Juliana Bicycles Launches New Juliana-SRAM Pro Team

Mar 11, 2015
by Juliana Bicycles  


Juliana Bicycles is proud to announce the launch of the new Juliana-SRAM Professional Mountain Bike Team. Anka Martin (RSA) is joined by Kelli Emmett (USA) and Sarah Leishman (CAN) to complete a trio of female athletes who will be racing the Enduro World Series and select international events in 2015.

Juliana-SRAM Pro team 2015.

A gravity racer and mountain bike adventurer for over 13 years, Martin has been with Juliana since the brand launched in May, 2013. Emmett brings another 16 years of race experience to the team, beginning her career as a cross-country racer and successfully transitioning to the new breed of enduro events. Leishman completes the roster with downhill and enduro skills honed in the mountains of Whistler over the past 6 years.

9 December 2014 - at Santa Cruz Bicycles in December 2014. Photo by Gary Perkin

Sarah Leishman. Photo by Gary Perkin.


9 December 2014 - at Santa Cruz Bicycles in December 2014. Photo by Gary Perkin

Kelli Emmett. Photo by Gary Perkin.


9 December 2014 - at Santa Cruz Bicycles in December 2014. Photo by Gary Perkin

Anka Martin. Photo by Gary Perkin.


It’s incredible to see how excited and motivated our partners are to support a women’s cycling team,” says Juli Furtado, founder of Juliana Bicycles. “Anka, Kelli, and Sarah are going to do us all proud at the Enduro World Series and look set to have a great time doing it... I’m quite envious that nothing like this existed in my day, to be honest!

Juliana-SRAM Pro team 2015.

Juli, known as “The Queen of the Mountain” during her race career, is also arguably the “Godmother of Enduro,” having raced both downhill and crosscountry in the nineties and claiming World titles in both disciplines. With the launch of the Juliana-SRAM Pro Team, Juli’s racing legacy continues.

Juliana-SRAM Pro team 2015.

The Juliana-SRAM Pro Team is possible thanks to the support of Juliana Bicycles, SRAM, Giro, Lululemon Athletica, RockShox, Evoc, and Chris King.

2 December 2014 - at Santa Cruz Bicycles in December 2014. Photo by Gary Perkin

Photo by Gary Perkin.


9 December 2014 - at Santa Cruz Bicycles in December 2014. Photo by Gary Perkin

Photo by Gary Perkin.


All factory photo's by David Smith.

julianabicycles.com


MENTIONS: @SramMedia, @SarahLeishman, @housemartin




119 Comments

  • 81 4
 It's great to see women getting more recognition and opportunity in the industry. Better then just a footnote on a bigger team. Now hopefully more equal prize money starts flowing.
  • 48 4
 Just look at what Simon has done for the British DH series this coming year - Equal prize money, all posters must feature woman along with every single page of the BDS website and finally media teams MUST cover both mens and womens events evenly. Bloody huge leap forwards!!
  • 5 37
flag Narro2 (Mar 11, 2015 at 7:20) (Below Threshold)
 What are these chicks goimg to run? Enduro? Or dh?
  • 9 3
 I think you should watch the video again.......The answer is there somewhere.
  • 19 55
flag meathooker (Mar 11, 2015 at 8:11) (Below Threshold)
 equal prize money for unequal times?
  • 12 11
 oh, ok, at the office right now, will watch it tonight, cheers
  • 3 9
flag Icculus19425 (Mar 11, 2015 at 9:04) (Below Threshold)
 would
  • 25 2
 @meathooker: Hey buddy, It's 2015 not 1915.
  • 2 0
 Brilliant :/
  • 2 1
 any one know where this video was shot?
  • 3 0
 @DropzoneProductions. A little place called Santa Cruz Wink ....... and surrounding areas.
  • 2 9
flag jaame (Mar 12, 2015 at 2:41) (Below Threshold)
 Equal coverage, but will it get equal traffic? If I was running a website I'd be pretty pissed off at them for wasting my resources on content that hardly anyone reads. I wonder how many media outlets will stick to that one.
  • 29 2
 Taken Straight from the websites:


Julian Robian spec S M L
TOP TUBE LENGTH 554mm 584mm 610mm
SEAT TUBE LENGTH 407mm 432mm 470mm
HEAD TUBE ANGLE 67° 67° 67°
SEAT TUBE ANGLE 73° 73° 73°
BB HEIGHT 346mm 346mm 346mm
WHEELBASE 1107.7mm 1139.3mm 1164.7mm
HEAD TUBE LENGTH 90mm 100mm 110mm
CHAINSTAY LENGTH 439mm 439mm 439mm
STANDOVER HEIGHT 718mm 731mm 733mm
REACH 375mm 403mm 428mm
STACK 585mm 594mm 594mm

Santa cruz Bronson spec S M L XL
Top Tube Length 554mm 584mm 610mm 635mm
Seat Tube Length 407mm 432mm 470mm 508mm
Head Tube Angle 67° 67° 67° 67°
Seat Tube Angle 73° 73° 73° 73°
BB Height 346mm 346mm 346mm 346mm
Wheelbase 1108mm 1139mm 1165mm 1192mm
Head Tube Length 90mm 100mm 100mm 120mm
Chainstay Length 439mm 439mm 439mm 439mm
Standover Height 718mm 731mm 733mm 749mm
Reach 375mm 403mm 428mm 448mm
Stack 584mm 594mm 594mm 612mm
  • 25 2
 But the Juliana is "women's specific" - what don't you get??

:P
  • 8 3
 And?
  • 3 1
 @bishopsmike - my comment was for @notallowedtoswear . The frames are the same, just the components are different. Smile
  • 11 9
 I looked at the numbers @notallowedtoswear provided and it became clear to me that we were all wrong - it is not Specialized and Santa Cruz Bicycles that are the source of the evil in our galaxy. It is the Canyon bicycles that is tracking Nibiru and attempting to gravitate it towards the Earth using of Satanic technology invented by Teutonian science

@barzaka - that means that all components they changed out were very manly and incoming ones are feminine - I want the ones from Bronson to boost my masculinity
  • 25 3
 Of course its the same bike. Santa Cruz/Juliana got it right. Women don't need a crappy component version of regular frame or "women's specific" geometry, whatever the hell that is. Just giving an option of women's specific branding with a few small details like the seat is all that is needed and its a smart way to market the bikes. Guys are even more vain than girls on this.You're way more likely to see a girl riding a bronson than a guy riding a roubion. Guys NEVER buy women's marketed products. Why shouldn't women at least get some options of their own for high end bikes.
  • 5 0
 what's the price difference?
  • 13 3
 @katmai that's because the "male-specific" really aren't male-specific, they're unisex.
  • 2 0
 tubing i.d. is not listed.
  • 22 3
 I see lots of women riding Bronsons, it is a better choice for resale value if you are realistic. I think some marketing and a frame sticker actually insults the intelligence of the astute female bike purchaser imho.
  • 4 0
 Great point Mountain-Life. Another view might be that a women-specific model might be a more attractive purchase for other women, thus buttressing future resale value. It may come down to how many of them they make. Nonetheless, you make an interesting point.
  • 7 0
 I get the resale argument, but if you are buying a bike as an investment that is not a very wise financial decision. The decision here is about supporting a women's specific brand that will support the female rider in the long run...
  • 9 1
 If I was a guy, I would get a Juliana just to be different! A guy on a Robian...now that's a way to stand out and show ur confident in who u r!!! (Given u may have to change the seat, & cranks...oh wait, us girls have to pretty much do that every time we buy a bike
  • 6 0
 @mountain-life That's one way to look at it, but I don't think most women would agree. They are far more likely to be insulted by being offered only the most basic models suited only to the most mellow trails than they are by being offered the same bike in women's focused branding. Women take a lot of pride the option of purchasing from a women's focused brand and Juliana deserves an applause for giving them that choice. Yes, resale is going to be lower because there are far fewer potential buyers (supply and demand stuff), but there's nothing wrong with more choices.
  • 5 0
 @katmai Thank you! Women specific geometry are crappy to me (Giant/Specialized), the only thing needed is shorter bars, wider saddle and the shorter stem as possible. The rest is just bad, BAD marketing "a MTB specifically design with soft curves, safe feeling blabla..." We do MTB, who expect MTB to be safe and soft ? Big Grin
  • 2 0
 @dhx42 you don't need to be buying it as an investment to care about it's resale value. I'd much rather buy a bike for $7k and be able to sell it 2 years later for say 3.5k, then sell it 2 years later for only 2k. That's near 5 grand after 6 years of biking just in extra resale value. That's almost a "free" bike on your fourth one.
  • 5 0
 I still think the whole women-specific branding is a crock. If you want to market a Bronson with bars, grips, stem & seat suited to smaller-framed riders, fine, offer a "Bronson b-spec" model for the same price. But there is no need to create a new brand called "Daffodil" and give it a new paint job and say how it was reinvented for the female market. This is a problem that does not exist if you have a decent LBS that will swap small parts like that upon purchase of a new bike.
  • 3 1
 @bishopsmike You should listen to more women before telling them that a women's branding is a crock. Many women do want exactly what Juliana is offering--premium level frames and specs but marketed towards women riders. Santa Cruz and every other bike manufacturer out there are men's focused brands. Would you say the same thing if it was reversed and Juliana started first and then came out with mens specific branding under the name Santa Cruz? I doubt it.
  • 4 0
 What I'm saying is that "every other bike manufacturer" are not men's focused brands - they are bike-focused brands. Are Honda and BMW marketed towards male drivers? Or just to drivers? Do you see BMW creating a whole new sub-brand that just has a different paint job, smaller-diameter steering wheel and narrow butt cushions on the seats? No, because it's a poor use of marketing and production dollars.

I'd be happy to buy & ride a Juliana bicycle after swapping bars and (maybe) grips, although if the prices were similar, I would get the Santa Cruz version just because of potential resale down the road.
  • 6 1
 "Do you see BMW creating a whole new sub-brand...?"

Yes. The MINI.

They can build an entirely different type of car and market it more towards women because they sell enough of them to make it worthwhile. Bike companies can't do that, so this is their answer. Buying a bike is a lot about buying an image; if there are images available to fit a wider variety of people's ideals, that's got to be a good thing, right?
  • 2 4
 I like you Linkpin Big Grin Wise words.

Form and color have subconscious meaning and while one design can appeal to both sexes, there will always be something more or less woman/man specific. Curved lines, smooth surfaces and bright colors are more feminine, while straighter lines, sharp edges and darker, toned colors are more masculine. Blue and pink is extremely disputable, I'd say both appeal to women more than men, especially when it comes to "weapons of choice" hahaha. Borders got slightly blurred after men became a bit moer aware of their woman side, metrosexuals, lumbersexuals finaly Endurosexuals are the proof of that. Macho is dead. Santa Cruz guys know that, they study design, so the better something sells the more "open" the design will be. Bronson, Tallboy or 5010 are quite girly, while Nomad and V10 in particular are more masculine.
  • 5 0
 The problem is not female focused mtb products, whether they're needed, or if a Juliana is a good bike. (The answer is mostly yes) The problem is that Juliana/SC is BS'ing customers by calling something female specific when it's not. In a perfect world, bikes would just be offered in smaller sizes with lower standover, and the female owner would get a seat of her preferred width, like any other rider would. But that's not reality. Women also DO NOT need special head angles or BB heights(this is why Juliana frames are fine, but don't need to be called women's specific or have a different name). Wider Juliana seats? Sure. Narrower Juliana bars? I don't know, how small is she and is she doing DH or XC?

Now if Juliana had been up front with this, along with the rest of the industry, we wouldn't be calling BS. The real need are smaller bikes, for males or females, and that's fine.

Ironically, Oakley got it right with Asian Specific glasses, because that is a legit need and solution(I ain't got no nose bridge and they're the only glasses that don't sit so damn close to my face that my eyelashes touches the lenses)
  • 3 3
 BMW brought out the mini because they would never make a front wheel drive car under the BMW brand. Had nothing to do with women
  • 3 2
 rattpoison, if you really want women specific BS, then look where it started, google for Torches of Freedom. For good and bad, it is irrelevant whether it is a lie or not, the feeling it creates is the important thing for the buyer, the slogan will always be planted in the brain - either as irritator to people like you and me, or excuse for purchase of a particular bike.
  • 2 0
 Ummm @timmeh2k they already make front wheel drive BMWs, look into it.
  • 2 0
 Imagine Ratboy hucks on a Juliana V-10 .
  • 1 0
 marketing is everything; they can call them "women's specific" or anything at all for that matter in much the same way as any other product spins their marketting BS, doesn't matter a rats arse to anyone at the end of the day. why should this one cause such an explosion of comments?

but i recon they should definitely look into offering these as an upgrade-
www.thisiswhyimbroke.com/vibrating-bicycle-seat
  • 2 0
 I think it's great. It's just a different colour and decals so what's the problem? Cheaper for Santa Cruz and better for the customer than a watered down new design. Since demand will be lower, I wonder if the price will be lower. I'd be all over a pink Juliana Nomad for $1600.
  • 1 0
 that's called "standardisation"
good idea, the difference is in the build-up, I wouldn't do it differently
  • 1 0
 @bishopsmike please name one?? I will be impressed if you can
  • 1 0
 I'm also waiting to hear this...
  • 1 0
 I'm impressed as id not heard of that yet and funnily enough its the first FWD BMW made directly due to the popularity of the mini so I'm still right about BMWs reasoning about the mini
  • 1 0
 Shows how much I know, I thought the mini was a 1 series with a different body, rwd. Doh!
  • 1 0
 I would actually ride one of these, nice and subtle colours.
  • 17 2
 Female MTB Athletes has been a hot topic as of late. Great to see three top women sponsored because of their results, riding style, attitude and personalities. Hats off to these real athletes, Juliana Bicycles and their sponsors. What we must all put a stop to is female riders getting sponsored for the wrong reason (their looks alone), no matter how much coverage that brings the sponsor. #openscanofworms.
  • 1 3
 I suppose their lack of penises has nothing to do with it?
  • 1 0
 That said I think the bikes look sexy along with the girls that ride them. Is it wrong that the name Juliana is just sexy too. There are only really a couple of designs that look and work great out there IMO who cares if it looks like a SC.
  • 14 0
 Unsolicited advice to the sponsors - you've started something really cool here, with a group of widely respected athletes. Yes, go after it on the EWS. But then, when it's time for the team to do their sponsor events/meet and greets/etc., pick it up a notch. Don't just send them to demo days or have them sign posters at a tradeshow booth. Instead, around the EWS events, have them teach specific clinics. Something like a prep clinic for women racers just before the event (where possible, using actual trails that will be part of the course). And then after the event, how about a girls' clinic (say middle and high school age) focused on skills, mostly on the bike, but also stuff like routefinding, maintenance, etc. (basically anything that would get those riders to a higher level and more stoked about the sport). That sort of thing would integrate quite nicely with the message of the brand, would take full advantage of what these athletes have to offer, and have the potential to inspire a whole new generation of riders.

Note that none of that stuff is necessarily specific to women - men and boys could also benefit from clinics like that. But as a women specific brand, and a women's team, and with all the BS girls and women face in adventure sports, they have a real opportunity here to make something awesome happen.

My girlfriend rides a Juno. Loves it. Yes, she knows full well that it's a Bantam with a different pain job, handlebar, and saddle. And likes that fact, because it means she's not being condescended to. And likes the color. And likes what the brand stands for - so all things being equal, she likes to support that.
  • 3 0
 I like the sentiment, but I think you'd have to make all that stuff happen after the event. All of the pros (women and men) are absolutely locked in full race mode for several days before an EWS or World Cup event. Teaching a clinic takes a lot of time and energy away from racing. But it would be a really cool thing for the festivals like Crankworx if they could do a couple of group rides or clinics after the race is over.
  • 1 0
 @katmai - I hear you, race prep is a full time job at that level. If schedule allows, maybe weekend before. Or, something like a pre-season event at one of the venues. But it would be really neat to see race-specific stuff like that.
  • 17 3
 So when are we going to see a Juliana branded Nomad?... I'm sure girls like to get rowdy too.
  • 2 0
 Haha!!
  • 32 1
 It shall be called the 'Womad'
  • 3 0
 There's already a female downhill WC racer on a Juliana V10 , or a she-10 as people in my shop call it, so maybe a nomad will eventually come out.
  • 11 3
 Homad
  • 5 4
 It'd be called the "I'm NoMad Baby!" But secretly you now she is mad, and it falls apart mid-run.
  • 10 0
 Surely it'll be called the no-nad(s)
  • 15 6
 like a my ex once said: why buy a Juliana when you can get the exact same bike for the same price but says santa cruz on?
  • 4 19
flag benhildred (Mar 11, 2015 at 6:35) (Below Threshold)
 The Juliana bikes are Santacruz's but with refined geo for women? You buy a Juliana if you're a woman after a better fitting, more specific bike. They are not 'the exact same bike'
  • 14 1
 pls explain the differences apart from grips and saddle and crank lenght
  • 10 0
 False. Same exact geo, but different components that are catered to a female rider. Direct from SC reps.
  • 2 4
 'The Juliana bikes are Santacruz's but with refined geo for women? You buy a Juliana if you're a woman after a better fitting, more specific bike. They are not 'the exact same bike'' -

They just did...
  • 2 2
 For much the same reason that we buy from smaller local companies...Santa Cruz is doing something cool by creating a sub-brand for women, with female specific input, marketing, and industry jobs. Sure, for now, the same bike with Santa cruz branding will have a better resale value, but given time...who knows? It will be interesting to see how much the female side of the industry grows.
  • 2 1
 just asking what the difference is really; just didnt seem obvious
  • 2 0
 Re: "Sure, for now, the same bike with Santa cruz branding will have a better resale value..."

I'm not so sure about that. Julianas have a smaller market being women specific - but they've achieved some pretty good market awareness. My girlfriend is constantly asked about hers by other women on the trail, and there's a lot of good buzz around the brand and what they're doing for women in the sport. I wouldn't be surprised if that will result in better resale at some point.
  • 2 1
 It's not obvious, and it's a fair question. Here is a more useful answer.

Mostly the Juliana line is spec'd at a lower cost of entry than the regular line - from their rep, "their are less women out there willing to drop $10k on a bike than men". With shorter cranks, a women's specific handlebar and grips (the bar tapers to a narrower circumference at the ends - very cool but requires you to run SC grips), a different saddle, lighter duty tires, and maybe a few other bits that I forgot. And let's not forget the colorways.

Around here, I see more female riders on actual SC bikes than Juliana but, like I said that may change in the future.
  • 1 1
 g-42.... I don't agree. The Julianas clearly have a lower resale (and new sale) price. Look on BC.com right now: You can get a brand new Juliana Joplin frame (same as the Tallboy) for $850. The same TB frame is almost twice as much. They're having a hard time moving them because of the Juliana brand name.
  • 3 0
 Also, I think this is an option for women to buy from a brand that's dedicated to supporting women's MTB. The more women that buy a Juliana goes to validate the existence of a Juliana MTB team and athletes that support marketing, which can be a good thing. Who knows, maybe as Juliana becomes more successful the will be able to build bikes with different geos - Juliana has to walk before it can run
  • 1 3
 No change in geo necessary. Just give the girls a women's specific brand and paint, you know kind of like guys already have with every single brand. Men are the ones too vain to buy a women's brand.
  • 1 0
 If it was purely about cost they wouldn't make their most popular models in carbon fiber only
  • 3 1
 put your business hat on guys, Santa Cruz is investing in Long Term here, right now the bikes are the same from a Frame Geo stand point, the geo specs comparisons for the Robian and the Bronson are on some other comment above, look at them, the same bike. A year or two years ago Santa Cruz was only getting feedback on how the Bronson could be improved over time, but that feedback was male or unisex specific, so all the improvements to the Bronson have been male or unisex specific. With Juliana the Robian will not have that problem, all feedback will be Female specific, with time this frame will have changes and improvements according to this Female Specific feedback, the Robian and the Bronson will be totally different bikes. Design changes and improvements do not happen from one day to another, they need years of tweaking.
  • 4 0
 Why do women's bikes have shorter cranks? They usually have longer legs than men (especially compared to upper body). Wouldn't that point to longer crank arms?
  • 5 0
 Every review of a Juliana so far goes like this - "Awesome to see a women's specific model. We quickly changed out the bars grips and seat though to similar ones on the guy models." So just a different paint job at that point. If you can get one on sale great, otherwise it's going to cost you a $1,000 or more in lower resale later on (plus the cost of switching out the "girl" specific components that every review so far has switched out).
  • 5 0
 Love it - Stoked on the Juliana/Santa Cruz brand to lead the way in growing the womens side of riding - everybody focuses on the fact that they are the same bike as if it is a bad thing? Its Not - finally somebody makes a high end frame that will fit a smaller sized women just right out of the box....but really to me the best part of this marketing effort is that it is women focused. When as a female you buy a bike from the big S , Trek etc....most of your money goes towards the boys, paying the boy pro's and the boy marketing....Juliana sponsor an all women's team, their marketing budget is going towards women with female shredding edits that make you want to go ride (just look up Juliana's web edits Smile )....I think that aspect is truly where Santa Cruz has shown tremendous long term vision by separating the brand and giving the Juliana brand all it has to offer with respect to bikes and yet giving it independence in spending their budget women focused. The message is simple and clear by riding a Juliana you not only get the same high end shred machine as the boys, but you also can rest assured that your dough goes towards women pro riders etc. And as a final note, loads of folks comment on how many women ride santa cruz but what you really should note is how many women ride Juliana's instead of Specialized/Trek/Giant womens bikes Smile ...loads of Juliana'saround where I ride...and once they bring out the Nomad as a Juliana, they will get my money Smile
  • 3 0
 Wow, the team bikes look like Yetis - in the video the teal paint is a spitting image of the Yeti signature color. If I were Santa Cruz/Juliana, and I've dropped serious cash on sponsoring a Juliana Pro team, I would at least pick a frame color for my pros that doesn't make it look (at first glance) like all my sponsored riders are riding my competitors bikes.
  • 5 0
 You should all start bike companies, you seem to have everything figured out.
  • 1 0
 e-experts
  • 1 1
 My line will be called the "Stable Mable" with super wide bars, 29" wheels and 20" training wheels.
  • 2 0
 This is the first Ladies specific MTB I've ever wanted to buy over a "unisex" mtb. No BS steeper head angle or triple ring or cheaper spec to the male equivalent (for the same price?). Decent colourways and a decent frame, rather than shrink it and pink it. If only they made a Nomad and V10 equivalent!!
  • 2 0
 Isn't this the very definition of shrink it and pink it? Same full bike they've already been selling, different name, different colour, and some nice fellow already cut 1" off the handlebars for you.

I'm 100% (one beelion percent?) behind products improved specifically for women (hey women are anatomically different with a different centre of gravity, longer legs & shorter torsos, and noisier in tennis), but I'm against a marketing facewash like this.
  • 4 0
 Sweet! Chicks that shred the MTB are awesome!
  • 4 1
 STOKED for these awesome Ladies! Can't wait to get my Roubion this year!! This year is going to ROCK for women's MTB. Big Grin
  • 3 0
 Nice work Juliana, you have a kick ass team. Amazing talent with an awesome attitude. Whats not to love.
  • 1 1
 But is it smart business sense to create a brand of bikes only for women? They're basically isolating themselves from at least 70% of the bike market which is men. All other bike companies have versions for women. Creating a bike company only for women doesn't sound like a very good business plan.
  • 1 0
 Giant has liv
  • 1 1
 Is it only 70%? I would guess higher. DOes anyone know exactly?
  • 1 0
 Wow, great to see Juli heading up a team like this. There likely won't be much of anything in these ladies rear-view mirrors during race day.
  • 2 0
 as a guy I would totally ride the soft yellow coloured bike If it was on a santacruz branded frame haha
  • 1 0
 Hell, I was considering a Juliana frame. I don't mind the logo at all; I like to think of my bike as a female anyway. I mean, I'm not really into riding dudes. Problem is the resale value is crap so I'd have to buy used, and it's almost impossible to find a used Juliana frame.
  • 2 0
 Yah true haha , I have a feeling though in the next year or 2 the resale will be up more. I work in shop that sells both Santa cruz aswell as Juliana and there is quite a interest in Juliana the brand from female customers
  • 1 1
 I would be all over a nomad if I could save a stack of cash. Are Juliana bikes available in all the sizes?
  • 1 0
 They are availabe in a variety of sizes
  • 2 0
 Do Cove still make a woman's specific G spot ??
There's a brand I see them staying clear of. Lol
  • 2 0
 There is none, just paint the geo is identical.
  • 1 1
 Although same geo on paper, if you look at the rear triangle, they are different. Same goes for top tube/upper pivot mount. My guess is that the Rubion has better stand over.
  • 3 0
 No, they're not.
  • 1 0
 My mistake, I was looking at the Nomad.
  • 2 0
 This bike looks like a SC Bronson!
  • 2 1
 And Rosara Joseph, who placed higher in the overall than the 3 of them has no factory ride this year.
  • 2 0
 lululemon? so will they have them pants on?
  • 1 0
 That's cute, they all have matching bikes and outfits. Just like me and the guys on our weekend rides!
  • 2 0
 Pretty exceptional team right there. Best of luck, ladies.
  • 1 0
 any one know where this video was shot?
  • 1 0
 Ttoo much typing and not enough pedaling.... See ya!!!!
  • 1 0
 Hi guys, does anybody know the song´s name?
Gr8 vid a music!
thx
  • 1 0
 i finally found it...song name : The Wrath Of Marcie
interpret (band,artist) : The Go! Team
  • 1 0
 Good Luck girls!
  • 1 3
 Juliana bikes = shrink 'em and pink 'em.
  • 2 0
 Ironically, most Santa Cruz bikes already have women's specific geometry. Short reach, tall seat tubes. Be curious what happens with the next generation Bronson etc, we might see them keep current geo for the Julianas and move toward the longer geo that is current for men.
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