Kona Honzo CR Trail DL - Review

Jun 17, 2016
by Mike Levy  




Big wheels, forward-thinking geometry, and build kits that say "no rear shock and no cares" make the Honzo a bit of a fun-loving misfit when talking about hardtails.

Kona has now added a carbon frame to their Honzo family, one that's said to be just over a full pound lighter than the previously existing alloy model, which makes for a 25lb 3oz bike for the top tier $4,599 USD Honzo CR Trail DL that's reviewed below.

Honzo CR Trail DL Details

• Intended use: cross-country / trail
• Wheel size: 29'' (not 27.5+ compatible)
• Frame material: carbon fiber
• All-new frame, longer reach
• Internal dropper post routing
• Boost hub spacing
• Frame weight: 3lb 2oz (claimed)
• Weight: 25lb 3oz (large, w/o pedals)
• Frame only: $1,599 USD (w/ Maxle Ultimate)
• MSRP: $4,599

The Honzo CR is essentially a rowdy trail rig made to laugh at bikes with more pivots than they probably need and $1,000 shocks, but the hardtail game certainly isn't for everyone - it obviously requires more skill to unlock their capabilities. With this in mind, Kona added 15mm to the new Honzo's reach on the large-sized frame (making for a very roomy 475mm cockpit) with the goal of creating the most competent package possible.

Kona Honzo CR


Frame Details

Without any sort of multi-link rear suspension design and the shock that goes along with it, I assumed that the Honzo CR frame wouldn't be worth looking at for more than a few minutes. But while it may be a ''just'' carbon hardtail, it also looks pretty sharp, no doubt due to the clean lines, low-slung top tube, and relatively slack 68° head angle that gives the bike an aggressive stance. I sometimes get way too excited about complicated rear suspension designs that promise the world, but there's something about a sleek hardtail that is probably always going to win me over. I'm likely not alone in thinking that, either.


Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore
  The Honzo CR's down tube is curved to provide ample clearance so fork-mounted dials don't clang into it when you crash. Also, it looks pretty cool.


Like most companies, Kona has gone with a monocoque front triangle that's molded into a single piece. The back of the bike is also manufactured as a single unit before being joined to the front-end by way of overlapping ferrule connections at the base of the chain stays and seat stays.

''These connection joints are then wrapped with additional carbon fiber layers and placed in the final curing mold,'' Kona Product Manager Ian Schmitt explained of the manufacturing process. ''The secondary curing cycle merges the two sub-frame components into a co-molded single frame,'' which all sounds a bunch easier than it probably is.


Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore
Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore
BMX bikes have a ton of standover clearance and mega-tight rear-ends... so does the Honzo CR.


Schmitt also said that Kona went through three different layup configurations before settling on the production version, although he certainly doesn't claim that the carbon frame has been designed in a specific way to be more forgiving than its aluminum and titanium brothers: ''We prioritized the stiffness and durability of the frame at the bottom bracket and headtube. This decision was made to maximize the performance gains of carbon and imbue the bike with what we felt was a ‘Kona’ ride quality. I wouldn’t suggest or state that the bike is a harsh ride, and I’m sure you’ve found it to be quite agreeable, but to say we set out to build in additional compliance would be disingenuous.''

In other words, buy a full-suspension bike if you want the 'hard' taken out of your hardtail.
Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore
The bike's seat and chain stays are heavily shaped, but this ain't no soft-tail.

The streamlined carbon frame nixes a feature that I thought it would have - ISCG 05 tabs - but does have one that I'm a bit surprised to see - Boost rear hub spacing. To be fair, neither the aluminum or titanium Honzo's have ISCG 05 tabs on them either, but they are something that some trail riders might appreciate.

''We had a lot of internal discussion before ultimately making the decision to eschew the guide option on the Honzo CR bikes,'' Schmitt says. ''The carbon bike was designed to be positioned as a fast and efficient cross-country (what is cross-country anyway?) trail bike that could be raced or ridden on steep Squamish trails. The advent and proliferation of good quality 1x drivetrains with chain-retaining rings helped ease our minds when we made the decision to leave the ISCG 05 tabs off.''


Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore
Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore
The Honzo CR won't accept a chain guide, but it is ready for your Boost rear hub. Kona says that there's a good reason for this.

A Honzo CR pilot will also never be mounting a lightweight upper-only guide or a front derailleur, as there is no direct-mount concession due to Kona's desire to get the bike's rear wheel as close as possible to the back of the seat tube. The result is a chainstay length of just 415mm (16.3 inches), but Schmitt says that number is only possible due to employing everyone's favorite punching bag: Boost hub spacing. More on that below.



3 Questions With the Kona's Ian Schmitt


Mike Levy: Boost on the back of a hardtail... Is this really needed?

Ian Schmitt: When we began the design process for the Carbon Honzo we viewed Boost as the future for rear thru-axle designs. It offered improved chainline and additional space where the chainring is closest to the chainstay. We needed to take advantage of this space in order to keep the rear end at 415mm with the carbon material. The steel and aluminum bikes can rely on a plate-style chainstay yoke which doesn’t require much space as it is just a flat piece of material. Carbon construction requires a hollow tube all the way to the chainstay/bottom bracket juncture, which occupies more space than the plate-style yoke. Boost made it possible to bring all of our Honzo design requirements (chainstay length, stiffness, tire clearance) into a carbon fiber frame. If we had used 12 x 142mm, we likely would have had to make concessions somewhere in the design.


Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore
  Kona says that Boost hub spacing was required for the Honzo's short 415mm chainstay length.


Levy: Is it fair to say that the Honzo and the Process 111 are kinda built for the same type of rider? Someone who likes the snappy feel of less travel, but also the new-school geometry and abilities that can make riding fun?

Schmitt: Absolutely. The Honzo and the 111 share a lot of similarities in their DNA. The original Honzo was one of the first production bikes to eschew a front derailleur and prioritize ride feel and playfulness over gear range. We clearly used what we’d learned when the 111 became a reality. This bike was essentially a squishy Honzo that would help to take the edge off when you made mistakes. That being said, there was a bit of a learning curve when alternating between the 111 and Honzo frames during testing. You’d get used to pushing the 111 and having that forgiveness and get back on the Honzo only to be reminded, usually after thinking “yeah I can jump that,” that you were most assuredly still on the hardtail. Had a few exciting moments there...



Levy: The reach is longer on the new Honzo CR than on the aluminum bikes, but the other important numbers are the same. How did you end up here?

Schmitt: The Carbon Honzo is just the first bike to be seen by the media with increased reach numbers. We’ve adjusted the fit of our Process and Honzo by adding 15 - 20mm of reach in all of the frame sizes. We found that as we grew more accustomed to the original geometry, there was a demand and internal ask for increased reach. There was much experimentation before making the decision to move forward with longer reach, but we are quite pleased as the bikes are more stable and still do not feel gargantuan in tight corners.




Specifications
Specifications
Release Date 2016
Price $4599
Fork RockShox Pike RCT3 Solo Air 120mm
Headset FSA
Cassette SRAM XG1180 10-42t
Crankarms SRAM X01
Bottom Bracket SRAM PF92
Rear Derailleur SRAM X01
Chain SRAM PC1130
Shifter Pods SRAM X01
Handlebar Kona XC/BC 35
Stem Kona XC/BS 35
Grips ODI Ruffian
Brakes SRAM Guide RSC
Hubs SRAM 900
Spokes Sandvik 14g
Rim WTB Asym i29 TCS
Tires Maxxis Minion DHF EXO TR 3C, 2.3'' / Maxxis Ardent EXO DUAL TR, 2.35''
Seat WTB SL8
Seatpost KS LEV Integra w/ Southpaw remote

Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore








Climbing

Riding the Honzo reminded me of an important fact that I may have forgotten: you don't need rear suspension to go fast or have a good time. That has always been Kona's m.o. with their Honzo range, to show that hardtails aren't only for people in stretchy tights who don't eat ice cream sandwiches for lunch (they are sandwiches, aren't they?), so it isn't exactly a surprise to learn that the latest, lighter weight model is still all about giggles and good times.

But before the chuckling, there must be climbing. The price has to be paid, at least it does in my mind, although the Honzo CR doesn't charge much. After all, a 25 lb carbon fiber hardtail is going to make anyone feel damn good about themselves when they need to smash up some gravel road that's so steep it feels like it's pointing straight down into Hell rather than straight up like it actually is. A light-ish bike doing that isn't noteworthy, though, because that's what it should do. The Honzo CR also gets along acceptably on technical trails, even with its long front end. The length does mean you'll have to think about where your front wheel is, however, and you can't just turn your noggin off like you can on a steeper, shorter bike. There were one or two ultra-tight corners that forced me to pull out some trials moves, and riders used to shorter bikes will notice the Honzo's front-end feeling a bit light now and then, but I'd say that it's well within being manageable, kooky hops and trackstands aside.


Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore
  Nothing can eat up a smooth climb like a lightweight carbon hardtail.


I also tagged my pedals on a handful of occasions while trying to squeeze in a few extra cranks up technical climbs, and while I'd argue that pedal strikes are always down to rider error, the healthy 65mm of bottom bracket drop that the Honzo sports meant that I had to keep my timing in mind instead of spinning wildly through a mess of roots and rocks. Yes, the 310mm bottom bracket height is similar to cross-country hardtails out there (a Trek Procaliber sits at 311mm with 58mm drop, 310mm and 61mm for a Specialized Stumpjumper HT) and obviously lower than the static numbers quoted for short-travel full-suspension bikes, but the Honzo's pedals always felt a bit closer than that number would suggest. That could also play a role in why the Honzo is one of the best cornering bikes I've ridden once the climbing is behind you.
bigquotesThe length does mean you'll have to think about where your front wheel is, and you can't just turn your noggin off like you can on a steeper, shorter bike.


The Honzo's 415mm chainstays, made possible by Kona ditching any and all possibility to mount a front derailleur, had me forgetting that the bike even had a rear wheel attached to it when I was snaking through tight switchbacks. This also makes for mega amounts of traction, and the black bike never let me down so long as I wasn't a complete dumbass about my line choices. We all have our moments. The copious traction also helps when you're working to get the Honzo's front-end around or through a slow-speed technical challenge.

This was all the more impressive to me due to the Honzo's 2.25'' Ardent rear tire, a model that I've always felt to be lacking in the drive department - just imagine if you put something on there with some real bite. At least the Ardent rolls quickly.
Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore
The traction is there even if the Ardent doesn't help matters, but you'll need to employ some skill when faced with tight terrain.

With climbing manners more in-line with a long and slack-ish mid-travel trail bike, and by far the most efficient rear suspension design* on the market, the Honzo CR possess an interesting combination of qualities. It can be a bit of a handful on exceptionally technical climbs, and don't anticipate cross-country race bike-type performance, but do expect a reasonably capable package.
*sarcasm


Descending

In a lot of ways, the Honzo CR reminds me of Kona's Process series, and especially the short-travel Process 111 that was (and still is) a bit of a bit of a game-changing hooligan of a bike. When I was on the 111, and also when I'm on the Honzo CR, I'm thinking more about goofing off than going fast, although the two are certainly not mutually exclusive; you can go quickly up and down the hill on the Honzo if you want, but you're probably going to be more concerned with smiles than Strava. This is because geometry will always trump suspension or lack thereof, and geometry is something that Kona seems to know a thing or two about.


Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore
  Much like the Process 111, the Honzo CR inspires a rider to amuse himself at every possible moment, and especially when it wouldn't seem worthwhile on a longer travel full-suspension bike.


Just like its metallic predecessors, the Honzo CR's handling errs more on the all-mountain side of the fence rather than anything close to a nervous steering cross-country bike, and its roomy front-end, 780mm wide handlebar, and 68° head angle make for a relatively stable ride on fast trails - it's much more comfortable while holding a line through an eye-watering corner than you might expect. It's nothing like the flighty hardtail that you may have learned to ride on, that's for sure, but the ultra-tight rear-end, spot-on geo, and 25 lb weight all make it the gas-powered turkey knife of slicing slow and medium-speed corners to bits. It's not just that it's good; it's that it is easy, and a bike that makes you feel like a great rider is probably a great bike. Or it's at least great at cornering.

If the traction is there - there's less on hand without rear suspension - this bike corners incredibly well with only the softest of steering inputs. I will admit to not being entirely convinced by the new-school, mega-long front-ends that many full-suspension bikes are sporting these days, with a lot of them losing much of the nimbleness that can make a trail so much fun. It works on the Honzo, however, because it adds a degree of stability that a hardtail can really benefit from, but doesn't rob the bike of its personality. The large-sized Honzo felt big throughout the first few rides, but it felt spot-on from then on it.


Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore
Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore
My face may say ''Where's the nearest washroom?'' but the bike says that it's having too much fun to stop.

I'd describe the handling as consistent. With no forgiveness out back and just 120mm of (stiff) travel up front, there's very little change in the bike's angles when you jump on the brakes or point it down something steep. That means that the Honzo is always going to respond how you expect it to; there will be no surprises, but there will be many long manuals, wheelies and possibly much discretionary skidding. Never by me, of course, but maybe from you.

The Honzo CR's angles and attitude are going to have some riders realizing that they can do big-bike things on this so-called little bike, which isn't going to be an issue so long as the line or landing are in order. But carbon fiber or not, I don't think the back of the Honzo CR is any more forgiving than other hardtails, and there were times when on fast, rough ground that I felt like the bike knew all my sins and was taking joy in flogging me for them like some sort of two-wheeled Catholic nun. But that's what hardtails do, especially to people (aka me) who have gotten soft after years and years of having their egos and backsides massaged by the decadent full-suspension bikes.
bigquotesIt's not just that it's good; it's that it is easy, and a bike that makes you feel like a great rider is probably a great bike. Or it's at least great at cornering.


Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore
  The Honzo CR is nothing like your dad's hardtail when you get going quickly, with handling that's more in-line with a modern trail bike.


Riding the carbon Kona was, at least for me, a bit like the re-education of Mike Levy because I had to remember skills that full-suspension long ago made foggy. I could do the same on a more traditional cross-country hardtail, of course, but the Honzo CR's geometry let me re-learn how to go fast on a bike sans rear suspension without feeling like I was going to flip over the handlebar for all three hours of a three-hour ride. Not that things didn't get sketchy now and then...

Just like the 111, the Honzo will fill you with confidence and make you think that this whole hardtail game isn't really any more difficult than on a bike with more travel, which is a neat trick that Kona has pulled off. But, just like the 111, you'll be reminded once in a while that it is, in fact, a lot less lenient of a rider's mistakes than something with more squish. That much should be obvious. The line choices need to be spot-on, and lazy riders will be shown out the front door (even worse than the back door) if they choose poorly. But the perk for getting it right somehow feels much more rewarding than when on a full-suspension bike.


Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore
  Roots or rocks that you wouldn't even notice on a full-suspension bike need to be taken into consideration, but it will quickly come as second nature due to the Hozno's inspiring handling.


Technical Report

• No Guide - With Kona rightly sacrificing the ability to run a front derailleur in the name of one of the tightest rear-ends out there on a 29er, there is no way to mount a small chain guide via a direct-mount option, and there are no ISCG 05 tabs around the Honzo CR's (or the steel, aluminum, or titanium frames) bottom bracket shell. Narrow-wide chainrings and clutch derailleurs are super duper, but I wouldn't be surprised if a Honzo pilot wanted to bolt on a chain guide as well. That said, I never dropped a chain while riding the bike, so what do I know?


• Bottle Blues - Sadly, there isn't a set of water bottle mounting bosses on the seat tube despite me thinking this would be a no-brainer on a hardtail. Kona says that the shaping of the bike's seat tube limited the clearance in this location (which is certainly true on the smaller frame sizes) but the only thing that I see being limited is my water intake.


Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore
With such a roomy front-end, Kona wisely specs a 40mm stem from the factory. Kudos for the 780mm handlebar as well.
Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore
The wide WTB i29 rims unlock the traction and low air pressure potential of the bike's tires.


• Wheels and Tires - The WTB i29 aluminum rims and Minion 2.35'' / Ardent 2.25'' tire combo worked well. What I might do, however, is install a higher-volume rear tire on the back of the bike if I was looking for a touch more forgiveness. A set of 2.35'' wide Nobby Nic tires would leave a rider wanting for nothing when it came to traction and volume. I also knocked the rear wheel out of true enough for me to need to give it some love in the stand, but I admit that this likely has more to do with me treating the Honzo CR like a hack during the first few rides. It stayed straight after I gave it a bit of love.


• Short-Travel Pike - The less suspension you're working with, the better it has gotta be, and the 120mm-travel RockShox Pike left nothing to be desired once I sorted out my settings. I found that the lack of rear suspension tended to really drive the fork, so a firmer spring rate and an extra Bottomless Token was required to make me feel confident with the front-end when pushing my luck on the Honzo CR.

It's also a Boosted Pike, mated to a pair of SRAM's Torque Cap hub endcaps... it all felt like a fork to me, no more torsionally rigid than a normal Pike, to be honest.
Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore

• KS LEV Integra - I've sure bitched a lot about how touchy these seat posts used to be, so I should probably also point out that I haven't had any troubles with a LEV for quite a while now, including the one on the Honzo CR. Also, KS' mega-adjustable Southpaw remote makes me happier than watching funny cat videos on YouTube for two hours. Kona was smart to go all the way and spec the CR Trail DL with a 150mm-travel dropper for maximum party-time as well.


Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesI've always liked things that can do a lot with a little, which, besides maybe saying too much about myself, would also describe the attitude of an ideal Honzo owner. This thing is a fin-less shortboard of the singletrack, a rig that makes a lot of other bikes feel like bloated, albeit safer, longboards, even if its handling is too relaxed to be a real cross-country racer and it has more in common with a rowdy trail bike than a dirt jump rig.

If the hardtail way of living intrigues you but you're used to contemporary full-suspension bikes, the Honzo is worth taking a look at.
- Mike Levy




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About the Reviewer
Age: 35 • Height: 5'10” • Inseam: 33" • Weight: 165lb • Industry affiliations / sponsors: None • Instagram: killed_by_death

Mike Levy spent most of the 90s and early 2000s racing downhill bikes and building ill-considered jumps in the woods of British Columbia before realizing that bikes could also be pedaled for hours on end to get to some pretty cool places. These days he spends most of his time doing exactly that, preferring to ride test bikes way out in the local hills rather than any bike park. Over ten years as a professional mechanic before making the move to Pinkbike means that his enthusiasm for two wheels extends beyond simply riding on them, and his appreciation for all things technical is an attribute that meshes nicely with his role of Technical Editor at Pinkbike.



202 Comments

  • + 124
 Carbon...Honzo... Carbonzo!
  • - 22
flag saso (Jun 17, 2016 at 10:36) (Below Threshold)
 Bronzo!
  • - 30
flag torero (Jun 17, 2016 at 11:43) (Below Threshold)
 Kona Cruz Bronzon
  • + 30
 I think Jabba has a Honzo-lo for sale.
  • + 8
 SRAM is not happy with you saying boost doesn't add torsional stiffness.
  • + 7
 @chyu: I'm not saying that it doesn't - I'm sure it does, to be honest - but just that I couldn't feel it on the front of the Honzo. Maybe the Torque End Caps compensates for the wider stance of the Boost lowers and the fork feels as torsionally rigid as a normal fork? Just playing Devil's advocate here. Either way, it feels like a Pike to me, which is a very good thing.
  • + 66
 I though wow it's refreshing to see a HT review on the front page but then it disappeared? Seriously, we need some HT love on pinkbike.
  • + 42
 Our bad - back now!
  • + 33
 Dear Kona,
How are you gonna change from steel to carbon and still call it a "Honzo" - Hittori Honzo did not free Japan with a plastic knife.
Could we call it the "Edison" after the inventor of carbon fiber?
Sincerely,
A guy who previously though Honzo was a play on Kill Bill's Honzo Steel.
  • + 50
 Sorry broham. The Honzo is named after a drunken monkey not Hittori Hanzo. Note the spelling...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hattori_Hanz%C5%8D

www.monochrom.at/honzo
  • + 6
 *Hatori Hanzo
  • - 14
flag spinko (Jun 17, 2016 at 10:52) (Below Threshold)
 @Mandell: which was a typo on Kona's part. It was meant to be Hanzo...
  • + 5
 This isn't the first non-steel Honzo. As mentioned, they've got the Honzo AL. The 2016 lineup didn't feature a complete steel build either, steel and ti were available as frame only.
  • + 10
 @spinko: dude, @Mandell prooobably actually named the f*cking bike.
  • - 1
 @Mandell: is you Chris Mandell ??
  • + 3
 @Mandell: Cool story Chris, but chimps aint monkeys. Show a little respect for our fallen homonid brother Wink
  • + 2
 @mattpatt: ya got me there. They are close cousins!
  • + 3
 @vic690: ex Kona Mandell. . . . . .
  • + 3
 @bmck: shit. I didn't know who. I had read on another site that was the case. Goes to show that you can't believe everything on the Internet.
  • + 3
 @spinko: everybody knows Pinkbike comments are the only true source >Smile
  • + 2
 @Mandell: great job you made @ kona..your interview of some years ago on dirt mag was best ever..
  • + 2
 I read somewhere that they Googled Honzo by accident when thinking (Hattori) Hanzo [edit] Not true I guess?
  • + 29
 This review seems strangely passive aggressive. It's ok to just treat a hardtail like a regular bicycle and not an ugly cousin you find yourself strangely attracted to. There are dozens of nice hardtails out there that are anything but XC race bikes. Lots of guys on my trails are on/going back to hardtails. If you don't have lots of gnar or aren't hitting huge features you gotta ask yourself why you're squishin' around the back. Hardtails are a fun low-maintenance option which make smoother/flowier trails a blast.

www.pinkbike.com/forum/listcomments/?threadid=131375&pagenum=2098#commentid6260252
  • + 9
 as someone currently struggling to remove the 12 old pivot bearings on my FS, a hardtail is sounding pretty good right now
  • + 3
 @xeren: Get a Production Privee and never look back.
Or do look back at everyone you just passed on this beast of a bike
  • + 2
 @fabdemaere: The new ones look very interesting. I've got a Chromag Rootdown which is not worlds apart from a honzo and I love it. Very few features/trails in my part of Canada demand full suspension outside of little DH parks.
  • + 1
 Smooth an flowy trails? I send my hardtail (Meta HT) over some rough stuff and lots of jump/gaps as well. You can hit so much on a HT AM and get away with it Smile
  • + 2
 @Christopop: sure, aggro hardtails can handle lots of stuff, but if things are really rough for long stretches I'd rather be on a full-squish as you start losing so much traction without it. To each is own in the name of fun, though.
  • + 21
 Man, Kona keeps making cooler and cooler bikes ...
  • + 17
 Built up a new steel Honzo this season. The thing is too much fun! A few short years ago, I never thought I'd be riding a hardtail, or 29'er. But now I realize it's the best of both worlds- love my Honzo! Keep up the great work Kona!
  • + 4
 I love my alu version too.. Just slaped a reverb on it and now i just ride it like i stole it!
  • + 5
 Steel 29er hardtails are the way to go. Plain simple fun especially when you smoke someone on the latest and greatest plasyic wonder rig giggling as you do it.
  • + 13
 Seeing people getting back on hardtails is restoring my faith in the mtb community and seeing manufacturers realizing the market is there and producing amazing bikes like this is fantastic. The whole "enduro, must have a long travel trail/short travel dh" thing has become predictable and boring. Gotta ask myself; 'i need a bike thats good for 90% of my riding' and that can be on a hardtail! I have 2 hardtails now and my dh full sus. I have a carbon xc 29er race orientated sub 10kg and a cotic 27.5 steel Bfe hardtail that is probably good for 95% of my riding. So capable. Like i said its so good to see the hardtail again coming full circle and becoming popular again. Big props to Kona too for ALWAYS giving a good hardtail options to get rowdy on. They are, as far as big manufacturers go, the kings of the hardtail!!
  • + 1
 Sorry dude I meant to upvote you.
  • + 4
 I'd argue that as the all mountain market hits saturation, the two bike crowd will want something with comparable aggression, with more efficiency for long days or going faster, and will want a bike that can share wheels. I think 27+ capability would be a plus in this case, as that is an added area, but being able to run the same 15x110mm/12x148mm wheels across from a ~5.5" travel rig with a hard tail may become the ideal. Put the aggressive wheels on for chunky stuff, the plus wheels for wet, loose, our sloppy, and cross-country wheels for everything else, and a two bike setup can cover all but the widest extremes.
  • + 3
 @tehllama: such a good idea bro - that's the future for sure. Wheel interoperability is the only thing I feel that's missing from my current FS and HT combo
  • + 11
 Just ordered the TI Honzo. It's en-route. My heart skipped a little when I saw this> but with no provision to run SS I'm glad I went with the metal bike. Also, Single speed hubs aren't boost because they don't need to be.

I wonder if they will keep the Ti model in their lineup, and if it will see boost and longer reach?

Of the 3 trends Long, Low, and Slack- I'm still not sure about how I feel about super long. Just depends on where and how you ride, I suppose. It's great for adding stability while descending.

Glad to see Kona making a comeback with the carbon. A 25lb stock all-mountain hard tail is impressive- especially with 150 dropper, Pike, and wide beefy rims and front tire.
  • + 12
 Ti >> C
  • + 2
 @velocitajano: ti>cromo>ALU>cr
  • + 3
 I agree about the length so far as balance is concerned. I can't get my head around how long reach and really short stays works well. The other day I was looking at the bikes I felt fastest down on, and the fastest up. And the best all rounders had balanced geometry
  • + 2
 @velocitajano: Ti >>>>>>>>>>>>C. Ti is the ultimate frame material.
  • + 1
 @kanasasa: You know it bro.
  • + 14
 If I can get over my loathing for boost, this just might be my next bike.
  • + 5
 Just forgive them its shitloads of fun!
  • + 10
 Check out the Canfield EPO, similar Geo, no boost.
  • + 14
 OK Ill say it,,,, WHERES MY PROCESS 153C ??????
  • + 12
 Pinkbike is no place for porn
  • - 3
 Too expensive
  • + 1
 What? That's news to me
  • + 7
 Finally a hardtail 29er that I would buy for FUN and not just XC Racing. I'm loving the direction hardtails are going these days... that being said, I'm sure this thing pulls the line just fine at a local xc event. Go uphill at 95% of say a Trek Superfly while laughing at 110% on the downhills. We all have our priorities in life!
  • + 9
 So, this is a lot like a Canfield EPO, except the EPO manages to fit 414mm chainstays using 142mm rear spacing, can take a front derailleur, and has ISGC05 tabs. Got it.
  • + 4
 Am I the only one who has a hard time riding up tight alpine switchbacks with super short chainstays and a long front center? I mean I realize that selecting a bike for that moment is akin to choosing a partner based on how much you like to go grocery shopping with them, but still, you do have to do it now and then.
  • + 3
 @b26-4-Life: you are not alone.....Attitudes on CS will change more.....look at the XXL V10 CS is now 450+
  • - 1
 Plus it can run 650b+, no compromise, no excuses.
  • + 1
 @b26-4-Life: I find it easier at times to lean around n have ur weight forward when u turn. I have more problem turning down though... yet to master the endo thing.
  • + 11
 HARDTAIL RULE Big Grin
  • + 8
 The kona honzo has always been a great chassis because the entire spectrum of rider from newb to expert can each find their own way to rip on the Honzo.
  • + 2
 For the longest time, I didn't bother with high end 'real' mountain bikes, because they mostly sucked... that was until my buddy talked me into trying out a honzo. For somebody my height, 29er was a given, but that was the first bike that didn't feel like a completely top-heavy barge.
Kona geometry is what for me hooked on serious mountain biking; at this point Canfield shares the mantle for rad wagon wheelers (Yelli, Epo), but more excellent options are always a good thing.
  • + 1
 @tehllama: mostly sucked, in the 1980s for sure haha
  • + 6
 I remember riding a 2010 Niner EMD in 2012 and thinking - OMG the rumors of 29ers handling like a freight train were true! This thing sucks as hell! Then I rode Honzo for only 5 minutes and I felt like I had this bike for my whole life and that it has 26" wheels. Excellent thing! I'd never buy a hardcore HT in carbon though, no need to make things harsher than they are already
  • + 2
 Even the new school geo 29 full sus bikes feel like 26 to me now..Especially the new Trek fuel ex 9.9 ☺
  • + 1
 Remarkably, one of the reasons the composite bikes are so much lighter is that material is saved in lots of places, which results in a remarkable amount of compliance. It's not steel, but on average it's more compliant than an aluminium frame would be. To me, the valid downsides are the initial cost, and that some crashes will immediately write off a frame that would be serviceable if it were metal. I'm quite happy with the usable compliance in my carbon Hardtail, and the weight - with a good setup it can everything from a gravel road bike to all mountain rig.
  • + 4
 Props to kona for not making it 27.5+ compatible by sacrificing playfulness. Although I cannot se the point in making it carbon, other then maybe targeting it for "i need a carbon bike, because it will make me 1% faster uphill, and anyway carbon is premium" customers.
  • + 6
 Haha went for a ride on my hardtail this morning and thought to myself what a pre historic slow painful waste of time they are. Then I see this and I want one again
  • + 4
 I spent a good chunk of time on a Honzo before succumbing to the lure of full suspension. Yes, it's more comfortable, and I can eke out a few more seconds on the downs, but I don't know that I'm having any more fun. I just might be enticed back into the Honzo fold.
  • + 4
 Tried the AL version and I'd never had believed there would be any 29er of this much fun! It climbs great and goes down the hill like a beast! It definitely changed my opinion on a 29er.
  • + 3
 Built up a new steel Honzo this season. The thing is too much fun! A few short years ago, I never thought I'd be riding a hardtail, or 29'er. But now I realize it's the best of both worlds- love my Honzo! Keep up the great work Kona!
  • + 7
 Love my Honzo Steel! Just a rowdy hardtail; great on the East Coast.
  • + 7
 I want it.
  • + 2
 Loving the expanding Honzo range but I'd still like to see ISCG05 tabs added to at least the alloy frame. It's true that drivetrains are becoming more reliable and chain retention is improving but what about added protection around the BB? When I hear the term "aggressive trail bike", I picture riders making their way through nasty sections full of protruding rocks and roots where a bash guard could definitely come in handy. I know not everyone is purposing the alloy frame the same way but I do notice most are going for a "do-it-all" rig, so why not slap some tabs on there and keep it in line with other aggressive alloy hardtails?
  • + 2
 @mikelevy Can you name any other hardtails or 120mm bikes in the same category of XC light with new-school long and slack geometry? This is exactly what I need. Bikes like the Transition Scout are awesome but still a little overkill for my local trails. But I really don't want to give up the fun of a long, low, slack bike.
  • + 10
 Hardtails made for similar intentions: Transition's TransAm, Chromag's bikes, and the carbon Canfield EPO.
  • + 3
 @mikelevy: Canfield EPO*
  • + 2
 @briceps: Doh. Fixed and thanks.
  • + 3
 the Santa Cruz Chameleon is a blast, good complement to a long travel bike
  • + 2
 BTR Ranger!
  • + 3
 Cotic Soul 27.5 with a 140mm fork absolutely rips. I have as much fun riding it as I do my knolly warden, usually a coin toss deciding what to ride
  • + 1
 @phalley: The Soul is an awesome trailbike!
  • + 1
 I wish there were more like it. Bikes are 30% more expensive here because the $CAD is shit, so I could see myself downsizing to a hardtail. I wouldn't complain if there were more mainstream options...
  • + 2
 COmmencal Meta AM HT
  • + 3
 Diamondback Sync'R Pro. 130mm float 34, Boost, 1x11. Fun stuff like that.
  • + 6
 Dude, look at the canfield EPO, Yelli Screamy, or Nimble 9.
  • + 2
 On one parkwood, Ragley big wig, Banshee Paradox and the new Genesis High Latitude are a few others. Parkwood is a bit short and weird in the numbers but just works when you ride it. Super fun bike.
  • + 6
 @mikelevy: Stanton Bikes make some proper hardcore slack hardtails too
  • + 6
 Stanton sherpa
  • + 3
 Ghost Asket hardtail is 27.5 carbon. Looks sexy as hell... and you get that sweet REI dividend mayne.
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: I'm looking at the TransAm my self. Great bike. If kona had a 27.5 with the same ideals as this one I'd be interested. But they don't. So TransAm is in the lead right now.
  • + 5
 @onemanarmy: "If kona had a 27.5 with the same ideals"

Isn't that the Explosif? Or do you mean carbon too?
(also see Ghost Asket... wish it had been around when I bought my HT)
  • + 2
 Have a look at Dartmoor Primal 27.5. On the cheap side, but is awesome to ride. Few pics in my gallery
  • + 1
 @szusz: That is nice!
  • + 2
 @onemanarmy: yeah they do the explosif, think there's a ti version to
  • + 1
 Devinci wooky
  • - 3
 XC light? My Santa Cruz 5010 weights just under 27lbs and this thing is CLAIMED 25lbs3oz w/o pedals so in reality its over 26lbs. That's a heavy ass hardtail. My XC hardtail is a fraction over 22lbs and it doesn't need a 68* HT to rip it up. I dunno about this bike...

It looks cool and I'm sure it rips but lets not go overboard and put it in the XC light category.

And Boost, c'mon.
  • + 3
 @warmerdamj: It's light for me. LOL! My hard tail is 35 pounds.
  • + 1
 @markg1150:

Last time I looked at that it wasn't offered in a 1x. They offer it that way... but i would like to see if they're going to make any of the updates to like they did to this one. I like a smaller frame... medium... with a longer reach. Always have. But I am gonna see if I can demo one of these or just jack one of the aluminum ones from my co-workers.
  • + 1
 Nukeproof Scout 290
  • + 3
 As someone with a 36" inseam I'm a little leery of chainstays this short. At full extension I'll be behind the rear axle. If a hardtail isn't a suitable candidate to get some size-specific STA and CS numbers what is?
  • + 6
 Manuals for days though...
  • + 1
 Totally agree man, there's definitely such a thing as too short. Idk why a guy on a L/XL frame would want to be that far back on the wheelbase.
  • + 1
 Yes, completely agree. It's maybe to the point where we need a number more akin to reach/stack, as in horizontal setback from vertical axis through bb at a given seat height.
  • + 3
 @b26-4-Life: Canfield Bros does a thing like that. It's really helpful to see how the STA changes with seat height. fcdn.mtbr.com/attachments/canfield/989699d1432076787-2015-canfield-brothers-riot-29er-fs-canfield-brothers-riot-size-help-medium.jpg
  • + 2
 @alexsin

I got a 2015 steel frame with adjustable CS.....415-430....it works well....I'm loving it with a 150 dropper and some flats..
  • + 1
 @b26-4-Life: It's not that hard to calculate.....it's all about triangles....I did it for a bunch before I bought my latest trail bike.....

Manufacturers have got to start lengthening CS for bigger frames.....YT is the latest to see the light on the jeffsy..
  • + 1
 @Travel66: obviously the calculation isn't difficult, but unless you know the specific seat height used by the manufacturer to come up with their effective seat angle, your result is meaningless. It's the same reason for reach and stack; sure you could look at seat angle, seat tube length and top tube length, but the measurements are so approximate that the end result isn't much use, so we have reach/stack.
  • + 1
 @b26-4-Life: your leg length determines the seat height and you work it out from there.
No measurements are perfect but they get you in the right ball park to make a decision.
  • + 2
 I´m 5'11”, 33" inseam and about to order Honzo Ti. My steel Honzo was just stolen and I loved the damn thing. It was a medium and am wondering whether to go medium or large. I see that you are on a large in this article, yet I never felt the m was too small... What to do, what to order????
  • + 5
 "It all felt like a fork to me". Hahaha. Great quote and nice review overall.
  • + 1
 Judging by the overwhelming responses you could argue that hardtails are coming back into resurrection with updated geometry and the plus option making them more attractive than ever. The hardtail is dead. Long live the hardtail. Cheers.
  • + 4
 Can it fit a 29x2.5 tire out back? 27.5+ with a taller fork? Available frame only?
  • + 2
 No on the 2.5'' rear tire, and no on the 27.5+ wheels. Frame-only option is $1,599 USD w/ a Maxle. There are also three complete bikes: $3499, $3,599, and $4599 for the bike shown here.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Great review, Mike! Any idea when these will be available, particularly the frame only option?
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: How about something like an Ardent 29x2.4? If it can only fit a 2.25 max that isn't great.
  • + 1
 Limited to 2.25 would really suck.
  • + 2
 @PHeller: Here's a photo of the rear end with the stock 2.25'' Ardent. Similar clearance down at the chainstay yoke as well. There would be zero issue with a high-volume 2.35'' tire on a much wider rim (picture a Nobby Nic on an Ibis 941 rim) but no room for a 2.5'' tire. I'd say that's acceptable.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/13616009
  • + 1
 @mikelevy any chance of the 'himself' in "...like the Process 111, the Honzo CR inspires a rider to amuse himself at every possible moment..." being changed to themselves since presently Kona don't offer a women's specific model of this awesome bike? It's good for all riders to be included. Keep up the great work.
  • + 1
 I´m 5'11”, 33" inseam and about to order Honzo Ti. My steel Honzo was just stolen and I loved the damn thing. It was a medium and am wondering whether to go medium or large. I see that you are on a large in this article, yet I never felt the m was too small... What to do, what to order????
  • + 1
 They should hire you mike, if i had the money i would buy one ahah
I had a normal low end xc bike (26) and sold it last year because i manly did road riding with it and when it was to go riding i would choose my enduro bike because it was more fun. But being that the hills at bike distance from home (and i only have car at the weekends) i feel like it's a bit of a overkill ,i have a transition patrol
So when i rode this i was sure that this would be a bike for me
  • + 3
 Love it.... but I'm bias... haha Man if I was racing XC courses in BC this is what I would ride! Hell I wish I had this for theTest of Metal tomorrow! Haha
  • + 1
 Haha. Me, too! I'm trapped between my "old school" hardtail and my "just a little too squishy" suspension bike. The Honzo would have been the perfect mount. Shoulda kept it, really!
  • + 1
 I´m 5'11”, 33" inseam and about to order Honzo Ti. My steel Honzo was just stolen and I loved the damn thing. It was a medium and am wondering whether to go medium or large. I see that you are on a large in this article, yet I never felt the m was too small... What to do, what to order????
  • + 1
 'Kona's desire to get the rear wheel as close as possible to the back of the seat tube'. That gap is huge compared to the Last Fast Forward, where you'd struggle to fit a cigarette paper, but at least you'll keep the paint on this frame!
  • + 1
 I just built up a 26 pound hard tail. Only has a four inch travel fork up front.
Cost me about 300$ using the Pink Bike buy and sell!Smile
Thanks pink bike........
A carbon hard tail that weighs 25 pounds?
Kind of heavy considering what it is.
  • + 5
 my wishing list is growing too much.
  • + 2
 so I have a Unit 29er SS for bikepacking, a new Process 134 for tricky up and down fun and the next bike Im gonna build is a steel Honzo for trailfun and nooow I also need this for XC races. damn Kona I love you!
  • + 1
 Yet still... The steel and ti Honzo are the only ones that is singlespeed compatible. Come on, Kona! Singlespeeds benefit massively from a little weight loss! I love my steel Honzo (and shy away from plastic in general), but I would buy this carbon Honzo if it had a singlespeed option -- something like the Pivot Les has...?
  • + 0
 Looks like a fun bike. Feel free to disagree, but I feel like riding a hardtail nowadays calls for an "eccentric" type of rider; 27.5+ is quirky and fitting for these eccentrics and for Kona to leave out 27.5+ seems odd when you also consider the Boost spacing.
  • + 3
 curious how ride quality would now compare between the 4: chromoly steel, aluminum, titanium and now carbon?
  • + 2
 Outstanding review. I'll stick with Steel thank you very much! Not a xc racer, and already made my carbon hardtail mistakes. Building a Stanton Slackline.
  • + 4
 Life is good on a hardtail with a dropper post. Get low get low....
  • + 0
 All hardtails, or aggro trail bikes need ISCG tabs in my opinion. Had to recently put on guide on my steel Honzo due to dropping chains, especially after the ring starts to wear down (don't care to buy a new oval ring every 4 months)
  • + 0
 Nice Bike! Looks like XC race version of the last fastforward. I do wonder why they stuck to 68 headangle however. Same geo with 66HA and 140mm fork would seem more capablee while not sacrificing anything on the ups. It's like anyhow up front.

The fastforward is shorter reach (25mm) - therefore 64HA fits well. But fastforward frame is more than twice the weight (2.8kg) due to steel and no boost and straight seattube means a couple mm longer rear. So it's the mean steel brother to the honzo CR. Would love a review on the fastforward by Mike too.
  • + 3
 I'd be interested to see who this rides against the Canfield EPO
  • + 3
 EPO is a much classier bike IMO, but CB doesn't offer completes and you'll never get to demo one unless you go to Bellingham and ask nicely. In that regard, Kona has the advantage and will outsell the Bros. But I stand saying the EPO is the superior bike.
  • + 1
 If it wasn't Boost, I'd consider it, as I could build it up pretty cheap and just swap wheels from my Ripley, but Boost = No Bueno
  • + 3
 where is the carbon process 111?
  • + 3
 Kona needs a slacker longer travel 29er Process to complete the puzzle.
  • + 3
 I hardly use my full-susser now thanks to a trail eating Whyte 909 ...
  • + 2
 The 909 is quite possibly the best bike I've ever ridden... it just gets better and better the harder and faster you go! I ride mine just as much if not more than my full sus.
  • + 1
 @buckley: a carbon version would be the icing on the cake... I'd sell both my bikes to own one !
  • + 0
 Interesting that they increase the reach by 15mm, claiming that people wanted more room in their cockpit. Yet they change the stem from a 55mm to a 40mm. So it's actually no roomier than before.
  • + 3
 great, now Strava miles are gonna be counted in manual's...
  • + 2
 What's that little thingy holding the spare tube? Looks tidier than a load of electric tape.
  • + 4
 It's just a toe-strap; any bike shop will have one for you. Ski straps work great as well.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: This was the first thing i noticed on the review! Pumped to try it out on my Transam. I have an old BD ski strap that is made of a tacky silicone that should work perfectly.
  • + 1
 This would have been the answer to my Hardtail prayers 12 months ago. Now I've tried (and owned a couple) plus tire bikes and couldn't go back.
  • + 2
 I thought the last time fork dials hit the frame was in 1996
  • + 2
 Welcome to 2016. Where brake levers and fork dials smash into frames again. Bullshit. And then frame companies think it's better to put bumpers on bikes than to simply sort out their frame shapes. All the while saying it's better for you.
  • + 2
 I feel like they designed this bike just for me. I'm flattered.
  • + 2
 Can't wait to see the updated Process:-D
  • + 0
 Why can't they make this bike... but built around 27.5. That's what I'm looking for. I don't want a 29'r but I want everything else this bike is. Ug.
  • + 13
 1) It's a Honzo. They've always been 29.
2) Which wheel size makes the most of a Trail bike (not AM, not DJ or SS) with no rear suspension: 29
3) Kona R&D doesn't arbitrarily pick a wheel size with a dart board and blindfold

You should try one, first.
  • + 5
 I felt the same way as you about 29ers til I went out on a limb based on the reviews and bought a process 111 and damn, what a bike it is. My big 170mm bike has been gathering dust since I got it apart from bikepark days. It's so much fun.
  • + 6
 they have the explosif
  • + 3
 @teamweee: Have an Explosif, and out of all the bikes ive owned - its my unicorn.
  • + 3
 Plus: The ti and steel Version both accept 27+ up to 2.8 wide without issues. Check out the kona manufacturer forum over at mtbr, there's a ti thread and a dedicated honzo 27+ (fatzo) thread quite on top.
  • + 5
 What's so great about 27.5"? It's heavier then 26" and slower than a 29".... 29'er roll over obstacles better and maintain momentum which you may not appreciate until you're riding with you buddies on smaller wheels as you effortlessly roll away from them. Smile
  • - 3
 @coloradosingletrack:
1. No shit.
2. That's your opinion. I come from BMX... then DS... I don't need a 29 inch wheel to make up for my lack of skill going over obstacles.
3. No shit.

There's 2 of them within 30 feet of me right this second.
  • - 1
 @rynee: I don't want a 27+ and I don't want a bike designed for 29 that can fit 27.5.

I'll probably end up with a trans-am.
  • - 1
 @coloradosingletrack:
Heavier? It's like a 5% gain and by that theory it's better than the 29 that's like 2% heavier than the 27.5... I highly doubt I'm gonna effortlessly roll away from any of my friends or co-workers while climbing regardless of what I'm riding without a motor.
  • - 5
flag onemanarmy Plus (Jun 17, 2016 at 12:55) (Below Threshold)
 Funny how butthurt people get just because someone asks for a 27 version. I never said this wasn't a great bike. I just personally don't want a 29'r. I want a 27.5 with the exact same set up as this... Act like I slapped your mamma or something. Comedy. Thanks for the 3 minutes of entertainment.
  • - 1
 @teamweee: Indeed. But not carbon and it's got slightly different specs. And not offered with the same drive train. If I'm gonna do a full custom build the trans-am is better in my opinion.

But it might be the next bike to get the update. Who knows. If it is... I'd be curious.
  • + 5
 I'm guessing you won't have to wait long for a carbon Explosif.... Also check out Ghost Asket. Looks like exactly what you want.

But really, 29 on a hardtail has literally no downside unless you're like 4' tall. I'll take the added rollover all day - makes up for a lot of the lack of suspension. I absolutely hated the first gen of 29ers that I rode but I'm in love with my current 29er Trail/AM HT. I tried one 27.5 HT and it was fun but really no advantages over 29, IMO (at least for hardtails - FS is a different story).
  • + 2
 @onemanarmy: sorry, my bad.
  • + 1
 @bkm303: That's my guess too. My inseam is short as hell but my arms are long. Think about an ape riding a bike. LOL!
  • + 1
 Can someone please explain to me how adding a few mm to the axle width gives you more clearance round the tyres/chainring?
  • + 5
 Boost rear end goes hand in hand with boost chainline, so moves the chainring out by 3mm, which in turn gets the chainstay out of the way of the wheel
  • + 1
 @honourablegeorge: Ah, that makes sense, thanks
  • + 10
 @honourablegeorge: which means it doesn't really do much... The dumbest thing about it is that 1.Soec made 150mm E29 with 430 chainstay WITHOUT any dumb boost, and 2.Trek who "invented" and "innovated" boost still made a wishbone solution where chainstay meets the BB on their Stache bikes because there was no bloody way you could make such short CS with or without boost. Yet they still had a fkng nerve to state "allows for shorter chainstay" in top 3 features of that groundbreaking invention, mentioning stiffening the rear wheel further down the line. Yea Boost shortens CS by 3mm. Whoopsie do!
  • - 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Hey Waki.
Shits gotta progress at some point.
Boost is part of it.
There's better things than this to complain about than this.
  • + 3
 @jflb: People don't like to be stuffed with BS and in case of such a small change there is no way, you can say that it moves something forward. Talking about compounded effect of many changes is saying nothing about Boost, really. At least iit does something even if micro change on wheel stiffness IF you reallu must have a centered hub. We are now getting into territory of inventions like 35mm bars where IBAIS "Innovation by annual incremental resize" trend spawns stuff that improves one ratio but fks up everything else.
  • + 2
 So like a Canfield EPO but a couple of years later?
  • + 1
 Well, sort of. Except the Kona has Boost and stealth routing from the factory. Huge Canfield fan and past customer but they were on something when they decided to forgo stealth routing... I know, I know - you can drill the derailleur mount on the EPO for stealth routing. I shouldn't have to do that on a current frame, sorry. And whether you like Boost or not, it is the current standard and from speaking with multiple wheel builders, builds a stronger wheel.
  • + 0
 I'm sure EPO and Honzo appeals to similar audience but with slightly different preference in style. EPO is more like a Harley... And Honzo Carbon, well... has a politically correctly Honzo shape.
  • + 1
 Does anyone know if they are going to offer a single speed rear dropout?
  • + 1
 I believe that's what the Ti and Steel version are for. The aluminum and carbon models are intended for geared only riding. I doubt this will change unless they get rid of the the Ti model in the future.
  • + 1
 Swizcore taking pics for Pinkbike? My moto and mtb worlds have collided.
  • + 1
 Just got off my Honzo , steel 2014 singlespeed. Fun as fark,
  • + 1
 If you we're picking women, would you choose a hard tail or softtail???
  • + 1
 @mikelevy Do you know when this bike will be in stores?
  • - 1
 Awesome! I want one! First Kona in years. Frame only and I'll slap my parts kit on and....Boost!? I'm out.
  • + 3
 So what, just Boostinate your wheel
  • + 1
 Yes please KONA!
  • + 0
 Fuck Boost
  • - 2
 nice job with the short penis jokes
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