Marin Attack Trail 6.9 Review

Oct 13, 2010
by Mike Levy  
Marin Attack Trail 6.9

You're checking out Marin's Attack Trail 6.9, a burly 150 mm travel bike that is built to tackle any sort of terrain that you can find. It is certainly not the lightest bike in its category, but it may be ready for more action than most. Strength, stiffness, and reliability were the goals, and to that end it features a brawny build that complements the robust frame, with the HammerSchmidt crankset acting as a guide, bash guard, and front derailleur all rolled into one. While there may be other 150 mm travel bikes better suited to longer epics, the Attack trail looks to suit more aggressive riders who don't shy away from gnarly terrain, especially if they have to pedal to get to it. Keep reading to learn more about this unique looking machine
You're checking out Marin's Attack Trail 6.9, a burly 150 mm travel bike that is built to tackle any sort of terrain that you can find. It is certainly not the lightest bike in its category, but it may be ready for more action than most. Strength, stiffness, and reliability were the goals, and to that end it features a brawny build that complements the robust frame, with the HammerSchmidt crankset acting as a guide, bash guard, and front derailleur all rolled into one. While there may be other 150 mm travel bikes better suited to longer epics, the Attack trail looks to suit more aggressive riders who don't shy away from gnarly terrain, especially if they have to pedal to get to it. Keep reading to learn more about this unique looking machine
While feedback on the Attack Trail's appearance seemed to be split down the middle, with half of the crowd loving the unique looks and the other half telling me that it has a face that only a mother could love, there is no doubt that it's burly. Both the upper and lower rear stays are large diameter rectangular tubes that are joined at the business end by a generous amount of material, including aluminum webbing that leaves just enough room for the RockShox Monarch shock to clear throughout the stroke. At the opposite end you'll find a set of replaceable dropouts that are tied together with a 12 x 135 mm Maxle thru-axle. The Quad-Link 2.0 suspension uses two short and stout one piece links to control the wheel path and shock rate, but being as short as they are, they must also be quite flex free. It is clear that Marin did not set out to build the lightest 150 mm travel bike around, but a sturdy machine that chargers will be able to feel comfortable on. How confident is Marin in the Attack Trail? It has a LIFETIME warranty on the pivot bearings! Marin is confident that between the rigid design and the threaded bearing covers, there should be no issues.
While feedback on the Attack Trail's appearance seemed to be split down the middle, with half of the crowd loving the unique looks and the other half telling me that it has a face that only a mother could love, there is no doubt that it's burly. Both the upper and lower rear stays are large diameter rectangular tubes that are joined at the business end by a generous amount of material, including aluminum webbing that leaves just enough room for the RockShox Monarch shock to clear throughout the stroke. At the opposite end you'll find a set of replaceable dropouts that are tied together with a 12 x 135 mm Maxle thru-axle. The Quad-Link 2.0 suspension uses two short and stout one piece links to control the wheel path and shock rate, but being as short as they are, they must also be quite flex free. It is clear that Marin did not set out to build the lightest 150 mm travel bike around, but a sturdy machine that chargers will be able to feel comfortable on. How confident is Marin in the Attack Trail? It has a LIFETIME warranty on the pivot bearings! Marin is confident that between the rigid design and the threaded bearing covers, there should be no issues.
Marin uses their unique looking Quad-Link 2.0 suspension system to control the Attack Trail's 150 mm of travel. This is the second generation of the Quad-Link platform, with this newer version featuring much more polished lines and a less progressive shock rate. The two links create a virtual pivot that changes location as the bike goes through its travel, not something that is unique to this design, but it can be used to create a longer travel bike that can still pedal with the best of them. According to Marin, the imaginary pivot location sits above and just forward of the bottom bracket during the early stages of the bike's travel, but at the midway point it changes to let the axle path rotate around the B.B., therefore lessening the amount of chain growth in the later stages of the travel.
Marin uses their unique looking Quad-Link 2.0 suspension system to control the Attack Trail's 150 mm of travel. This is the second generation of the Quad-Link platform, with this newer version featuring much more polished lines and a less progressive shock rate. The two links create a virtual pivot that changes location as the bike goes through its travel, not something that is unique to this design, but it can be used to create a longer travel bike that can still pedal with the best of them. According to Marin, the imaginary pivot location sits above and just forward of the bottom bracket during the early stages of the bike's travel, but at the midway point it changes to let the axle path rotate around the B.B., therefore lessening the amount of chain growth in the later stages of the travel.
Curvaceous. As is quickly becoming the norm, especially on bikes in the Attack Trail's category, Marin specs a tapered head tube to get the best strength to weight ratio. Just like the rest of the frame, the head tube junction looks to put some downhill bikes to shame! This angle shows off the 6.9's great graphics as well.
Curvaceous. As is quickly becoming the norm, especially on bikes in the Attack Trail's category, Marin specs a tapered head tube to get the best strength to weight ratio. Just like the rest of the frame, the head tube junction looks to put some downhill bikes to shame! This angle shows off the 6.9's great graphics as well.

Marin Attack Trail 6.9 geometry, size medium

Head angle66 degrees
EFF Seat Angle73.5 degrees
EFF Top Tube579 mm
Chainstay440 mm
Bottom Bracket Drop- 5 mm
Actual Frame Size (seatube length)444.5 mm
Wheelbase1139 mm


Specifications
Release Date 2010
Price $4000
Travel 150mm (Quad Link Suspension Platform)
Rear Shock RockShox Monarch 4.2
Fork RockShox Lyric Solo Air, 160mm, Mission Control
Headset FSA Orbit 1.5 ZS
Cassette SRAM PG-980, 11-34, 9 Speed
Crankarms Truvativ HammerSchmidt AM
Chainguide Truvativ HammerSchmidt
Bottom Bracket Truvativ HammerSchmidt
Rear Derailleur SRAM X.9
Front Derailleur Truvativ HammerSchmidt
Shifter Pods SRAM X.9
Handlebar Truvativ Stylo WC Riser, 25mm rise, 31.6mm Clamp area
Stem Truvativ AKA, 70mm reach, 5 degree rise
Grips Marin Lock Ons
Brakes Avid Elixir CR
Wheelset Fulcrum Red Zone
Tires Maxxis Minion 26x2.35 Front (Kevlar), Maxxis High Roller 26x2.35 Rear (Kevlar)
Seat WTB Pure V Race
Seatpost Truvativ Stylo Team, 30.9x400mm



The Attack Trail 6.9 has some interesting parts hung from it, including Fulcrum's great looking Red Zone wheels. Besides nailing down the aesthetics with matching decals, these wheels also have some neat features. They use a completely sealed rim bed that isn't drilled and would therefore require a rim strip, making tubeless conversions quite easy. Inside you'll find an angular contact cup and cone bearing system as opposed to sealed bearings like you'd find in most other hubs. From a finicky mechanics point of view, I am a big fan of this system because it lets you set up the bearing tension just right and then lock it down with the threaded preload collar. It also means that bearing replacement is much easier. The design does require you to keep a closer eye on the wheels than if they used cartridge bearings though and when the time does come to perform maintenance, it shouldn't be put off.
The Attack Trail 6.9 has some interesting parts hung from it, including Fulcrum's great looking Red Zone wheels. Besides nailing down the aesthetics with matching decals, these wheels also have some neat features. They use a completely sealed rim bed that isn't drilled and would therefore require a rim strip, making tubeless conversions quite easy. Inside you'll find an angular contact cup and cone bearing system as opposed to sealed bearings like you'd find in most other hubs. From a finicky mechanics point of view, I am a big fan of this system because it lets you set up the bearing tension just right and then lock it down with the threaded preload collar. It also means that bearing replacement is much easier. The design does require you to keep a closer eye on the wheels than if they used cartridge bearings though and when the time does come to perform maintenance, it shouldn't be put off.
The Marin's cockpit is a mix of Truvativ, Avid, and SRAM. I was a big fan of the Marin's thin stock lock-on grips.
The Marin's cockpit is a mix of Truvativ, Avid, and SRAM. I was a big fan of the Marin's thin stock lock-on grips.
Earning your turns is part of mountain biking in my mind, but it's important to have a bike that not only lets you get to the top without feeling as if you are being punished for your heathen ways, but is also fully capable of letting you enjoy the rewards of such work. There is always a fine line with these 150 mm travel bikes. A bit too much attitude and they quickly become more of a tailgate ornament than something I'd want to climb on, but too much in the other direction can result in a noodle of a bike that deserves to be shod with barends and a saddle bag. The Marin Attack 6.9 surprised me in this regard, considering that at well over the 30 lb mark it managed to hold its own when climbing. Equipped with sturdy wheels and rubber, as well as Truvativ's hefty HammerSchmidt crankset, the white bike was never going to feel overly inspired on the uphills, but it certainly surprised me. Contrary to reviews of the bike that I've read elsewhere, it pedaled very well, even with the pedal assist on the RockShox Monarch 4.2 damper wide open. Seated spinning moves the bike along quite quickly, but unlike most other bikes with this amount of travel, standing up and hammering away upsets the suspension very little. Sloppy sprints at the end of the ride do not encourage the Marin to enter its travel any further than needed and the bike felt relatively spritely given its sturdy build. The obvious knock against its more than tolerable climbing ability would be the riding position that the stock components put you in.  It should also be noted that the stock 66 degree head angle is far from ideal as well and can be a handful on the steepest of pitches, especially considering that the Lyric fork doesn't offer any way of shortening its long axle to crown height. Despite the weight and slack head angle, the Attack Trail climbed very well. In fact, I can think of more than a few lighter bikes that are supposed to pedal quite well that I'd pick AFTER the sturdy Marin if I had a big day of ascending planned. I can't be much more clear than that.
Earning your turns is part of mountain biking in my mind, but it's important to have a bike that not only lets you get to the top without feeling as if you are being punished for your heathen ways, but is also fully capable of letting you enjoy the rewards of such work. There is always a fine line with these 150 mm travel bikes. A bit too much attitude and they quickly become more of a tailgate ornament than something I'd want to climb on, but too much in the other direction can result in a noodle of a bike that deserves to be shod with barends and a saddle bag. The Marin Attack 6.9 surprised me in this regard, considering that at well over the 30 lb mark it managed to hold its own when climbing. Equipped with sturdy wheels and rubber, as well as Truvativ's hefty HammerSchmidt crankset, the white bike was never going to feel overly inspired on the uphills, but it certainly surprised me. Contrary to reviews of the bike that I've read elsewhere, it pedaled very well, even with the pedal assist on the RockShox Monarch 4.2 damper wide open. Seated spinning moves the bike along quite quickly, but unlike most other bikes with this amount of travel, standing up and hammering away upsets the suspension very little. Sloppy sprints at the end of the ride do not encourage the Marin to enter its travel any further than needed and the bike felt relatively spritely given its sturdy build. The obvious knock against its more than tolerable climbing ability would be the riding position that the stock components put you in. It should also be noted that the stock 66 degree head angle is far from ideal as well and can be a handful on the steepest of pitches, especially considering that the Lyric fork doesn't offer any way of shortening its long axle to crown height. Despite the weight and slack head angle, the Attack Trail climbed very well. In fact, I can think of more than a few lighter bikes that are supposed to pedal quite well that I'd pick AFTER the sturdy Marin if I had a big day of ascending planned. I can't be much more clear than that.
It only takes a quick look at the Attack Trail to realize that this is a machine that is put together to please those who relish each and every downhill portion of a trail. If the rear thru-axle, and robust parts package didn't make it clear enough, the slack steering angle and long-ish wheelbase should do the trick. Yes, you can ride it to the top (pretty damn well, as it turns out!), but this bike is put together to have fun going the opposite direction and it does pretty well at it. The white Marin is a very confident descender, due in many ways to the combination of inspiring geometry and a chassis that is incredibly stiff. Now, to be honest with ourselves, there are a lot of bikes out there that are more than adequately rigid. In fact, most bikes are... but the Attack Trail makes most of those feel as if all of their pivot hardware has come loose. The 12 x 135 mm thru-axle and sturdy frame that uses large tubes and short stiff suspension links combine for a chassis that feels as if it has zero deflection. The frame's confidence inspiring construction combined with a long wheelbase and 66 degree head angle all add up to a bike that really wants to go fast, but I struggled to get the rear suspension to live up the frame's potential. At 30% sag, the rear end felt harsh on anything that didn't push the bike deep into its travel, transmitting a fair bit of feedback and generally feeling rough on fast trail chatter, almost as if the bike's tires were over inflated. I struggled to tune this out and I ended up needing to run excessive amounts of sag in order to make the bike forgiving enough, which unfortunately would result in the bike reaching bottom far too often. Conversely, when set at 30% and ridden hard over big terrain, the Attack Trail was a joy. The rear end seemed to thrive on hits that forced it deep into its travel and the bike felt as stable and composed as much longer travel machines. While it was nice to know that the bike was there for me when I decided to go hard, it would be great to be able to set it up closer to a middle ground that would excel on more trails and under more riders. There was some noticeable suspension stiffening when on the binders, but less so than some other bikes are guilty of. The Attack Trail moniker is perfectly suited to the bike, you really get the most out of it when attacking the terrain and pushing the bike hard.
It only takes a quick look at the Attack Trail to realize that this is a machine that is put together to please those who relish each and every downhill portion of a trail. If the rear thru-axle, and robust parts package didn't make it clear enough, the slack steering angle and long-ish wheelbase should do the trick. Yes, you can ride it to the top (pretty damn well, as it turns out!), but this bike is put together to have fun going the opposite direction and it does pretty well at it. The white Marin is a very confident descender, due in many ways to the combination of inspiring geometry and a chassis that is incredibly stiff. Now, to be honest with ourselves, there are a lot of bikes out there that are more than adequately rigid. In fact, most bikes are... but the Attack Trail makes most of those feel as if all of their pivot hardware has come loose. The 12 x 135 mm thru-axle and sturdy frame that uses large tubes and short stiff suspension links combine for a chassis that feels as if it has zero deflection. The frame's confidence inspiring construction combined with a long wheelbase and 66 degree head angle all add up to a bike that really wants to go fast, but I struggled to get the rear suspension to live up the frame's potential. At 30% sag, the rear end felt harsh on anything that didn't push the bike deep into its travel, transmitting a fair bit of feedback and generally feeling rough on fast trail chatter, almost as if the bike's tires were over inflated. I struggled to tune this out and I ended up needing to run excessive amounts of sag in order to make the bike forgiving enough, which unfortunately would result in the bike reaching bottom far too often. Conversely, when set at 30% and ridden hard over big terrain, the Attack Trail was a joy. The rear end seemed to thrive on hits that forced it deep into its travel and the bike felt as stable and composed as much longer travel machines. While it was nice to know that the bike was there for me when I decided to go hard, it would be great to be able to set it up closer to a middle ground that would excel on more trails and under more riders. There was some noticeable suspension stiffening when on the binders, but less so than some other bikes are guilty of. The Attack Trail moniker is perfectly suited to the bike, you really get the most out of it when attacking the terrain and pushing the bike hard.
The Attack Trail has some interesting parts hung from it, including the Truvativ HammerSchmidt crankset. There is enough to say about this piece of hardware that it really does need its own article, which it will get in the future, but I'll touch on some points here as well. Firstly, it works exactly as advertised. There is zero shifting delay, no chance of dropping your chain as it acts as a chain guide as well, and ground clearance is improved. Drawbacks? Besides adding a bit of heft, the system has two snags that put a damper on its parade. The less serious of the two is how it handles mud, or rather, how it can't. Once mud and trail debris get caught up in the exposed drive ring, there isn't anywhere for it to escape. If you don't stop to clear it, you may experience skipping due to the chain not having enough engagement on the ring. If you live and ride in wet conditions, Truvativ makes a crud scraper that bolts up quickly and is pretty much mandatory. I take more issue with the amount of friction while in overdrive that is caused by having to turn the planetary gears within the system. You can clearly feel it through the pedals and it is bad enough that I only ever used overdrive when on the fastest downhill sections of trail. The saving grace here is how the system completely eliminates being crossed geared. You can be in the HammerSchmidt's 1:1 gear (the 22 or 24 tooth ring depending on what you have installed) and use your smallest cog without having to worry about being cross geared, meaning that you only really need to shift to overdrive when the speeds get high. The other standout components are the Fulcrum Red Zone wheels, which proved to be mega stiff and reliable throughout the test. While they certainly aren't the lightest around, these interesting wheels match the Attack Trail's personality perfectly. In a perfect world the Attack Trail would come stock with a telescoping seat post (the frame features cable routing for one) and a wider handlebar, but these are additions that can be made at the time of purchase.
The Attack Trail has some interesting parts hung from it, including the Truvativ HammerSchmidt crankset. There is enough to say about this piece of hardware that it really does need its own article, which it will get in the future, but I'll touch on some points here as well. Firstly, it works exactly as advertised. There is zero shifting delay, no chance of dropping your chain as it acts as a chain guide as well, and ground clearance is improved. Drawbacks? Besides adding a bit of heft, the system has two snags that put a damper on its parade. The less serious of the two is how it handles mud, or rather, how it can't. Once mud and trail debris get caught up in the exposed drive ring, there isn't anywhere for it to escape. If you don't stop to clear it, you may experience skipping due to the chain not having enough engagement on the ring. If you live and ride in wet conditions, Truvativ makes a crud scraper that bolts up quickly and is pretty much mandatory. I take more issue with the amount of friction while in overdrive that is caused by having to turn the planetary gears within the system. You can clearly feel it through the pedals and it is bad enough that I only ever used overdrive when on the fastest downhill sections of trail. The saving grace here is how the system completely eliminates being crossed geared. You can be in the HammerSchmidt's 1:1 gear (the 22 or 24 tooth ring depending on what you have installed) and use your smallest cog without having to worry about being cross geared, meaning that you only really need to shift to overdrive when the speeds get high. The other standout components are the Fulcrum Red Zone wheels, which proved to be mega stiff and reliable throughout the test. While they certainly aren't the lightest around, these interesting wheels match the Attack Trail's personality perfectly. In a perfect world the Attack Trail would come stock with a telescoping seat post (the frame features cable routing for one) and a wider handlebar, but these are additions that can be made at the time of purchase.
What does all this talk add up to? The Attack Trail 6.9 ended up being full of surprises. The bike climbed extremely well, something that wasn't expected, but that is greatly appreciated. It isn't often that bikes with this amount of travel respond well to out of the saddle efforts, props to the Marin engineers for breaking the mold. While the suspension didn't react favorably to smaller inputs, the faster and bigger you go, the more alive the bike became. There is certainly a type of rider that will have a blast on the Attack Trail, and I suspect that will be the most aggressive of the aggressive all-mountain riders.
What does all this talk add up to? The Attack Trail 6.9 ended up being full of surprises. The bike climbed extremely well, something that wasn't expected, but that is greatly appreciated. It isn't often that bikes with this amount of travel respond well to out of the saddle efforts, props to the Marin engineers for breaking the mold. While the suspension didn't react favorably to smaller inputs, the faster and bigger you go, the more alive the bike became. There is certainly a type of rider that will have a blast on the Attack Trail, and I suspect that will be the most aggressive of the aggressive all-mountain riders.

Visit the Marin website to see their entire lineup


73 Comments

  • 12 0
 Always loved Marin. Props!
  • 2 1
 yeaup, bummer im sellin my 09 version of the attack trail.
  • 16 0
 Say anything you want about the way Marins look, I guarantee you will be impressed when you ride one. The Quad Link is soooo nice. I bet even their 250 mm travel DH bike pedals good with the Quad.
  • 10 9
 So ugly, but if its fast I guess its alright
  • 2 2
 i love the paint job also it seems like this would be a bike to last along time with little problems
  • 4 0
 it looks futuristic! and slap a 180MM fork on that bad boy and you'd tear the trails A P A R T
  • 17 1
 I'm getting sick of reading bike reviews sans bike weights. I read "well over the 30lb mark," but what does that mean? 35? 40 lbs? Am I the only one who thinks weight is an important decision making factor?
  • 5 0
 araines1, Noted. I'll update this review with a weight soon.
  • 3 0
 Thanks, that is much appreciated!
  • 2 0
 dude i love my wolf ridge, it rails soooo hard, 5.5" in the rear, and 6.3 with w fox float rc2 in front, sooo dialed
www.pinkbike.com/photo/5737010
  • 1 0
 mine is 32lbs Smile
  • 1 0
 this looks like it would make a sick all day trail bike w/ a revelation and some lighter parts
  • 1 0
 this is a pretty ncie bike ! (:
  • 2 0
 Contrary to what seems like popular opinion, I LOVE the way these bikes look!
  • 1 0
 Another bike that is a pain in the ass to fit on a 2 prong bike rack. Aside from that, I like the way it looks. It would be a good bike for Fromme
  • 1 2
 Erm, aren't there cheaper and more pedal-friendly 150mm bikes out there? I beat the crap out of my '08 Spesh Enduro SL and it's still 100% (well, the important parts anyways... Razz )
  • 4 0
 Have you ever ridden quad link? How do you know it isn't pedal friendly?
  • 7 0
 Always wanted to try one.

Mike, can you put text outside those black picture description blocks? For me it's really hard to read when paragraph is long and the text is little white font on black background.
  • 5 0
 Agreed. I like a mix of the captions and body text, but once the caption gets too long, my eyes go squirrelly. Oh, and I alway wanted to try one too.
  • 2 0
 Point noted. We were trying something different, but if it's hard to read then it makes no sense! Thanks for the input =)
  • 1 0
 Not to make it too complicated, but I like the newer style. One vote for the white text on black?



Also-every review has to to the weight.

E
  • 1 0
 I kind of liked it too. Felt like I was reading a print magazine.
  • 1 0
 seasontwo, That's the idea! We'll be playing around with some changes soon, but everyone make sure to speak out if you guys like or dislike something.
  • 4 0
 Great review!
I've been riding marins for 4 years now...mount vision, wolf ridge\attack trail, quakes, and the quad dh. I think marins are the most under-rated bikes out there. After 5 months beating on the quad dh (silverstar,whistler, gillard, etc.) It has become my go to bike, although I ride the attack trail on the exact same trails. It will handle anything and everything! A must have all around bike, but I would definately suggest an RP23 in the rear for better tunability.
  • 1 0
 I had an 04 Wolf Ridge. Awesome bike that pedaled better than my old XC bike and inspired confidence on decents. Sad I sold it when I stopped riding XC/AM only to start riding that style again 6 months later.
  • 1 0
 Agree about Marins being largely under rated. I think they make some of the most versatile bikes round. The Quad-Link is amazing. FYI, the UK boutique brands uses the same suspension platform on it's bikes, which are considered ultra high-end (love the Whyte 146!). I have an 09 Mount Vision and absolutely love it. Would love to try some of their longer travel brethren.

Also, I think those are very nice looking bikes. They do look different from most of the stuff on the market, but I guess aesthetics appeal is very subjective.

Very nice review, by the way!
  • 3 0
 Great article about a great bike. I have owned a Quake, Wolfridge and the Attack Trail 6.8 and continue to be impressed with Quad Link Suspension. I'm glad to see someone actually ride the bike then review it. I have seen some total BS reviews in magazines about this bike which I can only assume is a result of Marin not buying tons of advertising space. Magazine tests are nothing more than "advertorials" funded by advertising dollars.
  • 1 0
 I have ridden an earlier version of this bike (I think it was a 2009) and was immediately blown how good it pedals, and meanwhile it also handles big rocks, chutes and square edges impeccably. This 2010 version seems to be more oriented to downhill, but still would love to own one as second bike.
  • 1 0
 i had the privilege of racing one of these bikes because mine fell off the trailer on the way up :\ and they are amazing to pedal! you can ride up a hill and have no sag, but if you ride over a root or something then it works. amazing!
  • 1 0
 Great bike to build up for the short yet technical UK downhills. I love my one, though I did go through a couple of bearings in the pivots so far (All replaced for free!). Get the base 6.7 version for cheap and make your own short travel bike!
  • 1 0
 All I can say to that is wow! How did the pivots get wrecked? were they all tight?
I have never heard of someone doing that before.
I have an 8" link for my Quake that I had to get bearings for. I was told by the bearing supplier they were out of some fighter jet or something like that. Kinda cool haha
  • 1 0
 Involved cracking the M8 bolt that runs through the linkage (haven't got a clue how!) but apparently this lead to the inner casing of the pivots to rub against the frame, finally destroying the cover until it was just the bearings left, damaging both the frame and wrecking the bearings! Thing is, this all happened underneath the dirt cap (black cap) and became noticeable when the frame developed play in it.
Frame was checked, cleaned and smoothed out by ATB (Marin dealership in the UK)and had spacers put in to compensate for the frame loss. Oh, and new bearings free of charge Big Grin

2nd time round was due to the "lovely" British winter.

P.S This is a 09 Wolf Ridge 6.7 frame btw
  • 1 0
 wow! definately the first time I have heard of that. I gotta say though that Marin does back up their stuff!
  • 1 0
 I have been riding a Quake for 3 seasons now, and had a Mount Vision for a local trail bike that I rode the hell out of as well. The entire lineup is full of incredible bikes. They ride amazing and the customer support is fantastic! Anyone who gets on my bike is absolutely blown away with how great it handles going down and how well it does going back up.
  • 1 0
 Unfortunately, I'm not stoked on Marin at all since a buddy bought one, only to find that the Marin engineers didn't compensate for the lack of a shock bumper on the high-end model with an airshock, and as a result the tire rubbed the seat tube at bottom out and f'd everything up. And no response from Marin. Flame away, but if that happens, a company needs to be able to fix it right away. Intense did it with their M6 dropouts a while back, Norco did it with their A-Lines, and Marin didn't do squat.
  • 3 0
 Intense warranty still sucks though. Did you know that they require the warrantying shop to purchase the new part first, and then they will decide whether or not to credit you later? That's f*cked up.
  • 1 1
 what if you deal with them directly? do they then make you pay for the part first, then decide whether to credit you or not? lolz either way, it sounds like one shitty warranty.
  • 1 0
 Intense usually does not allow you to deal with them directly. They generally require you to do warranties through a dealer.
  • 1 0
 I'm not talking about individual cases, but more of a systemic problem with a line of bikes. I know Intense has been putting out some lemons lately, but as a whole the line is still OK. The problem with Marin was definitely not a one-off problem.
  • 1 0
 Neither were the problems with Intense.
  • 1 0
 I've got a large 6.8 and it is around 33lbs stock. I reckon the 6.9 is about the same as it has some heavier and some lighter upgrades. I usually ride a 24.5 lb 4" race fully, and I could honestly say that it is hard to notice the added weight, but the 66 deg HA requires you to get as much weight over the front wheel as possible when climbing. I wish they made an extra large as the longer top tube would help for me. The bike is stiff and the suspension is very efficient, but feels pretty smooth on the descents. The slack HA also rocks the descents. There are other slack 6" bikes, but none with the performance of Quad Link. After just a couple of sips, I'm addicted to the Quad Link Kool Aid.
  • 1 0
 I will add that the Attack Trail is my "do everything" bike. I don't hit big drops, so I can get away with it for bike park riding and XC.
  • 1 0
 The Quad link is truely an amazing piece of engineering, however, I don't think air shocks have the right action for it. I found that once I replaced the air shock with a properly sprung coil the harshness that Mike describes totally went away and the ride became even better if that can be accomplished. I'd like to see a follow up review after strapping a new Elka Stage 5 on the bike.
  • 1 0
 I have 09 version of 6.9 attack trail. the main advantage over 2010 model is that it came stock with coil u-turn lyrik with travel adjust, which comes pretty handy on climbs. oh, and the color is plain vivid green with minimal graphics, which I prefer. i got the bike on 45% discount as last years model so there wasn't much to think. it rides as described in the review, fabulous. it can climb anything, but on the way down it just puts a smile on your face. very stable and forgiving for any mistakes... has anyone tried it with fox rp23. the back side is harsh over small stuff and so far i think this has to to with the monarch shock.
  • 1 0
 I have an '09 Wolf Ridge which is essentially the same frame, and with an RP23 I also get a harsh feeling at speed over small stuff. This is with 30% sag and pro-pedal off. Still love the bike, but thinking about a coil if it'll fit.
  • 1 0
 Branemb, I have the same frame as you do however I have a RP23 in the back and did not occur to me that it was feeling harsh in the rear.I had a 05 Wolf Ridge for 5 years and in comparison the 09 model felt a lot more stiffer frame wise and the ride in the back was comparable, with the new one being more efficient in terms of pedaling and just marginali firmer but never harsh by all means. However I notice now that I blow a lot more often thru the whole travel with proper sag and I think the reason for that is that the second generation of quad link does not ramp up as much in comparison to the first generation of Quad link. I think that if there is a shock out there that rams up faster on it's own then I want go thru the whole travel as often which would be nice. After everything being said and done this bike ROCK'S going up or down. It is very quite and easy to jump from things. Mine weighs just a bit less than 32 pounds. I bought a frame only because I cracked the old swing arm on my 05 Wolf ridge and had to buy new wheels (2200 DT Swiss 2009) and put a Maxxis Minion 2.5 EXO tubeless and RockShox Pike 454 Dual Air . It's great.
  • 1 0
 Thinking about a Van R. DHMonkey123 up there ^^^ says his mate's running a Roco WC which is a piggy-back design. Apart from that I haven't been able to find any reference to someone actually fitting a coil shock successfully. It does look tight I agree. Ideally I'd like to test fit a Van R but that's easier said than done, especially a 190x50 which seem hard to come by.
  • 3 0
 Quad-Link is incredible!!!
  • 1 1
 I have the '09 Wolfridge. . . it's amazing! The two things that bike needs is ISCG tabs and a tapered head tube. The Attack Trail nails it! I can't wait to get my hands on one.
  • 1 0
 A Delta front end? Sorta like a Cannondale Prophet? I bet this is really solid with a really great ride with a much stiffer rear end. I like it and cant wait to try it.
  • 2 0
 Overpriced, though the 2011 model is very nice for that price. No Hammerschmidt and Fox suspension.
  • 1 0
 i have a mount vision 08 and i won´t trade it for any bike else...except for an attack trail Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Why do they call it the 6.9? 150mm of travel? Shouldn't it be call the 5.9?
  • 2 0
 I believe the "6" refers to the travel (150mm) and the ".9" refers to the trim level of the model (i.e. the 6.9 is the higher-end model while the 6.8 is the lower-end model).
  • 2 1
 Beautiful bike, I love the look and always have! this would suit the riding in Japan very well!! RideOn!!
  • 1 0
 i am so lucky i live in Marin County CA. i get to demo their bikes all the time
  • 1 0
 I doubt that you get to demo their bikes as much as you say. Perhaps you've stopped by one of their dealers on demo days a few times, but that hardly constitutes "all the time."
  • 1 0
 yeah it is only once a month/every other month
  • 1 0
 im liking those fulcrum wheels. nice reveiw!
  • 2 1
 How much is that bike, around about
  • 1 0
 $4000
  • 1 0
 video please!!:P great review btw
  • 1 0
 that stem is looking goof with the stylo wc bar
  • 1 0
 can you fit a coil shock in there?
  • 1 0
 i have a friend with the 09 version and he has a coil shock on there. doesnt seem to screw anything up when riding around the parking lot
  • 1 0
 Any idea what shock he had fitted?
  • 1 0
 Roco WC
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 Dont know if ID spend 4000 on it nice though
  • 1 0
 i've read that quite a few have fitted coil shocks. what shock are you thinking about? i've read somewhere that even a coil with piggy back fits. can't imagine how because it's a pretty tight spot.
  • 1 0
 does anybody know the weight on this bike?
  • 1 0
 =S

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