Interbike: Day 47

Oct 2, 2007
by Mike Levy  
Pinkbike's coverage of Interbike continues with shots from day 47 at the show. Ok, it was only day 3 but Vegas time travels faster than regular Canadian time. Despite feeling like I got ran over by the 'Interbike Train', this update includes all of the cool new gadgets and bikes that you want to see....Along with the most haggard booth girl ever!Corsair is a new company that has come up with some great looking bikes. The Malestrom below is one of them. The Malestrom is intended for freeriding, a word that covers a lot these days, so it is built to very versatile is any conditions. Build it for heavy duty all-mountain rides or build it to be sent. Up front the frame uses an internal headset system that can be adjusted from 65 to 67 degrees. From a DH'ers perspective this is super important, as having the option to ride a shorter travel bike that will handle similar to my DH rig will be a bonus. The Malestrom has 7" of travel from a novel linkage system that pivots around the bottom bracket shell. What that linkage gives you though is the 2:1 leverage ratio that promises to deliver a superior ride. It is equipped with a 3.5" stroke Manitou shock to do damping duties. A nice benefit to the bike's design is the super low center of gravity, everything heavy is located low on the frame.


Wheel path is one of the main keys to a bike that will work well in rough terrain. With its pivot located high on the bike, the wheel path is mostly rearward. Just what the doctor ordered to carry speed over the nasty stuff. Besides the 2:1 suspension ratio, one of most important features of the design is the idler pulley attached directly onto the main pivot. Because of this the suspension will not be affected by chain pull, regardless of the high pivot. Clever bike.



The other sharp bike at the Corsair booth was the Konig. This is the slope style bike in the lineup, but I'm sure it would rip for just about any kind of fun riding. At first glance the Konig looks like both a single pivot and a virtural pivot ride. The rear end is held onto the front triangle by two short links but it really only pivots off of one. The links are there purely for stiffness. Bring on the tricks and hairy landings, the bike looks like it is ready to throw down. Just like the Malestrom, the Konig uses an adjustable headset system but with a different range of adjustment. You can go from 66.5 to 68.5 degrees. Also, the Malestrom and the Konig can use either a MAXLE or quick release rear end.






You may have saw Derek Lahr and his Virus bike on our Interbike coverage a few days back. It turns out that he claimed the Most Innovative Bike Of The Show award. There were lots of other neat products at the show but nothing that really blew me away like Derek's bike. The Virus has 7" of travel and uses a integrated chain guide to keep things proper.


The bike's real innovation is the Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT). Just like an internally geared hub, the CVT system can be shifted under load, while stationary, and even while back pedaling. The difference with CVT though is that if you run a non-indexed shifter there are no 'set gears' and no indexing. You can have any gear ratio you want between two set limits. Hopefully this thing hits the ground running because it has so much potential.







Who accidentally hit the time travel button?! If we were in the future before with the Lahr Virus, we have for sure traveled back in time to see this wicked Haro Original freestyle bike. Sick.




What do you do to make a bad ass bike even badder? Add some flowers! Vicious Cycle two-wheeler.




Syncros had some new clipless pedals that look great and the usual super tough parts on display. The four bearing front hub is built to last while the Mental pedals are built to eat shins.(Mine can vouche for this)








What are the chances of getting three bike celebs in one shot? The chances are slim but I managed to pull off the shot. Si Paton from Descent-world.co.uk, Sam hill, and in the back is Rennie trying to get in on the spot light. Si is interviewing the two-time world champ for a video that you'll see on Pinkbike very soon. Also, because we know that you all have crushes on Sam, we'll also have an interview with Jacey, his mechanic, to hear about some of the tricks they use to go so freaking fast. Stay tuned.

Si, Hill, Rennie

Si, Hill, Rennie




The good 'ol B.C. boys at RaceFace had a slick no nonsense booth set up inside the Sands Convention Center. Everything was out on display ready for the PinkTaco crew to snap some shots but first we'll show you whats new. We'll have a Fresh Meat article posted soon that includes the new D2 stem, but for now you'll have to settle for my grainy and unprofessional photos. Come to think about it, I did the Fresh Meat also so those pics won't be any better. Anyways, the new D2 stem has landed. It uses the same interlocking faceplate as the trusted Diabolus but has a lower stack height and has some BMX influence for sure. Regular and 1.5" are ready for you.


Also new is the Next carbon XC crank. This ain't for you chuckers out there. Production models should be close to 730gm. Outboard bearings, hollow carbon arms, and alloy hardware for you gram counters out there. Nerds.


News Flash! Good news for all you DH racers out there, Atlas cranks available with with a 83mm bottom bracket. Why are all 83mm shell crank sets so burly? Some of us don't need that heft but could still use some stronger then normal cranks, thanks RaceFace!


Other high-falooting goods included more in carbon bars then I saw the last time I was in the carbon bar store. A super tough Dual bolt Diabolus seat post and the trusted Diabolus cranks finished in shiny silver and topped with RaceFace's own D2 chain guide.







This seat is too cool for its own good. Selle Itaila and TLD teamed up to bring you the seat that is too cool for any seat post.




Gearbox bikes seem to be eternally on the edge of production but there was fewer then ever at this year's show. There are some smaller companies pushing them hard and one or two big companies have given it a try, but it hasn't quite hit mass production yet. There are a lot of things to deal with I would imagine, it's not as easy as just bolting up a box full of gears and having a go. There are advantages, but with how dialed and light current drive systems are it will take some time until gearbox's can match their performance, although I'm sure there are lots of folks out there who will gobble them up just because they are gearbox's. This is Suntours newest 9spd version .

The V-Boxx FR9

The V-Boxx FR9




Shimano may not be known for their hip ads or flashy product but one thing they keep doing is pumping out great product to cover everyone's needs. This year is XT's 25th birthday and the work horse group got a complete face lift and even has some features that XTR lacks.

The new XT derailleur uses Shadow technology (as does the XTR) to give you some extra clearance in the tight stuff.


XT crankset, simple and clean lines.


XT wheelsets in both quick release and 20mm front wheels and a 135mm rear wheel.


The big news is the new XT brakes. These look great and with the ability to adjust both the reach and bite point, Shimano may have a big winner here. Due to sheer laziness I didn't get to ride a bike with these fitted, but they felt nice and firm and had a great lever blade feel in the booth.




Check out this frame from Delta 7 Sports. It's called the Arantix and uses something they call IsoTruss technology. It is made from carbon fiber and their "Patented open lattice design leverages greater efficiency from the carbon fibers strength by concentrating material at proper reinforcement intervals and eliminating excess material". They also say that the "reduntant lattice structure makes the Arantix even more damage resistant during impact/crash scenarios by isolating damage without compromising the whole frame" I was totally going to explain that stuff in my own words but then I realized I had no idea what was going on. Frame weight is under 2.75lbs and there are no rider weight restrictions as on some other companies lighter goods.





Straitline had a small and unassuming booth tucked away in the corner of the Sands. Small and unassuming enough that you'd have never thought that some of their clients include NASA, mechanical medical needs, and tracking units for certain spy agencies. No joke.

They had some great cutaways in the booth that show you what is going on in there. As you can spot in the picture, the stem uses a vertical wedge clamp the produces an amazing amount of even force. Enough in fact that I removed the clamp bolt and simply pushed the wedge down with my finger and I couldn't twist the stem on the display!


In the pedal cutaway you can see the polymer bearings that are claimed to be lighter, spin better, and last longer then those pinner little sealed bearings you see in most pedals. Apparently they are also not affected by water. You can get 'em in both steel and titanium axle flavors too!


If you have brakes, then they have levers for you. Speaking of brakes, Straitline has made the greatest product in the history of products. If you run Hayes brakes then you know all about the dreaded lever creep during rides. Loc-tite it all you want but it is still going to happen. These nifty little barrels use a nylon tipped set screw that locks the adjustment into place. Models to fit Hayes HFX, Mag, and Sole versions.




These pedals will appeal to the street kid in all of us. The next time you back down from grinding that 30ft ledge because you don't want to burn a hole through your fancy pedals you may want to look up Straitline. It's just a simple insert on one side to preserve your pedals and make life easier for you in the end. They should be a lot easier on the local landmarks also, you vandal! Clever.




I'm not sure who's booth it was but they had the most haggard booth girl in the whole damn show.

one dollar, I love you long time

one dollar, I love you long time


Thankfully, we ran into these pretty girls on our way out. We asked them about that haggard booth girl pictured above and apparently her name is Karol, she is from Poland, and has 9 long haired Persian cats. Ugh.




9 Comments

  • - 1
 That Corsair video gave me a good idea about the bike as I wasn't able to see it in Vegas. A 10.5 inch eye shock on a freeride bike to give a 2:1 ratio is mint.
  • + 0
 How about some 08 haro bike shots? Thats pretty cool with the cut away stem.
  • - 1
 hey that beauty on the right looks like Angelina Jolie and also like a friend from my class...but i didn't realize that my friend lookes like AG ;D
  • + 0
 Thanks for that. It was good to read through Smile Haha 3 bike celebs in one photo, nice work!
  • + 0
 lovin the sweet coverage man keep it up!!!!!!
  • - 1
 That Corsair is S I C K!!! Freedride HI-TECH style, things just keep gettin' better--thanks Pinkbike coverage!!!
  • + 0
 Was Rennie wearng Black Flys? Wonder who got those to him? Hmmmmmmmmmm
  • + 0
 I know those two! There fun!
  • + 0
 last pic. is the bestt

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