Magura MT Trail Brakes – Review

May 26, 2017
by Richard Cunningham  
Magura MT Trail Brakes
Magura MT Trail Brakes
Blue highlights signify Magura's MT Trail Brake – four pistons up front, with two pistons in the rear caliper, paired with 180mm rotors (Pictured: Storm SL front and a Storm HC rear).


Magura's MT Trail Brakes came into being because their employees were mixing and matching the four-piston MT7 and two-piston MT8 calipers on their bikes to balance the braking forces and to enhance modulation. Magura took the hint and started packaging the combo as its "MT Trail" system. According to Magura, the difference in stopping power between the hard-gripping four-piston caliper and the softer action of the two-piston MT8 caliper closely match disparity in traction produced by the front and rear wheels. Because most riders tend to drag the rear brake, Magura specs equal-diameter, 180-millimeter rotors, which adds some cooling mass to the rear brake and further balances the feel at the levers. MT Trail brakes are offered with either carbon or aluminum lever blades (reviewed), and weigh 660 grams for the pair. MSRP is 585 a pair (carbon blades), plus $64 for a pair of 148-gram Storm HC 180-millimeter rotors.


Magura MT Trail Brakes
Magura's MT Trail lever with the new OEM one-finger aluminum lever blade option. MT Trail brakes have a five-year leak proof warranty, largely made possible by the precise fitting components inside its fiber-reinforced, injection-molded master cylinder.

MT8 and MT7 brakes share the same lever/master cylinder unit, so to balance the feel at the lever, the four-piston caliper has smaller pistons. The asymmetric calipers also require different brake pads. Four small pads are used on the MT7 in order to facilitate top-loading while providing clearance for the caliper's central reinforcing arch. The two-piston MT8 uses conventional rectangular brake pads.

Magura MT Trail Brakes 2017
Magura's MT7 front caliper uses four small top-loading pads.
Magura MT Trail Brakes
The rear caliper is also top loading but has two conventional rectangular pads.
Magura brake pads 2017
Front pads (left) compared with the rear. Colors are used to indicate pad compounds.

Magura says that all of their brake pad materials are organic. Three compounds are offered: gray "Performance" pads are standard, with softer-gripping blue "Comfort" pads and their grippiest gold "Race" pads offered as aftermarket options. Our review brakes used the standard pads, which provide powerful stopping and are longer wearing than Magura's high-performance Race items.

Magura MT Trail Brakes
The reach adjustment is flush with the lever blade.
Magura MT Trail Brakes
Perches can adapt to SRAM or Shimano direct-mount controls.

DIY Trail Brakes

Magura's disc brake range is interchangeable, so savvy customers who can live without the blue colorway can mix and match their own Trail Brakes by cherry-picking from their upper-level MT7 and MT8 systems—or save some money by piecing together a kit using MT5 and MT4 components. For the less inclined, Magura already packages that mid-range MT4 and MT5 combination into the Trail Sport kit for $275 USD.




Magura initially launched the MT Trail brake to aftermarket customers exclusively with their carbon fiber lever blade, which has a wide and comfortable profile. For 2017, they plan to offer the new one-finger HC aluminum lever which was previously an OEM-only option. My brake kit had the aluminum blade, and after experiencing both, I now prefer the feel of the metal lever. The grip length is about half way between a tiny one-finger lever like Shimano XT, and the longer, two-finger types from both SRAM and Shimano. The Magura profile offers one-finger braking, with slightly more room on the flats, so braking action feels just right from more than one position on the grips.

Magura's Performance pad material doesn't offer much grip until the pads are properly mated to the rotors. After a few hard stops, however, the pads bite into the rotors with a lot of authority. There is no bite point adjustment on the MT master cylinder, only an Allen-screw reach adjustment on the levers. The adjustment function is flush, so it will survive many crashes and it proved to be all that I needed. The master cylinder's bite point is precise, so I could set the lever close to the grip and be assured that the pads would contact the rotors consistently. For most of this season, I have favored SRAM's Guide Ultimate brakes. MT Trail brakes surprised me with their more precise feel, and with braking power and modulation that was pleasantly similar.

While I was happy to discover that Magura has achieved significant performance gains in the MT brake's feel and stopping power, the real story about MT Trail brakes is whether or not the four-by-two caliper arrangement can deliver better modulation and balance than a matched pair of calipers. The short answer is "yes, they can." An unusual-for-California rainy season provided exorbitant traction, and a rare opportunity to brake like a boss on high-speed descents and put some heat into the rear brake. There was plenty of power available, and I never felt any fading, but honestly, I didn't notice any advantages over matched-caliper brakes.

After the sun eventually baked the clay trails into their usual gravel-covered concrete, however, the asymmetric calipers, paired with same-sized rotors stepped up to the plate. My home zone's slippery soil and steep rock rolls require a sensitive hand on the levers and a lot of coordination between the front and rear brake. With Magura's MT Trail stoppers, I could intuitively nurse the tires to the razor edge of traction and control. In any situation where traction was compromised, they were a delightful improvement.


Pinkbike's Take:

bigquotesMagura's MT Trail brake system is not going to impress ham-fisted riders who use the rear wheel like a rudder to mash down steeps. Top bike-handlers with well developed braking technique, however, will appreciate the balance and enhanced modulation that asymmetric calipers bring to their games. It's not rocket science, but it makes a good brake even better.RC






165 Comments

  • + 84
 Who can afford this stuff? its really getting out of hand.. I'll stick with my $90 SLX brakes.
  • + 98
 ..people with more money than you?
  • + 30
 @Reignx08: $90?! Bro you got ripped off
  • + 16
 @zorba73: most likely, but that doesn't mean a set of brakes is worth $600. Drink the koolaid if you want, its your $$.
  • + 11
 @MortifiedPenguin: sure man whatever you say.. slx brakes are on all the major sites for $75 ish usd. Far as I'm concerned SLX brakes are the best bang for your buck out there.
  • + 8
 @MortifiedPenguin: that's $90 Cad. Which is about $60Usd.
  • + 3
 @habsfan2; @Reignx08: I have slx brakes on my bikes. Love them, work great, and were cheap. I was just making a joke, didn't think about the Cad to Usd thing.
  • + 6
 @habsfan2: Or Gazillion Philippine Pesos.
  • + 1
 @habsfan2: I think $90 US too.
  • + 4
 I'm definitely on team SLX brakes (have them on two bikes,) but Saints/XTR's and the like are worth every penny. Having said that I don't see how these could be worth $600... Maybe they come with a nice 30 y/o Scotch or something.
  • - 8
flag farmageddon (May 26, 2017 at 11:29) (Below Threshold)
 I was interested util RC called me "ham fisted" You want to play developed break technic old man? we only use both breaks when we need to .. Way to generalize to push your meathead/freeride stereotype agenda...
  • + 2
 @MortifiedPenguin: there awesome brakes , have them on one of my bikes, and zee's on my downhill bike.
  • + 8
 Just installed XT 8000 front and rear with Ice Tech rotors and metal pads, $240 with no tax and free shipping. I'm good thanks.
  • + 11
 A friend once said:

"Something is only worth what someone is willing to pay to pay for it."
  • + 6
 In Shimano, I trust.
  • + 7
 RC has a point with the "ham-fisted" comment. skidding is fun stuff, but not many situations call for it.
  • + 4
 @MortifiedPenguin: this is Pinkbike comments. No joking around here.
  • + 2
 @onemind123: I sometimes forget the rules
  • + 4
 @FarmeR57: skidding is fun but tyres are expensive. Argh first world problems
  • + 3
 dentists
  • + 2
 @enrico650: Amen!!!
  • - 1
 @habsfan2: You are getting the worst exchange rate possible dude. $60 is closer to $80.
  • + 2
 @farmageddon: the trails RC isn't allowed to see when he comes to BC require using the rear wheel as a rudder. I guess he hasn't been on upper Pemby trails eitherWink ham fist on!
  • + 1
 Well said @zorba73:
  • + 1
 @whitebirdfeathers: your right, either way the exchange rate sucks, It was a little exaggerated.
  • + 3
 made in germany, not in asia
  • + 0
 I mean it's cool they're so expensive if you're a billionaire, it probably doesn't matter. I see the discrepancy as like, I know how hydraulic brakes work, they're simple as fuck, could I start my own factory making them, no. You've been fucked.
  • + 0
 And are being fucked.
  • + 5
 @farmageddon: Have a brake, have a kitkat. Uhm, wait, what?
  • + 1
 New brakes for the car or pro-level bling factor for the bike?

Sorry car
  • + 1
 Paid 115 GBP from a well know Dutch online store for my Magura MT5/MT4 combo. No complaints here. Seems good value imo
  • + 3
 @Kramz: " I know how hydraulic brakes work, they're simple as f*ck, could I start my own factory making them, no. You've been f*cked."

And yet all you're ACTUALLY doing is sitting in front of your keyboard in your pants, bitching.
  • + 1
 @KeithReeder: My life never goes to plan, my options today were mow the lawn for the 3rd time in 2 weeks, or just be ill from being on so much medication from these f*cking retards.
  • + 3
 @KeithReeder: You have to say "underpants" as pants are trousers to the rest of the world.
  • + 45
 Did I read the $600 part correctly?
  • + 8
 I guess in fairness, the "ultimate" level SRAM brakes are nearly that expensive, too! Geez.
  • + 49
 I Hope no one buys these because there is better for cheaper..
  • + 5
 @camcoz69: see what you did there...
  • + 5
 @camcoz69: At least with the Ultimate you get carbon levers, idiot proof bleeding and and 4 piston on the front and rear.
  • + 128
 If you buy these your wallet will be MT.
  • + 1
 The price of a set of 8 pads
  • + 2
 @bigtim: oh my god you win. Actually laughing out loud
  • + 3
 made in germany, not in asia
  • - 2
 @Sethimus: Sucks like made in china anyway ... never i will recommend anybody those royal blooded brakes...
  • + 1
 @bigtim: omg yes
  • + 2
 I really don't think that that will stay/be the retail price. You can get a Magura MT-5 for 70€ and the MT-4 for 60€ in Germany. Granted, both a little heavier but the same characteristics and your DIY Trail Brake set.
  • + 1
 @Frell: Just picked a set of these up for £130 online so your prediction came true!
  • + 26
 Hoping to get legend performance, like the Magura Marta's of yesteryear (I've only bled them once cutting the line, some 8 years ago). Getting in on the Magura MT8's was a huge mistake and waste of money. After a headache-mess of a time, terrible customer service, and months on back up brakes; I'll never own another Magura product again. I would advise anyone reading and considering a $600 brake purchase to instead buy 5 sets of Shimano SLX brakes. Take four of those sets, and throw them away, you won't need them. The SLX brakes will be the most reliable and last set of brakes you'll ever need lest your ego fall victim to marketing propaganda.
  • + 1
 What broke?
  • + 2
 truth!
  • + 9
 I was an XT fanboi until I got MT5s on a complete bike I bought... It was a bargain and I thought "well I'll have to trash those brakes"... in no time, after getting used to the MT5s feel.. I sold all my shimanos, and got MT5 on DH & allmnt bike... these MT5s are not that expensive in german sites..forget about the MT7s and these trail fancy dentist versions.
  • + 2
 Such a bummer to hear the MT8s were so disappointing. I came really close to buying a set, but the cost put me off. I must admit that the aesthetic of Magura's brakes appeal to me quite a bit. But if they don't work, then I'll stick with my SRAM Guides.
  • + 3
 @Lagr1980: This I bought a used bike with MT5s and so far they have been great! I like them more than my Guides that I have on the DH bike. The only problem is that brake pads for them are expensive in the US, like $35 a set vs like $20ish for shimano or sram pads.
  • + 2
 They work until you have to bleed them. I know Magura remedied them, but it's still a pain to bleed.
  • + 4
 @Jhou: Bled my Trails in, ummm, 15 minutes? First try, no problem. Running a set of the MT Sports now that are something like $280 and they are fantastic.
  • + 5
 @MasterSlater: I wouldn't take one user as an indication of everything - I've heard they're great brakes and all products have at least some failures
  • + 2
 @Jhou: @alexdi: Like Jhou, they worked great out of the box, but when I shortened the line they would always leak air into the system. In the quest for light weight they somehow used the handlebar clamp bolts to seal the master cylinder. The explanation was somewhat cryptic as my explanation was through a shop employee and not directly from Magura. I bled them at least 4 times, good for half a ride. The shop I bought them from bled them at least 10 times, using multiple bleed kits, both universal and two different Magura kits, before fighting with Magura to get a RA#. Worth noting this was from a shop manager, so I can't say who is to blame for the excessive turn around. When I got them back they worked great, but I was afraid to look at them wrong, lest them send me off a mountain. Keep in mind this is the first generation MT8, I believe they are on the 3rd gen design of them now. Compared the Magura Martas, which I still have on one of my bikes and love (again, one bleed in 8 years on those things!), I was beyond disappointed and won't risk the time and money on an admittedly top-tier product that is anything less than bulletproof.
  • + 1
 @BullMooose: You can buy the pads on German sites (in bulk) or on CRC to save some money.
  • + 1
 @Lagr1980: Absolutely! I had Magura Martas back in the time and had several problems with those, but the MT5 are "cheap" and have been great since I got them: powerful, progressive and maintenance-free. The lever action is very smooth and the overall shape is well-thought. They may not be (as) flashy (as the MT7), but work wonders.
  • + 15
 "Magura's MT Trail brake system is not going to impress ham-fisted riders who use the rear wheel like a rudder to mash down steeps." -- welp, guess i don't need these.
  • + 10
 In fairness to Magura: these brakes are crazy-powerful, modulate very well, and they're lighter than Shimano's various options by about 110g. That's worth something if you've already dropped megabucks on the rest of the bike.
  • + 1
 Lighter? You sure? This article says 660g for the set. Zee is Shimano's heaviest brake at 628g per set. XTR race are 420g per set. I've tried all of the above and the MTs were my least favorite.
  • + 1
 @TheRaven: People usually quote the weight of a single lever, caliper (and hose), mounting hardware, and a disc. Only the first two parts matter. XTR Race is about 400g for a set of levers and calipers. MT Trail is 475g for the same. XTR Trail (which has Servo Wave; Race doesn't), XT, SLX, and so on are closer to 585g.
  • + 1
 @alexdi: re-read the article. It says 660g for levers and calipers, an additional 148g for rotors.
  • + 2
 @TheRaven: Delayed response on this one, but that's an error. Google has pictures of the brakes on a scale; they total around 480g. That 148g would be for a single 180mm rotor with steel bolts.
  • + 13
 Holy cow! Its like a game to see how much they can make things cost. There's just no way I'll ever buy these.
  • + 1
 Not defending the cost, but some mountain bike brake costs have been in this ballpark for years. Hayes Purples were about that much in '98. Or Magura HS22s before that. Or, the first generation Saints.
  • + 10
 I can barely remember to have extra stock of one type of brake pad haha let a lone two completley different ones haha.
  • + 6
 Honestly- How can you seriously justify buying anything other than straight up Shimano Saint?
Parts everywhere , flawless performance, insane power, super easy install and in comparison ...cheap as hell.
The only brake that entices me occasionally is Hope Tech3 V4's but really only for the blingage.
  • + 2
 After the third time sending my Saints back on warranty, I sold them. They spent more time at the distributor than ever on my bike. Had an issue with a Magura and had a set back within a few days, not the months for Shimano
  • + 2
 @kathwill: Ive used Saints forever. Never had an issue other than roasting some too small rotors. Switched to 203's and all was good. Formula and Maguras were not nearly as good.

What was the warranty issue?
  • + 6
 Best brake set on the market hands down. The price is high but it's worth it for the quality. I have heard of a couple issues with the mt7's but the mt trail's are amazing. Best power and mudulation for a trail bike brake easy.
  • + 4
 Five year warranty is good.
How is cutomer service?
How many shops will carry or service these brakes?
Fiber renforced plastic injection is a long winded description of plastic.
Mind you if it was carbon fiber plastic matrix.
That sounds cool.
  • + 4
 Used to be 10.. for what it's worth... which is nothing.. Appaling. Don't expect any. None if they can help it because they will all fail. True. Plastic. But light. But plastic. Don't tighten the clamp too much! Magura are Uber powerful. Insane even. And work for half a ride then break.
  • + 3
 @clarky78: Are you a relative of D. Trump ?
My joke. Terrible. Sorry. My friend from Paris knows many jokes. Very fun.
  • + 1
 Fiber content, orientation and length matter. If you look at the housing of typical power tools, it often says something like PA6-GF30. So it is made of glass fiber reinforced nylon with a fiber content of 30%. These housings are pretty tough. With their older Julie brakes already, they used a 50% fiber content. With their MT line of brakes, they started injecting longer fibers and they had decent control over the fiber orientation, which I think is pretty cool. This is not something you can do with hand lay up (which is what you might be aiming at) as these parts are to small and complex for that.

As for running different brakes front and rear, I don't think I have ever run the same type of brake front and rear. The usable envelope is just so different. In the front you can apply quite a lot of force and it usually doesn't make sense to use just a little. In the rear using too much will make you lock the rear wheel too easily (which might actually be nice if you've got the trials skills) but applying just a little to smooth out your stroke on slippery climbs and the like is really usable as well. If you need to use your rear wheel as a rudder, get one of those closed aero wheels and a very narrow tire. Will work a charm, if that's your take on trail respect.

TL;DR: You can't just call composites "plastics" as the mechanical properties of the fibers are too significant to ignore. And using different brakes front and rear is the way to go.
  • + 0
 @vinay: take some fiber rieforced plastic and smash it with a hammer. It will be destroyed.
Take some 7075 heat treated aluminium and smash it with a hammer. Small dent perhaps.
Carbon fiber plastic matrix sounds cool thats all.
Realy plastic has no place on hi performance hydraulic disk brakes.
Unless the price reflects the materials being used.
As in 50$ disk brakes.
  • + 1
 @Sshredder: Your experiment is too vague to verify the outcome. Impact resistance of fiber reinforced plastics largely depends on the plastics used and, if long fibers are used, the fiber layup of the outer layer. Geometry matters too. Typically, thermoplastic materials have better impact resistance than thermoset resins. Maybe your experiment was executed using a composite with epoxy resin (which is a thermoset). This shatters upon impact indeed. The Al7075T6 material you mention is typically used in aircraft skin panels mostly subject to compressive stresses. The ones subject to tensile stresses are made from Al2025T3 which is less strong but has better fatigue properties. So yeah 7075 is the strongest for a single blow but then still, it won't survive an out of plane blow by a hammer anyway. If you meant a chunk of 7075 (to be machined into the final product, like a bicycle crank) then compare it to a chunk of plastic. Composites typically are more commonly used as thin walled products than as chunks, but lets compare a chunk of Al7075T6 to a similarly sized chunk of nylon PA6GF30. The aluminium may not be destroyed but the same goes for the nylon. Now if you keep smashing and the aluminium develops a small crack, it will grow and eventually fail. If the nylon develops small crack, the glass will bridge the gaps and prevent stop or slow the crack growth.

Now back to bicycle parts. If you take a composite brake master assembly as reviewed here and similar master made out of aluminium and smash both with your hammer, neither may crack right away. The plastic master will only show elastic deformation, that is, it will spring back to its original shape and retain its function. The aluminium master may also show plastic deformation. That is, the bore may ovalize, causing the piston to jam and/or the system to leak. Yes if you smash harder the plastic master may crack whereas the aluminum one has merely deformed. Then still, both have become useless.

More importantly however, I question your means of testing. Smashing a brake with an hammer isn't comparable to normal riding conditions, including crashing. If you leave the handlebar clamp loose enough for the master assembly to swivel around your handlebar, it wont break when subjected to impact.
  • + 1
 @vinay: this is very informative and mist have taken you an age to write. But ultimately you just wasted your time because the simple truth is the Magura DO fail. ALL the time! The leak like crazy from caliper and lever piston (ironic because the last time I checked they had 10 year leakproof warranty), and they strip ridiculously easily at the clamp if you tighten them more than a little. All the figures and numbers for nothing if the simple fact is the actual product fails constantly in real life. We replaced dozens, maybe even a hundred MT2 brakes for leaks with basic Shimano brakes and the customers never come back. We have an enormous box of failed Magura brakes. From MT2 to RT8. All junk.
  • + 0
 @clarky78: I currently run one bike with Marta 2009 in the front and MT8 in the rear. Another bike with Louise 2008 in the front and Louise 2006 in the rear. And a commuter bike with an HS11 rim brake in the front. No issues. I prefer Louise but the other brakes are keeping up nicely. I haven't had issues with leaks or stripped bolts. Even at the max recommended torque, the handlebar clamps remain fine. Though I usually have these clamps a lot less tight. I tighten the rotor and caliper bolts at max recommended torque, no issues there either. Not sure what happened to your batch. Do these people use particularly slick handlebars and overtighten them the levers to keep them from slipping?
  • + 1
 @vinay: well I guess they must be overtightened by heavy handed mechanics. As for the failing I put it down to bad build quality. They suck. I was the only guy in the shop would give them a chance when I got some on a bike.. But they failed. Every ride. I bled them maybe 6 times in the first 10 rides. And then I sold the bike. I'll not touch that overpriced crap ever again.
  • + 4
 they do look overpriced, but hey there is probably a rider out there reading this and thinking: "man that is what I need."
For us mortals we can rejoice in the fact that Shimano exists, and is not like making a compromise, like pay less for worst braking. Shimano makes damn good brakes. I will probaly never buy this, but I am glad there are more options. remember kids more choices is never a bad thing.
  • + 4
 As long as I can keep bolting them to the next bike I will run the same Hopes for another decade. Everyone else brags about their warranty to sucker you in, Hope expects you to leave their stuff in your will. If only the bikes they stop were engineered as well.
  • + 6
 Wow, thats costly. Right everybody, what would you rather buy with the same or less money...anybody?
  • + 6
 Money no object (but still cheaper) Hope.
Otherwise you really can't go wrong with Zee or XT depending on how much power you want. Even SLX are sh*t hot brakes for the money.
  • + 3
 Hope on the main bike, Shimano on the budget bike. Really is that simple!
  • + 2
 A set of used Zees and forty kebabs
  • + 5
 So like moto with 4 pistons up front and 2 in the back. Been on that setup for a few years now. Saint front with 203mm disc and XT rear with 180mm disc. Sweetest setup!
  • + 2
 Almost 20 years ago I had worn out a qr stud on my HS11s and emailed the NA Magura rep on a Sunday. He answered right away an sent the part Monday AM gratis. Their customer service was the best back then. Brakes were flawless.
  • + 3
 Every sram dB and guide brake is having master cylinders stick causing brakes to lock and not release. Yes they warranty, but I've seen 1 in 4 this season need warantied. Also the shimano m8000 are having master cylinder issues. Regardless, there's a reason most the pro endure and dh guys use magura. They're fing strong and light. They have the best power in the industry right now. Shimano has gone down in power with new designs, and down in quality control. Sam has gone back to elixir days, and dare I say worse. If you want a brake you can not worry about, and be confident in top power, get magura. If you want the best modulation get hope. Don't cry about the money cuz they last twice as long as the cheaper bigger guys brakes.
  • + 4
 I guess that going ridiculously expensive is just another type of marketing, a way to stand above the rest of options (when quality and/or value isn't enough to make the product stand by itself)
  • + 1
 This!
  • + 2
 Can't believe there's so much hate for Magura brakes on here. It's not like the MT2 or 4s aren't a screaming deal. My last pair of MT8s didn't need to be bled through four years between several bikes before they got sold on a complete. Same story with my current pairs.

They are difficult to bleed or install when compared to shimano or sram, but the bleed holds much longer. Pads last much longer than other brands. They don't do that thing that every single XT brake does--i.e. leak small quantities of mineral oil past the piston seals and contaminate the pads. Power is higher than the 8000/9000 series. Modulation is on par with guides. Unlike other brakes, I don't have to constantly worry about Maguras. The one time there was a problem with a master cylinder, Magura USA provided top-notch support.
  • + 2
 I been running the MT Trail with 180 SL rotors F/R for about 500 miles in SoCal.
Performance is very precise, great 1 and 2 finger modulation control throughout the braking profile from zero to full skid.

I have having one problem though, I have smoked the pads 4 times. usually just the rear but once on the front rotor.
I am 237lb and I suspect that 30 miles to zero on the steeps is just to much for the dual piston rear.

I am switching to RACE pads and a Hayes rear rotor(more metal) and hope that solves the issue. Otherwise I ONLY trust magura brakes since 2006.
  • + 3
 Try the HC rotors also, I've noticed a big improvement over the normal storms. I'm in the same weight range as you.
  • + 2
 Started with a set of MT2s and they weren't enought for my fat ass. Put a MT5 on the front and loved it, but imho it made the rear feel weak with having one brake that was much more powerful than the other. Now run MT5s front and rear on all three bikes and love the balance.
  • + 5
 When you can buy a set of SLX brakes for $120, these do start to look pretty overpriced
  • + 1
 Zee's will beat the piss out of these things and are less than half the price. Even Hope's are cheaper.
  • + 0
 @TheRaven: Zee's will not even come close probably. But will last a lot longer than one ride... Magura wont.
  • + 1
 @clarky78: You must mean that Zee's so much better that they'll never come close...otherwise it's clear you've never compared Magura's four-piston brakes to Shimano's.
  • + 1
 @TheRaven: I've owned both. MT5 has better feel and power in my opinion. But failed all the time
  • + 2
 Interested if anyone has the same experiences I have had wiyh mt brakes, I find they dont bleed very well and also they are unpredictable you can bleed them get all the bubbles out take everything out and put it back together and they will feel like crap, then repeat the process and no air comes out but they magically feel better.
  • + 2
 I've been buying MT5 for front and MT4 for rear for ages and they just work ! Straight out the box ! Modulation is awesome and power is perfect balance between front and rear .The only adjustment iafe was to wind levers in a little so I don't get brake pump on London descents. Best bit is from Germany I can buy the pair for £120 !
  • + 1
 Pieced together a set of MT7/MT8 brakes for my DH sled a year back for under $350 CAD. Great brakes which I have yet to make fade (I'm 230 lbs geared up), but crappy lever design - must have been designed for giant German hands. Looking forward to swapping to the new lever.
  • + 1
 If I wanted an expensive set of brakes I would get Hope. This is ridiculous. I would have to agree: SLX is the brake - you can't beat that ratio of reliability-power-cost. I currently run XT but to be honest I prefer the looks of the new SLX (black).
  • + 1
 I've got the MT5s they appear to be much cheaper than these and are 4 caliper front and rear.,The power and modulation is great I've no issues with them at all. Here's a recent review: www.bikeradar.com/mtb/gear/category/components/disc-brake-systems/product/magura-mt5-review-51215
  • + 3
 I just don't see Zee point of these, but I'm always happy when people try to progress the technology.

203 up front, 180 in the back. Brakes = balanced.
  • + 1
 They look sweet but I'll wait to snap my other SRAM XX off my handlebar and replace with XT just like I did the front. I break too much actually riding my bike vs just blinging it out to look at so $600 brakes are probably a bad idea for me.
  • + 3
 I recently picked up 2 full sets of Formula RO's for less than that! Came with 4 Rotors and 4 pairs of extra brake pads! They are AWESOME too!
  • + 2
 Worst brakes i ever used was MT7. Customer service was terrible and dropped off the face of the earth. Would never run anything Magura again.
  • + 4
 Magura forks are the same, managed to destroy a set of brand new forks in 3 weeks haha
  • + 10
 I have some MT5s that came installed on a new bike - I thought I'd run them until I had issues, then replace with Zee or XT. They have been flawless so far. I've not touched them in 14 months - I was even thinking I may replace the XTs on another bike with Magura offerings. Surprised to hear of the bad experience.
  • + 3
 My first email to magura went into their spam bin. They eventually found it and replied however. The US distributor has been fantastic.
  • - 2
 @Marc2211: There 4 pistons brakes such as the MT7 brakes are terrible because the 2 pistons on each side of the caliper don't engage the rotor equally. Thus, causing the brake lever to squeeze all the way to the handlebar with zero stopping power. And there is nothing you can do to fix this issue! However, Magura's 2 pistons brakes don't have this issue because their is only 1 piston on each side of the caliper.
  • + 7
 @Marc2211: Yeah me too. My 5s have beem bomber. Now my friends are all on MT7s and threw their Saints in the parts bin. I guess theres always going to be a lemon though.
  • + 2
 @DH6: Yes there is, all 4 piston brakes do this from time to time. There is a method to 'balance' the pistons. Im pretty sure Park Tools did a video?
  • + 1
 @DH6: That's a bleeding problem, my MT7s and MT5 both engage with very little lever pull. I've never had a problem getting power out of the 4 piston brakes on my own or any other bike I've set them up on.
  • + 2
 @Tmackstab: with you on that one, my MT5's have been absolutely flawless, I've never had so much control and modulation in my brakes before, and have had Shimano, Formula and Avids previously
  • + 1
 Gustav is dead, there is no hope to guide us thru this Japanese fields, there is hayes in the eyes of the Indian cause he doesn't have the answer, the formula of success in braking is still somewhere out there...
  • + 1
 That pic pointing out that the perch can be adapted to SRAM or Shimano is actually showing a SRAM shifter on a SRAM dropper/suspension switch, nothing attached to the brake...
  • + 3
 My bike came with MT8's front and rear. Amazing stopping power and modulation.
  • + 0
 This doesnt make sense. They say they have weakened the power and shrunk the pistons on the front brake to make it similar to the rear. Would it not just be easier to have matching callipers in that scenario?
  • + 2
 They didn't shrink the piston, the pistons on the 4 piston brakes are smaller than the 2 piston.
  • + 2
 Get outta here with the front/rear balanced nonsense! Give me Saints front and rear, please.
  • + 1
 mixing piston count makes some sense, as they are all like that on motorcycles and cars, although it's one of those things you would have thought could have caught on sooner.
  • + 2
 I had a Hope M4/X2 combo on my bike for a long time, was great until the X2 could no longer cope with the heat! I've since resorted to different pads front/rear with XT's, Semi Metallic front and Sintered rear. Gives the same balance in power on big stops.
  • + 1
 Are they a great set of brakes? Yes.
$600+ great? No.

For a little more than half the cost of these, I can have a full XTR or Saint setup.
  • + 3
 Best modulation and by far the best feeling brake on the market.
  • + 2
 Tried MT7's recently. More power than my Zee or mates Saints. Definately would get 4 pots front and rear though.
  • + 3
 I bought my all Mtn bike for $1200... so...ouch on the pricetag
  • - 1
 Shall I take a brake review seriously from a guy that runs them levers in amateur position, meaning waaayyy to far outboard? No wonder he only got similar performance compared to a lousy guide, normally the Magura 4 piston brakes even edge out Zees/Saints. And really they should, because they work with one of highest surface ratios (master to slave) currently available. But yeah, therefore your finger should be at the very END of the lever...
  • + 1
 You nailed it. Rc's a hack from the old days. He's out there testing bike products at the speed of my grandfather. Donking down the trail like he's been riding bikes on gravel roads his whole life. That being said. Kyle strait runs his brakes kinda like that too... But at least he can ride.
  • + 3
 Nice sales pitch. When is the review?
  • + 1
 I like how almost nobody mentioned how evil needing two different shapes of pads on the same bicycle is. That's just a dick move. Good job guys.
  • + 1
 brakes suck tried to make them work just way to much modulation when the levers want to not hit the bar they work great
  • + 3
 SLX FTW
  • + 1
 @Richard Cunningham how are they to bleed. I have had bad experiences with previous Magura brakes.
  • + 2
 NEEEED THOSE. IN my enduro i have XX ,not enough power for 95kg rider..
  • + 2
 Is that a new Cannondale Habit or Lefty i see?
  • + 1
 Looks like last years Habit Carbon 1
  • + 2
 The 'Hate-oraide' is gushing today.
  • + 3
 Dude, I just found out that there is such a thing as "e-bike cleaner". So as if $600 brakes wasn't enough, now there is e-bike cleaner in the same day. Can't... contain .... rage.....
  • + 2
 The glow-n-da-dark green paint scheme rocks!
  • + 2
 god i love my hope brakes lol
  • + 1
 Do anyone know if the new brakes from Magura still is messy to bleed? Like the MT2/4/6?
  • + 1
 When in doubt, SLX will do everything you want all the time.
  • - 2
 @ Richard c*ntham then you say does a two piston and four piston have better modulation and balance than matched pairs you said "yes" two sentences later you say but they don't have an advantage over matched pair.
  • + 2
 .... he means that after the rain, where there was lots of traction, there was little difference. I had to read it twice too.

The next paragraph explains that, after the trails dried out to marbles over hardpack, there was a very noticeable improvement, so, "yes".
  • + 1
 If im gunna spend that kinda money id hope to get better tech
  • + 1
 Just got a set of these and I am stoked to get them on my bike
  • - 1
 Lmao every company on the market trying to get their share of the cake. Fair enough...
  • + 4
 Like them or not, they've been making hydraulic brakes since circa 1990 so they are hardly new.
  • + 0
 @wallheater: yup. agree they been making terrible brakes since 1990 and still have not fixed them.
  • + 2
 Not so. I've got 30 year old Magura rim brakes that have had zero problems or need for re-bleeds. The disc brakes have been above everyone else in the market for a good 9+ years. Making reliable brakes long before Shimano & Sram did. @DH6:
  • + 0
 You need too fire your fuckin editor
  • + 2
 ....at which point you should hire them as a proof reader / copy editor?
  • + 1
 Nuts
  • - 2
 Dot brake fluid no thank you
  • + 5
 They don't use DOT fluid. It's Magura branded mineral oil.
  • + 3
 @jaredpbt: thanks for the info my bad
  • + 1
 I'm a die-hard Shimano fan. I like to have a really good rear brake on my bike and then never use it.
  • + 0
 Oh you mean the fluid designed specifically FOR BRAKES?
Ya ya that's probably not what you want.
I'd rather have my brakes feeling different every time I grab them because the oil they use is intended for medical purposes.
Nice one pro perp.
  • + 1
 @jflb: brakes are overrated and only Slow Me Down.
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