Look Introduces New Trail Roc MTB Flat Pedals

Sep 14, 2020
by Mike Kazimer  

Look are best known for their clipless pedals, especially in the road biking world, where they were one of the first companies with a product good enough to convince riders to ditch their clips and straps for something a little less rudimentary.

Nearly 40 years after those first clipless pedals debuted, and with a full lineup of clipless offerings for road and mountain bikers, Look are finally adding a flat pedal to their catalog. Called the Trail Roc, the pedals have 12 pins on each side, and use an aluminum body that's 17mm thick. Those pins are set at different heights to give the pedals a more concave feel – the outer ones are 10mm tall, and the inner ones are 8mm tall.

The platform measures 110 x 110mm, and rotates around a chromoly spindle thanks to two cartridge bearings and a bushing in each pedal.

The Trail Rocs weigh 430 grams per pair, and are priced at $70 USD.



More information: lookcycle.com


99 Comments

  • 72 4
 Incredible, they literally got everything wrong
  • 40 0
 I’m just stoked that finally, someone has released a flat pedal, because we haven’t already got enough choice.
  • 3 1
 Not true, I like the size!
Edit: oh noes, the corners are way smaller Wink
  • 9 0
 @Waldon83: Thanks Look we need another flat pedal. S L O W C L A P
  • 21 0
 @Waldon83: they should have put their efforts into an aftermarket stem, in the 35 to 50mm length range.
  • 5 0
 But Would ya just Look at it. . Just Look at it!!!
  • 1 1
 @LaurensVR : They did get the number of pins right in the text. So that makes you in the wrong.
  • 1 0
 @AyJayDoubleyou: Don't forget handlebars. No one is making them anymore. ????
  • 2 0
 @duanehundley: I’d really like some 780 wide, 10mm rise in a 35 clamp bars..... but I feel like there just isn’t enough variety in the market.
With only 27 choices, I’m won’t be satisfied till there is at least 28.
  • 31 0
 I just hate pedals with a convex spindle housing creating a high ridge under the ball of your foot. The pin heights don't really change that given that they just sink into your shoe rubber for grip, you're still gonna feel that ridge and along with that a lack of stability as your foot sits proud instead of sinking into the pedal with some nice comforting support around the sides. Nice looking but I wouldn't spend my money on them.
  • 18 0
 I agree with you about everything except the fact they are nice looking... My first thought was that they look like they cost about 12.99 from Halfords
  • 2 0
 Convex pedals make it feel like my foot has to be in the absolutely perfect spot so I constantly have to readjust my foot.
  • 1 0
 @jeremy3220: Don't think these are convex. They look flat, not convex or concave.
  • 5 0
 No concave no sale.
  • 1 2
 I couldn't agree more. As far as I'm concerned, if a flat pedal doesn't have a concave body it isn't worth riding on trail.
  • 6 5
 @millsr4:

If it is concave (or convex for that matter)..... can you really call it a "flat" pedal?
  • 3 0
 Its even worse if they make the rest of the pedal as thin as possible, usually advertising that fact, and then there is this fat ridge under my foot which makes the pedal feel like a failed clipless experiment.
  • 4 1
 Back when I was riding with the ball of my foot over the axle, very concave indeed felt best. For most stability you want grip on the front and the rear of the pedal and obviously there is little your toes can contribute to that grip of the pedal moves away from them. So concave felt best as it also matches the shape of most shoes. Now that I'm riding with the midfoot over the axle, I don't feel this need that much. The ball of the foot is over the front pins, the heel over the rear pins. The pedals I'm using (Catalyst) are actually fairly flat but I still have enough grip and stability. If the middle would be slightly raised, I think it would probably still work as the foot arch allows for that.

I have no experience with the One Up pedals but everyone seems to be lyrical about everything they do. Their pedals are convex so apparently convex pedals are just fine Smile .
  • 1 0
 @vinay: My OneUp composite pedals are on my spin bike now because I hate the shape. Every time I went to put my foot on the pedals I spent like 10 seconds readjusting. I also eventually figured out that the convex shape was causing the pedal to roll under my foot sometimes when I'd unweight a bit.
  • 1 0
 @jeremy3220: I've spent time on the one-up composites and have the same experience of trying to find that perfect spot. Turns out it was a lot further forward than I was used to. The grip was super good too. It just took a lot longer to get to that spot. It was enough of a destraction that I pulled them off the bike
  • 2 0
 @jojotherider1977: So yeah, that's it, isn't it? Concave is ideal for when you ride with the ball of the foot over the axle. But convex is still good if you have the midfoot over the axle. And convex allows for a thinner pedal whilst still allowing enough room for the bearings.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: I come from BMX and we all rode mid foot over spindle with concave pedals. I've never rode ball over spindle and still hate convex pedals. My mtb pedals (Stamp 7) are pretty flat though.
  • 1 0
 @jeremy3220: ok I was wondering if that might be happening to me too in my oneup pedals. I got the plastic ones to try and break up my routine and some bad habits I’ve developed using my Time special 12 (which are great pedals). But I have had the same issue where my foot rolls off the pedal, they mention the sharp fitting your arch but I don’t seem to like the pedal in my mid foot so then the convex design may not be for me. Now I may have to find another cheaper flat pedal to alternate between my clips with.
  • 1 0
 @Jesse221: A convex pedal will make it more likely to roll underfoot regardless of foot position. Imagine a really convex pedal, like a really really convex pedal, eventually you'd have a pedal in the shape of a ball. That's why they roll easier.
  • 2 0
 @jeremy3220: What matters is how high the pressure point is from the center of the axle. So basically how much leverage this tangential force has. A concave pedal indeed makes it bigger if it becomes concave by raising the mid section (paired with a stiff soled foot) so much that it creates a pressure point there. So yeah sure, that ball shaped example does that. But just look at your foot, how high is that arch? It takes quite a huge convex shape before you can get a pressure point there. No convex pedal has that. If you actually apply pressure there, it is because you either push with the ball of your foot over the axle (which convex pedals are not good for) or your soles are so stiff that they try to stay straight and transfer the load you apply through your heel and ball right to that raised mid section of the pedal. And then yes, in both cases your foot is going to roll over the pedal. If your shoe is less stiff (5.10 Freerider instead of Impact) and you have your midfoot over the axle, then the sole will just apply pressure on the front and rear of the axle. And as I mentioned earlier, the lower these contact points are, the less you're likely to roll over the pedal. The other thing that obviously helps against the pedals rolling is to make the pedals proper long. But yeah, if the axle thickness is a fixed given then making the front and rear of the pedal thinner is going to increase stability, not decrease it. Again, provided soles aren't too stiff and provided you don't ride with the ball of the foot over the axle.
  • 1 1
 @vinay: That's only part of it. We used chunky as hell pedals when I rode bmx but rolling the pedals was never an issue. The problem is once your foot bounce and the pedal starts to roll a convex shape facilitates that and a concave shape corrects it.
  • 2 1
 @enis: What if C-A-T really spelled “dog”?
  • 2 0
 @jeremy3220: Love my Stamps. No distinct concave place to position, but they seem to agree w wherever my foot comes down on them.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: I ride midfoot over the axle and used Catalysts for a little over a year. I thought they were great until I got a few rides on a set of TMACs. I sold the Catalysts and now have TMACs on all three of my bikes.
  • 1 0
 @asf: Oh no! I've got six pairs of Catalyst pedals in use now (a seventh pair in desperate need of service). Wouldn't want to fall in love with a different pedal and switch all over again! That said, yeah these T-Mac pedals sure look nice and refined. But I think I appreciate the size of the Catalysts too. They're quite comfortable and they're pretty hard to miss so you can get away with being a little less precise. Which is perfect for me Wink .

@jeremy3220: Ok I get what you're saying. This is not my experience, at least not with a pedal with such a slight convex shape as that One Up pedal. But it is clear you have tried both and have developed your preferences, which is perfect.
  • 13 1
 Hey, look nobody is looking for flat pedals any more. That ship sailed 40 years ago. We are all looking for toe clips again.
  • 14 4
 " Look , new pedals"

"They're nice who makes them?"

"Look"

"Yeah they're nice, who makes em?"

"LOOK"

"FFS I CAN SEE THEM WHO TF MAKES THEM"

XD
  • 2 0
 Sweet, what does mine say?
  • 3 0
 DUDE what about mine?
  • 8 2
 110x110 with a 2X3 loss at each corner..manufacturers dont get none square shape creates pressure point at the foot when moving on the bike. Most flat pedals are way too small, anyone with more than a 9US size needs a real 110X110 square. Just like vehicle seats people are just so used to being uncomfortable settling for less that it becomes normal smh
  • 2 0
 Yeah thats the first thing I thought. It looks like a clip without the part that makes it clip. Useless.
  • 2 0
 Crankbrothers Stamp in Large, an absolute unit of a pedal, love em for my big hooves
  • 2 0
 Deity TMacs and Deftraps are my jam these days. Big and grippy
  • 8 2
 What value does this one bring to the already massive flat pedal market. At this pricepoint, there is enough on offer. The only thing I could imagine is that they want to deal with road cycling specific shops that may not deal with Truvativ/SRAM and Shimano (so Campagnolo only).
  • 3 0
 Yeh it's probably just that, they already have a distribution network in place so they might as well fire some more products into it
  • 3 0
 @n734535: Yeah, but it is really hypothetical, isn't it? I understand that there are some purist in road cycling who only see themselves ride Campagnolo but for a shop to stick with just that (so that they don't receive parts through the Shimano and SRAM distribution network) seems quite odd. I get that a road specific shop may not deal with the likes of Spank, RaceFace etc. It is just that this is the only way I could see how a shop would sell the Look pedals instead of Shimano or SRAM alternatives. Or well, it could be for just "that" customer. Seems like a miniature market though. Not worth the investment of these casting or forging dies (not sure what it is). Extrusion would have been a much cheaper option with still enough room for customization.

If they would have put a little thought into it and made something truly unique.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Sram has pedals?
  • 1 0
 @vid1998: Truvativ has some pretty good platform pedals indeed.
  • 3 0
 @vinay: they probably just order them out of a catalogue - half a day’s effort on the side of a trip to Taiwan they already had booked. Worth a punt.
  • 2 0
 I'm sure theyll capitalize on the roadies that are coming to mtb and want a familiar name under their feet. Whether or not that's enough to justify whatever the manufacturing cost will become obvious if these pedals are around next year.
  • 1 0
 @jaame: Yeah I thought of that too. But it seemed like an odd choice for a company that you'd expect to develop and make their own pedals.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Didn't know. I always thought that it's weird Sram doesn't have pedals to compete with Shimano.
  • 1 0
 @vid1998: SRAM isn't really a company, is it? It is more of a consortium, like Hayes group. Sachs gearing, Truvativ cockpit and cranks, RockShox suspension, Avid brakes, Zipp wheels... It now just says "SRAM" or "Powered by SRAM", which implies a SRAM representative drops by every now and then and starts yelling. A business that helps them pull in the bigger OEM deals but whose individual brands seem to work quite independently. Heck, how it is it even possible that SRAM sponsored athletes ride with wireless controlled seatpost and gearing, but have cables running to operate the lock out on their suspension? Compared to gearing, lock out control is pretty crude and doesn't even need to be as refined as the seatpost controller. If Magura can have a single unit that controls a dropperpost and lock out front and rear suspension, then surely SRAM would have the ability to do so too. And if they're at it, integrate Quark sensors inside the suspension units just like the Zipp rims got them. If they'd just cooperate a little...

Either way, Truvativ has been making pedals well before SRAM put their hands on them. And I don't think they even changed since. Which may not even be such a big deal. Sure Shimano released new pedals more recently, but are these even that much better than the old (pre SRAM Truvativ time) Shimano PD-MX30 pedals? Then again with the huge focus on OEM, I don't think SRAM cares that much about pedals so Truvativ never actually got to develop an update. After all, pedals aren't really OEM equipment.

Did I just pull of a rant? Sorry for that.

tl;dr: Truvativ made pedals before they got associated to SRAM and I don't think the pedals have changed/evolved ever since.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Haha, just a bit of rant that has some merit. Maybe SRAM has no interest in pedals or deems it a too complicated product to develop from ground up and they havent had a chance to buy out another company. Plus the gold standard of clips is from Shimano so they would have create another new standard Smile
  • 8 3
 Aren't we past grub screws yet? That's one of the main reasons why not to buy a pedal like this one. Personal preference obviously
  • 11 1
 Plastic end caps, eeeewwww
  • 1 0
 The end caps are just for sealing. There's an M8 nut under it that does the tightening. Any suggestions for what tool to use for removing the plastic end cap though? My X-Tracks need tightening.
  • 3 0
 @Lornholio: Yeah they're not strictly functional, but you just dont expect to see stuff like that on pedals costing more than 20 notes, removing them, normally you have to pick them out with something like a screwdriver, which will innevitably chew them up.
  • 9 0
 Grub screws are actually much easier to replace when bent.
  • 3 0
 @lkubica: 100% agree with you, just get some pliers and even the most mangled pin comes straight out. Plus they're cheap as chips and you can easily order longer ones.
  • 9 0
 Grub screws can be correctly implemented. The issue with through pins that screw from the opposite side is that you end up having to remove a damaged screw that needs to pass through the soft aluminium body, likely damaging the threads.

Some brands like Burgtec or Unite use grub (set) screws that thread into the pedal body "head first", with a small hole on the opposite side just to allow an allen wrench to access the screw socket. This is sort of the best of both worlds, you can always use a tool to remove the pin, even a damaged ones, but doing so without damaging the pedal
  • 1 0
 @Arierep: Chromag Dagga and Specialized Boomslang have pins which screw from the opposite side but are narrower at the top. I have both pedals broke a couple of pins on both and have had zero issues to date.
  • 3 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: that design solves the issue of pulling a damaged thread through the pedal, but creates several others:

A) the thinner than M4 pin tips are easier to bend
B) I personally don't like the feel of the thinner tips, they create sort of a floaty feel I dislike, at least with Five Ten Impacts
C) you end up with non standard pins. With normal M4 through pins or set screws you get dirt cheap replacements available virtually everywhere, and can customise pin heights
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: For the price of a Chromag Dagga you kind of have to expect that. I looked into them because I need wide pedals for my toes-pointed-outward stance but that price! I ended up buying crankbrothers stamp 7's, but I still keep thinking of the dagga's and how huge they are. I'd like to put in the smaller pins that you can buy separately though, I don't like super aggressive pedals.
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: Yeah, and Boomslangs also have the awesome feature of carrying spare pins on the pedal itself. 4 extra pins on each pedal. And since it's so easy to remove a busted pin, as you said, it becomes a trail-side repair after you smoke a pin on a rock, instead of having to get home and grab the vice-grips and find your baggy of grub screws.
  • 1 0
 @Arierep:

A) they're also not hollow at the tip (the hex socket) and so can be stronger than grub screws. I've ridden both and have smoked off both Spesh and RF "custom" pins, as well as both alloy and stainless grub screws with some well timed pedal strikes. Once you hit hard enough to break the special pins, you're probably also hitting hard enough to destroy a grub screw, or at least fold it over and/or ruin the hex socket. I've had a few of the harder pins break half the socket right off, making them both very thing and very hard to remove.
B) can't do anything about personal preference...
C) Since Boomlangs come with 8 spares, carried on the pedal body, finding replacements is not really much of an issue. Yeah, maybe they cost more, but it's marginal. Once you use up 4 or 6 of your spares, you just order some more. And most replacement kits (at least RF) come with extra washers if you want to customize heights.
  • 2 0
 @Arierep: just as @just6979 said, i have not expirienced these problems. Daggas come with a lot of sparepins and washers too. I also think the boomslang pins are not ideal but i think its mostly due to the missing thread. For me Dagga pins are the best, feelingwise. They dig in better than full M4 pins and do not have the floaty feel.
  • 1 0
 @makkelijk: hate to tell you that they are flawless (dimensions, bearings, feel, pins, alloy (forged)). most pedals have a weakpoint in one of the categories mentioned above, the daggas shine in all of them and on bike 24 they were actually not that far off pricewise. You get what you pay for. (Still riding my HT X2 until the end of Summer though)
  • 2 0
 @just6979:
A) M4 screws used as through pins and grub screws that thread upside down (as in the Unite Instinct pedals) are also not hollow at the point and stronger than tapered pins
B) Personal preference here, can't argue
  • 1 0
 @Arierep: straight m4 screws from the back aren't as easy to remove when damaged as the "custom" pins. 6 to one, half dozen to the other.
  • 6 0
 Smells lycra
  • 5 0
 Those 10mm pins are a vascular surgery waiting to happen.
  • 1 0
 Any long time flat rider doesn’t even notice calve or shin cuts at a certain point
  • 4 0
 Those flat 90° edges will not slide over things easily and instead want to come to a stop and send you off your bike.
  • 1 3
 I like this design better because it saves weight and reduces "virtual" chainstay length, so you can put your feet more in the middle of the pedal which means less ankle pain from very harsh landings (ankle impignement)
  • 1 0
 Is that a real issue tho? Several very popular pedals, like the Deity Tmacs, lack that feature and yet nobody seems to complain about getting stuck on rocks
  • 2 0
 @Arierep: Not really, but they will take more force from hanging up on rocks etc, even if its only ever so slightly and that will make them more prone to breaking than a design with slanted edges. Especially when they are already pretty thin and do not have that much material in the areas that will take most of the beatings like fx the corners.
  • 1 0
 @Arierep: Based on my experience it is noticeable and is also just common sense if it's a priority for you.
I'm surprised so many high end brands still use this design when even most of the cheap Chinese copies on Amazon have the leading edge.
  • 1 0
 I get that brands gotta let people know their new stuff exists, and that media has to report something, but these strike as a distribution add-on and being as unremarkable as they are, a memo to the distributors would have sufficed.
  • 1 0
 I think Look is "looking" in the right direction. The concave pin setup has it's purpose for more aggressive DH riding. However, this pedal is pretty flat from the side profile. So, why not have it set up as being flat for the pin profile? It's got a few things right and a few things it can improve on.

Things it's got right:
1) Price - I really don't understand why a lot of brands charge dentist prices, especially for wear and tear items. Look has come out with a price that is actually affordable for a set of quality pedals. This is huge!!!! I got a pair of Snafu Anorexics and the company won't even warranty the pedals after one of the pedals side bridge broke and these pedals are like $170-$200+!!! I've now gone to a cheaper resin Crank Bros pedal and it's more convex shaped. It works but I wished it was more flat in profile. But for the Look to come out with an aluminum pedal that is not going to clean out your wallet - that's a huge advantage!

2) Weight is not bad, and it can shave off a tad more if they cut out some holes on the pedals or even make it even more lower profile like the OneUp pedals.

Things they can improve on:
1) Definitely make the pedals more square

2) Should come with 10mm pins near the spindle rather than 8mm and make it a true flat platform for an all-purpose pedal

3) Pedals can shave off a bit more weight either by being more lower profile or having more holes on the side without sacrifice pedal stiffness/integrity

4) Better pin placements with more square platform and using pins that are screwed in from one side out to the other side. Like others have said and I've seen this on the Snafu pedals, if you have repeated strikes on those grub screws, the screws will deform the threads in the pedal and you'll have absolutely no way to put a new screw into a damaged hole.
  • 1 0
 Pedal announcement without announcement of the spare part availability - useless;
for whatever reason rider should by product that they should have headache servicing in half year ?unless the product price similar to service price
  • 1 0
 Look makes some of the best ski bindings out there, and has a huge cult following for the Pivot binding. Why would a flat pedal be so difficult to get right? It's not like it needs safety certifications like a ski binding does. Do they just not care about the mtn bike crowd?
  • 1 0
 Mike, why didn’t you cover the Vibram-clad flat pedals as well? Don’t get me wrong, I’m not actually interested in buying them, but they’re kinda neat in a look-but-dont-touch sense.
  • 3 0
 Missed the title "First Look:..."
  • 2 0
 Why make something heavier, thicker, uglier than the OneUp? Beat the benchmark, don’t glorify it!
  • 3 0
 No-one knows flat pedals like a road biking company
  • 2 0
 Oh Look, loose bearings new out of the box...
  • 1 1
 Open your preferred browser on your device, order some hope f20's. Close your browser safe in the knowledge you have the best flat's available.
  • 1 0
 "and the inner ones are 8mm tall"

and they'll feel like half that due to the stupid bulge in the middle.
  • 2 0
 LOOK... another flat pedal!
  • 1 0
 Why is your sister CyclingTips covering the Rubber Look pedal? This is the pedal the people want to see!
  • 1 0
 I would like to see more size options, would be nice to see more smaller pedal options for youth.
  • 1 0
 I don't like the look of these Look pedals, but I like high q-factor pedals. Hope VP Harriers coming back.
  • 1 0
 Wow! This might be the game-changing flat pedal that will make me give up my clips! Finally!
  • 1 0
 Look, I've got some roadie crap on my mtb Jk i really dont fn care
  • 1 0
 Could be good for road biking in sandals, but I thought I'm at pinkbike
  • 1 0
 nah i stay with, s-track and enduro cages
  • 1 0
 but why ?
  • 1 0
 Freeroad 4 lyfe!
  • 1 0
 Downroad?
  • 1 0
 what a shower of shite
  • 5 5
 Not bad for $70.
  • 2 4
 Looking good!
  • 2 0
 Doesn't Look like I will be changing my Penthouse MK4's anytime soon.

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