certain situations?


PS: No jokes. 2 days ago I so a man 165cm tall who rode 29" with such frame size that when his seat post elevated only 5 cm above seatpost clamp his legs fully straightened up. When I sow him I though "such an harshly and brilliant work of managers who sold him this bike".
  • + 2
 @ivankvkharkiv: All situations.. Especially where I live..
  • + 1
 Does moving the seat forward = more upright seat post angles :-)
  • + 0
 looks like my salsa horsethief carbon, except I got my carbon HT frame for $1700 and no BOOST....
  • - 1
 I thought the horsethief was full suspension....???
  • + 0
 The worst a 29er and carbon crap
  • + 0
 Brace yourselves.... Price Trolls are coming...
  • + 9
 I'm here.
  • + 0
 In summary.... "really nice... for a 29er"
  • + 1
 Looks like a Tallboy
  • - 1
 so basically a 29er version of a transition scout Wink
  • + 4
 Just another clone of Stumpy 29, Hightower, Remedy, Ripley, etc. All these bikes are pretty close in geometry with small variances in chainstay length and travel.
  • - 1
 Sounds like a Great rig. But to me it 's just another copy/ paste review.
  • - 3
 Looks good
  • - 2
 Don't BOOST me bro.
  • - 2
 ISCG tabs missing?
  • - 2
 cool bike, take my money.
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