End of Season Fixes: Part 1 - Lower Back Pain and Hip Care

Oct 7, 2016 at 15:00
Oct 7, 2016
by Dee Tidwell  
 
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Fall riding is spectacular in most areas of the world. Seriously, how awesome is it to be ripping trails through Aspen groves or dense forest leaving roosts of colorful leaves and moist dirt?

It’s crisp. You smell the remenants of a dying Summer around you, and honestly, it’s just nice not to be sweating like a stuck pig because of the summer heat!

Cue dark music.

And then there’s the other side, it’s the end of mountain biking season for many of us. This proves to be a time where many of us get grumpy because we see and feel the impending Winter season closing in on us. Others like me, while we too are grumpy, are relieved to be done with a busy racing and riding season!

We hope you've been able to remain healthy all year and aren’t dealing with an end of season injury. However, we know many of you are struggling with injury and one of the major topics I've been asked about frequently this fall is how to "take care" of lower back and hip injuries.

So we created two solutions for you that will help you or a friend who is suffering from either issue and we are confident they will allow you to start your off-season better prepared.

First is a "team" approach to your care, and second is this two-part video series. Part one of the video series is this one, and part two will deal with shoulder, neck, and rib cage solutions (keep at eye out for it soon!).

#1-
Consider using a “team” approach to help you recover from the stress of the season. We encourage you to create a “medical team,” using qualified professionals like:
1. A Chiropractor, who can keep your skeletal system in proper alignment so your nervous system fires on all cylinders
2. A Physical Therapist who can use different tools like “dry needle trigger point therapy” to help with nagging muscle issues as well as perform important diagnostic assessments
3. A Massage Therapist to help with trigger points, fascial adhesions, and other repetitive stress based tissue issues.
4. A Holistic Medical doctor or Orthopedic specialist

#2-
Watch part one of this two-part series- End of Season Fix #1- Low Back Pain and Hip care
- and if you do them daily you will quickly see and feel a difference in how you move on and off the bike!

Views: 8,418    Faves: 112    Comments: 2


All right, you have a couple of good end-of-season exercises of self-therapy to help you move better. Hopefully, you'll notice a decrease in your pain or dysfunction, so get to it and enjoy the benefits!

Like always, if we can help in any way, shoot us an email at info@enduromtbtraining.com, check out our website at www.enduromtbtraining.com for your off-season training solutions.


MENTIONS: @yeticycles / @shimano / @enduromtbtrainer

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91 Comments

  • + 33
 What is this "off season" you are referring to?
  • + 3
 I literally have no idea!
  • + 3
 ha ha! good point!
  • + 2
 Agreed, viva la Vancouver island and our lack of winter Big Grin
  • + 19
 1,4 and in some cases 3 are pseudoscience or often pseudoscience. Vet your medical caregivers, folks. Science-based medicine. It's a thing.
  • + 4
 sCAM unfortunately has forced itself in the door despite its lack of plausibility. Then there is that whole failure to perform greater than sham controls or placebo. It does work really well for vague transient conditions that get better on their own though!

#2 dry needling is also pseudoscience and has been consistently debunked. Toothpicks and retracting needles that do not enter the skin work just as well as acupuncture needles in experimental trials for reducing back pain.
  • + 0
 it works very well, I've been doing this the last 8 months after a severe sciatica .... and all those tips worked very well. (+1)
Good video
  • + 13
 @jefftrancex1xtr: I am stoked you are finding relief from sciatica, however anecdote is not the plural of data. Correlation is not causation. Your own experience does not override experimental trials and systematic reviews. It is pseudoscience.
  • + 3
 @michaelbooth28: You are correct.
  • + 4
 Yeah, lost me at No 1. Chiropractor? I was sure it was a joke. It wasn't.
  • + 8
 @michaelbooth28: I am an orthopaedic surgeon in training. Thank you. Adherence to evidence based medicine/practice is paramount as is not giving advice without the data/ qualifications to back you up. This kind of practice is harmful on every level right up to serious health/ societal issues. People no longer see the value of evidence and ignore it until it's too late. Seek help from those in a profession with a well regulated governing body who value evidence above all else (Doctors/Surgeons/Physiotherapists).
  • - 2
 As a practicing Chiropractor, it gets me sad that this is the general attitude towards chiropractic care in this community. Chiropractic IS science based. Im not here to show you journals and proof or give my personal experience. I only advise you and the community to make your own opinion based on your own research and experience. It's true that a lot of chiropractors practice outside of the scientific method and even worse try to take over from what the medical doctors are the best at, which gives us a bad image to the general public.
  • + 11
 @santiagomo87: I have the same attitude towards prosperity gospels that take advantage of desperate populations by promising faith cures for their money. Snake oil is snake oil. The burden of proof is with those making health claims, not with those denying a relationship.

People should not be advised to form their own opinion based on their personal research and experience. This is not the attitude of a scientist. Antivaxxers advise the same nonsense and are putting people like me who are immuno-supressed at risk by reducing herd immunity. Doing your own research or coming to conclusions based on personal experience may be benign in some instances, but it is a matter of life and death in others.

People should be advised to be scientifically literate, to understand what is meant by scientific consensus, systematic reviews, double blind experimental conditions, plausibility, and the numerous cognitive fallacies the plague our thinking.
  • - 2
 @michaelbooth28: Problem is when the cientific research can be manipulated to get the results wanted. Happens with studies about pharmaceuticals, studies about chiropractic, studies about other therapies and even studies about quantum physics. I know that still its the best approach we have towartds the truth but often it's not the case.

Life and death in chiropractic.... I don't think so. Not one single case of fatality or serious injury in mine, my 2 siblings, my father, 2 uncles, 8 cousins, grandfather, and great grandfather since the 1920's experience (all qualified chiropractors). I'm getting with anecdotal evidence which I said I wouldn't do though. Just this week I found in a patient's x rays that his back problem was a compression fracture secondary to methastathic cancer (which his medical doctor didn't find). I guess he wouldn't have been this lucky if he didn't go to a qualified chiropractor.
  • + 8
 @santiagomo87: You are not aware of the issues in your own field then. My point was that your attitude about research and experience is very risky when applied to medicine and health. You have just demonstrated it by citing your family history and personal practice as evidence for lack of fatalities despite the fact that they occur in chiropractic.

Once you pull out the "problems in all of science" card as a hasty generalization to dismiss counter evidence and argument, then discussion is pointless. Is there any condition or evidence that you would accept as legitimately refuting your theory? Sounds like you have made it completely immune to falsification and will rationalize away anything that says otherwise.

Our best option here is likely to go ride our bikes.
  • + 2
 @michaelbooth28:
I agree with some of your points and it's true I got emotional in the discussion.

Of course I'm aware that chiropractic is not harmless but neither are surgery and use of prescription drugs. The alternatives are there because there is a huge demand for it. But as you said, it's pointless to discuss here, better ride our bikes.

I'm just defending here what I have dedicated half of my life studying.
  • + 4
 @santiagomo87: I don't wish to belittle what you do and have worked hard for. Before I operate on someone I can/ have to provide them with numbers. Well established and researched numbers of how likely what I am about to do will cause complications, how often it goes wrong, what the alternatives are and what is the best course of action. If I fail to do so, my own profession will strike me off and I will no longer be allowed to practice. If I don't practice using evidence, I can no longer practice. That can not be said for many of the professions listed above, and why they are not held in as high esteem in the healthcare community. But I take @michaelbooth28 's point and we should just go ride bikes. We are all here for the same reason.
  • + 2
 @thestigmk1: yeah, only if you don't mind waiting 58 weeks ( current waiting list) to see an orthopaedic shoulder specialist in Wales!!
So, it's no wonder people ( myself included) pay to see chiropractors etc and try anything that might help ( clinically proven or not)!!
  • + 3
 @Kathg: I do sympathise with you on that. If you want to pay for a clinically proven service that offers evidence based non-operative treatment in the meantime, I suggest seeing a physio. Sadly the British public outside of Scotland have consistently elected politicians that sell off/attack public services. That's why if I hurt my shoulder, I'll be seen within 6 weeks and operated on (if needed) within 3 months at most. However, that's an issue with a political system. Not science/evidence base.
  • + 8
 Something that helps my lower back is sleeping on my side with a pillow between my legs. My physical therapist put me onto it and I'll never go back to sleeping without it.
  • + 2
 That's pretty much the only way I can sleep now too.
  • + 6
 As a physical therapist I must say I am more than a bit sceptical as to how usefull theese passive techniques are. No doubt taking care of your body is key to enjoying this sport, but in my experience passive interventions like theese have minimal to no long term effect on musculoskeletal function
  • + 1
 Thanks for your comment, but if you're skeptical, I'd encourage you to try them on yourself if you haven't already to see if it makes a difference. These are only part of a larger picture under the training umbrella and just a few tools along side other training protocols to increase function.
  • + 3
 @enduromtbtrainer: and I'd encourage searching pubmed.gov for clinical trials that prove whether or not they work any better than a placebo for the conditions for which they are being recommended before you throw away your money on them.
  • + 4
 Thanks @enduromtbtrainer! I always find your videos really helpful. Interesting point about the amount of time we spend seated, even when we're finding time to ride. Also, what do you think the benefits of seeing a Chiropractor are? I saw one for a couple weeks at the beginning of the season after experiencing two back spasms, but felt that I could achieve a similar result using a foam roller, lacrosse ball and stretching.
  • + 3
 Do it. I have a strong medical team here in Colorado and I refer out to different types of Chiro's based off a clients need. As much as I show you info on 'muscle' care, it's important to see a highly qualified 'skeletal' specialist at least once a quarter!
  • + 7
 @enduromtbtrainer: Or you could get a chiro like I went to and end up a lot worse when my back was never even sore!
  • + 2
 @russthedog: Ya, sadly there are bad apples out there too! That's why you have to do your homework about which to choose, just like you would a surgeon or any other medical practitioner. Like they say, "get at least three opinions' before making your decision.
  • + 4
 My lower back always used to hurt. I had to take 2-3 Ibuprofen before each ride until I discovered www.foundationtraining.com

Total game changer. I ride pain free now.
  • + 2
 I agree, foundation training is great, did a video on it last year in fact. Nice work @Robrobot
  • + 1
 @Robrobot tup nice 1 for the link
  • + 2
 My lower backs hurts most of the time any more, Ive been a construction worker for about 24 yrs now. Lucky for me my back feels best when I am on my bike.
  • + 2
 @brncr6: yep, same here, i've found the riding is a pain killer too tup
  • + 2
 4 ruptured discs in my lower back and this( foundation training )also works for me! My acupuncturist suggested it .
  • + 2
 I survived the socal off season aka 'summer' here...hopefully ready for our mtb season to start=1st rain of autumn(similair timing to our mx desert season). Oh well, winter surf season starts monday w/1st wnw ground swell anyways...and these exercises are great for that too!
  • + 1
 I unexpectedly fixed some of my chronic back problem. I have fairly impressively bulging discs at L4 and L5. I assumed the discomfort I was feeling in MtB was just a part of that problem, and something I had to deal with. Then I demoed (and bought) a different bike. Almost all of the measurements and geometry were the same except one number - seat tube angle. I went from a slack 72 ish° STA to a 74° STA and my back pain during riding diminished about 90%. And, @enduromtbtrainer I will try your exercises, even though they appear to be a less-severe form of rolfing.
  • + 1
 That make sense, glad you found that out! BTW- do know, you pretty much have to comstantly train to keep those discs from getting more. Hit me up, I can show you one, one minute exercise that will help immensely! info@enduromtbtraining.com
  • + 1
 great video Dee!! super thankful you were able to help me out in Aspen when suffering from my own low back issue after crashing into a tree :-) will definitely be referring back to your videos this fall, winter, and well into next season!
  • + 1
 Awesome @cchappetta1 ! Happy to help and here if you need me!
  • + 2
 good info...ya, its relevant...i just started PT for my rght lower side & IT band. but....
according to my PT, its an overdeveloped muscle creating imbalance...not an easy fix.
  • + 1
 But it is doable and good thing it's the off season. Hopefully you'll be good to go for 2017!
  • + 1
 I'd suggest taking a look at the evidence based work of Dr. McGill who runs the spine biomechanics research lab at the University of Waterloo.

All the stretching and rubbing in the world won't help you if you don't have the core endurance (not strength, endurance) and balance to start with.

I'm immediately skeptical of any back health program that doesn't reference his research or method.
  • + 1
 I never have pain issues riding my bike, even with my left knee fixed by screws, strained meniscus in the right knee, broken twice arm, broken ribs, damaged spine, knocked out teeth & with my head concussions. Just beacuse except riding my bike i do cross fit, yoga ashtanga & triathlon. Cross fit gives you strength, yoga ashtanga gives you suppleness & triathlon gives you condition. The most important thing is to strengthen your spine & do a lot of swimming!
  • + 1
 Will be working on these things a lot in my spare time. Have consistent lower back spasms especially in standing pedaling position and had scaphoid surgery a month ago so will be looking forward to wrist video.
  • + 1
 I had both my hips operated on this time last year. For those with chronic and worsening pain in the hips and back, don't be afraid to see a hip orthopedist to see if you have fai; ie bone spurs in your hips.
  • + 1
 Agreed! X-rays and MRI"s are valuable!
  • + 2
 Did a 90 day training program from Dee and it helped a ton...the follow up videos like this one just make sense and really do work. Thanks for all this info!!
  • + 1
 Thanks @Badassbaby - stoked it helped you!!!
  • + 2
 Very helpful and great info right there. What is your background Dee? Chiro or PT? Regardless, very useful stuff right there for a mtb'er. Thanks.
  • + 3
 23 years as Kinesiologist and Muscle Activation Techniques therapist. I surround myself with smarter people than myself Smile Thanks @jgusta !
  • + 2
 @enduromtbtrainer: Excellent! I am a PT myself, but spend much of the workweek working with and on the more sedentary, unhealthy population so it seems (large HMO). So, very much appreciate helpful tips like these for more active folks.
  • + 2
 @jgusta: Ya, I'm happy and dependent on my PT team... it's a blast working together to bring people back to better-than-before-the-injury lifestyle!
  • + 4
 Great info and presentation Dee... thanks!
  • + 1
 Your welcome!
  • + 1
 Did a 2 week trip through Oregon, Washington and BC in August and my back and hip is still killing me if I stand for more than a couple minutes...thank you!
  • + 3
 I wonder if I can get that "medical team" on the NHS
  • + 2
 These videos are so effing good! Thanks for taking the time to create and share big fella.
  • + 1
 Absolutely! Thanks for the encouragement and watch for vid #2 next week Smile
  • + 1
 Hi, can you share some information about wrist injury recovery?
My wrist is OK after the injury however it feels weaker and more prone to injury forever after that...
  • + 1
 What did you do?
  • + 3
 Go see a physio
  • + 1
 Very easy just buy a squeezy ball & in your spare time just squeeze it with your "weaker" hand. It will strengthen your wrist for real i see it all the time during rehabilitaion. Also while riding you can buy a special wrist stabilizer or cheaper you can buy a roller blade wrist pad just put out the plastic parts & it does great. I ride with my Roces wrist pads for over 10 years and they combain nicely with Fox gloves.
  • + 3
 This is my life right now.
  • + 2
 No such thing as proper alignment of the skeletal system.
  • + 2
 going on 4.5 months off the mountain bike due to lumbar spasms
  • + 2
 Holler if I can help!
  • + 1
 Gut smashin'? Sticky stuff? Sounds like things I'd rather get into with a broad than a rubby ball. Big Grin
  • + 1
 There was an obvious omission from that "feel good" team. Perhaps we are all not as crass as Trump (perhaps only me!).
  • + 1
 A lot of very useful information! Not all the exercises I found useful for me but information is very useful!
  • + 1
 Would this also be helpful during my recovery from hip replacement surgery?
  • + 1
 Yes sir. ONLY after your doctor and physical therapist clears you. You should ALWAYS follow their guidelines first.
  • + 1
 @enduromtbtrainer: That's great. Thanks for the reply and the great video, I look forward to your next one. Thanks again
  • + 1
 Wrist and finger injuries for me this year , would love a video on that . Thanks for this one too!
  • + 1
 I'll try to hit those in video #2 next week.
  • + 1
 As i replied to one wrist issue... just buy a squeezy ball & in your spare time just squeeze it with your "weaker" hand. It will strengthen your wrist, hand, fingers for real i see it all the time during rehabilitaion. Also while riding you can buy a special wrist stabilizer or cheaper you can buy a roller blade wrist pad just put out the plastic parts & it does great. I ride with my Roces wrist pads for over 10 years and they combain nicely with Fox gloves.
  • + 1
 Turns out I can fit a significant amount of my fingers behind my rib cage! Party tricks and a good video!? 11/10!
  • + 1
 Absolutely falls under the "stupid human tricks" category! Thanks @AElliott !
  • + 1
 Finally got back on the bike after I dislocated my hip 2 months ago.
  • + 3
 I can't imagine how much that hurt! Hope you recover fully soon!
  • + 2
 thanks for this guys !!!
  • + 3
 Heck ya!
  • + 1
 'Off-season'. There is no stinking off-season
  • + 1
 Get sized for a saddle that fits you
  • + 1
 I can so totally relate to this thanks
  • + 1
 My pleasure!
  • + 1
 Well this was ridiculous
  • - 1
 youtu.be/ap27X41VzUc You are all welcome.

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