Knolly Releases Tyaughton Hardtail in Titanium & Steel

Sep 21, 2021
by Knolly Bikes  
Tyaughton Ti

PRESS RELEASE: Knolly Bikes

Introducing the Tyaughton: our new 29’ hardtail comes in titanium or steel, can run a 150mm or 160mm fork, features advanced geometry and incorporates an unapologetically high level of construction with fully custom tubing. The Tyaughton is everything you need for a super capable and playful hardtail trail bike.

Tyaughton Photo credit Brayden Rastad

PROGRESSIVE GEOMETRY
The Tyaughton’s geometry has been designed from the ground up: we’ve utilized our extensive knowledge from our full suspension line-up to ensure that this bike rides as competently as our suspension models while still being incredibly balanced across all types of terrain. While conceived as an “all around, do everything bike”, the Tyaughton is extremely progressive and suited both to big days in the saddle as well as shredding your local trails.

The Tyaughton features a 64.5 degree head angle with a 150mm fork (or a 64 degree head angle with a 160mm fork) which makes it capable on both technical uptracks and steep descents. The seat tube angle is ideally positioned at 75 degrees to deliver an efficient climbing position while also ensuring that the rider’s hands and knees are comfortable during epic days.

The front end of the bike is long to increase room in the cockpit and allow the rider to stretch out. The chainstay is modest at 427mm, blending stability and maneuverability. It’s long enough to give the bike optimum balance across its wheelbase but short enough to get out of your way when you need to get the front end of the bike up.

Tyaughton Ti

MATERIALS: TITANIUM AND STEEL
Taking what we learned from our Cache gravel models, the Tyaughton was planned from the start to be offered in both titanium and premium air hardened steel. The primary focus was on performance and these are hands down the two best materials to use to achieve this goal.

Tyaughton Steel

The Tyaughton Steel frames use air hardened steel because it can be manipulated before welding and then heat treated to give high strength and durability. Our steel frames are also ED coated to ensure maximum corrosion resistance and painted with tough powder paints for longevity. All our steel tubes are butted so that the walls are thicker where it’s welded and thinner in the middle which reduces weight while ensuring that the tube ends are incredibly strong. This model is designed to be affordable while performing at the highest level possible.

Tyaughton Ti

The Tyaughton Titanium has been created from a dream material. Titanium is light, stiff and long lasting, providing a premium quality ride for discerning riders. With additional features and significant weight savings, the Tyaughton Titanium is the ultimate expression of mountain bike hardtail performance.

Tyaughton Steel

CUSTOM TUBING
The Tyaughton Steel features a frame size specific butted, bent and formed tubeset that blends production level repeatability and precision with a craftsmen level of manufacturing.
It features a size specific tubeset (small frames don’t get the same tubes as the XL and vice versa) and incorporates many of the titanium frame features including integrated ISCG05 chain guide tabs and a unique head tube.

The Tyaughton Titanium features a 100% proprietary Knolly oversized tube set with all frame tubes tapered, butted, bent and formed to the material’s limits. This allows Knolly to achieve subtle Knolly-esque frame design emphasizing stability and compliance. This model also features a unique frame size specific tubeset to ensure riders of all sizes can get the maximum performance gain possible from this material. Large frames get the largest diameter tubeset to compliment larger statured riders, while smaller frames get reduced diameter tube sets to match rider size and weight while providing matching compliance.

Steel and Titanium frames have a unique head tube shape designed to maximize strength to support forks up to 170mm. Tubesets flow into custom CNC machined dropouts, yokes and access ports (Titanium-only) so that stress risers are minimized. Even the included ISCG mount attaches cleanly into a recessed CNC machined pocket on the chainstay yoke.

Tyaughton Photo credit Brayden Rastad

ADDITIONAL FEATURES:
Titanium exclusives:
CNC engraved head tube
Full Internal dropper post routing with an access hatch on the underside of the down tube
Brushed finish
Fully 3D formed seat tube (butted, tapered, bent and formed)
Oversized tapered top and down tubes

Titanium and Steel:
157Trail rear hub spacing
Custom head tubes
Proprietary and size specific main triangle tube sets.
Fully integrated ISCG05 chainguide mounts
73mm BSA threaded BB
12 x 157mm rear end with DT Swiss RWS
Knolly CNC dropouts
Knolly CNC chainstay yoke
Dropper post insertion length: 175 Small, 175 - 210mm Medium, Large and X-Large

GEOMETRY/SPECS: knollybikes.com/

Tyaughton frames 2

AVAILABILITY
The Tyaughton is available in two material options including titanium or steel, with the steel version available in Container Red or 510 Green. There’s four sizes to choose from - small through extra-large - and multiple build kit options. Full bike prices start at $3599 USD for the Steel and $6099 USD for the Titanium. Frame only prices start at $1099 USD for the Steel and $2999 USD for the Titanium. Both models are available to purchase now from your local Knolly dealer or online at knollybikes.com/.

Photo credit: Brayden Rastad
Riders: Ken Fung and Brendan Gauthier

Tyaughton collage Sept 20



129 Comments

  • 39 4
 That headtube is beautiful and attention to detail seems pretty high, but it's kinda hard to see the value in getting this over an or RSD or Chromag or Kona for quite a bit less, which I think will realistically translate into the same level of fun when you're bashing down the trail. At this point 157 is a deal breaker for me. Even the hint of less choice in hubs doesn't warrant the gains listed. You can fit big tires in a Honzo no problem, with shorter stays. Overly elaborate steel or ti hardtails just seem over niche-y to me. I do love that headtube, though!
  • 23 5
 I agree, superboost kills this bike for me. Quite sad as it has a threaded BB, which is the only thing that is stopping me from getting a rootdown.
  • 11 2
 If it wasn't for super boost I'd consider this bike. None of my other bikes are super boost and I like to be able to swap wheel sets and other components between bikes if necessary.
  • 7 0
 @Notbn: There are always the UK steel options with threaded BB and regular boost: Stanton, Pipedream, Cotic. But those may not do it for you for other reasons . . .
  • 17 6
 157 axle spacing was one of the reasons I chose this frame. Now I can swap wheels between my Fugitive, Tyaughton, and future Knolly bikes. I love being able to standardize on parts. Also, finding 157mm wheels has not been a problem (other than due to Covid-related delays).
  • 4 0
 @estayton: definitely some good brit hardcore hardtails out there! (they basically invented the sub-genre after all haha) I just mention fellow Canadian options cause Im biased.
  • 5 0
 @Notbn: Don't let that stop you from getting a Rootdown! They are such incredibly fun bikes - you won't regret it!! Big Grin
  • 9 1
 @Skooks: I can appreciate this as my last hardtail is basically built as a spare parts hanger for my Rimpo, which was annoying as I had a good drivetrain layin around, but the new ripmo was 12spd shimano so having a bike that could switch with that was key. If I found a new full-squish (main bike) with super boobs I'd probably have to rethink everything.
  • 32 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: you may want to have a word with your autocorrect.
  • 4 2
 I’d buy this except for 2 things: superboost and that I’d love to have a ti HT in 27.5.

A 27.5, forward geometry 120-130mm ti HT would be a ton of fun
  • 13 0
 @BenPea: I want a bike with super boobs fo sho! That's a standard I can get into
  • 2 2
 @short-but-sweet:

27.5? You clearly wouldn’t buy this, “but”.

You are looking for entirely different bike.
  • 7 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: If I had a bike with super boobs, it would be hard to get me off the damn thing!
  • 2 0
 @hllclmbr: yeah I’m well aware - one that but for a couple of examples , doesn’t exist . Wish it did
  • 3 0
 @BenPea: Nope, all is well Wink
  • 4 0
 @short-but-sweet: if the ti is negotiable, check out the ragley piglet (steel and just regular boobs, 130, good geo)
  • 4 0
 @BenPea: when I'm riding, my bike has one super boob.
  • 3 0
 You can get a Marino and customize it any way you want (super boost, 135mm, threaded, 27.5, fat bike, etc) for under $300. You just have to wait 9 months....
  • 31 1
 KNOMAG
  • 17 3
 I might be alone in this, but I’m actually glad there are design similarities between it and chromag bikes. The more bike companies making bikes with good designs, the more opportunities for riders to get a good bike. Plus, ti. Plus plus, it’s a Knolly. Plus plus plus, they’re pretty good looking.
  • 18 1
 Plus plus plus plus….super boost plus…..
  • 1 0
 Hardtails in North America = Chromag (and eventually Kona). What else please?
  • 5 1
 @danstonQ: Canfield
  • 2 1
 @danstonQ: Rocky Mountain
  • 4 0
 @danstonQ: banshee
  • 2 0
 Why Cycles S7
  • 4 0
 @danstonQ: Transition Vanquish....well used to. That bike hauls ass tho.
  • 2 0
 @danstonQ: Moots, Stinner, Wyatt, Quiring, Reeb
  • 2 0
 @Telebikes: Thanks. These are good references. I appreciate. Cheers!
  • 3 1
 @Telebikes: Sage Cycles, if you are the dentist's rich father.
  • 20 6
 I miss 120mm fork 415mm chainstay hardtails ): if I lived in a place where a "rowdy" hardtail made sense I'd ride a full suspension bike.
  • 8 12
flag adrennan (Sep 21, 2021 at 10:16) (Below Threshold)
 so dirt jumpers. you miss dirt jumpers
  • 19 2
 @adrennan: dirt jumpers with droppers, gears, 29" wheels, and two brakes, yes
  • 4 0
 Not a ridiculous opinion. I have a hardtail and longer travel 29er and now that I live by mountains you can guess which one gets used the most and which one hurts the most. Still love a hardtail and the new aggro ones do ride quite well on gnarly stuff, just can't get the same speed going. It's not logical, just like retro cars.
  • 2 0
 So my "aggro" Ti hardtail has a 120mm fork, and sliding dropouts that go from 420-430mm. I tend to keep it in the short position.

I've found that a full suspension even with cheap shocks, if it has moderately decent geometry, is faster than the best aggro hard tail. Its also very much not fun to ride an aggro hard tail at full speed down a really rough trail. I love my hard tail, but not when trying to race my friends on their enduro bikes down chop, moto holes, and rock gardens. Because of this I think the uber short chainstays and head tube angles steeper than 65 degrees is the best way to go. You don't want to go super fast on them, so make them feel almost like a dirt jumper so you can play with the trail your on.
  • 18 1
 ...Looks like a Chromag?
  • 3 0
 That font choice, really???
  • 10 1
 Frames look awesome! But... If you're going to quote in length about choosing specific diameters of tubing for sizes (which is actually pretty awesome considering it would complicate the process a fair bit) it would be great to know what materials were actually chosen, i.e. type and grade of ti and "air hardened" chromo, and where they were sourced. Also, there's no note of where is the frames are constructed?
  • 6 0
 What company does anything like what you’re describing? Sourcing and grade of tubes, per model size.

Do you think providing that info would result in more than single digit more bikes sold, if that?
  • 3 0
 Also, if you're going so far as to spec different tube diameters, why the hell don't the rear centers grow with each size?
  • 1 0
 @hllclmbr: Cotic does do that. And many boutique frame builders aswell.
  • 1 0
 @hllclmbr: I know what Ti grade my Kingdom is made from.
  • 24 11
 you lost me at 157mm rear hub spacing
  • 8 1
 Am I the only one that feels like bikes are getting too long? A medium has almost 470mm of reach.

Otherwise a good looking bike. Could definitely be slacker. I think hardtails need to be about 1-2 degrees slacker than a comparable FS bike.
  • 7 1
 Like the recent RSD and Chromag bikes with similar geo, this is basically a buy-it-for-life bike. At least if you're in your 40's, which are probably the only people buying $3K+ hard tails.

Completely unrelated question, I noticed the serial number on the BB starts with OR, which is the same as my RSD bikes. What does that indicate?
  • 1 0
 I dunno about all that. I mean, I love Knolly's stuff, so for now I'll ASSUME, its better heat treatment and finish/welding than the previous Titus frame I had like 7 or 8 years ago with a 140mm on it, BUT... I cracked the weld around the stay/seat tube on that bad boy. They warrantied it and sent me a new one, but it was also 1/3rd the price of this one. That's a lot of money for something not guaranteed here. Steel would actually probably be a better bet, even though I love the titanium so...
  • 1 0
 Given that RSD and Knolly both have their frames made in Asia, its not impossible that they're made by the same manufacturer.
  • 2 0
 @Sweatypants: yeah OK, it SHOULD be a buy-it-for-life frame.
  • 7 0
 Ora Engineering - the frame maker in Taiwan
  • 1 0
 @silverstanktions: yea should be. I foreal showed the Titus to my welder friend and he said it looked like classic NOT heat treating after welding, so maybe the extra bucks get you some extra QC and care in the process there, but whatev. Looks sweet either way. And that was a fun bike. Lightweight and short stays is always a good combo.
  • 1 0
 @Sweatypants: My dad was still riding his late-90s era titanium hardtail when he passed away a couple of years back. So it was good for his life. I think he loved that thing more than us kids.
  • 8 1
 if i’m not mistaken this is the first aggressive hardtail with 157 spacing. kinda cool for people with a nice super boost wheel set.
  • 8 0
 Nice…I own a Chromag, but just got a Norco Torrent….now I need a Knolly for the Canadian Steel Trifecta!
  • 4 0
 157 supet boost feedback from my experience with the Knolly Chilcotin 2021:

I have a rear hub 148x12 and I bought the kit from Problem Solver to adapt it to 157 supet boost. Work perfectly well!

Knolly frame way more rigid than my Sentinel alloy... frame it self or superboost I can't tell!
  • 7 0
 Beautiful bikes... nice work Knolly!
  • 6 0
 Congrats Knolly! Super sexy Swingin HT you have there! Can’t wait for mine to arrive! #knolly4life
  • 3 0
 If you can manage to find it, a looooooonnnnngg time ago, Merlin Founder Rob Vandermark published a paper called "The Merlin Titanium Primer", went into great detail, and described their tube manipulating processes, vacuum anealing, etc. Plenty of good info, and if you read the whole thing, by the end you will come to appreciate WHY a Ti bike costs what it does. BUT, not all (ie:hardly any) manufacturers go to the lengths that Merlin did......
I found this document from Seven Cycles, also some good info in it

www.stevehoggbikefitting.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/Sevens-Titanium-Technology-and-Manufacturing-Methodology.pdf
  • 2 0
 It seems that all these Ti hardtails run about $3000 for the frame only. I bought a full NX build with a Pike Ultimate from Sonder last year for around $3200 and have upgraded everything else since. No issues with quality and the welds look pretty great. I’m all for the Ti hardtail. Absolutely love it. Not sure why they are so damn expensive though in comparison to the Sonder. Anyone?
  • 4 1
 This tells at least part of the story here:

knollybikes.com/blogs/knews/steel-vs-titanium
  • 2 0
 Kindom Vendetta ti frame is 1500 euro for semi-custom. Less if no semi-custom. Carver has been doing custom ti for 1400 USD for years.
  • 5 0
 Nice looking rig. Good geo for our neck of the woods. Also awesome to see more hardtails worth riding out there.
  • 5 1
 I have the Chromag Surface Ti which is just so so similar to this. It’s just the best bike ever. So fun and can do all the things.
  • 1 0
 I had one and there is no way this is a Surface Ti. I moved to a Rootdown Ti and it was a big improvement. But the Tyaughton is NOT a Surface in any way.
  • 1 0
 @blackfly: mine Ti is 64.5 hta with 160 Fox 36. Choose your reach, all other numbers are within 0.5 degrees or a few mm.
  • 2 0
 I love Knolly but I don't understand this bike. There is no value proposition here compared to a full suspension bike.
-Just as heavy
-Price point is approaching parity
-Won't pedal any better
-Won't be more playful / is longer
-Isn't going to be faster
-Will beat you up
  • 6 3
 China Ti or local crafted? Air hardened steel. One tube or whole frame. Is it Reynolds 853? Sorry but us old f*cks know our material when it comes to hard tails.
  • 4 3
 @Alexisjmorgan: nope nothing about who makes the tubes or what they are. But hey air hardened . That sounds cool!
China Ti. Is has exactly no reputation . Litespeed will be glad to pour over every minute detail of the 3al 4v aircraft certified titanium. I think they use water jet cut 6al 4v ti for drop outs.
At this investment I expect details. Which any custom frame builder is happy to divulge.
Bring on the hype!
Sorry Transition you guys rock but generic Ti. ? Labeling a steel frame set as air hardened? That's it? About as generic and dumbed down as stating it's 4130 . And Reynolds air hardened tubeset is not a 4130 alloy.
  • 7 0
 @Sshredder: I'm pretty sure this is a knolly, not a transition.
  • 1 0
 @nhtowa421: my bad. Knolly.
  • 1 0
 As of 2017 China started to make aircraft grade titanium tubing . That makes China's jump into the hi end alloy titanium tubing very new to the market.
A bit more digging they also compeat with the world market for steel and aluminum alloy . For a whole 4 years. Thus my suspicion of durability . Titanium coil springs from China were a joke. Close to same weight as steel . Because there was no certification .
In the past when most frames were hard tails made of steel or titanium$ . The type of tubeset and how it was built reflected the cost and the prestige of the frame.
Air hardened steel tubes are superior. I just have to accept the Chinese lack the romance of some 100 year old company , English or Italian well established tube set .
  • 3 0
 Go to MTBR if you're actually curious. Noel is quite active over there.
  • 3 0
 @whateverbr0: thanks I'll check it out. Noel is probably pissed at my comments. Sorry Noel. He does things his own way and people who own his trail bikes appreciate the ride.
  • 4 0
 @Sshredder: Never pissed - always happy to have meaningful conversations. Smile

Cheers!
  • 2 2
 erdekes lehet majd rajt utazni a 323 bb magassagal es a 652 stackel a magas embereknek eleg idota méretezés Big Grin Big Grin nembaj majd lessz par majom aki megveszi titanba (kinai),,, abba meg alapbol nem kéne semmi rezonancia nincs benne nem rugozik ugy mint egy reynolds
  • 16 0
 gesundheit
  • 5 0
 Beautiful bikes Knolly!
  • 5 0
 Sweet Chromag
  • 5 4
 In my opinion, a 64 hta is the bare minimum on a HT like this especially for Canadian conditions. The moment you sit on a HT you lose a degree or two at least. I'd like to see a way out there 62 deg steel HT.
  • 6 1
 So, you want a Chromag Doctahawk?

62 degree HTA, Steel HT designed around a 180mm fork. Released almost 3 years ago now (Feb 2019).

The Marin El Roy is a close second (63 degree HTA), as is the Kona ESD (also 63 degree HTA). Both of those are steel afaik. They are not as slack, but also have less fork travel, so they may be pretty close while being ridden.
  • 4 0
 since long top tubes, low standover ,short Cs and wide bars short stem arrived iv found the slack head angle angle fairly redundant . the bikes are just so stable that iv never been close to going otb like i used to regularly on older bikes wuth more travel and slacker head angles but less of the good geo.
  • 3 0
 Manufacturers should all quote their HT geo charts sagged like Cotic do. Gives a much better idea of how it’s going to ride.
  • 2 1
 I speak from experience on my own steel HT which has a 160mm fork and a 65deg HTA without a rider and gets so much steeper than my similar geo Enduro when I sit on it. That said I also agree with some of the other comments, my little HT handles the steep stuff surprisingly well. I'm just curious how much better it would be with that 62-3 deg HTA. Oh and the frame was on special from On One and cost GBP 120. So far its been bomb proof.
  • 1 0
 @headshot: My Solaris max is static about 63 with a 130 Helm, so 66 ish sagged. I tend to set the fork pretty stiff to keep the geo. It really is very good!
  • 3 1
 Actually progressive Ti frame I had made this year. $1200 US shipped. 62HA, 77SA, @150mm, 1295mm wb. ep1.pinkbike.org/p5pb20021924/p5pb20021924.jpg it's pretty fun.
  • 1 0
 Looks sweet! Where did you have it made?
  • 4 0
 Look like a Rootdown to me...
  • 7 4
 Really shoulda just released a dh bike again though
  • 1 2
 That’s a soft comment
  • 3 0
 My friend, there is nothing and I mean nothing wrong with my 2015 Podium.27.5 front/ 26 rear= great!!!
  • 3 0
 Looks awesome, nice work Kenny!
  • 3 0
 i just better leave this topic alone and move on
  • 2 0
 Boost Boost SuperBoost, ales SuperBoost m.youtube.com/watch?v=xLGLj9YjN-Q
  • 4 2
 Chromag had it right day one, everyone else just jumping on the bandwagon now.
  • 2 0
 putting 69 in the price tag won't make you forget that its a $6000 hardtail
  • 1 0
 Hardtails are the future! ...Seriously though I think its great that they are offering different tubing for different sized riders
  • 1 0
 Any thoughts on how this would compare to Chromag Rootdown/Primer?

Better yet, anyone ridden both?
  • 3 1
 why 157? just to match all products in the line?
  • 6 1
 No, although that would be reason enough. Knolly believes (and I agree) that 157 performs better and makes more sense from a design perspective that 148.
  • 2 3
 @Skooks: not saying it is bad standard, however S managed to produce Demo DH bike with 135 with for long time with great success and uber complex suspension;

I would say technically wise EOL6 (offset lacing like connandoel, GG, sentence) makes more sense rather them adding width, adding with is like lets add more carbon to make frame better, rather lets optimize performance to the max
  • 2 1
 Love knolly bikes but super boost makes it a no from me on all their bikes at this stage.
  • 1 0
 I already have a very similar style of hardtail but feel I now really need this in my life too! That headtube badge...
  • 2 1
 why do they insist on putting the kink at the top tube /seat tube junction? all their frames would be way cleaner without it
  • 1 1
 This looks suspiciously similar to a Chromag. Knolly outght to be careful, lest they get sued over design patent infringements...
  • 1 2
 Knolly is also trolling other bike companies over their dubious suspension patent:

www.pinkbike.com/news/knolly-bikes-suing-intense-for-alleged-patent-infringement.html

Seems their patent was not so strong after prior art submitted by Intense:

www.pinkbike.com/news/knolly-withdraws-patent-infringement-suit-against-intense.html
  • 1 0
 @zoobab2: Right. My comment was supposed to be a tongue in cheek reference to that case.
  • 1 0
 Looks like my new warden and stylus got busy haha
  • 2 1
 Would SO rag a mini mullet version
  • 1 0
 Looks like a chromag stylus with big wheels.
  • 2 1
 It looks less terrible than most Knolly’s…but still has superboost
  • 1 0
 They finally grew balls to build a true XL frame 522mm reach
  • 2 1
 Super boost! This bike is soooo sick! I like and want.
  • 1 0
 Knolly ass pounder. They have to good of suspension to give it up.
  • 1 0
 Superboost successor to the Free Radical?
  • 1 0
 The Free Radical was 150mm rear end. Almost super boost.
  • 3 1
 Chromag lawsuit incoming
  • 1 0
 Nah, if you knew them they would never… they’re good people
  • 2 0
 Beautiful bikes!
  • 1 1
 Finally a great looking Knolly frame!
  • 1 2
 knolly is now going to sue everyne who makes a hardtail for patent infringement. be careful world!!
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