2011 Knolly Chilcotin - FIRST LOOK

Sep 21, 2010
by Mike Levy  
Knolly steals the first day of Interbike with their brand new and yet to be seen Chilcotin, a 6" travel do-everything machine that is built with typical Knolly quality. Inside you can check out the new bike and read all of the info!

Read on..
2011 Knolly Chilcotin


Here it is, the first look at Knolly's new Chilcotin, a serious all-mountain bike named after some serious B.C. mountains. This is a brand new machine from Knolly that is designed to do anything and everything that you may come across on your local terrain. Head out for shuttle runs with your DH buddies or pack your bag for that massive climb up and over your local pass, adjustable geometry and 6
Here it is, the first look at Knolly's new Chilcotin, a serious all-mountain bike named after some serious B.C. mountains. This is a brand new machine from Knolly that is designed to do anything and everything that you may come across on your local terrain. Head out for shuttle runs with your DH buddies or pack your bag for that massive climb up and over your local pass, adjustable geometry and 6" of travel let you do as you like.

The Chilcotin's burly front end features a full length 1.5
The Chilcotin's burly front end features a full length 1.5" headtube that will fit many different headset combinations, allowing you to fine tune the bike's head angle and stack height to your liking. Further letting you have it your way is a built in head angle and bottom bracket height adjustment that lets you pick from a speed friendly 66 degree setting or a more trail friendly 66.75 option. Bottom bracket numbers are 341 mm and 350 mm accordingly.

I'm usually not a fan of bright bikes, but this Chilcotin was stunning in person, as were the graphics. Just out of view is the bike's built in cable routing for a telescoping post, something that is surely to be found on many of these bikes.
I'm usually not a fan of bright bikes, but this Chilcotin was stunning in person, as were the graphics. Just out of view is the bike's built in cable routing for a telescoping post, something that is surely to be found on many of these bikes.

Knolly uses their patented Four by 4 linkage that allows them to fine tune the suspension rate to their liking. The goal with the new Chilcotin is to have a bike that is capable enough to devour the gnarliest of terrain that you'll find out on your adventures, but also pedal as good as their more XC friendly machines. While that may be the holy grail of all-mountain bikes, it's the one that everyone strives for. I'm very excited to throw a leg over the Chilcotin to put in some big miles and see how the new bike performs.
Knolly uses their patented Four by 4 linkage that allows them to fine tune the suspension rate to their liking. The goal with the new Chilcotin is to have a bike that is capable enough to devour the gnarliest of terrain that you'll find out on your adventures, but also pedal as good as their more XC friendly machines. While that may be the holy grail of all-mountain bikes, it's the one that everyone strives for. I'm very excited to throw a leg over the Chilcotin to put in some big miles and see how the new bike performs.

A bolt-on front derailleur cable stop lets you remove it if you are running a HammerSchmidt or guide, and ISCG05 tabs let you mount up either easily. Rear wheel spacing is 135mm and Knolly uses durable 3/8th thick dropouts that should take any abuse that you can dish out. There is clearance for massive 2.7
A bolt-on front derailleur cable stop lets you remove it if you are running a HammerSchmidt or guide, and ISCG05 tabs let you mount up either easily. Rear wheel spacing is 135mm and Knolly uses durable 3/8th thick dropouts that should take any abuse that you can dish out. There is clearance for massive 2.7" tires, but this also means that you won't be clogging up with mud when using more common 2.3" - 2.5" rubber. If you are looking for an uber light bike that is fragile, the Chilcotin shouldn't be your choice. The 6" travel frame weighs in at a solid 7.5 lb, light enough to build up a sub-30 lb all day bike, but burly enough that you won't be giving a second to sending that back country gapper.


I'm excited about Knolly's new Chilcotin, a burly 6" travel bike that I picture myself using to both get way out into the back country, but hit some serious terrain with as well. What do you guys think about the new all-mountain offering from Knolly? Put your thoughts down below!

Check out Knolly's website to see all of their models.

Stay tuned for more Interbike coverage!



103 Comments

  • 10 0
 BOOM!!!! out of nowhere Knolly steps in there with this one..... nice work!
  • 6 2
 Looking at the bike, it looks OK..But nothing earth shattering there...It's a simple FSR with a link to the shock...Thats about it..NOTHING wrong with it but nothing really new..My only concern and this is the only one. The Rocker is machined of plate aluminum. Thus leaving a large space for spacers between the shock and rockers. Having ridden a few bikes like this I noticed that eventually (sooner than later) the through bolt bends and generates noise manifesting itself as a creak. Maybe a 3D forged pivot would be a great upgrade (also slims the profile of the bike a bit more). All this is of course only a thought.
  • 1 0
 thx tips
  • 1 0
 I agree that it is well done bike with nothing really new. With bikes coming out that claim to adjust themselves as you ride (magic link, Maestro. . .) it is a little old school to have to actually use tools on your bike.
That said, I'd be more confident of actually getting a different behavior out of this bike for all the adjustment.
  • 1 0
 yeah sure pal. adjust while you ride? the only bike that does that is the magic link.
and people are totally falling over themselves to run to the store and buy them aren't they.
oh and i think almost every other company out there is throwing money at kona to licence it as well. NOT!
  • 1 0
 right but all the new links claim to shift the force in a way that climbs better and still descends well. That's the idea behind ditching the simple but strong single pivot, or the four bar, or whatever you found on most bikes of the early 21st century, right?
  • 1 0
 my objection was to the claim about bikes that adjust themselves. yes the idea with modern suspension ideas is to make them work well in all situations. but a good design that works well for one aspect should work well for the other unless speaking about radical extremes such as full world cup xc or full world cup dh
  • 1 0
 I concede they, for the most part, don't self adjust. I really refer to how they take advantage of the different pressures applied by different situations to react differently. AN old linkage bobbed under pressure almost indiscriminately. Now they claim to only travel under correct pressure. While there is no direct bike adjustment the bike adapts to the adjustments you make with you body such as standing up and leaning forward to pedal hard.
  • 5 1
 Tough crowd here. The beauty of Knolly bikes is the great quality and no frill approach. You won't get any funny monkey motion, flex or bearings that need service every 2 months ... just a solid frame that soaks up bumps really well and will last a long time. Personally I think it looks great and I love the added touch of having a removable front derailleur cable stop. The linkage isn't very complex. The lower arm simply makes it a true 4 bars and helps control the axle path. The upper 2 links allow the to tune the shock rate independently.
  • 3 0
 Cool beans this is the one I have been waiting for. An all mountain bike built by Knolly with 6 inches of travel. Man would love to get my hands on one of these and ride some long gnarly B.C. trails with this. looks like fun
  • 3 0
 This looks really great. 66 deg HA and 13.5" BB height. Uninterrupted seat tube that looks a little less slack than the Endorphin. On paper it sounds perfect (for me). Seriously interested in buying one of these.
  • 2 0
 Looks like a top notch bike four years ago. The tech on it is nothing new, just well incorporated.
I laugh because you can see how the too-large o-ring sags on the rp23. Mine does the same thing. Why don't they make them the right size?
  • 3 0
 To be honest, after reading a few comments like yours, Im struggling to figure out why every bike that comes out needs to be something new? I like a back to basics approach, a sturdy do-it-all mountain bike that does provide some very modern features. Its a good weight and serves its purpose. What more could you ask? You want new-fangled self adjusting suspension, there are other offerings on the market already. Not trying to slay your comment, just discussing.
  • 2 0
 You make a great point. I know a lot of people hate konas, but I think their loyal fans bank on that same idea. Simple and strong equals fun without constant effort and financial investment. The difference here being that this bike is designed for a better ride than konas with less pedal feedback and more adjustability.
  • 1 0
 Dont forget how nicely these are made. For a frame like this you pay alot of money, maybe it doesnt use the "latest and greatest" in suspension design, but it is top notch craftsmanship. Ill pay for that in a heartbeat, I just love looking at these things. That being said in regards to the suspension design, Ill be interested to know more about this setup, and how it rides, in my experiance four-bar bikes work VERY well.
  • 1 0
 Like I said: top notch and well incorporated technology. Doing what works well is better than crappy innovation, or even untried innovation. Every innovation leads to a few crappy model years until they get it right. This bike has no such risk. I do have a question about the front derailleur though.
  • 1 0
 Nice bike! Thought he'd put a tapered head tube and increase the travel of the endorphin since its a pretty darn capable bike as it is if he needed a 6 inch bike. That would keep the weight down as well. I think it would be pretty expensive to make this a sub 30lb bike... My endorphin is built pretty light and its 32lbs. But knolly doesn't build bikes for the weight weenies!
  • 1 0
 My Delirium is 33. Try harder with your Endo.
  • 1 0
 I'm sure I could get it lighter, but then it wouldn't be as downhill worthy and I would be putting more money into it then is needed.

Where are you compromising to get the delirium down to 33? And if you're riding a Delirium why are you concerned about weight?
  • 1 0
 My Delirium is my do it all bike and really is compromised nowhere. Check my pics. When I rode an Endo it was 30 lbs flat with single ply's.

I also ride a Podium so the Delirium is my AM/FR rig.

The Delirium will likely be replaced with a Chilcotin in short order.
  • 2 0
 why did you replace the endorphin with the delirium?

Just checked your pics. Your Delirium looks nice! you have a firebird too?

I think you're worse then me...
  • 1 0
 Wanted a slightly slacker bike for the downhills. I found the 67 HA too steep for my liking. The Firebird was just a pic I saved.
  • 1 0
 Superb Bike, I like the way Knolly builds bikes, i sell a couple of brands but Knolly is my favorite. I ride a Knolly Delerium myself, and its a realy stable and nice to tune bike. I can't wait to ride this bike, if it rides as good as it looks.......
  • 7 4
 what is the point in that extra link? why not have the chain stays go straight to the top triangle?
  • 4 0
 bikerboywill, Expect some more coverage of the Chilcotin in the next few days. We'll get much more in depth and address your question as well. Mike
  • 2 0
 cheers tup
  • 2 2
 Is it 7.5 lbs with or without shock?
  • 3 1
 clearly with
  • 1 3
 Pretty kool but knolly should have a hardtail instead. i think the delirium can do the job of this steed fair enough.
  • 2 2
 it should make the rear triangle less flexy. bike of the year candidate.
  • 2 6
flag russone (Sep 20, 2010 at 16:29) (Below Threshold)
 ....to not look like a Sunday
  • 3 1
 the link allows them to further tune the leverage ratio acting on the shock, to further isolate loads of the rear end from affecting the shock, and to allow a full length seat tube.
  • 3 0
 So is it just a lighter DT? or a heavy Endo?

Wasn't the Endo supposed to be the perfect Chilcotins bike?
  • 3 0
 Finally manufactures are realizing how stupid it is to run the cables/lines on the bottom of the down tube!
  • 5 2
 wow this bike looks great!
  • 5 3
 sick bike! but when is knolly gunna come out with a DJ frame?
  • 4 3
 love Knolly's DH bike, but this one doesn't have the same spark for me. The linkage connecting the 2 rockers kinda interrupts the flow of the frame a bit. Each to their own though I geuss!
  • 10 27
flag xetal (Sep 20, 2010 at 18:26) (Below Threshold)
 Wtf is that. It is U G L Y. Not even close to being almost nice !
  • 5 1
 :O NO! its like an orgasm on wheels!
  • 6 2
 Sooooo many pivots...ugh
  • 3 0
 Pretty good looking bike if you ask me!
  • 1 0
 66- that is SLAAACK. Very sweet looking bike, Good work Noel!
  • 1 0
 Mike - would love to see how this is different than an Endorphin. Other than the obvious more - travel and tweaks to geometry
  • 2 0
 You have a 1.5" headtube, so you can run more fork options or make the headtube slacker, you get ISGC (or whatever they're called) tabs.
  • 1 0
 ISCG: International Standard Chain Guide mount.
  • 1 0
 I think the reasons you mention leelau are enough to choose this over the Endorphin, if it suits you. I think this bike looks perfect. More and more people are getting into the kind of riding this bike is built for, myself included, I think its great. Love the adjustable headtube, personally, I would use that feature quite a bit. Depending on where Im riding for the day, and I get to ride real DH lift serviced trails maybe 3 times a year- would like a bike that can do that well, but also serve as my all around free-ride all mountain shredder. Love it!
  • 2 0
 What is with these pretty fluorescent paintjobs this year? Everyone seems to be doing it
  • 1 0
 Ok...so I'm not a huge fan of this bike...but they have some serious imagination... -66? Incredibly slack, but I guess it's all trial and error.
  • 1 0
 when you ride around here. you want a trail bike with 66degrees
  • 1 0
 I respectfully disagree. That's pretty slack - even for around here. I agree that some people will want a 66 degree HA trail bike but not all. Having said that - with an Angleset headset (assuming that works in this bike), you could get steep or slack so perhaps this is all just friendly debate
  • 2 0
 but its all available in the adjustment, and with adjustable forks. its nice to see they've got all the bases covered
  • 1 0
 ah ok - I see where you're going with this. You can have a slack bike that can climb decently but then slacken out for the descents - like say a Gravitron climb bike. In that case i withdraw disagreement and agree with your point
  • 1 0
 ok i'll accept as long as you apologize for giving out gps map coordinates and directions to a secret ski cabin that nobody who didn't deserve to, needed to know about.
  • 1 0
 You could apologize for false accusations. How about you point to a specific example where I've done that.
  • 1 0
 This bike could be configured with an Angle Set anywhere from 64 to 68.75 HA based on the stock numbers of 66 and 66.75. Really what are you complaining about?
  • 3 0
 I love the green...
  • 1 0
 I love this dayglow green,too - but the other green they are using (www.pinkbike.com/news/interbike-2010-randoms-3.html) reminds me too much of Santa Cruz.
  • 5 3
 14 bearings.... personally dislike that aspect
  • 2 1
 They use INA bearings (made in Germany), best in the world (used in, amongst others, BMW and Porsche engines) so don't worry about this!
  • 2 1
 thats great and all. still just more to maintain
  • 2 1
 Nope ;-) Bearing life is exceptionally long! Really, don't worry about it. Ask the guys who ride Knolly how much they have to attend to their bearings.
  • 2 0
 The bikes I've owned with INA bearings go much much MUCH longer without new grease. (Yeah, they don't seem to wear out.)
  • 3 0
 @UncleCliffy: You know what you're talking about man!
  • 1 0
 If you need me to do any bearing testing, I'd be happy to demo a Chilcotin indefinitely... Just let me know. Wink
  • 2 0
 bit of overlap with the endorphin, t'would seem
  • 1 0
 naturally there would have to be
  • 1 0
 It looks like on the bottom of the shock there is another bolt, is that to change goemetry or travel?
  • 2 0
 "Further letting you have it your way is a built in head angle and bottom bracket height adjustment that lets you pick from a speed friendly 66 degree setting or a more trail friendly 66.75 option. Bottom bracket numbers are 341 mm and 350 mm accordingly."
  • 2 0
 that's a pretty sweet looking bike!
  • 3 2
 i pray for the day that Knolly makes a bike that makes me not want to punch myself in the face...
  • 2 2
 I usually just punch a baby, but it's not my fault, their bikes are horribly ugly.
  • 1 0
 I like to punt handicapped children into the ocean. It has nothing to do with bikes, it's just because I have serious self-esteem issues due to my parents showing me animal porn at a young age.
  • 1 0
 dig that humor sessionDH!
  • 1 0
 hahahahaa, yea, there is something wrong with me. glad someone could appreciate it.
  • 1 0
 Uber sexy and dialled. Looks like evolution has taken another step.
  • 1 0
 soooo nice but... what's up with the name? haha

Cheers,
Beer
  • 2 0
 The Chilcotin is a name of a geographic area north of Vancouver (about 5 hours drive). The South Chilcotin in particular has a very high concentration of high-quality alpine singletrack. It's actually an area which lends itself well to light bikes. It's a curiously strange name to choose for a bike that looks like its almost quasi-downhill, freeride.
  • 2 0
 A small taste of the Chilcotins:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=EAYz7JHbHNk


I agree with you Lee, a Chilcotin bike to me is a little 4X4 or 5X5 type bike, the trails are so smooth there you don't need much for travel....
  • 2 0
 Hey lee and danny... thanks for taking me out of my ignorance!!! Saw the vid and looks like a real nice singletrack and I agree with you guys. To name the bike after this place would take a different type of bike to me.

But this 6 inch travel bike looks amazing and I bet it would be perfect as the ultimate AM rig!!! tup

Cheers
Beer
  • 1 0
 chainstay length looks long.
  • 1 0
 agreed - it looks long but isn't - the seat tube junction is well ahead of the BB, making the gap look huge. You have to compare the length according to the derailleur/cranks.
  • 1 0
 Geometry chart on Sicklines says the chainstays are 16.85 inches.
  • 2 0
 love the color way!
  • 1 0
 Good golly!!! Let's see a geometry chart, STAT!
  • 2 1
 I still like the Banshee Spitfire more....
  • 1 0
 Cable routing looks like an afterthought on the frame.
  • 1 0
 Let's see a head-to-head match-up with the Mojo HD!
  • 1 0
 I can't figure out the rear linkage...looks overly complex.
  • 1 0
 How bout water bottle cage bolts?
  • 1 0
 Will be on production models. These are preproduction frames.
  • 1 0
 knolly needs to make a single speed hardtail
  • 3 2
 looks sweet
  • 2 2
 Looks like the rear tyre could hit the frame...?
  • 1 0
 SIICK~! Retail Price?
  • 1 0
 nice looking bike
  • 1 0
 Cool bike!!
  • 1 0
 sick colour!!!
  • 2 1
 well they dont have to be strong, only strong in the direction of load! But yea they do look a bit flimsy but none the less an awesome bike tup
  • 2 0
 it's a way to get around the FSR patent.
  • 1 0
 "Knolly uses their patented Four by 4 linkage that allows them to fine tune the suspension rate to their liking."

Its to do with the shock rate.
  • 1 0
 bikerboywill - It is for dialing in the leverage ratio to their liking:


-"Knolly uses their patented Four by 4 linkage that allows them to fine tune the suspension rate to their liking."
  • 1 0
 their main reason is to get a full length seat tube with horst link
  • 1 0
 Mine will be ~31 lbs

Frame and RP23 will be around 7.5 lbs +/- on size.

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