Local Flavours: The Complete Guide to Riding in Eastern Idaho

Feb 23, 2021
by Brice Shirbach  
Views: 2,074    Faves: 4    Comments: 1


Local Flavours

THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO RIDING IN
EASTERN IDAHO
Words, photos, & video by Brice Shirbach

Presented by Visit Idaho

Note from the author: These are strange and tenuous times we find ourselves in, and putting together a travel guide when so much of the planet is (rightfully) dealing with various travel restrictions due to the global pandemic is a strange and tenuous task. The truth is that these trails will be waiting for you whenever the time is right for you to explore them safely. For now, enjoy the images and inspiration, and stay safe my friends.


Here's the deal: I spent 5 days riding my bike in the Pocatello area and in the Teton Valley, and I'd say I barely scratched the surface. I know we call these "The Complete Guide to Riding In (insert location here)", but this is decidedly incomplete. In fact I'd say that most of these are, and that's a good thing too, as there should always be more to explore, and I can confirm that Eastern Idaho has quite a lot more to explore than I was able to. In 5 days, each of which saw me spend no less than 8 hours on my bike, I am not especially confident in saying that I saw even 5% of what this region has to offer. That's rad, and that's what has me itching for a return.

I had been meaning to check this region off of the ol' bucket list for some time. Of course I have seen jaw-dropping imagery from the Teton Range for 38 years (at least 4 of which I can remember), and as is the case with anyone who has a pulse, my interest was instantly piqued upon the first glance of these legendary mountains in whatever magazine happened to expose me to them for the first time. It would take a few days before I would actually see the Tetons with the naked eye however, as the devastating wildfires that had been ravaging the American West for much of the summer created a massive cloud of smoke that had been pushed east due to prevailing winds, effectively blanketing much of the region as such. Still, the scale of the terrain here is plain to see even if the mountains are somewhat obscured, almost as if nature has placed an Instagram filter over them. The landscape here is punctuated by extremes, whether it's the sharp and precipitous channel left behind by the Snake River carving through the Earth, or the towering juts of the Rocky Mountains that dominate the skyline regardless of the haze. This land is an icon of adventure for so many, and while I had a bit of ground to cover between Pocatello and the Victor/Driggs area, you can bet that I was more than happy to oblige.

Brice Shirbach // Local Flavours
Age: 38
Location: Wilmington, DE, USA
Industry affiliations: Pivot Cycles, Maxxis Tires, Pearl Izumi, 9point8, Julbo, Deity Components, Shimano, Dialed Health, Stan's No Tubes
Instagram: @bricycles
Favorite Ride in Eastern Idaho: Down the Chimney
Riding Style: Whatever's Clever


Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho
Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho
Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

A Bit About the Region

Long before Captain Meriwether Lewis and Second Lieutenant William Clark crossed through Idaho on the way to the Oregon coastline, this land was inhabited by the Shoshone-Bannock people for centuries. The tribes generally lived as hunters and gatherers, traveling during the warmer months gathering food for sustenance during the harsh winters of the region. Their connection to the land they called home was profound. They hunted wild game, fished the region's abundant and bountiful streams and rivers, and collected native plants and roots. However as railway development allowed for increased westward expansion for American immigrants, the Shoshone-Bannock tribes would find that their traditional way of life was infringed upon severely. Currently the Shoshone-Bannock people are based at the Fort Hall reservation about 20 minutes north of Pocatello, and is one of five federally recognized tribes in the state.

Today, Eastern Idaho is held in high regard as an outdoor paradise. Fly fishing on the Snake River and its various tributaries and feeder systems, hunting down hot springs both on and off the map, and of course exploring some of North America's most revered mountains are all significant draws for visitors and residents in the area. Idaho is famous for its potato production, and the majority of that occurs in this portion of the state as well. Agriculture is a major driver for the region's economy as evidenced by the seemingly endless stretches of barley, wheat, and cattle farms and fields that fill in the gaps between the mountains.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the largest religion in the region, and much of the culture here is anchored to the church and its sensibilities. The Idaho Falls Idaho Temple dominates the city skyline and was the LDS Church's first temple built in Idaho, and the first built with a modern single-spire design. Pocatello is home to Idaho State University, a public university with close to 13,000 undergrad and graduate students, and is highly regarded for its psychology programs as well as its nuclear education and training programs.

COVID-19 updates: Some counties and communities across the state of Idaho are requiring residents and visitors to maintain physical distance and wear face coverings in public places and outside where physical distancing is not possible. Check out Visit Idaho's COVID-19 travel information page to stay up to date on any restrictions that may impact your travel plans.

Getting to Eastern Idaho

I flew into the Boise Airport (BOI) and drove about 5 hours to Idaho Falls where I would spend the next 5 evenings exploring the Teton Valley and Pocatello. This airport is a small airport compared to most major international airports, but is large enough to offer low airfares and has all of the resources you need in terms of car rentals and ease of access. Salt Lake City is actually an hour closer to Eastern Idaho than Boise, and again, provides you with low cost options for flights as well as plenty of additional transportation resources. You can always opt to fly into Idaho Falls or Jackson, WY as well. Idaho Falls is squarely between Pocatello and the Teton Valley, and is serviced by Skywest/Delta Airlines, United Express, Allegiant Air, and Frontier Airlines. You can connect via non-stop flights to cities such as Denver, Phoenix, Las Vegas, Minneapolis and others. Jackson Hole Airport is located within Grand Teton National Park boundaries, and is less than 45 minutes from Victor, ID. Flights here are notoriously hit or miss when it comes to their schedules, but it's a stunning place and easily the closest to Driggs and Victor. Jackson is serviced by American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Frontier Airlines, Skywest Airlines and United Airlines seasonally. These airlines provide direct service to Denver, Salt Lake City, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Minneapolis, Chicago, Newark, Atlanta, San Francisco, Houston, and Los Angeles.

You can also catch the bus out of Boise and Salt Lake via the Salt Lake City Express. They offer daily trips to southeast Idaho, and very palatable fares compared to train or flight options.

Of course I'm all about that road trip life, and this is one hell of a sweet place to see on your own schedule and at your own pace. Idaho's interstates generally see good traffic flow without much in the way of major population centers to slow things down, and gas prices in this part of the country are reasonable as well.

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho
Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho
Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho


The Best Trails to Ride in Eastern Idaho

As vast as Eastern Idaho is, the trails are really kind of relegated to two main hubs: the Teton Valley and Pocatello. Fortunately, each of those present an almost absurd amount of world class trail and a look at Trailforks can present an overwhelming proposition. Both Pocatello and the Teton Valley have enough trails that are close to town to keep you happy for a week or more, but it's the backcountry access that really sets this region apart. Local riders are discovering new routes or opening up forgotten ones regularly, so the reality is that there's an almost endless amount of trail to explore and discover here. You can spend years here and still have more to explore. As a reminder, Eastern Idaho is grizzly bear country so make sure you’re bear aware and properly prepared. I had 5 days, so of course my experience was limited, but I'll do my very best to give you a sense of where to start.

Teton Valley
I know that this is Eastern Idaho's Local Flavours, but I'd be remiss if I pretended as though their neighbor to the east, Wyoming, doesn't play a huge role in the mountain biking for locals on either side of the state line. In fact, many trails cross state lines, some more than once. The truth is that Mountain Bike the Tetons, the area's mountain bike advocacy group, works hard for trail access and development on both sides of the state line, and if you were to look at the map of area trails on their website, there is no state line drawn. The Teton Valley could keep you busy for the rest of your life, so to pretend as if I have a full sense of what this place offers is a silly proposition. I was stoked to have two days to take this place in, and will combine my limited experience with discussions and research to try and paint a fuller picture for you here.

The Palisades: This zone is chock full of raw, backcountry riding at its best. The Palisades are a small chain of mountains separated from the larger Tetons to the northeast by a small valley where Victor and Driggs can be found. It's hard to find a "short loop" here, so plan for a big ride accordingly.
Key Ride - Mail Cabin to Mike Sell Canyon: You're on a shuttle mission with this one, but you should still expect to do quite a bit of climbing. The ride actually starts in Wyoming where you'll work your way up Mail Cabin for 4 miles climbing close to 2,000 feet. From there the ride picks up the Mike Sell trail, which undulates for 5 miles and takes riders for a roller coaster of fast and loose descents interrupted by chunky and technical climbs. Eventually you will connect to Mike Sell Canyon, which is an incredible 3 mile descent dropping riders 2,000 feet. It can be blisteringly fast, and much of it is loose and technical. Bring a friend or two, and some bear spray.

Southern Valley: These trails are close to Victor, so it's much easier to put together a quicker loop from town here. Most of the trails are geared toward more intermediate riders, but there are still a few opportunities to go fast and get loose if you fancy yourself something special on two wheels. Any ride in this part of the country requires some grizzly prep however. Don't be lulled into a false sense of security just because you're close to town. There are signs at every trailhead where grizzlies have been encountered, which happens to be every trailhead I saw.
Key Ride - South Grove Creek to Drake Creek: A 90 minute ride that begins and ends along the road just to the west of Victor, this will give you a taste of the mountains and terrain without having to fully commit to a pure backcountry adventure. The climb up South Grove Creek starts as double track before narrowing to a smooth and well kept singletrack ascent. At the top you'll turn left and hike a bike up the super steep and loose headwall that is the Big Hole Crest trail before turning left once more to descend Drake Creek. Drake is a lot of fun. It's really fast and raw, with several technical sections that can trip you up if you're not paying attention, and takes you through Aspen groves as well as some evergreen forest.

Big Holes: The Big Holes region of trails is full of amazing views, ridgeline riding, and massive descents. It's definitely a go-to for locals, and it's very easy to string together a number of trail combinations to create whatever kind of ride you're looking for.
Key Ride - Horseshoe up to North Mahogany down: This is a Victor classic. The climb up South Horseshoe is 6 miles in length, and will carry you 2,500 feet up. There will be plenty of amazing views but be sure to keep your eyes peeled for riders headed in the opposite direction, as well as moto users. You'll cut the final mile out of the ride by turning left onto Mahogany for a 5 mile descent dropping 1,900 feet to the valley below.



Pocatello
The mountains that surround Pocatello might not be on quite the same scale as those found north of town throughout the Teton Valley, but they're still large and Caribou National Forest provides a truly beautiful backdrop for the trails in this region. Looking at Pocatello on Trailforks belies the true quantity of trail available, and much of that is owed to the fact that there isn't really an advocacy group to speak of here. Instead, it seems that many of the legal trails throughout the area have been grandfathered into networks in and around town, and as more pop up, it just takes some time for this nebulous arrangement to work itself out. All of that aside, the riding here is much better than I expected it to be. While many in the Teton Valley look at this area as more of a shoulder season spot to ride while they either wait for their trails to thaw or escape early onset of winter, the truth is that Pocatello can very much stand on its own two feet compared to the Teton Valley. The sense of backcountry is especially strong only 15 minutes from downtown, and the variety of riding opportunities is huge. Your best bet would be to pop into a shop like East Fork Bikes to get a lay of the land and some trail info.

City Creek: These trails are the closest to town, and are managed primarily by The City of Pocatello. There's also some connectivity to BLM and National Forest land, and rides that start here can easily carry through to the other area trail networks. It's a mostly high desert style of riding, with plenty of shuttleable trails and a massive spaghetti bowl network of trails to keep things interesting for several days.
Key Ride - Ritalin to 911: A fun and easy ride that can be lapped via a 15 minute climb up the City Creek trail, this ride features great flow, corners, and small to medium sized features from top to bottom throughout both trails.

Gibson Jack: This area is the connective tissue between the City Creek Trails to the north, and the Scout Mountain Trails to the south. It's full of beautiful views, and the terrain is a bit more varied than the mostly high desert stuff found closer to town. The vast majority of the trails are National Forest property, and many of the trails are multi-use which includes motorized modes. The backcountry vibes are strong here, and some of my favorite trails from this whole trip can be found in the Gibson Jack area, so don't sleep on them.
Key Ride - Corral Creek to Down the Chimney: Corral Creek is multidirectional, but as a climb it's not bad at all. From the trailhead you'll work your way up the wide corridor for 3 miles and climb close to 1,300 feet before cutting onto Down the Chimney at the top. Corral Creek is popular for motos and side-by-sides, so be aware of the potential of encountering motorized traffic. Once you start on Down the Chimney, it's pure mayhem and fun. It features several very steep, fall line sections with nary a straightforward camber to be found. It will occasionally present a quick punch of a climb, but those are always short lived and the descent is properly gnarly.

Scout Mountain: This area is furthest from Pocatello, and as such is certainly the most backcountry centric. The views here are stunning, and the trails are largely suited for intermediate riders and up. Trailforks will help you navigate the trails well enough, but don't be shy about stopping by a shop in town to get a more detailed breakdown of what to ride and how to get around.
Key Ride - Scout Mountain to Crestline: A ride that will take you from the actual 8,700 foot summit of Scout Mountain down close to 3,000 vertical feet over the course of about 5 miles, this is as good as just about anything you'll find in all of Idaho. The views will stop you in your tracks, and the trails themselves are brilliant. Because it's at a higher elevation than most of the trails in the region, it tends to open up a bit later than most others, but it's as much of a "must ride" as any from Eastern Idaho.



Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho
Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho
Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Weather:

Eastern Idaho's riding season varies depending on which area you are considering. Pocatello trails typically open up earlier than those in the Teton Valley, with favorable riding conditions starting in April and going through October. The Teton Valley is known for being a world class winter destination due to the ample amount of cold and dry snow that blankets the mountains every winter, so the bike season in this part of Eastern Idaho is considerably shorter than Pocatello's, usually kicking off in mid to late May and ending in early October, or whenever the snow starts to fly.

Temperatures during the summer months are generally warm, with temps rarely getting above 90 degrees F in Pocatello, and are cooler as you travel north through the Teton Valley. Wildfires have been a major part of the narrative for much of the American West in recent years, and Idaho has not been immune to them either. Keep your eyes on fire warnings and forecasts as you plan your trip, as it can certainly have an impact on travel.

Bike Advice:

Eastern Idaho has something for all bikes. Just across the state line from Driggs is Grand Targhee's bike park, which has some properly steep and rowdy terrain, as well as some sizable jump lines that your DH rig will eat up. Most of the riding warrants something within that long to mid travel trail bike range, as there's quite a lot of climbing required to access many of the area's best descents. Gravel/cross bikes see a lot of love here as well, with thousands of miles of dirt and gravel roads to explore between the national parks and forests throughout the region.


Local Clubs and Advocates:

Oddly enough, there are no actual advocacy groups on the ground in Pocatello. Area bike shops such as East Fork Bikes volunteer at local events and help to organize dig and trail days, but the waters are a bit murky when it comes to the relationship between riders and land managers here. It's not a bad relationship either, it's just not entirely clear how things are working. The trails are awesome, so I suppose somebody is doing something right.

The Teton Valley is a very different story in terms of advocacy efforts. Mountain Bike the Tetons is an incredible group dedicated to enhancing lifestyles and livelihoods in both Eastern Idaho as well as Western Wyoming through the growth and development of a truly vast array of mountain bike trails. There are 7 full time staff members (4 trail crew, 2 youth program managers and an executive director) in addition to an 11 member board of directors. They are officially a member of IMBA, however they operate under their own 501(c)3 with a membership that totals roughly 600 individuals per year.

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho
Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho
Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho
Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho
Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho

Local Flavours Eastern Idaho
Check out my full gallery of images here.

Accommodations and Food:

Given the importance of outdoor recreation and tourism for the region, there are numerous options for any budget and preference to stay and play in Eastern Idaho. Pocatello has numerous options, including several of the big name hotel franchises including Fairfield Inn, Towne Place Suites, Motel 6, Hampton Inn, etc. There are also a number of locally owned, smaller scale lodging options including an RV park and of course plenty of camping options throughout the Caribou National Forest land. An Airbnb search will yield nearly 200 options as well.

Between Victor and Driggs you'll find a handful of hotel and lodges that range from a Super 8 to a full service resort. Camping is a great choice here as well, just remember that you're in grizzly country and to prepare accordingly.

For a breakdown of places to stay, check out VisitIdaho.org.

Breakfast:
Red Hot Roasters serves up tasty baked treats and of course amazing coffee.
Rise Coffee House in Driggs has amazing coffee and espresso, with light breakfast and bakery options.
Alpine Air Coffee Roasting drive-thru in Victor is run by mountain bikers, and has amazing food and coffee served up all morning.

Lunch:
Looking to keep it clean and free of gut bombs for the day? The Healthier Place to Eat is a restaurant & gluten-free bakery with an organic juice bar and smoothies.
At Butter Cafe in Victor you'll find real food that's really good.

Dinner:
Big Hole BBQ in Victor will be one of the best decisions you'll make all day, every day.
Provisions Local Kitchen in Driggs serves breakfast all day, and has some killer burgers to boot!
A big day in the mountains means you need a big plate of food. Abracadabra's has you covered in Pocatello.


Local Bike Shops:

Pocatello:
East Fork Bikes: The shop has been around since 2012, and it's full of super helpful and knowledgeable people who are happy to cover your mechanical needs as well as provide you with all of the local trail knowledge you could hope for.
Oregon Trail Bikes: Owned and operated by Adam Artner, he has over a decade of experience as a bike mechanic and is sharing good vibes throughout the Pocatello cycling scene.
Barrie's Ski and Sport: Large bike Trek and Specialized dealer offering rentals, service, and bike fit.

Teton Valley:
Fitzgerald's Bicycles: These guys are a full service bike shop in downtown Victor, Idaho and offer pour over coffee and espresso.
Habitat: A really passionate collective when it comes to exploring and playing in the Tetons who have been operating since 2004.
Peaked Sports: They're in downtown Driggs and are the most conveniently located shop for access to Targhee's bike park.

Other tips:

1. Road Trip Stop: Snake River Canyon. If you have the time and if it's along your route, you really should consider a stop somewhere along the Snake River Canyon. It runs for 50 miles, and has several different places to take it in. Shoshone Falls in particular is a great spot for this. It's just outside of the city of Twin Falls, and is 212 feet high and 1,000 feet wide.
2. Check out the Museum of Idaho. Located in Idaho Falls, this recently renovated museum features traveling collections as well as exhibits on Idaho’s history. Interactive exhibits are also available by appointment.


Presented by Visit Idaho

Pocatello mountain biking trails

Teton Valley mountain biking trails

Regions in Article
Idaho


110 Comments

  • 61 0
 Quite why the tourism board aren't leaning more in to the obvious portmanteau of "RIDAHO" I'll never know.
  • 38 2
 I've seen shirts around, but slight sexual innuendo
  • 8 1
 What TDownhill said. If there is any possibility that it can be construed as sexual...it will be.
  • 1 2
 Here in the US we only like to couple celebrities using portmanteaus
  • 6 1
 @TDownhill: lol "Ride-A-Hoe" is a slight sexual innuendo? Props to whatever tourism agency actually approves that slogan!
  • 2 1
 @Dopepedaler: That's what she said.
  • 6 2
 Idaho?
No, udaho
  • 4 0
 @ReformedRoadie: Haha we had a sports team in high school where we combined our Idaho team with a Utah team and named it Udaho, the organizers were not pleased.
  • 2 0
 that's one of the denied custom license plates on the list they release every year.
  • 1 0
 Ridaho, the state where you’ll enjoy the local bikes.
  • 2 0
 I thought it was Guydaho
  • 2 0
 @TDownhill: There is a town in Iowa that really leans into their name. Lots of "i love Cumming" shirts and gear around... So to me RIDAHO is totally reasonable.
  • 36 4
 Not mentioned are the hungry and plentiful mosquitoes, hordes of UTVs, and unpredictable weather. You're better off staying in utah or california.
  • 46 1
 @frizzmatt: Utah is as bad or worse than Idaho and Wyoming. Everyone is best off just staying in California.
  • 14 1
 @Hayek: I see what you did there...
  • 4 0
 @Hayek: While I love traveling out of state on occasion, I am still constantly amazed at the beauty of my home state. So, not so bad when I do a "staycation".
  • 17 27
flag TotalAmateur (3 days ago) (Below Threshold)
 @JSTootell: if only we could get some sensible governing bodies in the state maybe we could protect the beauty of CA a bit longer, before it just turns into one big Tenderloin or Skid Row. Seriously don't vote blue if you want CA to stay nice.
  • 16 4
 Cali has the best riding in the US, literally everywhere else is worse. Just stay in California it is so rad.
  • 2 0
 @Hayek: And goat-heads...
  • 1 2
 @Hayek: California is too crowded to even ride a bike, and Rangers give out lots of trespassing tickets. Everyone is better off going to Arizona.
  • 4 1
 @JockoJones: Uhhhhh no. Cali is the best if you like dry af trails, long drives to trailheads, packed expensive bike parks, and gullies down the center of like every other trail. I lived there for a year and liked it (don't get me wrong, CA is sick!), but would never say it's the best American riding. Frankly North Carolina, Utah, Colorado, Oregon, and Vermont if you like snow sports are better.
  • 1 0
 @superxavi: Broseph... Oregon is only gravel roads that lead literally NOWHERE. Also the snow is always wet and the terrain flat. Stay in Cali bra its so much chiller.
  • 24 1
 Idaho sucks, don't come here Razz
  • 1 0
 Totally agree!
  • 2 1
 Yeah, there's too many fast youths here.
  • 3 0
 And all the ladies look like potato’s!
And when riding any or the trails be prepared to crash because there was a giant potato in the middle of the trail... potato’s are lethal over here! Save yourselves!!!
  • 13 0
 Bummer we missed ya when you passed through! There are so many great trails in Pocatello beyond what's listed. Depending on your flavor you can be riding amongst pines up in the alpine or dodging junipers in the desert. Not to mention all three shops have a strong community focus! We've also started grooming a couple trails for fatbiking around here this winter and they've been amazing to ride!
  • 1 0
 Is there even enough snow in Pocatello for fat biking?
  • 2 0
 @AsherJacoby: yah for sure.
  • 2 0
 @AsherJacoby: The Grooming has been up in the Mink Creek watershed.
  • 1 0
 @allredbikes: That's good to hear
  • 12 0
 I'm from Pocatello. When I was a teenager in the late-80s through the 90s I rode religiously. Like all the time. Then I moved to Nevada, got super super super fat, moved to a bunch of other places (including Fruita, Colorado) but I was always too fat to ride bikes. Then I moved back to Pocatello and lost 150 lbs, and once again I'm riding all the time. The thing is, other than road trips to Moab, virtually all of my riding experience is around East Idaho, mostly in Pocatello, so I have very little concept of how the riding here compares to anywhere else. This article was great in a lot of ways, but to me, it was especially cool because it gave me a small sense of what someone with experience riding all the places I read about on websites like this would think about the riding I know.

I kind of wish Brice had been critical, or at least gave the riding a rating on a scale of 1-10 or something. I know he'd have been crucified in the comments section by people from the area whining that he'd dared desecrate our holy land, but I'd be curious to know how we would really rate the trails I know.
  • 4 0
 150 lbs! Nice work!
  • 6 2
 Hehehe, I didn't do any work. I went to Tijuana, Mexico, and had gastric sleeve surgery back in Feb of '18. Best $4.5K I ever spent. (including plane/hotel/everything)
Discipline and self-control are for those lacking passports, baby!
  • 4 0
 Thanks for the kind words! Regarding the rating system: I have thought about doing a piece based on my top 10 or so favorite places to ride, but that would be largely predicated on the kind of terrain I prefer. I think the issue I might have with a rating system is that besides the subjectivity of it, I know how hard it is to build up a network of trails and beyond the actual trail building itself, the advocacy element is so much work that it would be a disservice to those who put in the sweat equity to rate the location. In other words, it’s not comparing apples to apples. But here’s a bit of insight: I’m headed back in the summer to film a Sight Unseen edit for Pivot because of how striking and amazing your home is.
  • 14 0
 If riding in the Preston area, watch out for flying steaks to the face and footballs flying over the mountains.
  • 3 0
 This really deserves more attention
  • 2 0
 Lots of llamas in the area as well.
  • 3 0
 @skidmarkbro: and Ligers!
  • 1 0
 They have sweet jumps there!
  • 10 1
 My great-great-x-grandpa was one of the original settlers of the area around Driggs in Teton Valley. My uncle still farms the same farm. Every summer as a kid I'd escape California and go live on the farm, moving hand lines, riding my mountain bike with v brakes and indy C fork all over the valley. My brother and i bought some land and a cabin at the mouth of Mahogany Creek, on the ancestral land that used to be part of the original farm.
  • 11 0
 terrible riding in E idaho, just keep on going to Utah or California, much betterWink
  • 7 0
 I lived here my whole life until I moved to Fruita CO this last year. Fruita has some of the best riding ever, but I do miss the real backcountry feel of these trails. A lot of my rides I would never see another soul and feel totally detached from the world. Hint: keep some form a GPS on hand. Most trails aren’t marked well, if at all.
  • 3 0
 I did college in eastern Idaho and miss getting lost in the big hole mountains (and occasionally hiking out after dark). So much land out there and jumping in a river or stream post ride was always the icing on the cake.
  • 9 0
 My what big pictures you have!
  • 6 1
 Well, that was a nice break. Super photos too. I have ridden the area a bit as our kids go to school at BYU Idaho. Great trails and very few people. So much yet to explore!
  • 3 0
 I was excited to see some pics of Twin Falls in this, even though we are definitely not eastern Idaho. I hope you took an hour to hit up our Auger Falls Park down in the canyon for some fun riding after you stopped at Shoshone Falls.
  • 1 0
 Same here man!
  • 1 0
 I'm moving to Twin this summer for an internship from Ogden and could use some know-how about the trails. DM me if you or anyone you know could show me around!
  • 3 0
 Don't forget about the Knotty Pine in Victor for lunch/dinner, and Yeti's Post in Driggs for breakfast. The breakfast sandwich and the donuts at Yeti's are amazing. There's not much good local beer, but Moonshine Liquors in Victor has been seeing a lot of good beer come in recently. And if you are going to be in the area, definitely save a day to ride the park at Grand Targhee, and rent a downhill bike. The black trails are gnarly, and anything short of an enduro bike will be a bad time.

And of course, you could write an entire second article about Teton Pass. Lithium gets all of the attention, but Black's Canyon, Phillips Ridge, and Philips Canyon are some of the best riding around.
  • 3 1
 Surprised you didn't mention the grand Teton Pass - is that the right name ? it s a very steep and very busy highway up and over from Victor to Jackson. Some really choice shuttle trails in that zone. Very easy and rewarding shuttle as its just right up the highway and back down. And there is a paved bike path if you want to ride up (or take your chances on the highway not recommended). We were there last Summer and really enjoyed those trails. Grand Targhee bike park was super fun as well. Don't worry we pedalled a bunch on the west Yellowstone are as well. CDT is good stuff all along its ourte.
  • 3 0
 Supported by Idaho tourism board...Teton Pass trails on the other side of the Wyoming state line, lol.
  • 6 0
 IDAHO SUCKS, TELL YOUR FRIENDS.
  • 4 0
 Just think you could go to ride in any state that is east or west of it and not end up in jail because you have 1/8 ounce of weed on you.
  • 6 0
 "Video unavailable" Frown
  • 3 1
 Teton Valley is great...while its technically Wyoming, Grand Targhee has a nice little bike park too worth checking out while you are there. Idaho is kinda weird but people are nice.
  • 4 0
 if you can get to the top of city creek you will find it well worth it on the way down
  • 2 0
 The Satterfield area trails are waaay better
  • 3 0
 @mikeyscottlunt: Yes, only go there!
  • 1 0
 Not a MTB destination, but if you are in the Rexburg area everyone really should check out the St Anthony Sand Dunes. Can rent UTVs right at the dunes at a campground and have a couple hours of non-pedalling fun. Dunes are like nothing else you will ever ride or drive.
  • 1 0
 @briceshirbach great to see a mention of @OregonTrailBikes - had to add my own personal recommendation for Adam Artner--a meticulous mechanic with a great aesthetic, also a badass child prodigy bike racer. Cheers from the State of Jeff!
  • 4 0
 Definitely do not ask a local for a beer though.
  • 9 0
 Or weed. The LDS is strong in eastern Idaho...
  • 4 0
 Just gotta go to the right part of town- Our neighbor, Jim Dandy Brewing, has a taplist that is 100% drinkable and will make you spend the rest of your money on to-go beers Smile
  • 6 6
 @pandafoo: Yes, its a very scenic and beautiful place, but I would never live in Eastern Idaho, except maybe a Jackson Hole suburb in Idaho. Culturally it is not great unless you are Mormon.
  • 3 0
 @OregonTrailBikes: Next trip for sure. One of my favorite Idaho post ride pastimes is to go a brewery, admit I’m from Cali, and up my shit talking game. Hours of entertainment!
  • 6 1
 @HB208: As a Mormon who moved to East Idaho 8 years ago, it isn't really a great culture for Mormons either. I only stay because I'm too poor to move anywhere else and because the fishing here is phenomenal.
  • 2 0
 @taldfind: I guess that is fair? Idk for sure since I am not mormon. However, some towns in eastern Idaho (Rexberg, Pocatello, IF) are EXTREMELY mormon and that makes them feel a bit unwelcoming for non-mormons that live there. This is based on me visiting those towns and having college friends that grew up in those towns as a non-mormon.
  • 1 0
 @pandafoo: My people!
  • 2 0
 @HB208: I believe it. I'm just adding that as non-local I've rarely been met with welcoming arms despite being a member of the predominant religion. There is a brand of Mormonism (found everywhere there are Mormons) that perpetuates exclusion of those who aren't part of the "tribe." My experiences say that brand is especially strong in East Idaho, and even exhibited by locals who aren't Mormon.
  • 4 0
 How I love Idaho. Something about that state... bucket list material.
  • 3 0
 It's like Colorado without all of the people. I enjoy living here a lot. Although, I live in Boise and it has grown a lot since moved here was 11, which was like two decades ago.
  • 1 0
 @HB208: changed a lot, was there this summer and it felt like SLC.
  • 1 0
 @allredbikes: That sucks. Secret is out I suppose. Or maybe just COVID travel.
  • 1 0
 @HB208: I’ve driven up I95 from Winnemucca to Payette to see family for decades. The amount of cars has increased tenfold the last few years.
  • 2 0
 @HB208: I think the secret is actually mccall. that place is incredbile.
  • 1 0
 @allredbikes: I meant more about Idaho. And Boise to some extent since most people who go to McCall for the weekend live in Boise.
  • 3 0
 @HB208: I've visited Boise numerous times and travelled much across the state and there's really so much beauty to it (granted, with tons of nothing in between). Even as an outsider it was obvious the place is undergoing a rapid change. I hope it manages to keep the rural vibe with the warm hospitality for years to come. Friendliest people i've met in the States, that also counts.
  • 3 0
 @foxinsocks: It depends on what your definition of "rural" is. It is certainly not rural any longer, but it hasn't been in the 20 years I have lived here. All of the surface parking lots downtown are quickly being filled with 5-10 story buildings. I don't mind the development downtown so much. The issue I have is the rapidly increasing housing prices, kinda toxic politics, and poor trail management (we need some proper flow and tech).

With all that being said, i would not live anywhere else in the world during my prime working years. The fact that I can ride my bike 5 days a week because the trails are 10 minutes from my house while also having a decent career is something that can not be understated.
  • 1 0
 @HB208: I guess its all relative. And yes, the Boise metropolitan sure isn't rural, but the rest...
I dunno. I've visited quite a few states, and Idaho just rubbed off on me the most. I guess its a combination of the scenery, the experiences, and the people. I hope it stays like this until my next visit.
Plus, the riding wasn't all that bad (Eagle bike park, McCall, Sawtooths, Brundage, Sun Valley... didnt have one bad day thereSmile
  • 1 0
 @foxinsocks: Oh yes, it is still that way. There is a reason that it would take something really significant for me to ever leave here. My wife's family lives in Sun Valley, so I spend a month or two up there a month. It is honestly one of the coolest states if you are into the outdoors... especially given the crowd sizes.
  • 1 0
 Also being from Delaware, I can vouch for the stoke of discovering other riding spots - especially in the west! (Joking aside, northern Delaware actually has some solid and very accessible trails.)
  • 4 0
 Take me back to the Carriboo Jack!
  • 2 0
 Great article! Love the Local Flavours. Great pictures too. Add this to the list of places to visit!
  • 3 0
 Awesome I’ll just get ready for a road tri... errrrr nope
  • 3 0
 Great article. Need more like this! Send these guys around the country!
  • 2 0
 Thanks, Devin! I've been producing these for a while now...you can check more out here: www.pinkbike.com/news/tags/local-flavors
  • 1 0
 @briceshirbach: Are you also doing a feature on Boise?
  • 2 0
 @briceshirbach: There is a Palisades Wilderness Study Area, the mountains are the Snake River Range.
Up Mahogany and down Horseshoe is Ok. The reverse is better, over and back best.
  • 2 0
 @HB208: not yet but I’d love to!
  • 1 0
 No mention of Snake River Mountain Bike Club... based in Idaho Falls... they have huge groups on some of their weekly rides. Awesome people.
  • 1 0
 Wish they spread more of this propaganda here in Cali, need more people to leave so i can finally ride without a bell. hope they like the winters up there hahaha
  • 3 0
 Looks amazing!
  • 2 0
 good stuff as always @briceshirbach!
  • 2 0
 Wow looks great there
  • 1 0
 give me a one way plane ticket please and thanks!
  • 2 0
 So good, so good!
  • 1 0
 FWIW, the Brakeman in Victor has the best burgers anywhere.
  • 2 0
 Photo Epique
  • 1 0
 Heidi!
  • 2 3
 I can't believe the bare shoulder look is still a thing.
  • 2 4
 Looks sweet, even with all the enduro bro’s in the pics
  • 2 0
 Hope that was a joke. As one of said “enduro bros” I can tell you that myself and many others in the pics have never raced enduro and wouldn’t consider ourselves enduro bros. Maybe you’re just threatened by our obvious masculinity ????
  • 1 0
 Enduro bros are cooler than Xc dads.
  • 1 2
 @HB208: I am def intimidated by your masculinity! Anyone who uses Fanny packs and moto goggles to ride Mt bikes must be studs! They must know what they are doing, I am just a slow washed up dad, that I invite any of u enduro bros to race me, on moto or Mt bikes, would love to see it!
  • 1 0
 @yamaha0249: Fanny packs are a good way to keep your keys and wallet with you while you do a 1-2 hour loop and goggles are nice for dusty trails.
  • 3 0
 @yamaha0249: Why is one photo of someone in goggles triggering you?
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