Liteville 601 MK 3 - Review

Mar 4, 2015
by Richard Cunningham  
 
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2015 Liteville 601
REVIEW:
Liteville 601 MK 3

BY: R. Cunningham
IMAGES: Greg Lambert
RIDER: Harold Preston


Liteville’s 601 was well ahead of its time when it was released nearly five years ago. Its robust aluminum chassis was as light as some trail bikes, yet its long-legged suspension and slack geometry were closer to the gravity machines of the period. Today, most riders would classify the 190-millimeter-travel Liteville as an enduro racer, but the 601 was born for a higher purpose: the European definition of big mountain freeriding.

The Alps slice the European subcontinent in half. Centuries of warfare and undocumented trade between the countries that border the range and later, the onslaught of mountain climbers and adventurers, have created a rugged trail network that is unmatched elsewhere in the world. Imposing as the Alpine massif may be, trails lead to most every peak and pass. They certainly were not made with cyclists in mind, and while many routes have proven to be navigable by good bike-handlers, the prize summits in the Alps are not to be trifled with – not by mortal men.

This is the domain of Liteville’s 601. It was designed to push the envelope of where a mountain bike can go and what it can be trusted to do in an environment where there are huge consequences for small errors. The 601 has earned a number of first descents, and it has also earned the respect of select all-mountain riders, who discovered that the same attributes that make the Liteville a big mountain freerider also make it one of the rare birds that can hit anything at a bike park, and still make the cut, should its owner decide to climb a thousand meters of singletrack that afternoon.

Liteville sells the 601 as a frame kit in six sizes, ranging from X-small to XX-large, and each has dedicated geometry and wheel diameters. Few bicycles are as rigorously engineered and tested, and Liteville backs up its claims to that end with a ten year transferable warranty. The frame and its RockSHox Vivid Air DH shock retail for $3150 USD. To put it bluntly, the 601 MK 3 is not for everyone. You either get it or you don’t, and that’s OK for the one percent who ride them, because where they are going, there probably won’t be anyone hanging around asking questions.


601 MK 3 Details:

• Purpose: Freeride, technical trail, enduro racing
• Chassis: welded custom 6000-series butted aluminum frame. 4-bar Horst-Link type suspension, 190mm travel.
• Fork/ travel: Designed for 180mm forks (Fox 36 Factory Van R used in test)
• Syntace X-12 thru-axle system and integrated SCS II lower chainguide.
• Shock: RockShox Vivid Air DH, custom tune.
• Adjustable shock mount to allow fine tuning of frame geometry
• Tapered head tube with integrated bearings and 1.5-degree angular adjustment option
• Patented Neutral Center Path cable routing
• Liteville Scaled Sizing: frame geometry changes between sizes.
• Wheel sizes change with frame sizing
• Ten year transferable warranty, including race usage
• Sizes: X-small, small, medium, large, X-large and XX-large
• Available colors: anodized black, raw aluminum
• Weight: (stated, frame and shock) 3320grams. (complete, as tested: 13.76kg / 30.27 pounds)
• MSRP: $3150 USD (sold as frame and shock only)
• Contact: Liteville USA, Liteville DE
Liteville 601 2015
bigquotesIt was designed to push the envelope of where a mountain bike can go and what it can be trusted to do in an environment where there are huge consequences for small errors.


Meet the Liteville 601

Liteville is the brainchild of Syntace’s Jo Klieber and freerider Michi Gratz who founded the brand to build no-compromise mountain bikes with performance qualities that they could not find in 2004. The 601 is on its third iteration. The Mark 3 shares the same four-bar Horst-Link rear suspension of the original and its large, centrally-located rocker-driven shock. All its suspension pivots feature stainless steel bearings and titanium hardware. Its adjustable geometry is slack up front and tight in the back to give it an advantage in both technical ups and downs. Necessary accessories, like its chain guides, front changer mount, rear mech’ guard, and its Syntace X12 rear axle and break-away hanger system are integrated into the frame. The threadbare cliché, “a well-thought-out design” is refreshingly accurate as it applies to the 601.

Construction: The chassis is welded in a two-pass process which produces smoother transitions and is said to greatly improve the fatigue resistance of the frame junctions. The 6000-series alloy that Liteville uses is specific to their frames and each of the massively oversized tubes is butted up to five times in their lengths. That, and creative profiling of each member, ensures that every gram of the 601’s aluminum is doing a specific job. The rocker link, swingarm junction and bottom bracket shell are machined in halves and welded into lightweight, rigid structures. As a result, the 601 frame is remarkably trim for a 190-millimeter-travel mini beast. Liteville says that the medium-sized frame with its RockShox Vivid Air DH damper weighs 3320 grams (7.34 pounds in ‘Merica)

Liteville 601

Liteville 601
Liteville 601

Liteville 601
Liteville runs the rear derailleur housing through a tunnel in the seat tube (top left and top right) to minimize flexing caused by suspension action. The sturdy Syntace X12 derailleur hanger (lower left) uses a breakaway bolt to protect the changer in a crash. A spare hanger bolt is screwed into the bottom bracket shell (lower right).



Appointments: Simple as it may be in profile, the 601 Mark 3 bristles with juicy details that would be the highlight of a nerd worshipper’s convention. The tapered head tube uses Syntace’s VarioSpin direct-mount headset which can be used to adjust the head angle up to 1.5 degrees with optional VarioSpin cups. (zero-degree cups are standard) The frame’s head tube area is reinforced with internal and external gussets and a concave profile beneath the top tube allows 601 owners to hide an external dropper housing, or if that isn’t good enough, route it internally through ports in the top tube. In addition, the 601 may be configured for stealth routing, inside the seat tube.

For simplicity’s sake, the full-length shifter housings and brake hoses are routed externally on the downtube. To ensure that suspension action does not interfere with the operation of the rear derailleur, however, Liteville runs the rear derailleur’s housing through a tube in the base of the seat tube and then inside the swingarm’s right seat stay. Because the housing passes through the hinge line of the rear suspension, it flexes very little, and it is also protected from any foreseeable impacts.

Liteville 601
Interlocking teeth in the upper shock mount index adjustments to the 601's frame geometry and bottom bracket height. The RockShox Vivid Air is very lightweight for a DH damper.


Adjustable suspension: The upper shock mount meshes with interlocking teeth on a boss that is welded to the down tube. The full range is ten millimeters of linear adjustment at the shock – which raises or lowers the suspension 25 millimeters (one inch) at the rear axle. A rider can use the adjustment to raise or lower the bottom bracket, adjust for a different rear-wheel diameter, and to change the head angle roughly up to one degree. Riders can make trail-side geometry changes using a single, six-millimeter hex key.

Dedicated chainguide: One would expect to find ISCG 05 mounts at the 601’s threaded bottom bracket shell, but there are none. Liteville candidly states that any mountain bike in the 180/190-millimeter-travel class should be fitted with a reputable chain guide, but they opt for an upper guide that bolts to the direct-mount front derailleur bosses (Syntace makes one, although our test bike used an e*thirteen item) and the chainstay is machined to accept a Syntace SCS II lower guide. We have had positive experiences with the SCS II guide system, which allows for the use of one-by, two-by, even triple cranksets with no averse shifting issues, and with minimal chain rattle.

X12 system: Syntace’s X12 rear through-axle system has gained notoriety among a number of OEM bike makers for good reason. The non-drive-side end has a tapered collet that locks into the dropout, and it contains its own hex tool, stashed inside the hollow aluminum axle. Instead of a wimpy piece of threaded aluminum dangling below the right-side dropout, the X12 derailleur hanger is a stiff block of CNC-machined aluminum indexes into the frame and is held in place by a pinch bolt. The X12 hanger boosts shifting performance and is almost immune to bending upon impacts. When the rear mech hits something that could damage the derailleur of the dropout, the X12 pinch bolt is designed to break in half. A small Allen key is used to unthread the broken shaft inside the dropout - and should you need a trail-side replacement, a spare breakaway hanger bolt is conveniently screwed into the bottom bracket of the 601 frame.

Liteville graphic
Liteville's graphic depicts the different forces acting upon a front-wheel impact (left) and a rear-wheel impact (right). The rider's inertia tends to drive the front wheel downwards and into the bump, while the same forces tend to lift the rear wheel up and over the obstacle.


Scaled Sizing

Liteville’s sizing system is one of the most comprehensive in the business. It is the creation of Syntace designer and founder Jo Klieber, who came to the conclusion, after a couple of years experimenting with frame geometry and wheel diameters, that changes in the center of mass of a tall, versus a short rider affect the bicycle’s roll-over performance over rough ground as much or more than is attributed to the various wheel diameters. From this, Klieber instituted gradual changes in the lengths of the top tubes and chainstays of each size frame, as well as alterations in the frame angles to reproduce a similar ride quality for riders of all statures.

Further research led Klieber to re-assess the roles that the front and rear wheels play as the bike and rider negotiate various obstacles. In the end, Klieber was convinced that the roll-over advantage of a larger front wheel was substantial, because the rider’s weight transfers forward and down upon impact, which magnifies the detrimental effects of a small wheel getting hung up in uneven terrain.

Conversely, the rider’s mass far exceeds that of the bicycle, and thus creates a lifting force and forward acceleration to the bicycle when the rear tire contacts a bump. The bicycle slows while the rider’s mass continues forward – a dance which tends to lift the rear wheel up and over the obstacle and eclipses the minor part that a larger-diameter rear wheel plays in the roll-over equation. Klieber theorizes that choosing a smaller rear wheel which accelerates better, and is lighter weight with similar width tires and rims, is the more intelligent compromise. Liteville then specs one diameter larger front wheel through most of the 601’s size range to capture the measurable improvements in roll-over and cornering traction which were proven in their test trials.

Scaled sizing incorporates Liteville’s graduated frame sizing with Klieber’s wheel diameter theory to produce one of the more complicated frame sizing charts that we have seen. The extra small 601 gets a 24-inch rear and a 26-inch front. Small-sized frames are 26 by 26 inch, mediums and larges are 26 rear and 27.5-inch front, and both the X-large and XX-large sizes are 27.5 by 27.5 inch. So, where do 29-inch wheels come into play in the Scaled Sizing graph? Liteville’s chart omits them from the 190-millimeter-travel 601, but they still encourage the use of 29-inch wheels in their literature. A quick look at the specs for their lighter weight, 160-millimeter-travel model 301 shows that the XL size is intended for a 27.5 rear and 29-inch front wheel, while the XXL model has 29-inch wheels on both ends. It is doubtful that the 601's swingarm could fit a 29er wheel with full-width DH rubber, but that won't stop you from using a big wheel up front.
Liteville Scaled Sizing
An overlay of all six frames from XS to XXL illustrates that Liteville lengthens the top tube and chainstays of each successive size.

liteville graphic
Liteville's sizing also makes wheel-diameter judgments based upon proposed usage and the amount of suspension travel.

liteville graphic
How the height of a rider fits into Liteville's Scaled Sizing map for both frame size and wheel diameters.


About the Build

Syntace owns Liteville, so it should come as no surprise that our 601 Mark 3 was decked out with Syntace’s W35 MX wheels, and a 740-millimeter Vector carbon handlebar clamped to a Megaforce 2 50-millimeter stem. Brakes were Shimano XT with ICE Tech pads and rotors (180mm R, 200mm F). The drivetrain was powered by an e*thirteen TRSr crankset fitted with a 30-tooth narrow-wide chainring, and backed up by an e*thirteen upper guide. The SRAM one by eleven transmission had an X0 rear mech and an X1 shifter. Up top, a RockShox Reverb Stealth 120mm-stroke dropper post grasped an SQlab carbon rail saddle. Tires were tubeless, with a Schwalbe Rock Razor 2.35-inch on the rear and a Magic Mary 2.35-inch up front. Suspension was powered by a Fox Factory series 180mm stroke Van R coil-sprung fork and the aforementioned RockShox Vivid Air DH air-sprung shock. Total weight without pedals was 13.76kg (30.27 pounds), which is quite respectable for such a no-nonsense build.

Liteville 601 geometry



Liteville 601 2015
TRAIL REPORT:
601 MK 3



bigquotesI must admit that my expectation was that the 601 would handle much better with equal sized wheels, but I was in for a surprise.

The elephant in the room when we rolled out the Liteville 601 was the bike's 26-inch rear wheel. We all cut our teeth on 26-inch wheels, but after the industry shook hands and admitted that larger wheels rolled and generally performed better, why would accomplished designers like the men at Liteville bother to dig up the corpse and bolt a little wheel on the rear end of its most prestigious all-mountain shredder? Emotionally, it doesn't jibe, but the nature of our job when we face the improbable is to ignore speculation and look for the science.

Mountain bikes with differing wheel diameters have been introduced with marginal success on a number of occasions, with the most memorable period being the 26 by 29-inch "69er," which was a response by designers to blend their way into the 29er movement without actually committing to it. The most popular reason for mismatched mountain bike wheels is a nod to motocross racing motorcycles, which run a front rim that is typically three inches larger in diameter than the one used for the rear wheel. Moto logic fails to hold up, however, when one considers that the rear tire must be larger and wider to provide driving traction, while the front tire needs only to deliver enough grip for cornering and braking, and thus is considerably smaller. The end result is that the actual diameters of motocross wheels end up the same, or close enough to make the case.

That is important to note, because when wheels are the same diameter, they scribe the same arc when leaned into a corner. Smaller diameter wheels make a tighter arc than larger ones do when leaned at the same angle, so a bicycle outfitted with different diameter wheels has little in common with a motocross bike and can be expected to handle quite differently with regards to its steering and cornering.

Jo Klieber's description of how the rider's inertia lifts the rear wheel up and over an obstacle is irrefutable, and it does make a good case for using a smaller diameter rear wheel. The main advantages of choosing a larger diameter wheel seems to be that it rolls more efficiently over little bumps - the incessant chatter that is the very nature of off road cycling, and in that respect, the smaller 26-inch wheel should always be at a disadvantage.

To settle those questions, after testing the 601 for three months in its intended 26 by 27.5-inch configuration, using the adjustable shock mount function to produce similar frame geometry, I switched out the rear wheel to a 27.5-inch size to provide a direct comparison. I must admit that my expectation was that the 601 would handle much better with equal sized wheels, but I was in for a surprise. The short version is that changing wheel diameters enhanced the Liteville's performance in noticeably different ways, and neither setup proved detrimental to any key ride qualities.

Suspension setup: Both the Fox 36 Van R fork and the RockShox Vivid Air shock have separate high and low-speed damping circuits, so it takes a few rides to achieve a balanced feel. Liteville must have got the rear suspension kinematics just right, because the shock always felt as if it was operating in its sweet spot. RockShox told us to set the air-sprung Vivid to feel softer in its initial stroke than intuition would suggest. The advice was heeded and, remarkably, we were able to use full travel with nary a hint of bottoming. I would love to provide some magic settings, but as it turns out, all the dials were about two thirds out from full slow. The performance of the coil-sprung Fox 36 with the FIT fluid separation system is legendary and at 180-millimeters of travel, it feels like there is a dual-crown DH fork up front, but it's a heck of a lot easier to lift the front end off the ground with the 36 out there.
2015 Liteville 601
Nothing seems to upset the 601 in a straight line. Its stiff chassis snaps out of off-angle landings and its suspension feels next-level in the big stuff.

Improvised pedal platform: Liteville's rear suspension is purposefully designed to be neutral during braking and pedaling. So, without built-in chain growth or special BFD-link geometry to counter suspension bobbing with each power stroke, the 601 could use some help from its shock to firm up its pedaling feel. There is no lever on the Vivid Air shock for a pedaling platform, and if there were, I am sure that many enduro racers and all-mountain shredders would be running one. As luck would have it, the Vivid shock's compression dial is within easy reach while riding, so all we had to do was count clicks - all the way in produced an adequate measure of pedaling firmness for climbing and rolling trail work. Four clicks out and the 601 was instantly transformed for downhill duty.

Pedaling and acceleration: With a 30-tooth chainring and SRAM's 11 by 42 XX1 cassette driving a 26-inch rear wheel, the 601 feels like it has a rock crawler low gear. Add the traction boosting authority of its uncoupled four-bar rear suspension and the Liteville can make its way up some improbable climbs. At 30 pounds, it climbs and accelerates better than any 180-millimeter-travel all-mountain bike I have ridden as of late, with the exception of the Cannondale Jekyll, but that is not a tough audience to impress. Expectedly, the 601's super slack, 64-degree head angle and trombone fork do little to enhance the bike's ergonomics and steering when the grades get steep, but it isn't all that bad either. Both test riders responsible for this review used the 601 as a daily driver. It gets up to speed quickly enough to keep you in the game on a group ride, and when faced with an extended climb, turn the blue compression dial in, get into a rhythm and the Liteville will march smoothly uphill without nagging you about its weight or about how softly sprung its rear suspension may be.

Turning and steering: Doubts about the advantages that a smaller rear wheel may bring to the game are erased the first time the 601 rounds a corner at speed. Typically, bikes with long forks and with head angles in the neighborhood of 64 degrees lead into a turn with the front wheel until it finds grip, after-which, the suspension loads up and, if there is enough speed present, the rear tire will drift slightly, which helps tighten the arc around the turn. Because slack head angles force the rear wheel to stay in plane with the front wheel, steering into the turn will set the rear wheel in a correspondingly larger drift angle. The 601 doesn't do that.

2015 Liteville 601

bigquotesThe 601 works, and it will make anyone who likes smashing corners a fan.

The 601's smaller rear wheel tracks the front, gripping tenaciously as the rear suspension compresses, and upon exit, the suspension unloads and the bike seems to leap out of the turns. Even on slick surfaces, when we pressed hard to drift the rear tire, the 601's tail would do its best to stay tucked in. The Liteville invariably held a tighter line than anticipated and initially, my fingers were often left bleeding from unintentionally grazing the shrubbery on the inside of corners. We soon learned to ride the 601 from the front of the bike, steering or placing the front wheel in the direction we wanted to go and ignoring what the rear wheel was doing.

The 601 works, and it will make anyone who likes smashing corners a fan. But, was it the smaller wheel or other factors? The front end was shod with a Schwalbe Magic Mary, which is presently the grippiest front tire sold to the public. That may have explained the 601's good behavior in the turns. We switched to the new Nobby Nic up front and netted similar results, but when we tested the 601 with 27.5-inch wheel on both ends, the tail of the bike performed in textbook fashion for a slack all-mountain design - with the rear tire settling into a slight drift each time we pushed the Liteville to the limits of its cornering speed. So far, all indicators point to differential wheels as the key to the 601's remarkable show in the turns.

Technical riding and descending: With a 180-millimeter Fox 36 Van R showing the way down the mountain, the 601 proved to be a fearless descender. Its slack head angle encourages riders to keep their weight low and centered over the chassis, and it makes the Liteville feel much like a mini downhill bike in the sense that we could straight-line almost any descent if we ran out of line choices. Aided by a level of sensitivity made possible by the Liteville's uncoupled rear suspension and the one-finger modulation of its Deore XT brakes, the 601's braking feels precise and powerful. We could burn off a lot of speed over a short patch of ground, or ease the bike down a tricky section of boulders with surgical precision.

The 601's long-ish front center and 440-millimeter chainstays spread the rider across the bike - an arrangement that makes it easy to shift weight fore and aft without exaggerated body movements and that makes it possible to move the front or rear wheel around in a pinch. As a result, the Liteville jumps well and recovers like a cat from off-angle landings or after being bounced off line by roots or boulders. Seamless weight transfer also makes it much less of a beast to maneuver at slower speeds than its gravity-derived geometry suggests it should be. All that adds up to an easier bike to ride on unfamiliar trails, where one is constantly making last-minute line choices and decisions like, "should I roll it or huck it?" After putting in some time aboard the 601, it is easy to understand why it has become a favorite among Alpine descenders.

2015 Liteville 601

bigquotesWhen pressed over successive hits, the chassis stabilizes at a near-perfect ride height - just tall enough to keep the cranks from bashing outcrops in the trail.

Suspension Notes: As tested, the Liteville makes good cases for both air-sprung and coil-sprung suspension. Granted, the 601's suspension was set up more like a DH bike, so it makes sense to put coil-sprung suspension on the end that is meeting and greeting the lion's share of the bumps. Fox's coil-sprung 36, as anticipated, had the small-bump suppleness to keep the tires hooked up, and few single-crown forks can match its big hit performance. The air-sprung Vivid shock was the surprise, however. The Liteville's leverage rates were a good match for the shock's spring and damping curves. Damping felt consistent, from smoothing out noisy chatter, to aggressive, full-travel events. We have learned to expect long-stroke air-sprung shocks to excel at one end of their travel, while their performance falls off on the opposite end.

Happy accident? Perhaps, but it works for the 601. When pressed over successive hits, the chassis stabilizes at a near-perfect ride height - just tall enough to keep the cranks from bashing outcrops in the trail. Braking dive was never an issue, and though we expected the smaller rear wheel to hang up on square-edged bumps, if it was, the rear suspension did a good job of hiding it. Overall, the 601 stays planted, but it doesn't match the magic carpet ride of a properly tuned DH bike. You can feel the bumps, but Liteville has engineered the suspension so that they don't affect your decision making process while you are in shred mode.


Wheel Diameter Report

We compared the Liteville 601 on the same trails with the original 26 by 27.5-inch W35 MX wheels, with a matched set of 27.5 by 27.5-inch Reynolds AM wheels to assess the differences (if any) in the bike's turning, rolling resistance and suspension performance. All 27.5-inch tires were Schwalbe Nobby Nic 2.35-inch. The 26-inch wheel used a 2.35-inch Rock Razor. The shock position was altered to provide similar geometry. The following are subjective, but realistic assessments:

Pinkbike liteville 601

Cornering: 26 by 27.5 was superior in almost every type of turn because it carried more exit speed and carved a tighter line, with less drifting. The 27.5 by 27.5 shrugs off speed with a smoother, more assuring rear-wheel drift, but it scribes a wider apex.
Rolling: Here, the 27.5 by 27.5-inch version was the clear winner. The smoother roll-over and marginally faster pace was mainly apparent on flatter sections of the course and when climbing steadily.
Suspension: Jo Klieber may be right about the rider's mass assisting the rear suspension, because the two diameters deliver about the same ride over mid to maximum-size bumps. The 27.5-inch rear wheel is noticeably smoother, however, over small bumps and chattery terrain.



Technical Points

Liteville does not sell complete bicycles, but it offers builder assistance kits with key suspension items and accessories, many of which are made by its parent company, Syntace. For the uninitiated, Syntace makes a number of lightweight components which are designed and tested specifically for rigorous all-mountain applications. Through five months of riding, the 601 MK3 proved to be quiet running and fantastically reliable. With the exception of two flat tires, all we needed to do was hose it off and lubricate the chain. As far as I remember, it didn't even need a derailleur adjustment.

Chain guides: Happy to report that Syntace's SCS II integrated lower chain guide, paired with the e-Thirteen upper guide gave us no trouble, in spite of the fact that we were shuttling DH runs with some heady company. Some potential customers are going to complain that the 601 lacks standardized ISCG 05 tabs, but it ain't broke, so we don't think it needs fixing.

Vivid Air DH Shock: Syntace beats to the rhythm of its own drum and, in this case, their choice to go with a dedicated DH shock like the Vivid Air instead of following the crowd to Cane Creek was arguably the better option. Who would have known? If RockShox would add a pedal platform lever to it, the Vivid shock would leave nothing to want for the Liteville's rear suspension. The Vivid Enduro Air?

Wheel options: Liteville's Scaled Sizing is a valid system, especially for riders who make up the taller and shorter ends of the six available sizes, but there should be options for riders in the center of the range to opt for matched wheel diameters, or to upsize from 26 by 27, to 27 by 29 where those combinations make sense.

Adjustable shock mount: The concept is great, but the range needs to be doubled so that owners can also match the bottom bracket height between different wheel sizes. Ten millimeters of additional adjustment, paired with Syntace's angular adjustable headset to fine tune the geometry, would allow the bottom bracket height to hover around 355 millimeters (14 inches), where the 601 seems to handle best.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotes Highly refined and purposefully designed, the 601 MK 3 is a bicycle that is by nature, mutually exclusive. The perfect customer would be athletic enough to grind up steep climbs for an hour or more on a 30-pound bike shod with aggressive rubber, and talented enough to put on an A-game and ride the big-boy lines on the way down. The 601 is expensive. You can buy a lot of carbon for the same money, but professional tools don't come cheap. If you view riding as your vocation, and if your definition of all-mountain is more like big mountain, its MSRP won't be your first concern. The 601 customer may appreciate that it is made from aluminum after parting company with a carbon bike in the recent past and down-climbing a rock face to retrieve its remains. The 601 can also be defined by what it isn't. It is not showy and it is not speedy enough to bag Strava victories unless the trail points towards the center of the earth. There are more competitive options available for those who want to make a name for themselves racing enduros. Liteville's 601 MK 3 is remarkably simple looking for how well it performs because all of the faddy and useless stuff has been carved away. Over time, the same thing happens to talented riders. If that sounds like you, I'd suggest that you try one on and see if it is a good fit. - RC



View larger-format and additional images in the feature gallery.



MENTIONS:
Must Read This Week

202 Comments

  • + 219
 I like it - a lot. Plus with this bike you get to choose TWO wheel sizes to be a dick about.
  • + 153
 i'd go a 24 rear and a 29 front
  • + 89
 This is the first step to seeing Penny Farthings on the Enduro circuit.
  • + 37
 i could never take 24 in the rear, maybe 7, good for you Wink
  • + 35
 I've taken 9 in the rear. Don't tell my dad, he'll never understand.
  • + 11
 don't worry, we're open-minded and we will not tell your dad buddy! taking 9 in the rear is okay, considering that some people above - like me, of course - take 24.
  • + 22
 24" front and 29" back is the shit when it comes to bikes. Rock gardens become way more interesting.
  • + 18
 this is a real deal mtn bike. scaled sizing, staggered wheel size, slightly more rear travel, aluminum straight tubes. SO moto.
  • + 3
 I like it too, except the XL and XXL sizes. Wink
  • + 130
 @RichardCunningham: In terms of pure authorship, this is the best Pinkbike review I've read in quite some time: written with insight from a balanced and open-minded perspective, in spite of the Liteville's controversial design. I particularly enjoyed the "Pinkbike's Take", in which you described the 601 as a "professional tool" - the analogy consolidated the elements of the character of the bike (aluminum, coil fork, chainguide, spare hanger bolt, simplicity) in a tidy and satisfying way. The defining characteristic of a true bike enthusiast is the ability to recognize the CHARACTER of a bicycle, and your insight into this character, powerful enough to make me want a bike completely outside of my discipline, is something I respect and admire. Cheers, RC; you never fail to impress!
  • + 8
 word!
  • - 26
flag toddball (Mar 4, 2015 at 13:25) (Below Threshold)
 Why do both the review and this comment refer to the bike as both "the Liteville" and "the 601", occasionally using both in the same sentence? For example, in the Technical Riding and Descending section, we have:

"Aided by a level of sensitivity made possible by the Liteville's uncoupled rear suspension and the one-finger modulation of its Deore XT brakes, the 601's braking feels precise and powerful."

The whole Trail Report section reads like this. We are only talking about one bike, right? Am I missing something here?
  • + 16
 @toddball: Don't worry; we're only talking about the one bike. I split up its name into maker and model that way I had two names to use for the sake of variety, and I imagine RC did so for the same reason. You'll notice that most every review on Pinkbike does this if you read them closely - it's a pretty common technique in written English; there must be a name for it but I don't know it. Imagine an article that read: "The Liteville 601 Mk2 does this; the Liteville 601 Mk2 does that; the Liteville 601 Mk2 is laterally stiff and vertically compliant..." Even if an author just picked one part of its name to use instead of the whole thing, it would get pretty repetitive, no? Smile
  • + 7
 The authorship of RC's authorship is the best Pinkbike message board post I've read in quite some time also. This is something I'm sure many PB members respect and admire. Seriously. Smile
  • + 2
 I've been looking at a few reviews of the 301 and 601. This is the first review to try more than one wheel configuration. Thank you! It cleared up a lot of confusion for me!!!!!! Cheers for an informative and very in depth article!
  • - 6
flag toddball (Mar 4, 2015 at 20:05) (Below Threshold)
 @Bluefire: I know there is only one bike in this discussion; I was making an attempt at sarcasm. I guess that didn't work out. My point is that switching up the name at every opportunity sounds odd. Imagine reading a newspaper article about Ronald Reagan. Would you first refer to him as Ronald, then Reagan, then Ronald again?

No, you wouldn't. If you want variety, we have words and phrases like "the president" and "he". We also have "this bike" and "it" (and many others, of course).

Consider Paul Aston's recent review of the Solid Strike Black Star. That bike has four names! And yet, throughout almost all of the article, Paul refers to it as the Strike. It turns out "Solid" is a brand name, and "Black Star" is a limited edition model; Paul uses these terms to highlight the brand in general, or to differentiate the limited edition model from the normal Strike. RC could have done something similar with "Liteville" and "MK 3".
  • + 9
 @toddball: Most writers use multiple proper names to avoid redundancy. For instance, "When Regan was confronted with the threat, the Commander in Chief was swift with his response, proving the Gipper had some fight left."
  • + 1
 Thanks @RC for that rewiew! I never thought deeper into riding a different size front wheel, but now I understand. Maybe I will give it a try, my old FOX36 takes 650b wheels too..
As for "scaled sizing" as Liteville sells it: Doesn't work for me. The XXL frame is too big and clumsy for me and I prefer 26" on a light freeride bike, maybe 27.5" front. I had a 301 for some years, but XL was too small, and some of those details were just weird.
But the quality of the making was stunning.
  • - 2
 I would feel more comfortable if the one reviewing the bike was the one actually riding the bike in the photos like most of this world's reviews.
  • + 4
 bikegreece ^^^ Harold Preston is an official PB test rider and he looks a lot more manly on a bke than I do, so I also use him as a model for many of my reviews. You are seeing pics of at least one of the guys who is reviewing the bike.
  • + 62
 wtf a 190mm pedal(ish) bike DOOO WANT!!!!!!
  • + 16
 @30lb for goodness sake. I bet those NN and RR helps keep the weight down. Still, mighty impressive even with that built.
  • + 2
 @mtbdude562 never heard about the MDE Pusher? Big Grin
  • - 10
flag TFreeman (Mar 4, 2015 at 11:11) (Below Threshold)
 Or for the Same price as the frame you could get a Canyon EX Vertride... unfortunately not available in the U.S. for god knows what reason. 180mm front and back, 2X10, Mavic XL 26inch wheels, CCDB CS, fox Fit talas 180mm and XT brakes. everything you need for a do it all bike.

DAMNIT CANYON LET ME GIVE YOU MY MONEY!!

www.canyon.com/en/mountainbikes/bike.html?b=3564
  • + 10
 Or buy a used Canfield one.
  • + 5
 Most DH bikes have 72-75deg effective seat angle - get a Reverb, CCDBAirCS, Supergravity tyres on carbon rims and up you go... it's in your head.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns for taller guys like me the real challenge is the standover height, not the seat angle Smile
  • + 3
 I'm not sure if most dh bikes have a 72+ degree seat angle either, that's not my recollection from looking over the years?
  • + 0
 I'm sure you could arrange something with Canyon if you contacted them in a polite and gentlemanly manner...
  • + 2
 i just pissed my pants

do they make the size M in black???
  • + 61
 Shut up and take my money. Slowly. And in small manageable chunks.
  • + 3
 That means interest...
  • + 10
 YES i'm definitely interested in shredding this beast down a mtn, and then climbing back to the top with this 190mm bike.
  • + 54
 "Ten year transferable warranty." Now that is a selling feature!
  • + 4
 5-10years you'll get 50% discount if you want to replace broken frame.
  • + 5
 Which is still dope.
  • + 35
 Props for not following the other sheep Liteville
  • + 28
 "Ten year transferable warranty, including race usage" that can be argued its worth around $1000. Brings the price down quite a bit if you compare it to the piss-poor warranties other companies offer.
  • + 1
 ^^^ So much this!!
  • + 21
 My dream bike. They look awesome, are bomb proof and a little different. Shame I will never be able to afford to Buy one.
  • - 12
flag TFreeman (Mar 4, 2015 at 11:11) (Below Threshold)
  • + 3
 "Never say never."

Fivel from A American Tale
  • + 5
 @TFreeman Torque are very sad bike, not fun at all. Pedal like an old freeride, without the fun. Sell it after less than a year. Now I ride a Claymore. I'll never sell it. But @RatHunter83 never say never!
  • + 3
 It has sense to save some money and offer it to your self one day... I have two of these beasts and I am happy as a baby.... Smile
Every single word in this PB review is true and describes the feelings I have when I ride my two animals...
  • + 2
 Why do you have two?
  • + 16
 so... tomorrow everyone still on 26 is gonna buy a 27.5 fork and wheel? XD
  • + 2
 I've been wanting to do just that for 2 years now on my 2011 Jekyll Carbon. It's 68 HTA stock, and the 27.5 front end would slacken it out nicely I think. And raise it's super low BB to a more rock clearing level.
  • + 1
 My bike is too slack already, I'd have to do some tomfoolery with travel reduction on the front in order to keep it at least slightly climbable, & probably to an extent that would make it really too short of travel in the front, unfortunately.

That said, I miss my BigHit.
  • + 4
 Isn't the 36 fork on that liteville a 26 inch fork, though?
  • + 2
 to slack? sure?
  • + 1
 The front wheel wants to come off the ground on any climb that isn't a fire road. Yes, a bike can be too slack. I've measured it somewhere around 65.
  • + 8
 Smart, methodical design--shows they have the brains, ego and skill to think outside of the box instead of just switching frame materials like so many other companies. Zee Germans are yet again one step ahead of everyone else.
  • + 5
 they optimized the bike for every size rider too, which is rare. I feel like most companies only optimize for, say, the medium size frame, and every other size is just scaled linearly from the middle. I consider myself on the short side at 5'6" so it's always difficult to find a size small that fits properly. My riding buddy who is like 6'2" has the same complaint about L and XL frames - just doesn't fit right. Which is why the tall and short people tend to stick to a certain manufacturer whose geometry works for them.
  • + 2
 Norco too
  • + 7
 I was skeptical at first, this bike can do a lot, I was fortunate enough to have Gee follow me down a local trail, Got to open the bike up, it really comes alive on the descends and a very capable climber. It corners like no other when we changed out the rear 27.5 wheel to the 26" wheel.
  • + 6
 I ride a 301 MK11 built with 650B and running 160mm travel (about 27.6lbs). Liteville is an amazing company, it's parent company is Syntace. With that being said, if you know the quality of Syntace then you should know how amazing the quality and engineering is with the Liteville 301, 601 and 901. BTW, you choose your suspension travel on a 301. You can choose to run 120, 140 or 160mm. Oh, and they have the BEST warranty in the industry! Warranty goes with the frame and not the original owner only.
  • - 13
flag Satanslittlehelper (Mar 4, 2015 at 13:23) (Below Threshold)
 Oh man, you ride a Liteville Dick Scissor!? Stay safe out there...
  • + 14
 Again with the dick scissor jokes...because we all lean IN FRONT of our seats when descending. :-/
  • + 1
 I've had a 301 for over two years and never once had my junk get caught up in the linkage ;-). I did bump my knee on it once because I was using poor riding technique.
I had the chance to demo a new SC Nomad and compare it directly to my 301. Both are fun bikes but have different character, for sure. The Nomad has a long front end and low bb which makes it stable and easy to wheelie and manual. The VPP suspension has a lively feel but climbs poorly when the going gets steep or rough- so much so that my legs were actually sore the next day! The Liteville 301 has only 5mm less travel but climbs so much better that it feels like an XC bike. The bb is a bit higher which makes the bike a little harder to manual but makes for way less pedal strikes on rocks and such. In the corners, the Nomad requires a more forward, agressive stance and the 301 is more neutral. Descending is awesome on both bikes but the 301 seems more plush, even though the sag settings were the same on both bikes. Soooo... I would say if you are a DH rider and don't like to go on long pedalling rides, get the Nomad. It's like a mini DH bike. But, if you are an XC convert who likes to pedal all day and still have a blast on the descents, get the 301. The hard part is coming up with the cash for these machines!
  • + 4
 Great stuff. Another great bike made of a proper meterial called "metal" being reviewed. Please keep making these bikes as im sick of seeing all the cloth a super glue ones getting all the limelight. Would love to give this rig a good trashing!!
  • + 4
 Radsport USA, the official home of Liteville, Syntace, SQlab and Trickstuff in North America will have demos available this year for both the Liteville 601 and 301 in our new home of Bend Oregon! Stay and ride deals are also possible. Give us a shout to set up!
radsportusa.com
  • + 4
 bikes are so cool. And i found this review to be one of the more enjoyable ones i've read recently.Its interesting how many different theories their are out their in regards to bike design, and the different ways people go about optimizing every aspect of the modern MTB. It definitely reminds me of why mtb's are so cool.even compared to our gasoline fueled brothers. Dirt bikes are awesome, but they are relatively consistent in design and function, while mtb's have so many different and unique concepts that totally distinguish one from another, both structurally and visually And the Litteville is a good example of that, even though its a bit expensive in my opinion
  • + 5
 I think it will be a lot less than "one percent" who are riding this bike. Regardless, looks (and sounds) like a well designed bike for the intended market.
  • + 3
 Similar concept to a Canfield the One. Close to 30 lbs with Adjustable travel between 175 mm and 200 mm, with according changes in geometry, and pedals well and climbs great. I commute on it, ride it on XC trails, take it to the bike park and shuttle downhills. I just change my tires and suspension settings depending on the situation. Truly worthy of the name "the One"! This machine looks to be a little more specialized but I would love to see how it compares to my Canfield. It also has reawakened my interest in trying out a 27.5 on the front of my bike...

Overall, great review of the Liteville!
  • + 0
 My Canfield One is by far my favorite and most durable bike I have ever owned. Its an AM/FR/DH bike that can take on everything.
  • + 2
 I am not totally convinced by that front wheel theory because it ignores the rider's skill. Who amongst us is going to just bash into a hit like that? Nine times out of ten the pinch flat or dented rim is on the rear wheel, which proves we are all dancing the front wheel over obstacles.
  • + 2
 ...or running excessively low tire pressure
  • + 4
 God if I lived in Oregon still near Blackrock or anything where freeride bikes were still the best tool I'd buy this so god damn fast.
  • + 6
 Suddenly demand for 26" rear wheels skyrockets.
  • + 2
 i thought that trail looked familiar, thats my favorite stomping ground (Cowles Mountain in San Diego)... idk how he could use full travel, i have a 160mmm bike and still don't completely bottom out unless i go very off line.
  • + 17
 Good place to shoot action, but not such a good place to open up a bike like the 601 - unless you want to piss off hikers and pop Chihuahuas.
  • + 2
 yeah... the hikers. its usually pretty empty early in the mornings. and yeah, probably not high speed enough. but good gnar to churn through if you wanted
  • + 3
 HA HA HA HA!! Pop Chihuahuas!! I get that mental image everytime I pass people with small dogs
  • + 3
 can't..stop...laughing.... "piss off hikers and pop chihuahuas"
  • + 2
 I love the 601 and the philosophy that is behind the contruction. None the less i think the bike is highly overrated. I can well understand why someone is choosing a 301 that is insanely versatile from cc-racing to light-freeride, depending on the spec. But the 601...I went for the Rotwild 26 inch wheel E1. I speced it with the 180 Fox fit talas in the front and - lately - kicked out the fox ctd and went for the db inline. I never had and still don´t have any concerns about my choice. The Rotwild weighs well under 14kg with reasonable tires, can handle everything up to freeride it doesn´t climb worse than the Liteville and - for me personally in the toxic yellow i chose - the looks are much better. And it saved me a bunch of Euros...
  • + 6
 sigh....more people trying to push the 27.5 wheel size myths..26 is better
  • + 2
 This well as great article on what looks like a stellar bike but I have a complaint / request: Since this is a bike that will often be a frame only purchase then why isn't information like BB Shell width and type, rear hub width, etc. posted in the article as well? In this world of ever-expanding "standards" this type of information is invaluable.

Even Liteville's website seems devoid of this info Frown
  • + 2
 Wait, my x12axle has a hex bolt tool inside? Didn't know that.
I do know that the x12 axle o ring is broken everytime I remove wheel if my norco range c.
The rubber catches on the sharp corner of the gap in metal.(Head of axle) need to fill that with something.
  • + 1
 @jrocksdh

your bike may not have the Syntace X-Fix 4 / 5mm allen key tool or the TX25/5mm version, but it is available as an available retrofit for any bike running a Syntace X-12 rear axle system (Cannondale, Norco, secialized, Cube, Canyon etc etc) www.syntace.com/index.cfm?pid=3&pk=2601

As to the O-Ring, call your closest Syntace Distributor, they should be able to sort you out for a new O-ring. They won't last for ever, but it is also not my experience that they get caught on something like you've described... certianly not on the Liteville.
  • + 6
 looks to me like an up-to-date Scott Voltage
  • + 1
 Couldn't agree with you more. Has a better spec tho
  • + 8
 This bike looked like this long before the Voltage.
  • + 5
 i dunno. horst link with straight tubes. i think it looks like ALOT of bikes. Wink
  • + 4
 I don't have the skill to warrant this bike, but if I had it (or the money), oh man, I'd make this sucker mine.
  • + 1
 i have one of this for two years, i put now the new fox float x2 2016, its bike of my life, in the past i have it a lot of bike for 18 years. this is perfect bike for me, its expensive, i dont fucking care, its passion, not gold , not money, nothing more!
  • + 4
 Looks like a Scott FR polished hehe, I like this tipe of bikes, simple and ready to shred \m/ Smile
  • + 3
 I love the look of this bike, its so clean and purposeful. Looks like it was designed by engineers and riders instead of marketing people and colour consultants.
  • + 1
 I am so happy to see the spare hanger bolt on the bike kuz those fuckin backup hangers suck so much. Last week's bike also had a spare hanger on the frame. Hopefully other companies will see this and copy it. I've broken a bunch of hangers and had to spend 15 minutes trying to figure out how to put the damn thing on and how to align it. This would make my life so much easier.
  • + 3
 Still though. Canfield one, climbs like no other, some say better than 5inch travel bikes with dh Geo. That's the dream bike.
  • + 2
 Hey you are right about place/usage!. I'm certainly not the "pick a wheel size and be a di*k about" rider. My comment was definitely not applicable to all rides, just mine and for what I ride.
  • + 5
 Best bike ive ever owned bar none.
  • + 5
 Old Scott Voltage??? haha. Sick bike though
  • + 2
 Holy cow this is a bold design. But it all works. Kudos to Liteville for making something unique, Well built and designed to be any mountain and all mountain.
  • + 3
 Wow! straight lines and minimalist graphics, makes for a super clean and good looking bike !
  • + 2
 Great, lets test a bike made for the alpine in some nice, dusty, smooth trails with not much elevation change! Stunning bike tho! Want one
  • + 2
 The boutique bike loving little boy in me drooled all over the front of my shirt as I read this review. And a decently done review too!
  • + 2
 Wait a second. I know that corner, the pictures are from here in san diego, alot of the scenery is from the backside of cowles isn't it?
  • + 3
 been riding one over the last few week. Good bike would like to a slightly lower bb.
  • + 2
 this would be a great bike for short shocking. ie. putting the next size down for the rear shock. you lose 5-10% of travel but since this bike has more rear travel than front, it might be a good candidate for short shocking. drops the bb and slackens the head angle.
  • + 1
 @livetowinborntolose

Have you slid the front shock mount forward ie played witht hat adjustment? Just checking ;-)
  • + 4
 That's a pretty nice bike
  • + 1
 Love this! I've been saying for awhile now that a great combo would be 26" out back and 27.5 up front!! Used to ride a Specialized BigHit with a 24" rear and 26" front and it rode awesome!!
  • + 3
 I get it RC. And I want one. Can we get a side by side review of the 601 and 901?
  • + 3
 i agree. 601 vs 901 would be a tits review.
  • + 3
 put dual crowns on it with a 26" front wheel and let me at the bike park....
  • + 0
 pure porn
why 2x10?
how's the "uptimizer"?
  • + 2
 Thanks!
It's 2x9 not 2x10.
Yep Uptimizer rocks my world.
Check out my review here:
forums.mtbr.com/all-mountain/yep-uptimizer-dropper-post-thread-~-italian-design-swiss-perfection-935313.html
  • + 4
 I keep throwing my wallet at the screen... And nothing is happening !
  • + 13
 You're meant to leave a comment with your bank account details so they can sort it out for you!
  • + 3
 That's because your computer doesn't have a bill insert slot. duh?
  • + 7
 Because your wallet is empty
  • + 5
 moefosho - throw it over here - we have larges in stock now! Wink

Regards - Kenny
Radsport USA
  • + 2
 I like 301 model more, awesome approach to wheel sizing, awesome warranty and frame design, i do believe that 3k price is fair enogh for ten year investment
  • + 3
 just a brilliant bike! how it can be driven see here:
www.vimeo.com/106715068
  • + 1
 Wow, that takes mountain biking to a whole new level, "fearless descender" epitomized.
  • + 1
 damn the finger cramps and arm pump would be shocking!! awesome ride though Smile
  • + 1
 or this one as well:
vimeo.com/15929380
  • + 2
 If protur is listening, I know you are a big proponent of the front and rear axle paths matching. What do you think of litevilles explanation of rear wheel movement?
  • + 1
 So where can we get one? I might have missed that part. Great review of this bike. Been looking at this frame but not sure where to buy. Thanks for any info..
  • + 2
 Theres a link in the details list.
  • + 2
 www.radsportusa.com is the US Distributor for Liteville, Syntace and other german brands
  • + 1
 @yesimaddicted - we are offering demos in Bend OR this year if you are in the area. Otherwise we do have some dealers out there and sell direct.
  • + 2
 Freeride bike. So glad to see they are still getting the love they deserve.
  • + 2
 I had a bug hit years ago 26 front 24 rear and that combo works great for FR love this idea
  • + 2
 Why they picked the worst trail in SD to feature this bike is beyond me. Sweet bike though
  • + 3
 San Diego's version of the Alps -- Cowles Mountain.
  • + 1
 cwatt, the bb is up, not down, the chance for hitting with pedals in the deep trails leaved by the tractors or valey of water , its minimal. Of course, if you have tehnique.
  • + 2
 Half shells and goggles..........this will never be cool.......please stop it!
  • + 2
 I was lucky enough to spend a day riding one of these around lake garda not too long ago, Amazing bike! Amazing riding!
  • + 1
 Did Liteville throw a 27.5 wheel on a 26 fork? Fox doesn't make a Van 27.5.
  • + 3
 Voltage fr!!
  • + 1
 Is it made in Germany? or designed in Germany, and made in somewhere else?

Can anyone clarify this?
  • + 0
 The frames are made in Taiwan based on all the sources I have seen.
  • + 0
 That's true. They produce in Taiwan.
  • + 2
 "European subcontinent"... is that a new phenomenon?
  • + 1
 I guess many feel that it is a subcontinent if you base it of off plate tectonics and should be called Eurasia. They feel there should only be 6 continents, or 10 or something......
  • + 2
 So I can fit a 27.5" wheel in my Fox 36 van 180 fit rc2?
  • + 1
 Already been done... Jamis was a major proponent.
  • + 0
 I can wait the 10 years it takes to be better priced -and with a gearbox as well - 27.5 by 29 for me! My Spec Enduro 29 will do just fine for me now!
  • - 1
 Liteville feels like an ironic name for something that's reviewed as being perfect for someone 'athletic enough to grind up steep climbs'. In saying that i do quite like the idea they are going with
  • + 9
 It is an aluminium 190mm bike with a coil freeride fork on the front, and it weighs the same as my nomad 3... I don't see a problem.
  • + 1
 Im guessing the 'iz' on your specialized bike is crossed out..
  • + 1
 Points well made, I stand corrected.
  • + 1
 @RC Looks like Liteville does sell complete bikes:
www.liteville.de/t/22_586.html
  • + 0
 This bike is sick. With all the wheel sizes integrated into one design, a reasonable price, sleek look, what's there to complain about?
  • + 17
 reasonable price at $3150 for the frame and shock only... i dont think so Facepalm
  • + 1
 I would love to ride one. But here in Germany they even cost 1500 Euro when they are hard used. 1500 for just the frame
  • + 1
 If this will be available in Canada I may read all that text. I'm intrigued but 190mm has got to be a dog climbing.
  • + 1
 @dirtdoctor It's available through Radsport USA.
www.radsportusa.com
  • + 2
 so Fox makes a 27.5 offset 180mm fork?
  • + 1
 and what fork are giants supposed to run on their 29er front ends?
  • + 2
 Dorado lowered to 180?
  • + 2
 Next new industry standard , "69 er "" whahaa
  • + 2
 I am loving that clean unpainted frame so hard. WANT.
  • + 1
 No idea why but I love the look of that
  • + 1
 good review. looks like a canyon DH bike????? cutting edge stuff!
  • + 1
 Looks like my old bottlerocket. I now want it back. :-(
  • + 1
 10 years transferable and race tolerant warranty!

Chubby Chum Chariot! Smile
  • + 2
 Want this bike
  • + 1
 It is a mk3 - 3 rd interation...
  • + 1
 You can see a mk2 in my album
  • + 2
 supergabby: I got it before there was an official MK3
  • + 1
 you are all sheep!!! drink the kool aid!!!!
  • + 1
 what a bad ass enduro ride
  • + 1
 Paint the frame matte black. It would look nasty.
  • + 3
 I own the black anodized 601, brilliant piece of kit. Have a look in my album to get an idea. For those more into a bike with less travel, take a look at the 301 which I used to own before. Building the 601 with a 160mm setup is also possible.
  • + 0
 CAN SOMEONE PLEASE STOP THE INMATES FROM RUNNING THE ASYLUM!!! PICK A WHEELSIZE, STICK WITH IT, BE A DICK ABOUT IT!!!
  • + 1
 I was curious until I saw the price....
  • + 1
 as tested 13,76 kg ... BULLSHIT
  • + 2
 Old school cool
  • + 1
 Haha ok..
  • + 1
 How can I try one??
  • + 1
 Want it
  • + 1
 drooool.......
  • - 2
 Well one point you have missed: If you own a Liteville you have to be a dick about it...
  • + 3
 look at the linkage at the rear axle, not the same. pivot above BB shell, not the same BB height is lower on the pic you shown, but I can imagine your pedals would be hitting everything.
  • - 2
 looks like a focus sam
  • - 1
 I smell bs
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