First Look: Lapierre 2016

Jul 13, 2015
by Richard Cunningham  

Damian McArthur photos

Lapierre's 2016 press camp was staged in Morzine, France, concurrent with the famous Passportes du Soleil - an 80-kilometer guided ride that visits six cities and incorporates a dozen or more uplifts which are tucked in the deep folds of the Alps bordering Switzerland. During Lapierre's launch, guests were given all-access passes to the Passportes, and encouraged to ride the most relevant examples of its 2016 range on what seemed to be a limitless network of XC trails and DH tracks. Heavy rains the previous month ensured that Morzine's infamous rooted steeps were lubricated and treacherous, but for the most part, the trails were tacky and fast. Mother Nature then blessed the Lapierre launch with a week of perfect weather, so after a brief presentation, it was game on for three days of shred perfection.


Passportes du Soleil
Scenes from the Passportes du Soleil: A look back at Morzine's wall of steeps and festivities at the food stations.



Lapierre in One Paragraph

Those unfamiliar with Lapierre should know that the Company is one of France's older brands, headed by Gilles Lapierre - the third generation of the family to take leadership of the marquis. Lapierre is headquartered in Dijon, France (yes, the mustard capitol of the world), where it designs and tests its products, as well as assembles all of its high-end range. Like most cycling brands, Lapierre's elite level frames, as well as its lower-priced bicycles are made in Asian factories. The brand has recently attained the very stringent, ISO 9001: 2001 manufacturing certification standard, and its parent company is the Accell Group (one of the world's largest conglomerate bicycle makers), which gives the technically minded folks at the Dijon factory a lot of clout with its manufacturing partners when they need to innovate. Lapierre is actively involved in all forms of racing at the World Cup level, most notably with its Gravity Republic DH team.
President and third generation of the famous Lapierre family Gilles Lapierre
Lapierre President, Gilles Lapierre


Lapierre Zesty AM 827 2016
Damian McArthur photo


All New Zestys

The Zesty is Lapierre's most important mountain bike. It slots into the long-travel trailbike segment, and with its lightweight chassis and its electronically controlled Horst-Link type rear suspension, it has gained a reputation for being a top performer in the highly contested all-mountain/trailbike market. The Zesty is completely new for 2016, with a swoopy-looking carbon fiber frame, a longer front center, slightly slacker geometry, and a more aggressive component spec. Two models will be offered that share the same chassis: the 150-millimeter-travel AM, which uses a longer-stroke fork, more aggressive tires, and a hardier component build; and the 120-millimeter XM, which features a lighter-weight build that is targeted at the more cross-country-oriented rider.


Lapierre Zesty XM 527 2016
Zesty 527 XM shares the carbon chassis of the top-range 827. "XM" models have less travel and a lighter build. Damian McArthur photo
Lapierre Zesty XM 427 2016
Zesty 427 XM frames are butted aluminum, and feature identical geometry as their more expensive carbon siblings. Damian McArthur photo


Both models will only be offered with 27.5-inch wheels, which should come as a disappointment to those who have ridden last year's Zesty 29, because it was arguably one of the best handling bikes to come from Dijon. The official word, at least from Lapierre, is that 29ers simply aren't selling in the all-mountain categories. Zesty AM and XM will be each be offered in two carbon models, and each will have two aluminum-framed derivatives. Also notable, is that the Zesty and its longer-travel and burlier brother, the Spicy, will no longer share the same front triangle. The enduro-oriented Spicy has also been completely redesigned and it will be launched separately at the upcoming Eurobike exposition in August.


Zesty AM: Old vs. New

• No shock driver yoke: shorter shock length.
• Shock mounts to top tube instead of down tube
• Frame is 50 grams lighter weight
• Suspension kinematics reconfigured for big hits
• Ei reprogrammed for long-travel suspension
• Longer top tube by 5mm
• Shorter stem: 55mm
• Longer reach: Avg. - 11mm
• Shorter seat tubes for dropper clearance: 10mm to 50mm
• Slacker Head tube angle: from 67 to 66.5 degrees
• Wider handlebar: 760 from 740mm
• Four sizes: Small, Medium, Large and X-large
Lapierre Zesty AM 2016 vs 2015


Lapierrre Zesty AM 2016
The shock has been moved to the top tube of the new Zesty chassis and the yoke extender is gone. The Ei shock servo can be seen below the valve head of the RockShox Monarch Relay damper.


Ei in Two Paragraphs

Ei stands for electronic intelligence and it is a collaboration between RockShox, which produces the shock, and Lapierre, which masterminds the system's electronic components. Ei basically switches the Monarch shock's existing Lockout, Trail, and Open options automatically. Accelerometers placed at either end of the fork sense whether the fork is being activated from below by a bump, or from above by the rider's pedaling inputs. The Ei shock's default mode is locked out. When the fork hits a bump, the Ei computer opens the shock before the bump reaches the rear wheel.
Lapierrre Zesty AM 2016
Lapierre's Ei Auto rear suspension control is compact and effective.

If it's a big bump, Ei opens the shock completely. If it is a small bump, it switches the shock to trail mode. Sensors in the bottom bracket tell the Ei system to open up completely when the rider is not pedaling, and the accelerometers used to sense bumps also signal Ei to open the shock when the bicycle is weightless, like when flying over a jump or drop. In short, when you are pedaling, Ei makes the suspension firm, but you will never notice it working beyond the "zip-zip" sound of its shock-mounted servo-motor. For 2016, Ei has been re-tuned to work seamlessly with longer-travel suspension. I wouldn't buy a Zesty without Ei - ride and decide.




Bruce Aufrere TiltShift photo


Meet the Zesty AM

Lapierre's Zesty was a capable handling bike, but because it shared the same front triangle and various suspension parts with the all-mountain Spicy, it was a hard sell. Outfitted with Ei, suspension, the longer-travel Spicy could climb and accelerate within a percentage point of the lighter, nimbler Zesty, but with its longer legs and more capable spec, a Spicy rider could shred high amplitude technical descents that were outside the reach of its little brother. Lapierre's decision to cut the umbilical cord that connected the two models was long in coming. Next month, Lapierre will debut an all new Spicy - which presumably will be a longer, slacker, more gravity-oriented design that is specifically intended for professional enduro competition, very much along the lines of the Yeti SB6c. This frees up the Zesty to fill the vacuum left by the Spicy as a true all-mountain/trailbike, and the Zesty AM does exactly that.

After riding the 2016 Zesty AM back to back with last year's Spicy, I can report that the new chassis is a step above in pedaling and handling performance. The top-line 827 that I rode has a great component spec that delivers elite-level performance without falling prey to conspicuous high priced items where they are unnecessary, like its Nico-signature aluminum handlebar and stem, and its mix of SRAM's XX1 and X01 drivetrain components. Its 66.5-degree head angle is a half-degree steeper than current enduro fashion, which may be good news for riders seeking a better balance between good trail and climbing manners and raw descending prowess. A steep, 74.5-degree seat angle centralizes the rider over the chassis for good cornering balance, while optimizing climbing performance. Ergonomics are greatly improved, with wider bars up front, room for a water bottle on the down tube, and a long-overdue redesign of the seat stays. For three years, Lapierre ignored complaints that the seat stays of Zestys and Spicys were notoriously wide. The new design does not compromise tire clearance, while slimming the frame by at least 30 millimeters at their critical mid-way points.


Lapierrre Zesty AM 2016
New, one-by friendly swingarm pivot location.

Lapierrre Zesty AM 2016
A carbon bash guard protects the rear mech.
Lapierrre Zesty AM 2016
Internal wire, hose and cable housings throughout.

Lapierrre Zesty AM 2016
Carbon downtube protector doubles as bash guard.


Ride Impressions:

bigquotesFive hours of exploring trails in France and Switzerland and bombing every rooted and flow-trail descent I could find was enough time on the Zesty AM to return with sore muscles and a positive report on Lapierre's newest trailbike

As mentioned, I rode many of the same tracks one day earlier on the 2015 Spicy, so I had a rare chance to compare the Zesty AM with its capable predecessor. Initially, the differences seemed negligible, but as I put more time on the 2016 Zesty, I realized that it was an improvement for a handful of reasons.

Lapierre changed the algorithms of its Ei suspension controller to feel more seamless in longer travel applications. As a result, there was no downside to leaving the system in "auto" mode, regardless of speed or terrain. Some riders complained that there was an increase in low-amplitude chatter when first-gen Ei was engaged. Whether it was the upgraded Ei, or the Zesty's new suspension kinematics, there is very little decrease in compliance when the system turns the shock off - a situation that occurs anytime the terrain is smooth and cranks are being turned. When coasting, or while the bike is airborne, Ei defaults to open mode, so descending performance is unaffected. The bottom line is that anti-squat and out-of-the-saddle pedaling firmness is reliably provided by Ei, but only when necessary.

Lapierrre Zesty AM 2016
Rectangular seat stays are slimmed and re-curved to maximize heel clearance. Note the offset seat tube, used to widen the stance of the swingarm pivot bearings.
Lapierre's specs say that the new Zesty chassis has been lengthened by ten millimeters in the cockpit, but much of that seems to have been absorbed by the shortened, 55-millimeter stem. With mega-long top tubes in style, I am occasionally stretched out on medium-sized frames, but the Zesty felt spot on. The top tube is 24 inches (610mm) by the chart, which is in step with contemporary AM/trail numbers, but riders who like a roomy cockpit may want to jump up to the next larger frame-size. The Zesty's steep, 74.5-degree seat angle centers the rider between the wheels and naturally weights the front tire for push-free cornering - and even with its less-than-grippy Maxxis 2.25-inch Ardent rear tire, the Lapierre was a flow trail shredder in the tight turns.

Morzine and the surrounding slopes offer some of the best technical descents in the Alps (half the World Cup DH teams were training there during the launch). I must admit that there were a couple of moments down the steeps where I was hoping for a slacker head angle, and tackier rubber, but for the lion's share of the technical riding I did, the Zesty AM felt like it always had a little more handling in reserve to cover my mistakes - which was a good thing, because I was making them.

This is not a true review, but it's probably worth summing up the experience with a plus/minus report. On the plus side, the Zesty AM will not need much of anything beyond a better choice of tires to make a top bike handler happy in any trail situation. The chassis is stable, braking seems uncoupled from the suspension and the Ei system frees up the rider to worry about the terrain, not laying down power. On the minus side, the forward weight bias and steep seat tube angle require more effort to loft the front wheel. You need to yank it like a DH rig to gap washouts and bounce over surprise roots, and the tail end can get light on jumps if you don't make the correction. No deal breakers there. So far, I'd say that you'd be hard pressed to find a more versatile trailbike.


Zesty XM 827 2016
The Zesty 827 XM. Bruce Aufrere TiltShift photo


COMPONENTS: Zesty 827 AM and XM

Zesty AM 827:

• Frame: Carbon, 150mm travel OST suspension, 27.5" wheels
• Fork: RockShox Pike Solo Air 150mm stroke
• Shock: RockShox Monarch RT3 Relay
• Derailleur: SRAM XX1
• Crankset: SRAM X01
• Bottom Bracket: SRAM GXP PressFit
• Chain: SRAM X1
• Cassette: SRAM XG 10 x 42
• Brakes: SRAM Guide R (180mm rotors)
• Shifter: SRAM X1
• Headset: FSA Orbit
• Handlebar: Nico Vouilloz Signature aluminum, 760mm x 15mm
• Stem: Nico Vouilloz Signature aluminum, 55mm
• Seatpost: RockShox Reverb Stealth, 125mm stroke
• Saddle: SDG Duster
• Wheelset: SRAM Roam 40
• Tires: Maxxis High Roller 2.3" (F), Ardent 2.25" (R)



Zesty XM 827:

• Frame: Carbon, 120mm travel OST suspension, 27.5" wheels
• Fork: RockShox Revelation RL Solo Air 130mm stroke
• Shock: RockShox Monarch RT3 Relay
• Derailleur: SRAM X01
• Crankset: SRAM X01
• Bottom Bracket: SRAM GXP PressFit
• Chain: SRAM X1
• Cassette: SRAM XG 10 x 42
• Brakes: Shimano XT (180mm rotors)
• Shifter: SRAM GX
• Headset: FSA Orbit
• Handlebar: Nico Vouilloz Signature aluminum, 740mm x 15mm
• Stem: Easton EA70 aluminum, 60mm
• Seatpost: RockShox Reverb Stealth, 125mm stroke
• Saddle: SDG Duster
• Wheelset: SRAM Roam 30
• Tires: Schwalbe Nobby Nic 2.25" (F and R)


Zesty AM Geometry

Lapierrre Zesty AM 2016 Geometry


Zesty XM Geometry

Zesty XM geometry 2016




Damian McArthur photo


DH Team

bigquotesNot new for 2016, but when someone hands you an all-access lift pass and then asks if you would like a team-issue DH rig to play with - the answer should be, "yes."

Lapierre's launch was heavily focused upon its e-bike range, so while that was going on, I opted for a different form of electric transportation - Morzine's 1500 horsepower uplifts - and put in some hot laps on the DH Team, Gravity Republic's weapon of choice. The launch was billed as an AM/Trailbike affair, and I did not pack for DH, so I had to suffer the embarrassment of punting around on a World Cup-level gravity bike wearing a half-shell helmet and prescription glasses on a day when many WC pro teams were on the mountain practicing for Lenzerheide. The experience, however, was well worth being the butt of a few jokes. The DH Team was brilliantly easy to ride.

I was half expecting the DH Team to be a plow horse. The quest for speed on the World Cup circuit prevails over fluffy park attributes like pop and agility, so contemporary race bikes feature steering geometry and suspension adapted for straight-lining technical bits and minimizing air time wherever possible. The DH Team does both admirably, but its steering is wonderfully light, even while banging down the area's infamous anaconda-sized roots and chunky rock chutes. The bike is responsive to weight shifts, and little effort is required to get the front tire up or unweight the chassis to gap a bomb hole - two important Morzine survival skills.

Fitted with Schwalbe Magic Mary tires, I felt like I could do no wrong, corkscrewing down the mountain's dusty flow-trail berms that fell prey to an unexpected heat wave and the multitude of skidders who attend the Passportes Du Soleil. Aided by a great tune on its RockShox BoXXer World Cup fork and a Vivid shock, the bike's centered feel and easy steering have a calming effect that makes it easier to stay ahead of the bike.

Now that two riders have posted World Cup results without a chain, it seems superfluous to discuss pedaling efficiency in the context of a DH bike report. The short version is that the DH Team earns a place near the top of its class under power. It has just enough support in its suspension to make those critical first three pedal strokes out of a turn count.
Lapierre DH Team 2016
Easton direct-mount stem and molded rubber fork tube stops. Lapierre's decision to make the DH from butted aluminum pipes helps keep the MSRP within reach. Three models are offered, ranging from 6299 Euros for the Team, to 3299 for the DH 527. Falco Mille photo

Lapierre DH Team 2016
Lapierre's "Supra Tech linkage" provides a mild rising rate in the mid stroke, with an increase near the end for bottom out resistance. A small fender deflects mud from the expensive bits. Falco Mille photo

Lapierre DH Team 2016
Removable dropouts incorporate the brake caliper mount so the team can switch them out to lengthen the wheelbase. Falco Mille photo

I had not been on a big bike for a long spell, but it only took a few minutes on the DH Team to feel as if I had owned it for a season. I'll candidly admit that I returned the bike without pushing it near its limits, but few riders could. Lapierre designed the Team DH for only 200 people - the men and women who have the skills and strength to qualify for a World Cup DH. That probably isn't you, but the magic of the DH Team, is that it treats punters with the same respect that it gives Loic Bruni on race day. I barely made the last lift home and when I returned the DH Team, my arms and legs were rubber. It was a good day in the saddle


DH Team Geometry

Lapierre DH Team 2016 Geometry



Scene from the 2016 Passportes du Soleil

MSRP for Featured Models


Lapierre MSRP 2016




View full res and additional photos in the Lapierre gallery



MENTIONS: @Lapierre-Bikes, @SramMedia, @schwalbe


131 Comments

  • + 151
 Very french looking scarf you have there
  • + 118
 Only third generation millionaires can wear that scarf and jogging suit combo.
  • + 35
 Typical french style for rich people ..
  • + 89
 he's probably not even wearing pants...
  • + 19
 SOOO much France in that picture.
  • + 6
 He reminds me Roberto Mancini as Manchester City Fc coach
  • + 20
 ...and for that reason I'm out.
  • + 2
 I wouldn't bash this guy, he has good guards.
  • + 30
 He's a beret away from breaking the internet.
  • + 1
 haha yes, frenchest
  • + 16
 Gilles Lapierre doesn't always drink beer, but when he does, he prefers Kronenbourg. Stay Zesty, my friends.
  • + 8
 baguette
  • + 8
 This picture is actually of Jean Girard from talladega nights after he retired from racing. I thought he said he was going to make a currency for cats and dogs but apparently he started working on bikes
  • + 10
 I am coming for you, Ricky Booby.
  • + 1
 i just came here to see if there was anybody saying that it looked like a session...
  • + 2
 Geez I thought I'd be the only one on here essentially sayin' he looks like one snobby French shit don't stank ski resortin' scarftard.
  • + 55
 Stuff your stupid batteries up your ass.
  • + 2
 Yep & while he's at it we can continue to lock-out whenever we want on the fly, seamlessly, at our own discretion with a bar mounted lever & a cable that's lighter & far more reliable that doesn't just stop working because it ran outta juice. :/
  • + 35
 63.7°. Thank god, 64 was much to steep, and 63.5 I am unable to get enough weight over the front. With 63.7, I now not worry. Thanks lapierre for creating a bicycle of my long sought out fashion. Without you, I would probably have crashed and be lying in a ditch on a different bike.
  • + 38
 Right, because round numbers make so much more sense. When they picked the proto they liked best and found that it was 63.7 they should have adjusted it to 63.5 or 64 for production like a real bike company would.
  • + 62
 I know what you's mean, i couldnt sleep at night when I found out my "kx250f" wasn't actually a 250, but a 249cc. I left it on the front lawn with a "free" sign
  • + 5
 Or just told everyone it's 64, sage makes a bigger difference
  • + 2
 All of these bikes are 0cc. Free pile for sure.
  • + 4
 And the world will come crashing down when you realize that when you upgrade to new tires it will go down to 63.5 and nothing will ever be the same again.
  • + 1
 Probably in talks with SRAM's snobby shit don't stank ski resortin' scarftard right now to see about licensing the Boost juice for "Boost 63.7" since Boost has become synonymous with the "sweet spot".

Or maybe he'll just go with "63B" if he don't like the SRAM tycoons scarf.
  • + 37
 whats gonna protect the carbon bash guard?
  • + 58
 Yo dawg, we heard you like carbon bash guards. So we added a carbon bash guard for your carbon bash guard!
  • + 28
 ...so you can guard you bash guard while you bash you bash guard guard.
  • + 24
 When will Lapierre learn to run a tape measure from one axle to the other?
  • + 86
 They can't. Their scarves get tangled in the tape measure while bending over and they get super frustrated.
  • + 3
 @aoneal you win the internet for the day, congrats
  • + 4
 He should get a Thurber Prize nomination for that one.
  • + 15
 Their trail and AM frames look quite a bit like Rocky Mountain designs.
  • - 1
 True! But RM should make a DH-bike
  • + 12
 I thought they look like the Nukeproof mega
  • + 36
 Rocky Mountain hit the lottery with their website domain...

"www.bikes.com"
  • + 15
 Will the new dh make me whip like Finn?
  • - 8
flag morcombemedia (Jul 13, 2015 at 0:57) (Below Threshold)
 Whip like Finn
  • + 10
 Still have press fit bb's Frown
  • + 8
 My exact thoughts. Even Ibis realized that press fit bb's were a big mistake. The new Ripley has threaded bb vs the previous version had the creaky press fit. I thought companies would learn that certain changes aren't really innovations but rather set backs. Stay with what's tried and trued bike industry.
  • + 1
 Apparently the current system of bolting up disc calipers to a frame was born of it being more efficient for manufacturs, hence cheaper build labour costs. This was a good thing, it also made our lives easier.. If you've tried setting them up the old way you'll know. Washer hell! Sadly though, seems press fit just doesn't benefit us, so most people don't want it (obviously some do). Actually, why was pressfit adopted? Bmx ditched it, what's the deal with it? Didn't we 'borrow' it from road bikes? Seems like a step backwards given modern manufacturing techniques. Who actually benefits from pressfit? And what's the carbon connection? Saves you having an internal shell?
  • + 1
 Pressfit means the frame around the bottom bracket is wider and stiffer, plus it makes frame manufacturing easier (no threads to cut into an aluminium frame (or metal inserts to bond into a carbon frame???)).
For all it is sold as bring stiffer the obvious reason it is so common will be that it is cheaper for manufacture. I'm not sure how much stiffer it makes a frame - maybe a couple of percent? I don't know if it is noticeable, but as long as it says stiffer on the marketing then people will buy it.
However, there is a solution in that you can buy an adaptor that you glue into the bb which means it accepts an English bb (i.e. a 'traditional' threaded type). I've one on my road bike and it is great. I'm going to get one for my mountain bike soon as pressfit bb's are less well sealed and harder to replace...
  • + 1
 I see. So if I inderstand it right, pressfit is usually mounted a bit like old skool USA bmx type? With a high quality 'longterm' grease? Then the adaptor gets glued into press-fit 'shell', right? So it's still removeable if need be? But you'd just 'unscrew' from the adaptor to change bb's? Would it stay still when you were change bb's? Rotational force on something designed to press. What have I missed?
  • + 1
 A pressfit bb is exactly like a headset - you just push it in from either side. It doesn't screw in. You tend to have the bearing covers and seals to try and prevent water ingressto the bearings, but IMHO they don't last as long as a traditional type. The adaptor is a metal tube that you glue inside your frame, and it has threads cut into it that you screw the traditional bb into. The bb therefore fits in exactly the the same way as if it was attached directly to the frame and doesn't spin, unless the bonding between the adaptor and frame failed for some reason. I've heard it is crazy strong glue though, so unlikely!
  • + 2
 Riiiiiight! So in a nutshell it's a device to return your brand new pressfit nonsense, back to threaded common sense, permanently. That's reassuring. Surely if loads of those sell, plus frames with threads, the manufacturers making pressfit mtb's will sober up! Haha
  • + 1
 You got it - search for 'FSA BB30 Threaded Adapter' and you'll see it is nothing more than a metal tube with threads cut in. Quite cheap and quite simple. I'm sure other brands must do them too...
  • + 5
 I rode one of the newer Zestys in a recent Outdoor Mag bike demo, and it is one of the noisiest damn bikes. The bike itself was quiet, but the constant electronic adjustment of the suspension was quite loud and fairly distracting, especially on more quiet pedally sections. Not my bag. I'll stick with mechs and clutches until they do something about that.
  • + 3
 Eh, just get a bumpin system powered by a car battery all shoved into an external frame camping pack that you can wear, brah.. First world problems= first world solutions!! lol
  • + 2
 Forget it for five years. They'll be much better quality/value by then. haaHa! But not if nobody buys them right? Hey.. can someone else buy electric stuff please??
  • + 2
 But if I got the car battery in my pack, where do I keep the brewskis?!
  • + 2
 I rode last years zesty at a demo day. Sales person practically begged me to try it. Accelerometer in the fork, a computer to analyze the data, a battery to power the computer, a solenoid to change the shock damping. These will be worth nothing in a few years when the parts are obsolete. And the whole time I rode it was Clicky... clacky... clicky/clacky.. clicky.. It wasn't cool it was annoying.
  • + 1
 Exactly. I'd rather hear a bunch of chain slap than all the electronic bull going on. It's (kinda) cool in theory, but not so much in application.
  • + 6
 All well and good but have they sorted the problems with pivot and frame wear on the chainstay and seatstay pivot?
Also lets hope they have brought there customer service and support upto date!
  • + 5
 You realize they are french? Fixing problems? More like making more of them.
  • + 9
 Was scrolling for e-bikes.
  • + 4
 and you only found Ei
  • + 4
 as I can say nothing about the technical aspect (due to the price tags cutting me off from all possibilities to ever lay hands on these bikes), I am going to say that Lapierres used to be more aesthetically pleasing, than now. But I bet they ride awesome
  • + 3
 Sorry, I know it's stereotyping a bit - but really, a French brand doing some funky stuff with overly complicated suspension doesn't seem like a great idea in light of decades of wonderful-concept-poor-execution Citroen cars that rode like little fluffy clouds for the first year and then ended up needing repairs all the time as soon as the warranty was over...
  • + 5
 Wonder why they shortened the shock length on the zesty? Beautiful, well engineered bikes from the looks of it though! All of 'em!
  • + 2
 I was confused as to that being a positive as well... thought the prevailing opinion in bike design is that shocks work generally better, the lower the leverage rate. shortening the shock suggests the opposite, & mentioning it smacks of a release written by a marketing drone who doesn't know how suspension works, & just asked the engineers "what's different on this years model?" when he should have been asking "what's better on this years model?"
  • + 2
 Dude, right? I gotta admit though, that electronic shock control is pretty badass.. I wonder if Dave Weagle is worried about job security? lol
  • + 2
 Nah, Dave Weagle designs suspension that works without all this bullshit.
  • + 1
 I rode an e:i bike, & as a person who runs Hope & I9 hubs, even I think the servo noise is too loud.
  • + 3
 For me, a really bad experience with this brand. Having bought a DH Team from 2012 half a year ago, the warranty could not offer me a new rear triangle had a fissure in it. They are only providing me a 2011 rear triangle from the lower bike which is the dh 720... not going to buy a Lapierre again ever.
  • + 4
 That's naughty. Buy a dartboard and print a photo of Gilles! Lol
  • + 1
 I really like the new Zesty AM platform, but don't dig the top spec. They should have saved some $ on the XX1 rear mech, which really makes no sense at all with only an X1 shifter, and rather spec better brakes. Many brands seem to to do this and its really sad.
  • + 4
 I like AM frame. Ditch electric shock, sram stuff bolt some Shimano components and you're ready to go.
  • + 5
 Lapierre offers an A la Carte program that lets you choose your build on its upper end range.
  • + 5
 By upper end range you mean carbon fiber? It would be really cool if you could build your bike with cheaper alu frame as well.
  • + 4
 F*ck yes EnduroriderPL! The company that gets the custom build right for "budget" alu frames is going to attract a lot of attention. What most of us "poor" alu $3k bike owners have wanted for years.
  • + 1
 Start the revolution! Hell yeah! Smile
  • + 1
 I thought A La Carte was Max not Gilles? Or does Gilles just claim same region of France like wine ?
  • + 2
 For all those worried about the PONS acquisition of Santa Cruz...it doesn't look like Lapierre being part of Accell Group has impacted their innovation or operation.
  • + 2
 Bring back the Froggy! It might not be the most fashionable of bikes but mines had a couple of years of regular abuse and is still going as good as ever.
  • + 2
 I am saddened by the overall quantity of available freeride/mini-dh bikes diminishing. Given that they want to give us fat bikes and e-bikes etc, just seems like a strange move to remove the bikes that fit perfectly between a full dh bike and an enduro bike, which lets face it can basically be used for 'xc', albeit to a certain level. Maybe people weren't buying 180mm bikes anymore. Do people think they're pointless? Maybe as suspension gets 'smarter' we'll see travel go up on enduro bikes. But it seems to me that, as many dh bikes now run 200-210mm+, some good 180-190mm bikes would arise. Are they out there? And is this 'genre/catergory', or what remains of it, largely focused in American/Canadian manufacturers?
  • + 2
 I had a froggy and loved it. I've never heard of a froggy frame cracking ever.
  • + 1
 Pics or...
  • + 3
 the new dh bike is tiny, a size large dh team has a reach only 8mm longer than a size small zesty.
  • + 4
 Compared to most other current WC frames, the front end of their large fits similar to most mediums (on paper at least). Definitely not a long bike.
  • + 2
 Wow, that zesty is quite roomy; close to a 25" tt and 18" reach for large, and a steep sa. Good #s
  • + 1
 Embarrassingly I STILL haven't managed to destroy my 2012 714, it's still in warranty until January next year, but I just know it'll crack a week later!
  • + 1
 Can someone please try to explain to me how the linkage of the dh works Ive been staring at it a lot and still can't figure it out. And why doesn't the dh bike have a name
  • + 2
 Single pivot design for the wheel. Frame moves forward and pulls the shock rocker with it but to make the shock compress and not just let the rocker rotate a link is installed limiting the degrees of freedom.
  • + 1
 Ah right thanks got it now i forgot that the swing arm rotates so it made the rest of the linkage not to make sense
  • + 1
 Looks like euro is falling behind on the aggresive 29r trend. Gt made this mistake w/sensor.
  • + 1
 Carbon is not an ideal material for impact absorbtion....Why use it as frame protectors? use rubber or aramid..
  • + 2
 honestly the EI auto works great and makes things easy.
  • + 1
 They need to brighten up the colour scheme of the dh bike....then I'd buy one!
  • + 1
 theczech: Good call. I just posted the two other DH color options in the gallery.
  • + 2
 Why so defensive, Gilles?
  • + 2
 They all look sick. The DH one mainly
  • + 1
 people that say this bikes are ugly are the ones that say that those shytt,y Xpresso bikes are nice....
  • + 2
 Great effort, I'll take a few of those dérailleur guards please
  • - 1
 would have liked to see a rock shox in frong and rear at midprice level.
are fox so much cheaper?!
by the way i have to wait for sale off of 2015 bikes, or have to sell my grandma
  • + 1
 So what happened to the Spicy? Full overhaul and 170mm at each end?
  • + 1
 Yes please!!
  • + 1
 Love my 2015 zesty am 527! with the awesome wide chain stays too!
  • + 1
 Yellow one please, that looks like fun.
  • + 1
 Is Gilles Lapierre in the mob cause these bikes are straight up gangsta!
  • + 1
 Links to an Argentinian football firm.
  • + 1
 Why is everyone hating in the french!!!!! Just kidding, they earned it.
  • + 1
 Status lights on the steerer cap is a brilliant use of space.
  • + 1
 This carbon bash guard looks more like aerodynamic wing.
  • + 2
 High tech as fuck
  • + 0
 For some reason the name Lapierre, sounds like a word referring to something that stinks.
  • + 4
 Lapoopierre
  • - 1
 "For some reason the name Lapierre, sounds like a word referring to something that stinks."

What, like a Frenchman? Bahahahaa I can get away with saying this cuz I am a very small fraction French.. And I a stinky mofo!
  • + 1
 can I have a new rapt pls. kthxbai
  • + 1
 I always found Dijon mustard a bit too zesty for my liking.
  • + 1
 Zesty looks like an RM Altitude
  • + 1
 Oh I just love people that wear scarves indoors...
  • + 1
 reminds me of a Bronson.
  • + 0
 I only like the look of the am827. The fluro yellow looks hideous.
  • + 1
 2016 EnduroScarf
  • + 0
 Ok who farted?
  • + 0
 Looks like a Nomad .
  • - 3
 Look like a session
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