Last Bikes Launch the 2021 Glen & Coal

Jun 18, 2020
by Dan Roberts  
Last Glen
The Last Glen
Last Coal
The Last Coal

Today Last bikes launch not one but two new bikes. With a bit of clever engineering and a couple of different parts, they are using the same frame to offer options for trail and enduro riding.

Sold as separate frames and bikes, the Glen and Coal use the same aluminium front and rear triangles with a different linkage and shock to adjust the bike suspension and intent.

The Glen, now in its second iteration, is a 29” wheeled, 145mm travel bike based around a 150mm fork while the Coal, now in its third iteration, is now a 29” wheeled, 160mm travel bike based around a 170mm fork.

Last Glen
Glen frame
Last Glen Details
• 29" wheeled trail bike
• 145mm rear travel
• 150mm fork travel
• 2.9kg frame weight
• Geometry and suspension adjusted per size
• Starting at €1799 for the frame w/o shock

Last Coal
Coal frame
Last Coal Details
• 29" wheeled enduro bike
• 160mm rear travel
• 170mm fork travel
• 2.9kg frame weight
• Geometry and suspension adjusted per size
• Starting at €1799 for the frame w/o shock






Last Glen
All aluminium frames with neat and clean details. The down tube is upped in size compared to the previous Glen and Coal versions.
Last Glen
Dropouts see extensive machining, along with the other frame parts, to drop weight. Rear triangle tubing has more rounded, ankle friendly, edges.

Construction & Details

The Glen and Coal frames are constructed from 6011 aluminium and are more strings to the aluminium renaissance bow of recent years, although they recently debuted their lightweight composite Tarvo. But don’t think that by using aluminium it signifies a less developed and poorer performing version than some of the composite superbikes out there.

Last are astute engineers and the frames host many details to up the strength while dropping the weight. The new frames start at 2.9kg and can be built up into what look to be incredibly capable bikes starting at 12.5kg.

The new versions of the Glen and Coal see a slightly larger down tube for improved stiffness and more rounded tube profiles on the rear end for less sharp edges around your legs and heels.

Last also take extra steps to machine all the bearing seats close to home in Germany, allowing them to have finer control on the tolerances and alignment of the bearing seats.

Last Glen
Both Glen and Coal use SRAM's Universal Derailleur Hanger.
Last Glen
Lower shock bolts are titanium on both frames, with the Glen also having a titanium upper shock bolt.

All cables are internal and use bolt-on pieces close to the head tube to secure the cables and some direct routing through the main pivot and chain stay bridge to avoid taking a route that requires a lot of cable slack to compensate for the travel.

Both frames use SRAM’s Universal Derailleur Hanger and have threaded BBs that can also take an ISCG adapter if required, screwed in between the BB cup and the frame.

Hopefully, no hardware finds its way under the washing machine as all the spacers in the rocker arm are captive and both frames use a titanium lower shock bolt. On the Glen, the upper shock bolt is also titanium and all these bolts are back compatible with their older Glen and Coal models.




Last Glen
Last Coal

Geometry & Sizing

Last size their bikes according to the intended rider size in cm, starting at 155 and going up to 195. There are five sizes in total for both the bikes and the chain stay length and seat angle vary per size. As the bike size increases the chain stays grow and the seat angle steepens, bringing balance between the front and rear centres and positioning the riders seated weight comfortably and further away from the rear.

The Glen and Coal do see geometry changes between them, due to the difference in fork length, but Last have a done a really good job of balancing the two bike’s geometry given that they come from the same platform.

The Glen, with its focus a little more on trail riding, has a slightly steeper head angle and lower bottom bracket to play with the reduced travel. Reach is a little longer, 10mm, and the seat angle is a touch steeper. But for a modern trail bike, it looks, on paper, like it could handle a lot.

The Coal, focussed more on enduro, has a slacker head angle and a slightly raised BB, but then has more travel and so would sag to almost the same position as the Glen. With that longer fork, the seat angle does slacken a touch but is still steep enough and in combination with the shorter reach it should result in a not too dissimilar seated position between the two bikes. With the Coal’s upped travel and purpose the slightly shorter reach, while still quite lengthy, should help keep the big travel bike easily manoeuvrable.

For both bikes, the 155 and 165 sizes do see a lower BB and come specced with shorter cranks to account for this.




Last Glen
The Glen and Coal use, like all other Last bikes, a single pivot linkage driven suspension system.
Last Glen
The connecting link between the rear triangle and rocker link can be swapped out for the MX Link, allowing the bike to be set up with a 27.5" rear wheel.

Suspension & MX Option

The frames use a single pivot linkage driven suspension design with the Glen using a 210 x 55mm shock for its 145mm travel and the Coal using a 205 x 65mm shock for its 160mm of travel. The frames change the upper rocker link to facilitate this change in travel and Last kept standard eyelets on the Glen and trunnion mount on the Coal to bring the overall shock lengths for the two bikes closer together, despite the differences in stroke.

Added to that Last offer an MX option for both frames that uses a 29” front wheel but swaps the rear to a 27.5”. The longer MX Link, that connects the rear triangle to the rocker link, compensates for the change in wheel diameter and keeps the geometry close to the full 29” bike. The MX option is available to spec at no upcharge when you purchase the frame and full bikes also change the spec to suit the smaller rear wheel.

Last Glen
Last Glen leverage ratio.
Last Coal
Last Coal leverage ratio.

Last measure the leverage ratio progression from the sag point to the end of travel and both the Glen and Coal have 41% in that respect. For a long time, Last has been using very high levels of progression citing the gains in sensitivity and bottom out resistance that it enables them.

While the Glen and Coal have the same percentage progression the bikes do differ slightly in the leverage ratio values, likely due to the change in linkage and shock stroke between the bikes.

Last Glen
Last Glen
Last Coal
Last Coal
Glen anti-squat and anti-rise left. Coal anti-squat and anti-rise right. The blue lines show the bike's adjusted kinematics per size, with the grey lines showing how they would have been if Last hadn't adjusted the kinematics to the changing centre of gravity of different sized riders.

Anti-squat and anti-rise values are high and fairly constant for both Glen and Coal and Last also worked on changing the kinematics per bike size to keep the acceleration and deceleration responses similar between the different sized bikes, accounting for the change in centre of gravity between different sized riders.




Last Glen
Last Coal
Glen, left and Coal, right, full builds featuring many of the upgrade options from Fox suspension, Shimano drivetrain and brakes, DT Swiss and Newmen wheels and Vecnum dropper posts.

Builds, Pricing & Availability

The Glen and Coal are available as frames, starting without shocks and going through most air and coil offerings from Fox and RockShox.

The Glen starts at €1799 for the frame without shock and up to €2488 for the frame with a Fox Factory DHX2. Full bikes are available starting at €3299 and the list of upgrades to the standard build is a long as my arm.

The Coal starts at €1799 for the frame without shock and up to €2488 for the frame with a Fox Factory DHX2. Full bikes are available starting at €3459 with again, the extensive list of upgrade possibilities.

Frames are available in completely raw, that can be re-polished if you get it scuffed, blue powder coat and black anodizing are available too with a choice of decal colours. Custom paint jobs are also available for a €799 upcharge and are done by 70ID, the same company that recently painted George Brannigan's custom Propain Rage.

Last also offer a pick up option in addition to their shipping option. You can meet the guys in Dortmund and have the bike setup up exactly right for you and even get out for a guided ride with them. Test rides are also possible and all information can be found on the Last website.

Last even offer a crash replacement, in addition to their 5-year bike park approved warranty, that extends past the first owner and lasts for 3 years.


Last Glen
Last Coal






117 Comments

  • 56 2
 2.9kg for the frame and the price is insane. A SC alu weights 1kg more and most Carbon frames are heavier. Way to go Last
  • 15 0
 It saya ‘starts at 2.9kg’ with different shock options. So its probably more like 3.5kg or 4kg with a coil. But that is still very good for aluminium.

I really like the look of these. Look a little bit like the new spech enduro with that linkage/rear triangle, but much nicer in my opinion.

Geo is on the money. Can’t wait for a review.
  • 4 24
flag DC1988 (Jun 18, 2020 at 5:24) (Below Threshold)
 Could be even lighter if they made their seat tubes a more reasonable length...
  • 13 0
 @DC1988: I’m 186cm. The 185 frame has a 455 seat post. My current bike has a 450mm seat post and I run a 210mm dropper with 20mm of post showing. These are plenty short enough!
  • 4 1
 @DC1988: yeah not sure what you're talking about. I'm in the same boat as the comment above, my current bike has a 450mm length with a 210mm dropped that isn't even slammed. 5mm wouldn't make a difference.

Go look at Alchemy if you want to see long seat tube lengths
  • 2 1
 @Richt2000: Yeah 415mm for a 175cm rider leaves loads of room, what are you on about?
  • 1 0
 @Richt2000: 4kg maybe for the XL/XXL frames with a coil.

For comparision: A similar priced Santa Cruz Hightower AL weights 700-900g more (frame only).

Reviews on the german sites were Always very positive
  • 2 0
 Weight is really good, Partly why I went with a Last Glen 12months ago, my XXL (195) was around 3.1/3.2kg without the shock.
  • 13 0
 @NotNamed: I don't have hard data to back this one up, but it seems to me that bikes like the Hightower AL is an aluminium interpretation of a bike whose shape was optimized to composite. This might lead to an inefficient design and consequently a heavier frame. This is one more reason to look for companies who actually put some effort into their alloy frames
  • 4 3
 3-4 years ago, 2.9kg for an alloy all montain frame was the norm!
  • 2 2
 one look at the leverage ratio start bump has me headed the opposite direction.
  • 3 0
 @payze: 3-4 years ago? maybe 7-8, and there were a lot more broken frames back then.
  • 2 0
 @payze: on the other hand, we also used to see way more cracked frames
  • 3 0
 @englertracing: oh come on, it's a tiny bump, and it happens super early. You would only feel it (if you have super-spidey-senses on the very mellowest of landings, in which case who cares?
  • 2 0
 @englertracing: Why? To me it looks like the initial 10% or so of the travel will be very supple
  • 3 0
 @englertracing: Regressive-progressive suspension leverages with the apex close to sag point are a very common way to get a supple suspension feel.
Care to explain why do you dislike it?
  • 1 1
 @ThinkTank45: it will be too supple at sag while not being supple enough before sag point. It can work relatively ok with coil, but it only enhances weaknesses of air shocks (worse small bump, less mid stroke support)
  • 2 0
 But how long will it... last?
  • 1 0
 @ThinkTank45: The bump drastically changes the speed of the piston during the stroke, which can make the damping feel weird. Going through 10ish mm, the shock will be pushing back less, and then start pushing back progressively more on the other side. From sag (which is really what matters), it's a nice smooth and fairly linear progression, great. What you might feel if the bump was bigger is that in the parking lot, from full extension, it might take a bit more of a push to get moving, but then it'll feel like it falls into the sag, which really is just fine. And that bump is so tiny, no big deal. If that bump that early in the travel let them get that sweet very linear line through sag to bottom out, then it's worth it!
  • 2 1
 Probably the Last bike I would consider buying.
  • 2 0
 @Mondbiker: why worse small bump? Do you unweight your bike when hitting them? If not, you'll be hitting them around the sag point... so best leverage just before sag is just great
  • 1 1
 @just6979: You would be surprised how often the suspension is fully extended especially on really rough stuff.
  • 2 0
 @Richt2000:
I'm about 195cm and I would never want a 510mm seat tube. My latest bike has a 480mm seat tube and can accommodate a 200mm+ dropper and could also allow the seat post to go higher for someone taller than me. Perhaps it's just the largest size with this issue, given my height I only ever look at the largest size!
  • 1 0
 @Mondbiker: Really rough stuff is not small bumps. Why the hell would I care about "small bump" compliance if I'm "on really rough stuff"?
  • 1 1
 @just6979: I don´t know about you but I have to go through the "small bump part of the travel" everytime I hit something from small through medium to large but maybe that´s just me. Same principle as with excessive LSC, you can have the softest hsc stack and all the oil flow in the world, till the HSC opens damage is already done, the wheel didn´t move away quickly enough and energy was transmitted to the sprung mass of the bike and rider. That´s why small bump compliance matters everywhere other than smooth flow/ jump trails. Now I´m not saying these bikes have kinematics messed up completely but there is just no point in having regressive curve there, even SC after x years learned it, it should be closed case by now.
  • 1 0
 @james-skipper: But someone at 4ft 9 can't size up to 528mm reach for full Enduro bro.
  • 1 0
 Same as Commencal
  • 1 0
 @DC1988: I have the 195 size with a 210mm Oneup Dropper and it fits with space to spare I am 193 tall.
  • 1 0
 I'm just gonna say that I'm super impressed with how well the bearings in my Coal are holding up, going on 3 years now, and not one of them are feeling rough yet, or have any slack, only greased them up a few times. The rear end is also super sensitive over small bumps and trail chatter, though I kinda regret not getting a rear shock with lock out or some form of pedalling platform.
  • 1 0
 @Mondbiker: There is no such thing as "small bump part of the travel". Current dampers are _not_ position sensitive. No matter where you are in the travel, it's going to react the same (for compression). And most any bumps, even small ones, _are_ mid- to high-speed events, unless you're just puttering along.

But this is not about dampers. It's about the leverage. And that tiny increase in leverage 10mm into the travel is not going to hurt you "on really rough stuff". Especially with modern air shocks and their big negative chambers that move quite quickly through the first 5-10% of the travel, this bike will go through that hump real quick and put you back into that sweet linear curve.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: Jesus, so first you say there aren´t small bumps in the rough stuff, fine. Now you argue that there isn´t small bump part of the travel. Let me try this, if you hit single typical small bump the part of the travel you use (which for average people on average setup hitting them at very average speeds is within 1/3 of available travel) that part of travel could be called small bump part of the travel, just like you have mid and bottom part of the travel. If you cannot understand that, feel free to call it initial touch or first 1/3 of travel whatever works for you. I never mentioned anything about position sensitive damping anywhere, even though there are damper that indeed are position sensitive today and are considered the best of them all by many (EXT, FAST, BOS, PUSH... in forks manitou, BOS, aftermarket upgrades AVA cartridges, smashpot)...Satisfied now? The point still stands, it makes no sense to have firmer start of the travel than later part.
  • 1 0
 @Mondbiker: It really doesn't matter, it's a tiny amount before sag point, if you are at extension, you will hit the ground with enough force that it wouldn't matter in any real world scenario.
  • 1 0
 @Losvar: and I said exactly that, that it is small to do much harm, just let´s not pretend it´s there for any performance reason.
  • 1 0
 @Mondbiker: no one said the hump was there for a performance reason. You said it was terrible, we refuted that. No one tried to say it's ideal that it's there, rather that it's not a big deal because it's well before sag, which would be your hypothetical"small bump travel". It's not the first part of the travel, because once you're sitting\standing on your bike, your at sag, not top out. Even going through rough stuff when the fork might top out as it goes over holes and such, well you're in rough stuff so the first 10mm of travel is going to go by _really_ fast and then you're into that nice linear curve. So the tiny early bump is not better, but it's worth it to get to that linear part ASAP
  • 1 0
 @just6979: I never said it was terrible.
  • 25 2
 Looks like a Knolly...which is a good thing
  • 10 0
 Could be the last bike I own
  • 5 0
 @scottlink: Last Call?
  • 19 0
 Madonna had a lovechild with a Fugitive and they named him Glen.
  • 8 1
 Glen was around before both.
  • 16 2
 If there's one standard that should be replicated throughout - it's the universal hanger.
  • 2 7
flag JDugan (Jun 18, 2020 at 8:47) (Below Threshold)
 all hangers are universal, if that's the one all manufacturers choose to use! calling it universal is just a pop word/marketing.
  • 3 0
 @JDugan: You must be fun at parties.
  • 1 2
 @Leicester: Cute. But am i wrong?
  • 13 3
 "threaded BBs that can also take an ISCG adapter if required, screwed in between the BB cup and the frame" Eh? Why the hell wouldn't you just put the tabs on properly, ridiculous with trails getting hairier, BBs getting closer to the ground and chains getting thinner, a lot of people need a solid mount for a guide + bash. Annoys me almost as much as my stupid 2 bolt specialized.
  • 16 2
 it's still a proper mount, with dedicated "notches" in the frame for the adapter to sit. many people aren't running guides or tacos on trailbikes. it's an acceptable compromise
  • 1 0
 @crisotop: Fair enough, still odd why they wouldn't just put a fixed one on.Granted a lot of people don't use them, but others do and if you look at the EWS etc, most riders and even the specialized team with their 2 stupid bolts are running them.
  • 2 0
 @pbuser2299: Being replaceable is a good thing when we're talking about tiny tabs that bear the brunt of a log or rock impact. A few companies are doing something similar and it's an outstanding idea IMHO.
  • 11 0
 Glen & Coal....sounds like an expensive Scotch.
  • 2 0
 Last bikes folks do spend a lot of time in UK & Scotland to ride the sweet trails center.
  • 9 0
 You go Glen Coal Coal
  • 3 0
 Seriously underrated comment
  • 4 2
 Wouldn't it make sense for the bike with the longer travel and slacker HTA to have a steeper STA? Not vice-versa? Whenever a brand uses a "flip chip" or different linkage, same frame, etc. it always seems the slacker bike still has the slacker STA. I'm no engineer, just saying it still seems to get the "over-forked" effect.
  • 5 0
 If they're using the same main frame, then the angle relationship between the head tube and the seat tube is fixed. So, if you make the head angle slacker, the seat angle gets slacker. I suppose they could have designed the trail version with a layback seat post, and the enduro around an inline post.
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: Factory angleset!
  • 1 0
 @yupstate: might have made sense, though they'd probably have been heckled in the comments for doing that!
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: radon is doing exactly that and comment section was livid.
  • 3 0
 Beautiful! Now please do a 130-140 version with 66 HA and slightly shorter chainstays for more playfulness. New Clay? That might give the Knolly Fugitive a run for its money and the title of most fun bike out there.
  • 1 0
 100% this. Still looking for a modern geo aluminum 27.5 bike. Everything is carbon (SC) or 29 (Habit)
  • 1 0
 Longer travel enduro bike has less reach (in the same size) than the shorter travel trail bike... maybe maxing out the reach isn't always the best? Yes, I know it's because it's the same frame over-forked, but, still, if they're OK with 10-11mm shorter reach on the "enduro" model, then maybe this is further proof that the usual "always longer" pattern is wrong.
  • 2 0
 LAST is not the company to push boundaries in geometry, these two are very brave for conservative company regardless of those 10mm.
  • 2 0
 Spec choices look good too. I'm so pleased Shimano are back in the game and I don't need to keep delaying a bike purchase to avoid a Sram nx build. Coal MX just made it onto my not-so-shortlist.
  • 1 0
 They look like awesome bikes but... fornus US riders they wont sell... even if you go to the factory !
???,

Looks like I’ll be buying another Orbea instead..
“we can't sell to customers from the US or Canada, even if they would collect it here and we are not allowed to help customers from the US or Canada to get one.
Sorry.


Best regards,
Michael”
  • 4 0
 If you're not first you're....
  • 3 0
 How many mtb frame brands are there? I feel like every few days I hear of another brand. There must be several hundred.
  • 4 2
 As a person not interested in KOMs or racing, i'm really not interested in 29ers. If they had a 27.5 option id be interested.
  • 3 0
 They do. The Coal V2 was 275" as was the Clay V2 - they still have sell those frames.
  • 3 0
 It's like a single pivot knolly
  • 1 0
 Exact thing I thought when first seeing the frame.
  • 3 0
 Size-optimized geometry, size-optimized kinematics at Last!
  • 1 0
 Size optimized kinematics is the buried lead in all this. Does any other bike mfg do that? Size optimized geometry is a bandwagon ATM but haven't heard of Size optimized kinematics from anyone else.
  • 1 0
 Progressive is good, but 41% is a lot. Your rebound/compression settings will be 41% different off the top compared to bottom out as well.
  • 1 0
 Yes, but isn't that a good thing ? I had lots of problems with linear leverage ratios and shocks completely filled with spacers, where you couldn't setup the rebound right. Either it was too slow of the top or way too fast deeper in the travel. Wich would catapult you out if you bottom out
  • 1 0
 @emptybox: My dumb question here. How is the progressiveness coming from a suspension shock vs. a frame linkage (leverage) different? Are they replaceable like linear coil shock + progressive frame or progressive air shock + linear frame? Or, they are something different?
  • 6 0
 @okavango: Pretend the rear shock is just like a fork- it directly attaches to the wheel. As you compress the shock, if it takes an increase in added force for each additional inch of compression, the shock itself is rising. This is the case for air shocks, esp. low volume air shocks. A coil shock is going to be almost linear- if 100 pounds compresses it 1 inch, then 200 pounds will compress it 2 inches.

When you put it in the frame, you are compressing the shock with a series of levers. Bikes like this have a falling leverage rate, meaning 1 inch of actual wheel movement starting from the sag point will compress the shock less than the final inch of actual wheel compression movement. At the beginning its like compressing the shock with a longer lever, making it easier (softer). The last inch of travel is like compressing with a shorter lever, so its harder to compress and bottom out.

The progressive nature of the frame means that the force that the shock pushes back changes- and the force that the shock pushes back with is affected by rebound and compression settings. So the damping you get changes for different parts your travel.

If the change in force needed to compress comes from the shock spring instead, then the rebound and compression are less affected by the position you're in in your travel.
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: Thanks a lot for your kind explanation! I kinda understand it now.
  • 1 0
 This thing with a 50mm stroke shock and a 140 fork seems like the perfect trail bike in my opinion...(I don't need a lot of travel)
  • 3 0
 Finally, a bike named after my race finishing position!
  • 2 0
 But what’s the anti-squat @ 52t?
  • 1 0
 Hopefully they're as much fun to.ride as my (very) old Last Herb was back in the day
  • 2 0
 These look like modernized Ironhorse 7point's. Looks great!
  • 2 1
 I'd like to see a review of this - the MX link for mulleting is great to see and the frame only price is good.
  • 1 0
 I think the names to appropriate for my race results for me to dare to buy one.
  • 2 0
 Wouldn't buy a Glen I am afraid of Negan
  • 3 0
 NO SHIPPING TO USA !
  • 1 0
 Really? They're shipping mine to aus without issue.
  • 2 0
 @SprieFKinkle I messaged them on Insta G and they confirmed this, which is a total bummer. Seemed like a solid contender for my next bike.
  • 2 0
 They probably need FDA to approve it's food safe or some other bullshit, it's supposedly hell to sell anything to USA from abroad due to your insane broad patents and other legal trickery landing pretty much everyone in trouble with Specialized.
  • 1 0
 They wont even sell to you if you show up in Dortmund!! So weird
  • 1 0
 Have Last ever made an ugly bike?!
  • 1 0
 I have absolutely no use for that Coal - but damn I want one.
  • 1 0
 Frankenbike features like GG, that’s awesome
  • 2 0
 Great looking bikes!
  • 1 0
 5 year warranty that lasts 3 years?.... I'm confused.
  • 1 0
 5 years for carbon frames, 2 years only for aluminium?! this is a bummer! If it had 5 years for aluminium I would be making a frame order.
  • 1 0
 Warranty extends to non original owners. This is awesome.
  • 1 1
 At last, launch the donut!!
  • 1 0
 Last but not least
  • 1 0
 So finally, Last is First!
  • 2 2
 29 definitely seems to have taken over
  • 2 1
 Great ... after boost and 27.5, my parts will lose their worth another time
  • 5 0
 There's been multiple new 27.5 bikes released recently. Ibis Mojo and Santa Cruz 5010 in the "Last" week. More 29ers these days but I wouldn't say "taken over".
  • 3 4
 Looks like a 2009 Giant Reign
  • 1 2
 why 145mm and not 150mm? why 160mm and not 170 like the fork?
  • 1 0
 I’d’ve home 146.3 mm travel
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