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Jessie-May's Randoms Part 2 - Eurobike 2024

Jul 8, 2024
by Jessie-May Morgan  
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ENVE Dark 6 Prototype Wheels

At the Muc-Off booth, a Commencal Supreme DH was home to a new gravity wheelset from ENVE. The Dark 6 is indicative that this is a prototype wheelset, and yes it does look very similar to that we saw on the Frameworks DH Bike at Sea Otter. We swung by at ENVE to learn more about the new rims, but very few details were divulged.

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These are the narrower rims for XC and trail riding
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ENVE are moving away from internal spoke nipples with rims that appear to be much shallower than those of the current M-Series

What we do know is that this will be the next evolution of the M9 Gravity Wheels. Commencal Muc-Off, Union and Frameworks Racing have been involved in developing the new line, and Amaury Pierron, Asa Vermette and Myriam Nicole have all taken it to a multitude of World Cup DH wins and podiums. Notable are the external spoke nipples (the current M Series wheel have internal ones), and the change in rim profile. While the current M9 rims have a uniform rounded profile, these here look to have a more wave-like transverse profile. We are told the new wheels will have front and rear specific rims.

More info on these new carbon hoops in due course.



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ND Tuned Prototypes

First revealed at the Taipei Cycle Show in April, the ND Tuned Hunter Trails prototype forks were also on display at Eurobike. The Hunter Trails 38 enduro fork and 34 trail fork are due to be available by the end of the year, at a price that falls just under that of the respective Fox Factory forks with the GRIP2 damper. What's interesting about these Portugal-assembled fork is that they'll be a bit lighter than comparable forks from competitors; the Hunter Trails 38 has a claimed weight of 2,150g for a 29" 180mm travel. The Hunter Trails 34 with 120mm travel weighs a claimed 1,350g.

CEO and Founder, Nuno Duarte, was on hand to divulge a few more specifics. As you can see, both use a carbon arch. Nuno says this arch can be much lighter than the arches employed on other forks, largely because it is subjected to comparably reduced forces. That's because ND Tuned house the air spring and damper inside a single fork leg, rather than separating the two as is the case on most mass-produced forks; i.e. Fox, RockShox, SR Suntour, Ohlins... the list goes on.

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That effectively means that the competing forces of the spring (two positive chambers, one negative) and the damper are contained to a single leg. The other leg is essentially passive. Nuno tells us the fork arch doesn't need to be quite as robust, therefore. While uncommon, the arrangement isn't unique; the F929 Next fork from Bright Racing Shox also houses the damper and air spring in a single leg, though in an inverted design.

Another uncommon design feature is the use of sliding bushings, made possible by the use of a thin aluminum tube that sits within the lowers, housing the cartridge. As the fork is compressed, one of the bushings slides along the tube, increasing the distance between the pair. That effectively makes the telescoping assembly laterally stiffer the deeper into the stroke the fork is pushed, reducing friction from side-loading. Again it's uncommon but not unique, both Bright Racing Shox and Intend use a similar layout of the bushings.

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The high (large) and low speed (small) circuit oil flow orifices found inside the ND Tuned damper
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The aluminum sleeve that houses the cartridge has spiral recesses etched into the inside face, serving as lubrication channels for the bushings

The damper itself will only have external adjustment for the rebound damping. The high speed compression damping circuit can be adjusted by swapping out the shim stack, but the low speed compression circuit won't be adjustable. Future iterations of the Hunter Trails line will see external adjustment of more damping characteristics.

Finally, those machined golden crowns can mean only one thing; ND Tuned are also developing a DH fork.



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The 2025 NS Soda is a "slopeduro" bike

New MTBs from NS

NS Bikes have updated the Soda; what was a 26" single-speed slopestyle bike is now a "slopeduro" bike with 27.5" wheels and a traditional multi-speed drivetrain. Also on display was an entirely new model called the Fizzy, a budget-oriented all-mountain bike with 29" wheels. NS were also presenting two new models of the Nerd MTBs for kids. The Nerd 246 can take a 24" or a 26" wheelset, and there's a Nerd 275, too. There are virtually no details available on these bikes just yet, so glean what you will from the pictures.

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The NS Fizzy is presented as a well-rounded all-mountain bike that won't break the bank
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The NS Nerd models will accommodate the next generation of mountain bikers



Lightweight Level 2 Protection Pads from D3O

D3O are expanding their range of knee, elbow and shoulder pads with the Diablo pad. It's lighter than their Ghost pad material and will be available in both Level 1 and Level 2 certified versions. This should allow manufacturers to compete with the very excellent Rapha Trail Knee Pads, which are basically the gold standard for lightweight, breathable, comfortable knee pads with Level 2 protection.

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Keep an eye out for new protection from Troy Lee and Race Face; they will be the first to market with the Diablo pad.



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Continental Kryptotal 24"

Yep, the popular Continental Kryptotal Fr tire ridden to World Cup DH wins and podiums by Andy Kolb, Ronan Dunne, Rachel Atherton, etc., will soon be available in a 24" and 26" - no pricing or exact availability date just yet.



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Exposure Lights Tap & Mesh Technology

Exposure have added a new functionality to their helmet-mounted lights. Until now, their Reflex technology, whereby the light's lumen output automatically adjusts to riding speed and terrain changes, has exclusively been a feature of their bar-mounted lights (Sixpack, Maxx-D, Toro and Race). Now, the helmet-mounted lights (Zenith, Diablo, Axis or Joystick) can do the same thing, but only if they are paired with a bar-mounted light. All of the sensors necessary for Reflex are housed within the bigger, bar-mounted light, but the so-called Mesh technology can pair the bar and helmet-mounted lights such that the helmet-mounted light does adjusts output in-line with the bar-mounted light.



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SQlab's new Clip-On saddle base can be topped by a variety of their Infinergy saddles right across the size range

SQlab Clip-On Saddle Base & Topper, and an Aritificial Intelligence Hans Rey Saddle

SQlab will now be partnering with more OEMs with their all-new Clip-On saddle technology. It's essentially a two-piece arrangement where the saddle base can accommodate a range of different toppers. Brands will be able to purchase an SQlab saddle to be sold with on their bikes and, if the customer isn't a fan, they can switch out the topper for a different SQlab saddle that suits their sit bone with and/or preference. The toppers will retail at around half the price of a complete new saddle, so around 100 €.

Initially, the Clip-On technology will be rolled out for SQ's made-in-Germany Infinergy range; the 6OX, 610 and 611 saddles, so expect this to come on bikes at the higher end of the price scale. However, the plan is for the entire SQlab range - across road, gravel and MTB - to move to Clip-On eventually. The standard one-piece saddles will always remain available.

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It's not like SQlab saddles weren't conversation-starters already...

As if the standard SQlab saddles weren't long enough as it is, the brand has gone ahead and made an even longer one. The 60L saddle (far right in the second picture) is meant for technical eMTB riding, and will retail at 180 €. That black and white version of the 6OX Active Ergowave saddle is a limited edition version created in collaboration Hans Rey. Get this: it has a Wave On chip in the rear that can be scanned to pull up an AI bot trained by Hans Rey, who will be ready to answer any questions you may have on your new saddle. Bicycle industry marketing rarely gets more weird than that.



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More Affordable Schwalbe Magic Mary & Big Betty

In addition to the all-new Rick XC tire (yes, we are all mourning the missed opportunity for alliteration), Schwalbe also announced new versions of the popular Big Betty and Magic Mary tires. The tread patterns are unchanged, but there's a new casing called Double Defense (67 TPI), which is essentially a more affordable trail casing. A Schwalbe representative tells us it's a reinforced Performance Line tire with similar puncture protection to a Super Trail casing, or the Maxxis EXO+ casing. It is made up of a single-ply of 67 TPI, with reinforcement with fabric in the sidewalls, and then an additional rubber reinforcement layer at the sidewalls. It's basically a cheaper way of making a stiff casing tire.

The rubber compound making up the tread is said to be a softer version of their basic Addix compound (comparable to Addix Soft) with a slower rebound. The bottom line is that Big Betty and Magic Mary are now available at the more affordable price point of $66 USD, as compared to the Super Trail variations which retail at $98 USD.



Eurobike 2024

Funn

Funn has expanded its range of riser bars to include a 75mm rise option. The R75 has is a 31.8mm bar with an 8° back sweep and a 5.5° upsweep. It will be available sometime this month for $64.90 USD in Black, Red, Grey, Blue, Orange, and Green.

They also have new cockpit components for little bikes, with a new range of stems, handlebars, and grips for little hands - and of course, they're all available in a multitude of colors for matching and clashing. The Speedrun JR bar is downsized everywhere you look. It has a 19mm external diameter, as compared to the standard 22mm. It comes at 680mm wide with a 20mm rise, and come August of this year you can get it for $39.90 USD.

Eurobike 2024
Eurobike 2024
Eurobike 2024

The Hilt JR grips go with the Speedrun JR bar with that 19mm internal diameter and a narrow 26mm outer diameter; these are priced at $12 USD and are available in eleven colors.



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This airbag-based protection system retails at 790 €

Mase Air Bag Protection Systems

Mase Safety Systems were showing off their Airbags. These comprise an unassuming-looking vest harboring an air canister and some sensors. Data from an accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer are collated to determine whether or not a rider is falling from their bike. When the threshold is surpassed, air from the canister is released to inflate numerous discrete air bags, in a bid to protect the rider when they eventually hit the ground - slow motion clip here.

Here's the thing; you can't do jumps with it. Well, you can, but it will trigger inflation and you'll very rapidly become a sail.

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This one with more coverage one goes for 860 €
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Its vest weighs 1.5 kg

However. Mase are developing a new version that uses permeability sensors positioned on the handlebar grips. In that version, the airbag inflation will only be activated if both sensors detect that the rider has let go of the grips.




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94 Comments
  • 90 0
 Ripping down a trail only to turn into a marshmallow. A new Friday Fails theme?
  • 44 0
 CANNOT WAIT for the first Friday Fail that involves an air bag deployment.
  • 19 0
 I wish Yoann Barelli had this in Quebec. That crash has to be the worse thing i've ever seen. Frown
  • 6 0
 If it keeps my face and body from swelling up like a marshmallow, then I'm all in.
  • 4 0
 Never forget the guy carrying his airbag system inbounds at Kicking horse last ski season as it went off in the lift line, DOH!!!
  • 3 0
 I'm more worried that someone wears this in traffic, does a small hop and as the system deploys and obstruct the riders view, the poor rider crashes into traffic or an obstacle. It can only help so much (and it doesn't safe your bike).
  • 2 0
 It seems to be missing protection in a vital area.
  • 3 2
 Imagine stopping on the trail to wait a buddy to catch up. Both hands off the bars… POOF.
  • 3 1
 @vinay: It doesn't save the bike? In the case of a massive incident, I couldn't give two hoots about the bike. Sat in hospital after, the state of the bike is def not something I'd worry about.
  • 2 0
 Ski cross racers use some sort of airbag system and they jump all the time. MotoGP also use some sort of air bag system and I’m sure there are others. It can’t be the air time but maybe being inverted or something like that? There are certainly applications for this in Rampage or Hardline and DH racing.
  • 4 0
 @BermSkid72: that was a very ugly crash, and I'm amazed he got away with less injury, but if that's the worst crash you've ever seen them you may not have seen Gee Athertons' crash from the knifes edge.
  • 1 0
 @hardstaff: Assuming you're talking about an avalanche airbag, those have to be manually triggered, via a pull-cord. Did it catch on something, or did some a*shole in line think it'd be funny to grab it and give it a yank?
  • 1 1
 @vinay: Good point but nobody is going to buy it so we can all rest easy.
  • 2 0
 @Blownoutrides: I might get one just as an excuse for not doing suicide no handers.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: This basically happen in a bike shop I used to work in, we sold hovding which was basically this as a scarf, turned into an inflated full face in a crash. A mechanic rode off a curb test riding a bike and it set off. Luckily he avoided traffic or obstacles but still hit the deck because of it. We stopped selling them shortly after, seems they've gone bankrupt now too....
  • 2 0
 @hgardner: Yeah, scary stuff. And this happened to a mechanic who likely at least as some decent skills bailing when things go pear shaped. Imagine this happening to an elderly person and/or someone who after years of not riding got straight onto a heavy bike with pedal assist up to 25km/h, thinking this was to keep them safe.
  • 1 0
 @carlitouk: I would say that 9/10 riders' first thought is actually "is my bike okay" as weird as that reaction to a crash is.
  • 62 5
 "... it has a Wave On chip in the rear that can be scanned to pull up an AI bot trained by Hans Rey, who will be ready to answer any questions you may have on your new saddle."

Nobody asked for this. Not one person. Not a single living human being said, "I have questions about my saddle, and instead of opening the manufacturer's website to read the information already available there I'd like to talk to a hallucination-prone computer program imitating Hans Rey's voice." No one. This is what happens when companies try to integrate AI into their business without any logical purpose or function, just to ride the hype cycle. So dumb.
  • 24 2
 I absolutely want to interact with an AI approximation of Hans Rey. Literal dream come true.
  • 14 0
 @sfarnum: No Way
  • 10 0
 If we can get one in Werner Herzog's voice, that might be something.
  • 1 7
flag onawalk (Jul 8, 2024 at 13:19) (Below Threshold)
 Its usually just a test bed for new tech, not something to get too worked up about Good thing you didnt over-react there
  • 7 0
 @thomasjkenney1024: “Is this saddle merely a place upon which to rest one’s haunches? Or is it something more to those who alight their hip bones upon this narrow expanse of black vinyl? Is it a place to find and reckon with one’s innermost desires and fears?”
  • 2 0
 @sfarnum: not this one but the saddlespur is
www.saddlespur.com
  • 3 0
 Speak for yourself. I have always wanted to discuss my ass with Hans Rey.
  • 2 0
 @DarrellW: Who wouldn't want to talk about their donkey with an MTB legend?
  • 34 9
 After completely backing away from legitimate warranty claims, ENVE can chew a fat one.. absolute dogs
  • 7 26
flag ENVE (Jul 8, 2024 at 14:12) (Below Threshold)
 Sorry to hear you had a bad experience mate. Feel free to shoot us a DM, happy to look into it.
  • 30 3
 @ENVE: you've deleted all evidence of ever promising a "no questions asked" lifetime warranty. One of the main reasons I chose to buy M730s over any other top of the line rim was the confidence that I would be looked after if I happened to smash one. You claimed that people could smash their bike into a garage on a roof rack and would still be warranted, their dog could even chew the rim up and you'd have their back.
Any trace of that claim has been erased from your website yet still exists in direct quotes within all the media releases from the time. I registered the rims when I bought them, kept receipts and it all ment nothing. All the other top shelf carbon rims have a lifetime warranty for 2/3rds the price of your rims. I loved the m730, they served me really well but this warranty issue has completely soured my experience and I won't ride them ever again.
  • 1 13
flag BermSkid72 FL (Jul 9, 2024 at 8:35) (Below Threshold)
 @mulisha-man: lifetime warranty doesn't mean forever. It means the life of the product. You could have a lifetime warranty but the fine print says the product is only good for 3 years. Also, brands typically launch with crazy warranties to get started but then claw back on them due growth and cost. Just buy chinese carbon rims and put ENVE stickers on them. No one will know. Smile
  • 7 0
 Very interesting new pad material - the Diablo D30 pads look very similar to Dainese's Trail Skin series pad - which are my current favorites for summer rides, as they flow a TON of air. I'm curious who will utilize these new pads for the next generation of pads, as air-flow is my primary concern. Are there more protective pads? indeed there are, but if it's too hot to wear em, then what's the point. I'd rather wear a less protective pad, than nothing at all when it really gets summery.
  • 3 2
 D3O is not new. these companies are new to using it. its the bomb when it comes to armour.
  • 2 0
 There appears to be a glitch in the matrix... this and the following comment are identical
  • 3 0
 @hardstaff: from reading the blurb, and a quick search, it looks like D30 DIABLO material is new
  • 1 0
 The Trail Skin pads are amazing! I love how they actually let through a ton of air. Unlike the D30 integrated pads which always have very low breathability covers over the D30 material.
  • 3 0
 Stoked on ENVE's new wheels, though I thought they would've already come out. I guess its good that they are getting the thorough testing (beating) they need from the Commencal and Frameworks folks. Asa has been putting those things through the ringer!
  • 5 2
 Thanks buddy. We’re just as antsy as you to get them out there.

And yes, their feedback has been invaluable. The amount of prototypes we’ve made to get exactly what the riders want has been a massive undertaking.
  • 1 3
 Sure look like Zipps to me.
  • 3 0
 @Rollfast2: Zipps sure like Bouwmeesters to me.
  • 2 0
 I was hoping for some wider Continentals before some smaller diameter Continentals... one ride on my new Kryptotal pair, they're pretty sweet. Still figuring out the corner knobs, but the drive off the rear on ugly climbs is like a cheat switch vs, the worn out Dissector it replaced.

SQLabs gonna market, but their stuff is a game changer for my butt and hands.

Slopeduro is a funny way to say Freeride, but I'm interested... it seems like the goof 150-160mm bikes are gone; it's faster trail bikes at a little less travel, faster enduro bikes at a little more, or true park bike monster trucks. I miss the days of pedaling slowly through the woods, feature to feature, to scare myself. I still do it, but I just miss my old Big Hit.
  • 4 0
 Looks like they are more interested in making 24" tires than enduro casing supersoft.. No bother of waiting for that then.
  • 2 0
 "permeability sensors"

Permeability is the ability for liquids to pass through... Not sure what is being sensed as permeable or not is helping with deciding if a rider is jumping or not.

And what is a "Wave On chip", and why is it capitalized?
  • 3 0
 I believe it is alluding to Magnetic Permeability - and sensors to detect changes therein. en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permeability_
  • 1 0
 @GoWithTheFlo: So it's gonna need gloves with magnets in them?

+1 for that response, BTW.
  • 3 0
 I thought NS Bikes was dead. lol I miss the parts variety in their prime DJ days. I'm also not sure about them going single pivot from FSR....
  • 3 0
 They have sold the brand to a private equity group, so it will probably die soon when the other investments have more ROI. Same as Revel and other brands I would guess.
  • 1 0
 @trashpander275: The company is most likely going to survive, the layoffs already happened so :')
  • 2 0
 The Kryptotal Fr was not piloted to World Cup wins by Ronan Dunne. He started his win streak after the switch to Maxxis with Mondraker. I’m pretty sure Bruni may have piloted the Argotals to a win though…
  • 2 0
 That ND Tuned fork... no external compression adjustment and fixed low-speed seems like a HUGE miss. But with the air spring and damper in the same leg... seems a lot like a Lefty with another leg!
  • 2 0
 imagine a clip where Kyle Strait is doing his famous no hander on a massive clif in Utah and then booom the airbag inflation caused by sensors detecting that the rider has let go of the grips. ROTFL
  • 4 0
 first person to invent a protection system for the crown jewels wins.....
  • 2 0
 It would launch you off the saddle as it deploys. Win well deserved indeed.
  • 4 0
 That 24” kryptotal will suit my banshee scream just fine.
  • 4 0
 What's with those Muc Off valves??
  • 11 0
 "we heard you like valves...so we put valves, on ya valves!!"
--Xhibit
  • 3 0
 High flow with no valve core. Little handle is a ball valve.

Available in presta rim hole, presta pump ; presta rim hole, Schrader pump ; Schrader rim hole, Schrader pump.

Link on their website is dead though (404's) but they put out marketing email last week which lands on a video of Chopper explaining how they work etc.
  • 1 0
 Inwas wondering the same thing
  • 3 0
 I can totally picture some e-bike riders with that protective vest popping up at the inevitable gelato stop
  • 3 0
 wuh.... bubble boy is real!
  • 4 1
 If we can get one in Werner Herzog's voice, that might be something.
  • 3 0
 Conti will launch anything but a SuperSoft compound with Enduro casing
  • 1 0
 it's coming, the new Decoy SN on the front page has an Enduro supersoft in the front.
  • 2 0
 Sometimes dogs are brown.
  • 2 0
 Ohh he's so bulgey, like a moose!
  • 2 0
 What happened to Soda?! I thought we all agreed on Soda!
  • 3 0
 24? Ain't dead!
  • 1 1
 I will agree on those Rapha knee guards being the gold standard, love those. Using that blue brand of impact protection, I love them.
  • 1 0
 I bought some Light Bicycle rims that are 27mm id. I wish l bought the 30mm rims. Narrow need not apply.
  • 2 0
 when can I get a 36" Kryptotal for my unicycle?
  • 1 0
 Why stop at the hips with those airbags?
  • 1 0
 24 and 26 inch real tires… thank you conti !!
  • 1 2
 Why does Pinkbike show old news? Like othersites have had their stuff up for ages... Might aswell not even Show it if its 2 days behind lol
  • 1 1
 Are Hookless rims bad for mtb too? The roadies complain about them a lot.
  • 5 0
 My recollection is that at MTB pressures, they’re fine. But at even mild road pressures, you have to be damn sure your tire was designed for hookless rims
  • 9 0
 @pmhobson: The question is why the F would you even take that chance?? Like press fit BBs, this is something who's main benefactor is the companies producing them.
  • 3 0
 @ReformedRoadie: yeah. I don’t have any hookless rims or skin in this game. Just trying to answer the question.
  • 2 0
 @pmhobson: You're correct. The higher pressures make it a greater problem for the road. At 20ish PSI, could / should be ok.

But like parts that have rider weight limits, I'm not interested...
  • 6 0
 Hookless rims have been around in MTB for a good 10 years now, they're fine. For road tyres with tiny volumes at 70+ psi I'm not sure I'd trust them.
  • 2 0
 Peak Torque on YouTube talked about it in one of his hookless videos. Don’t remember what he said but I think it works better with MTB because of lower pressure and much higher volume and the width of MTB tires relative to the rim. Jonas and Pogacar are riding like 25mm rims with 30mm tires in the TSF. On MTB it’s a 30mm rim with a 60mm tire. The UCI mandated a minimum tire width for a given rim width for hookless earlier this year after the hookless fail earlier this year.
  • 8 0
 @ReformedRoadie, hookless rims are pretty much the norm now for carbon MTB rims, and it's been that way for a while. We haven't seen any issues due to the design. If anything, it makes it easier to create a wider rim sidewall, which can help reduce pinch flats.
  • 2 0
 Hookless at 20-30psi works fine. Above 70psi, not so much……
  • 2 2
 Just one personal data point, but I used hookless road rims with 28c Schwalbe tires for several years at pressures of 70-90psi. No issues whatsoever for me with the integrity of the tire to rim interface. Fear of hookless on road setups seems oddly reminiscent of fear of tubeless or hookless setups with MTB in the past.
  • 2 0
 @Ginsu2000: the thing with hookless on road is there is really no benefit other than a tiny cost saving in the carbon mold. And the downside of tires falling off the rim when they flat in races like in UAE tour this year is pretty big. Tubeless has huge benefits so fear of it is silly and not really a fair comparison.
  • 2 0
 @xciscool: I'm not going to be trying to ride out a flat, so I couldn't care less why a pro tour roadie might want to have hooked rims. Really, the integrity of the tire to rim interface is going to suck hard with any tubeless setup, hooked or hookless. That's one of the main reasons why tubluars were the de facto choice for so many years on the world tour. I can't imagine a hooked road tire staying on the rim much longer than with hookless, but hey, I haven't personally conducted this experiment so that's just me talking out my ass.
  • 3 0
 @ReformedRoadie: Beneficiary. The manufacturers certainly aren't being generous.
  • 2 1
 The hookless drama on the road side is mostly about users (big Pro Tour teams included) not respecting the minimum tire width and/or maximum pressure for a given hookless rim width.
  • 2 0
 @Ginsu2000: Tubulars were the de facto choice because you could ride them if you got a flat, until you got a spare wheel. Also, if you got a flat on a descent, the tire is not going to blow off the rim. For a long time, all of the really good tires were sew-ups.
Tubeless for the road has not been around that long. With an insert, they (generally) stay on the rim and can run flat for short periods...essentially addressing two downsides of clinchers. And between eliminating pinch flats (generally) and sealant, you are getting far less flats to begin with. Tubeless have way less rolling resistance than tubulars.
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: "Tubulars were the de facto choice because you could ride them if you got a flat, until you got a spare wheel. Also, if you got a flat on a descent, the tire is not going to blow off the rim."

Yes, that's pretty much what I wrote.

@ReformedRoadie: "Tubeless for the road has not been around that long."

Depends what you define as not that long. I started using road tubeless maybe... 9 years ago? Not nearly as long as tubies obviously, but road tubeless isn't exactly a new thing. On hooklesss rims, at 70-90psi. Never a single blowout, despite the conjecture on this thread.
  • 1 0
 @Ginsu2000: I was also an early adopter...back when there were literally a half dozen tire options total.
Road bikes looked exactly the same for decades. Steel frame, tubular tires, down tube shifters. Roadies are often Luddites.
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