Leyzne's New Chain Checker, Mini Pump, & Hidden Tools - Pond Beaver 2021

Apr 7, 2021
by Mike Kazimer  



Pocket Drive HV Pump

The Pocket Drive HV pump ($29.99 USD) measures only 145mm long when compressed, which makes it easy to stash in a hip pack, a jersey pocket, or position next to a water bottle cage without it taking up too much room.

The body of the pump is CNC machined from aluminum, with a flexible hose that's stashed inside when it's not in use. Once it's time to fix a flat, simply unthread the hose to remove it, thread it into the other side of the pump, and you're ready for re-inflation. The end of the hose threads on to either a Shrader or presta valve depending on the orientation, and there's even a little bleed button that's used to release some hose pressure before removing it and going on your way.



Chain Gauge

With a price of only $10, there's really no reason not to have a chain checker in your tool box somewhere, since replacing a chain every so often can help prolong the life of an expensive cassette. Lezyne's offering is a go / no-go style of gauge, with 50% and 75% marking that show how much wear has occurred. The stainless tool also has a valve core tool, a chain hook, and of course, a bottle opener, since chain checking is thirsty work.



Dual Insert Kit

The Dual Insert kit hides a multi-tool in once side of a handlebar, and a tire plug kit in the other (it's also possible to purchase either tool separately). Different o-rings are included to ensure a the correct fit for different inner handlebar diameters, and there are three different tool size options to choose from.

The large size shown here has 2,3,4,5,6,8, and 10mm hex bits, along with T10, T25, and T30 torx bits, and a Phillips head screwdriver. The bits are held with magnets to the the body of the tool, and there's another magnet in the 3-position head. I've found that the bits are a little hard to remove due to the strength of the magnets, and they're also easier to drop in the dirt compared to a regular multi-tool. The flip side is that the size of the tool does allow more leverage than you'd be able to achieve with a typical multi-tool, and there is a very sturdy, positive feel to it in use.

While the hidden multitool isn't exactly my cup of tea, I do like the tire plug kit. Like the multi-tool, it's held inside a handlebar with o-rings, and it has an insertion tool with five plugs that are stored inside the aluminum canister.

MSRP: $69.99 USD. Weight: Tubeless insert kit: 35 grams, Large tool insert: 90 grams.


ride.lezyne.com








114 Comments

  • 120 5
 Who here has had on of those tubes pull out a valve core on the trail, even when you use the little depressurizer button? It's enough to swear you off those pumps for life. Which is too bad because they're otherwise really good.
  • 47 2
 Lezyne recommends a drop of Loctite on the valve core threads to prevent that, but I'm sure most people miss that step. Maybe they need to integrate a valve core tightening tool into the pump somewhere.
  • 48 9
 ok that only happens if you twist it on past 2 turns which is all that it needs. de-cored once shame on leyzne, de-cored twice shame on you.
  • 6 0
 Blackburn pumps gone with a core tool in them.
  • 7 2
 Come with...
  • 18 2
 @mariomtblt: I know the lezyne guys and like them alot but this is a design flaw. they would sell more pumps if they fix the issue.
  • 8 3
 Yup. Won’t use one of their pumps as spent too many times pumping a road tire up only to have this happen and then having to start all over again.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: been there, Now I carry one just in case
  • 2 0
 @onemanarmy: so do a lot of the Leyzne models (alloy drive for example), odd that they’ve passed up here
  • 1 0
 @alexsin That was my first foray into tubeless. I burped a tire and went to pump it up and the valve core came with it. I do keep a valve core tool with me now but honestly I haven't had it happen since.
  • 20 0
 It’s called getting “Lezyned”.
  • 2 0
 Some of their pumps now come with a valve core tool integrated into the hose. You can also buy it separately.

ride.lezyne.com/products/1-mp-prsdr-v2m04
  • 3 0
 I'll take it over working the whole valve stem loose.
  • 4 7
 Happened to me a few times but then I taped old Mavic valve tool to my lezyne pump. It's never been a big issue with MTB tires as they loose pressure slowly, but Christ almighty I have been swearing when this happened on 32C road tire which drops pressure very fast after the valve gets undone and it takes forever to inflate it with Lezyne HP pump. I am now using One Up for MTB. Lezyne just for gravel.
  • 24 1
 Clearly we need a new valve standard:
Make it slightly beefier, 8mm diameter would be perfect.
Also, its $1 aftermarket metal valve cap could be used as a core removal tool if ever needed.
Maybe give it some slightly German name and done. No more annoying valve cores and bent presta goddamn piece of sh%!"%it.
Seriously it's 2021 and even 35mm id rims come presta only.
  • 5 0
 @mikekazimer: Red 271 for valve cores, got it.
  • 6 2
 @ben314: we call it Gruber... and what do you do with it if it doesn't work? "Hit it again!"
  • 5 0
 @mikekazimer: when I carry a pump it gets used on other people's bikes way more than mine
  • 4 0
 I've been using Lezyne pumps for ages, but I've never had that happen. I always check for it, but it hasn't happened. I tighten my cores pretty tight though.
  • 3 2
 Agree, happened to me far too often, pump went on ebay for £5 and I bought a topeak mini morph and never looked back. Best mini pump ever....
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer:
No just ditch the screw-on for a clip on...
  • 11 0
 @ben314: Please can we talk about this more on here? I see literally no advantage to running a presta valve on a modern rim yet it comes loaded with downsides (checking pressure, unthreading cores, needing an adapter for "non-bike" compressors..).

I'm actually not having any real issues with Presta other than the occasional struggle pushing stan's through the stem, and I only own Lezyne pumps, but just working on my bike and knowing there's something so simple and superior drives me very slightly crazy.
  • 1 0
 @thustlewhumber: I thought I had to use black. my bad
  • 2 0
 @ben314: obviously we should call it a dub boost valve. 7.99mm complete with valve torque cap.
  • 1 2
 honestly, i hate those pumps.. always pull the valve core out, takes a million pumps to inflate... my go-to pump trail has a foot clip and handle that folds out so you can use it like a floor pump, as well as a built in pressure gauge.
  • 2 0
 Those pumps also get a bunch of water in them if you leave it on your bike.
  • 7 1
 Simple, just tighten your valve cores tighter and don't tighten the pump hose too tight
  • 6 0
 I love my lezyne HV pumps. At first I was removing cores all the time, but I've learned to snug them down a little more, and zero removed cores in the last 2 years, in over 100 uses. I'm stoked for this pump, I'll definitely be getting one.
  • 1 0
 Don't need to screw on tight. Then never a problem.
  • 1 2
 @jpcars10s: there are other pumps with a hose who don't have that srew system. They just have the leaver you find on a floor pump.
I do get it why they can't integrated that.

My pump is a cheap 15 bug's one but is working for 5 year's now. Small and light with enough air volume, what do you want more ?
  • 1 0
 @ben314: how about the valve core threads in reverse so that pumps like that will tighten them on removal of the hose.
But really a much bigger tube for easier sealant delivery would be ideal.
  • 3 0
 @Explodo: I've been using one of their pumps for probably a decade too. Love it and have never even considering this a possibility. Are people cranking them down on their valves or what?
  • 2 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: I really wonder this too. But I also on thread it on until just barely snug. People must be cranking the hose down as tight as they can get it?
  • 5 2
 @mariomtblt: if you actually can't figure out how to tighten up a valve core that's what happens. We also can go schrader instead and be done with this all together
  • 6 0
 @ben314: maybe call it presta boost
  • 3 0
 @MrDuck:
I had a presta valve get sheered off by trail debris in a race once, super frustrating.
Schraders are more durable, convenient and move more air, making seating tires easier.

Ive drilled a carbon rim out to accept schrader before, worked just fine, but could use longer aluminum valve stem.
  • 2 0
 @ben314: how about we call it a schrader valve - or just rader valve
  • 1 0
 @adespotoskyli: oops meant to give u props instead of downvote
  • 2 2
 What am I missing here? I went to CO2 cartridges and will never go back to a pump for the rare time I need air on the trail....
  • 8 3
 @Regamaro: Greta Thundberg hates you
  • 1 0
 @getsomesy: Thanks for that comment, makes me think I'll give this carbon drilling a shot once I get some nice Schrader valves!
  • 2 0
 @MrDuck: if the knobs making carbon rims figure out that they can make the hole bigger you wouldn't have to do it your self. Even in the case you desperatly needed to have the fiddly prestas, you could use an adaptor.
  • 3 0
 @ben314: Preach it, brother! I don't get why the mtb world is stuck in presta land
  • 2 7
flag OrangeGoblin (Apr 8, 2021 at 1:55) (Below Threshold)
 I Will NEVER buy a Lezyne pump - it's an ongoing joke for nigh on a decade that every time one of our riding group use one, it's 50/50 whether it'll pull the valve core out. The Loctite thing is a joke - why should I have to account for bad product design? - So many other pumps out there that just push on with zero risk.
  • 1 0
 @OrangeGoblin: only had it happen once with my road bike. But then I run scrader valves on all my MTBs and the Wife’s Presta valves have always been put on properly and tightened every now and again when I check the bolts on it.
Also the nozzle on a small bottle of Stan’s fits in the end of a scrader valve perfectly when topping up.
  • 4 0
 @OrangeGoblin: zero risks? I've seen many cut presta valves because of pumps not using a hose, pumping a tire and trying not to shake the valve is impossible. Pumps with hose are much safer and easier to use and the core tool is a piece of plastic that can be stored anywhere, keep one with you and tighten that core. Your inability to tighten a valve core it's not pumps fault, ffs
  • 3 0
 I´ve been using a Lezyne Floor Pump and several smaller pumps with their thread-on connection for almost 10 years - never had a single problem. What am I doing wrong?
  • 3 0
 I am impressed with how much discussion one can have around a tiny little pump. If Lezyne could get a penny for every word... I forgot what Pinkbike was like Big Grin

Few more and we'll beat MTBR discussion whether to use oil or loctite on nipples. It was like Battle of Hastings...
  • 1 0
 Funny, that is always the first thing I think about when I see Lezyne pumps... the only pump of them I use is the shock pump, there it does not matter...
  • 3 0
 The first time my Lezyne pump pulled out a valve core, I tightened the valve core back down and quit screwing the pump on so tightly. It hasn't been a problem since. I can't seem to reliably operate most lever style pumps, so I prefer the thread on style.
  • 1 0
 @justwaki: That's kind of funny especially given that both are correct. Actually Park Tools in their threaded BB install video specifically says that if you don't have loctite to apply some grease to the threads. Not hard to understand why that is, dry threads aren't going to torque properly.
  • 2 0
 @friendlyfoe: the higher beings proposed oil at the nipple head entering the rim and loctite at the spoke/nipple interface. Except some bearderd IPA drinkers who insisted on linseed oil being where it's at. Oh boy, that was a read
  • 1 0
 @justwaki: As someone who has never built a wheel, wouldn't it make more sense to also use grease on the spoke/nipple interface? That way you get correct torque and aren't breaking the loctite when you true the wheel? (and yes I know exactly what I'm starting right now hehe)
  • 1 0
 @friendlyfoe: Spoke prep. Wheelsmith is my strong favourite, feels like something in between grease and loctite which sounds odd, but it's the best I can describe it.
  • 1 0
 @MrDuck: I'm to the point where I'm going to just gorilla tape Schrader valves in for ease of use
  • 1 0
 @friendlyfoe: you can grease the nipple from the head so it doesn’t reach the bottom where spoke goes in. And then apply loctite on the spoke from half of the thread depth and deeper in. In this way loctite and grease never meet yet both are in there.
  • 27 1
 All Lezyne pumps ship with a free valve remover. Whether you want it or not.
  • 11 13
 That’s just silly. Lezyne pumps ARE valve core removers!
  • 10 3
 @bogey: whooosh!
  • 16 0
 The handlebar insert tools are a really clever solution, and I really want to like them.

But all of my recent grips have been single clamp lock on grips that don't use bar plugs (ie, they are integrated into the grip, like the DMR Deathgrip, Diety Knuckleduster, SDG Thrice, etc). And I'd assume that style of grip is pretty common these days. Which means I'm a bit curious who is buying these, and how they are using them.

Are people only running these tools on dual clamp grips? Or are single clamp grip people cutting the ends off of their grips to use the tools?

Thoughts?
  • 3 0
 My mate is using the Samurai Sword tubeless tyre plugs in his Deathgrips. No issues.
  • 8 0
 Think you answered your own question.

I run a Granite handlebar tool with Renthal grips cut - its fine.

Also , I use the space in the other side of bar for a zip-loc bag rolled up that has spare chain links, a few spare tyre plugs, steri-strips and a valve core tool!

The closed-end of Renthal/Deathgrip style (not cut) ones keeps it all in there without a plug to eat up space. You just need an Allen key handy to slide grip off to get it.
  • 2 0
 I'm using the granite design tire plug and chain tool in mine with single clamp chromag grips. Works great because granite design tools actually include handlebar diameter end caps to fit inside grips or as the end cap of a dual clamp grip.
  • 2 0
 I have this tool and just cut the end off my grip. Works good but doesn't fit all my bars.
  • 8 0
 I don't care for the tools in the handlebars, either. Largely because I kinda hate having metal bar plugs. I'd much sooner use rubber or plastic bar end plugs. I wonder if there isn't another reason for this: heavier things at the end of the bars helps dampen vibration.

Furthermore, I think the crank tube is a perfect spot for tools and I'm disappointed neither Lezyne nor Wolftooth have made inserts for their tools in that position. Maybe all it would take is some bigger o-rings?
  • 1 0
 @Allen82: Had the Samurai Swords, but broke them all getting too close to trees. Narrow tree gates and stuff that goes into the bar don't work for me.
  • 3 0
 @Molesdigmyjumps: So you just need your multi tool so you can take off the grip to get to your multi tool...? Smile
  • 1 0
 I've got the Wolf Tooth Encase system and after some trimming it works great for me. It fits all of my carbon bars (Raceface, OneUp, and Santa Cruz). I run the grips I got used to a long time ago (Ergon GS1/GP1) which aren't popular anymore but work great with these having an open end plug design.
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: I agree. As for diameter there's nothing gorilla tape can't take care of. I'll have to give that a go
  • 19 2
 Just what I need for my extra low weight Next SL carbon bars!
  • 10 0
 Also, 55g differential between the two sides. Pretty sure that's why I can only whip to the right.
  • 1 0
 Yerp, bar weights, and uneven at that. I can't get my engineering head around this. Central in the stem, or in the crankset, yeah, sure, otherwise .... nah.
  • 11 2
 I bet that pump takes like 2 hours to inflate a tire lol. But I guess it's still better than walking out if you get a flat.
  • 10 6
 "With a price of only $10, there's really no reason not to have a chain checker in your tool box somewhere,"

With a price of only $16-$25, there is no reason no to have a legit chain checker that checks actual pin to pin length by measuring from the same side of two different rollers, not inside roller to inside roller. Tools like this one will very often read short (ie: chain is good for longer than is really is) unless the chain is spotless internally. Especially since some SRAM Eagle chains have oversized rollers.

SHIMANO TL-CN42 or Park Tool CC-4 or similar should be the only option. Get rid of the other inaccurate types.
  • 7 2
 Or you can use the measuring tape or ruler you already have in your house. A new chain measures exactly 12” from center to center of pins. Very easy to check wear.
  • 3 0
 @rickybobby18: "but then i have to do math"
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: well yeah, of course, but since this is an article about specialized tools, figured anyone already doing plain measuring isn't going to be buying a bad chain checker anyway.
  • 2 0
 @rickybobby18: 0.5% of 12" is 0.06". Maybe you have better eyesight then me but I would not say it is very easy to reliably check this with a ruler, especially if you take variables in chain tension into account. Calipers give you a better chance but then you run into the problem of measuring on different sides of the rollers.
  • 1 0
 You can buy cheap vernier calipers and measure far more accurately than a tape measure. Plus it's a useful tool to have. The chain wear gauge, like a lot of single use tools, only makes sense for a bike shop. I didn't check this guy's numbers, but this is the process:

www.pinkbike.com/u/notdannyhart/blog/how-to-measure-chain-stretch-using-a-vernier-caliper.html
  • 1 0
 Park Tool CC-4 is the way to go. It either goes in, or it doesn't. No trying to fuss and measure a dirty chain, using an adjustable measuring tool or anything like that; this means its even friendly to use after you've had a few beers when trying to remove your welded on Sram Dub cranks.
  • 2 0
 @kcy4130: That method is just as bad as the bad chain checkers. Inside to inside of rollers is error prone unless the chain is super clean _internally_. Also needs different numbers if a chain has even slightly different roller sizes.

You need accurate pin to pin length, and trying to push the rollers apart isn't necessarily going to give you that. If you have calipers, just put the points right on the pins on the outside of the chain and measure that.; otherwise you'd be better off with a good "same side of the rollers" chain checker as mentioned above.
  • 1 0
 Not to be pedantic but chain checkers generally measure wear at 0.5% and 0.75%. This one is marked 50% and 75%. I know that this is a common misconception but it's hard to feel good about a measuring tool that is off by two orders of magnitude.
  • 1 1
 @pinspanner: It's not 2 magnitudes off, it's just a different scale that happens to corelate.

The 0.5% and 0.75% are literally percent "stretched". If you consider a completely and 100% toasted chain to be 1% stretched, as most do, then the 50% and 75% marks line up just fine.

0.5% "stretched" = 50% worn = replace if you care about your cassette
0.75% "stretched" = 75% worn = replace before a long trip even if you don't care about your cassette
1.0% "stretched" = 100% worn = replace ASAP because it's going to shift like crap and could start skipping any time now
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: While I agree with your assessments of a chain's condition at 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 percent stretch I disagree with the correlation between 0.5% elongation and 50% wear life.

This logic indicates that a chain that I consider too worn to continue using is only 75% of the way through its life.

At any rate, your comment kind of proves my point. Measurement tools should be objective and precise, not based on a subjective scale.
  • 2 0
 @pinspanner: Well, this checker is the bad design anyway, doesn't really matter if it's scale is off because no one should be using it anyway.
  • 8 0
 Wolf tooth wants their design back..
  • 5 3
 I stopped using my Lezyne pump due to the screw on valve system. I run tubless and love refilling my tires via valve stem. So using loctight on the valve core is pointless and just an added step. But out of the trails I don't like losing air because the pump chuck is also unscrewing the core.
  • 2 0
 One up pumps with tool stash takes care of two of these tools in one deal w/frame mount next to yo water bot the pumps work great too and there’s extra storage for spare mas link etc. I’ll never buy another tool or pump
Til I loose this one. up. tool
  • 1 0
 I remember that about 5-10 years ago people used to complain that they could feel if their bars were a tiny bit off centre as it caused them all sorts of bother with their bars not being perfectly balanced. LoL.
Now we’re all up for shoving all sorts of heavy things in the ends of them. Are all these tools (Lezyne, Wolftooth, etc) the same weight for each side? Or were people just talking out of their arses all those times.
  • 2 0
 I think you know the answer to that...
  • 1 0
 I could never get why they don't just design screw-on pump outlets or FV-to-AV adapters in such a way that it screws onto the valve stem or neck rather than the valve core. Typical valve adapters have the o-ring seal before the threads, which mate to the core to press the seal into the stem's rim. If you orient the threads first before the seal, with the threads mating, this time, on the stem, it seals the same but doesn't touch the valve core.

Again, what am I (or they, preferably) missing here?
  • 7 3
 Thread on pumps. When will companies learn?
  • 16 1
 Every time a thread-on has unthreaded a one of my valve cores, it was because the valve core started out too loose. Take 5 minute and snug all of your valve cores down now and you're all set.
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: lol thanks for the tip!
  • 4 0
 @CircusMaximus: No problem. And I agree that when it does happen, it's universally barely above freezing, pissing rain, and feels like the absolute worst betrayal imaginable .
  • 3 2
 @pmhobson: its nice to have hand tight valve corr. Can easily let all air, seat bead, add sealant that way. Only really matters if you have a stupid lezyne pump that u have to spend 10 sexonds spinning on then off instead of just flipping a lever
  • 2 2
 The thread-on connection is far more reliable than any lever-based solution. Easy to clean if you have to use it in the mud, no rubber seals to wear out and misalign, no pressure loss when removing the pump head, etc. It´s not that hard to figure out how to use a simple threaded connection, is it?
  • 3 0
 I went Schrader valve tubeless and am loving it. See no need to ever go back to presta.
  • 6 0
 Presta sucks. Unfortunately I'm too big of a whimp to drill my rims. The industry should've moved away from presta years ago.
  • 2 0
 @Notbn: The hole is not much bigger than the presto hole. Fully charged battery on the drill and a decent bit. I have Spank rims and it was super easy. Really minor clean up with a small round file. Got the valves on Amazon and they seem fine to me. Clean any sealant off the valve core once a year and it's perfect.
  • 2 0
 @Notbn: just do it already. Ive drilled carbon even, no problem. If u have deep rims can be hard to find long enough valve stems. They make aluminum shrader valves.
  • 2 0
 @mtbschrader: id previouslyy had problem in very deep carbon rim with another brand. I see that now, cool.

We should start a movment for schrader valve rim option again. I bet some of the cooler small brands would give em to you like that if asked. Only reason i Dont drill is procore valves and warranty concerns.
  • 1 0
 Damn another Leyzne product I need, I’ve been packing around the mini stainless for years and a separate shitty Blackburn with glue patches for those friends who don’t pack tools .
  • 1 0
 Lezyne makes some pretty cool stuff. i recently bought the combination torque / tool wrench set . i was really surprised when it arrived at how well made it is .
  • 1 0
 *sees something cool*
*checks price*
*sighs*

Jokes aside, the pump is sick for that price!
  • 2 0
 I use the push on adapter for my Lezyne floor pump.
  • 1 0
 Push on would be chill
  • 2 0
 How in the world is there not a Dual Insert joke in here yet?
  • 1 1
 Give me some more of that yummy pond beaver. I’m land shark and otter taste like under weight seal...
  • 1 0
 I had this pump, nothing to complain, really tiny and do the job
  • 2 2
 These looks like some high quality pumps for a spicy price as well!
  • 5 0
 $30 is Spicy? Does that mean cheap, or expensive?
  • 13 0
 @z-man: It means you have to drink milk after you use it...

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