Marin Wolf Ridge: First Ride

Apr 20, 2017
by Richard Cunningham  


Marin and Polygon were both on the ground floor while Naild was putting the final touches on its R3act rear suspension system, and it must have been tough keeping the novel looking design a secret. According to eye-witnesses, who reported seeing some wild-looking, unadorned carbon machines flashing by with familiar faces on board, Marin's staff have been riding prototypes and first production samples for quite a while. How their secret did not appear on social media may be a miracle.

One of those ended up in my stable for a number of weeks this year for a first ride on my home trails. Officially, the carbon-framed 29er is called the "Wolf Ridge," and, while you'd never know that from looking at my bare carbon test sample, there was no hiding its dramatically different profile. I fielded many mid-ride questions. Marin's embargo lifts today, so I can finally show you what the Wolf Ridge looks like all dressed up and tell you a bit about how it rides.

bigquotes...a bike rooted in the birth of mountain biking, when one bicycle did it
all and there were no category-specific machines.
Marin mission statement

Marin Wolf Ridge

Marin's Wolf Ridge is intended to be the "one bike" for experienced trail riders with well-honed skills and an appetite for speed. What that means is that its R3act rear suspension brings ultra-efficient pedaling to a chassis designed with numbers that once were the domain of gravity-oriented all-mountain machines with lackluster acceleration and climbing performance. The magic of this recent development is that the Wolf Creek is equally capable of leveraging the skill sets of less experienced riders.

The Wolf Ridge's 160-millimeter-travel carbon chassis is built around a patented rear suspension package designed by Darrell Voss. Voss also founded "Naild," which will offer the complete system to select partners. Marin was privy to the R3act project in its early stages, so Voss and Marin have had substantial time to fine tune the 29-inch-wheel Wolf Ridge chassis to mate with a suspension configuration that defies convention in just about every way.

Two versions will be offered: the $8,599 USD Wolf Ridge Pro, suspended by Fox, and the $6,799 Wolf Ridge 9, suspended by RockShox. The chassis is designed for one-by drivetrains, and both models feature versions of SRAM's 12-speed Eagle transmission.
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The $6,799 Wolf Ridge 9 features RockShox suspension. – Marin photo
Weights hover around 29 pounds (13.2 kg). Marin says that, while the Wolf Ridge is efficient enough to race cross-country, its components reflect that the bike has technical skills which reach all the way up to enduro racing, where Kyle Warner will be using it to contest the EWS series this season. Marin, however, stops short of condoning their new hot rod for bike parks and downhill.

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– Marin photo


What R3act Suspension Does

One look at the Wolf Ridge's R3act 2 play (the full name) suspension is enough to understand that it is a whole different animal. The short version is that its sturdy mono-stay swingarm telescopes on a tubular aluminum stanchion, which, in conjunction with a rocker link control arm, provides a measured amount of anti-squat action throughout the bike's suspension travel and gear range. The telescoping action works to balance the suspension's anti-squat function against the rider's mass close to equilibrium, which frees the system to react to the terrain without the need for excessive damping or spring force. Translated, that means: You can pedal almost any way you choose, without being affected by the suspension. It also means that the rear suspension can track the ground more accurately because the kinematics do not require much damping.
Marin Wolf Ridge
The red button in the center of the shock yoke pivot releases air pressure that may have built up inside the stanchion tube. - Greg Lambert photo

Equally important, but less apparent, R3act requires less suspension sag—20 to 25 percentand it tends to remain at that height in motion. As a result, the chassis feels and acts as if it has more wheel travel available than the more heavily damped all-mountain and enduro designs that we have grown used to.

The mono-stay swingarm design also keeps the R3act suspension compact so that it can be adapted to almost any size frame, and its elevated chainstays bypass the heavily constrained area near the bottom bracket, crankset and rear tire, which allows frame designers to shorten the chainstays at will without sacrificing clearance for full-width rubber. Finally, with the swingarm above the chain, the Marin runs across rough ground quietly.

bigquotesThe chassis feels and acts as if it has more wheel travel available than the more heavily damped all-mountain and enduro designs that we have grown used to.


About Marin's Frame Design

Marin could have gone full futuristic with the Wolf Ridge, but the carbon chassis design is tastefully modern. The conventional-looking front section's semi-rectangular tubes expand into reinforced box sections where they terminate at the head tube and bottom bracket areas. To provide clearance for the mono-stay swingarm, the seat tube must angle sharply inward, and the bottom bracket sits beneath the swingarm on a rigid "tray" that is the full width of the Wolf Ridge's 92-millimeter-wide press-fit bottom bracket shell The telescoping element slides on sealed bushings, as does the yoke-type shock driver, while the rocker control link pivots on sealed ball bearings. All of the cables and hoses are internally routed, and the floor pan created by the bottom bracket extension is protected by a thick, screw-on plastic bash guard.

As mentioned, the low-stance of its R3act suspension allows for a generous measure of stand-over clearance. Marin offers the 29-inch-wheel chassis in small, medium, large and extra-large sizes, and reports that the small size can fit riders down to five-foot, four-inches (162.5 centimeters). As an added benefit, the low-slung seat tube allows smaller riders to choose longer-stroke dropper posts than most compact frames would normally allow.

Speaking of dropper posts, the Wolf Ridge uses a custom-made KS LEV seatpost with a set-back saddle clamping head. The reason stated was to buy another inch of space behind the seat tube to clear the rear tire and swingarm at full compression. The benefit of Naild's R3act suspension is how efficiently it pedals when paired with copious amounts of unrestricted rear-wheel travel, so Marin offset the seat tube to squeeze out 160 millimeters from the Wolf Ridge chassis while maintaining a relatively short, 430-millimeter chainstay length.

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Bio-metric sizing from size small through size extra-large. Small circles represent the center of mass.
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Relationship of handlebar positions, stem lengths, head tube heights, and top tube lengths. &ndash Marin images


Bio-Metric Frame Sizing

The premise of anti-squat kinematics is to create an opposing force to counter the mass of the rider, so it makes sense to position that person in just the right place above and between the wheels to optimize that action. Marin says that its team charted average body types to determine leg and arm lengths, torso proportions, and center of mass, and then used those biometrics to determine the Wolf Ridge's frame geometry and sizing. Reportedly, the result of their efforts ensures that riders will enjoy similar handling and power transfer attributes across the four sizes that Marin offers. 'Tweeners can take advantage of the Wolf Ridge frame's low stand-over height to size up to the next longer reach without suffering progeny issues.

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Wolf Ridge Pro
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Trail Bike Numbers

In the handling department, the Wolf Ridge' geometry is a contemporary trail bike. Considering its 29-inch wheels, the 66.5-degree head tube angle is plenty slack enough to descend technical steeps without steering like a wooden tiller on the climbs. Reach is ample, measuring between 415 and 476 millimeters (16.3 and 18.74 inches) across the four available sizes, and the chainstay length is on the short side of the scale at 430 millimeters (16.9 inches). Mix in a sufficiently low bottom bracket height (336 millimeter/13.2 inches) and the Marin stacks up to be a playful trail machine with a good measure of stability. The old-school 73.5-degree seat tube angle, however, seems out of context with the rest of the Wolf Ridge's numbers—a necessity, says Marin, to position the rider where the suspension's kinematics are optimized.


Wolf Ridge Pro Specs

Specifications
Release Date 2017
Price $8599
Travel 160mm
Rear Shock Fox Float X2 Factory custom tune
Fork Fox Float 36 29", 160mm, Performance Elite, Fit 4
Headset FSA Orbit,
Cassette SRAM XG-1299 12-Speed, 10-50T
Crankarms SRAM XX1 Eagle Carbon, 34t
Chainguide e*thirteen TRS+ upper and lower, ISCG 05
Bottom Bracket SRAM GXP BB92
Pedals NA
Rear Derailleur SRAM XX1 Eagle, 12-Speed
Chain SRAM XX1 Eagle, 12-Speed
Front Derailleur NA
Shifter Pods SRAM XX1 Eagle, 12-Speed
Handlebar Deity DC31 Mohawk carbon, 787mm width, 15mm rise,
Stem Deity Copperhead, 35mm
Grips Marin locking
Brakes SRAM Guide Ultimate 180mm R, 200mm F
Wheelset e*thirteen TRS Race
Hubs e*thirteen TRS Race,
Spokes The Hive Triple-Butted, black
Rim e*thirteen TRS Race, carbon fiber rim, 28H, 31mm inner-width
Tires F: WTB Vigilante 29x2.3" R: Breakout, 29x2.3", TCS Light/Fast
Seat WTB Volt Race
Seatpost KS LEV, 150mm with custom offset head

Marin Wolf Ridge
It took a few tries to balance the Fox 36 fork with the Marin's supple R3act rear suspension. - Greg Lambert photo

Pinkbike-Polygon-3-2017
Without paint or graphics, the Wolf Ridge's profile is all business. – Greg Lambert photo


Riding Impressions

I had the opportunity to ride the Wolf Ridge on a number of trails ranging from cross-country tracks to chunky natural rock descents and groomed flow trails. Weather conditions ranged from tacky hero dirt to classic Southern California's mixture of rock hard clay topped with a mixture of ball bearings and dust. Up until then, I had ridden rough aluminum prototypes. The Marin was the first dialed-in production model that I had a chance to put through its paces. To begin with, the suspension setup was different than I am used to. I prefer the fork to be slightly stiffer than the rear suspension, so I can descend steeps without dropping the front wheel into a hole. I was prompted to equalize the fork and shock sag at about 20 percent and to try riding with a minimum of low-speed compression damping in the fork. With 25 psi in the front tire and 27 psi in the rear, those settings turned out to be a good starting point.

I chose a rolling cross-country trail to come to terms with the bike and, in spite of the fact that my test bike's tires had heavy downhill casings, it rolled along much better than expected. Oddly, until I became used to the way the R3act suspension hugged the ground, the rear wheel felt like it was chasing me and not quite attached to the bike. I don't have a better phrase to describe that sensation. I think I was anticipating the rear wheel to unweight slightly on the back-side of each bump and roller. Instead, the tail end of the Marin rolled the backsides so closely that as it extended, it felt like I was getting a tiny push each time. By day three, I became accustomed to the sensation.

With plenty of traction on hand and suspension set foolishly soft for any 160-millimeter-travel bike I had previously ridden, I learned that could roll around sketchy corners with a degree of surety. Big 29-inch tires rarely push in the turns, which allowed me to experiment with the ground-holding ability of the Wolf Ridge's nearly undamped rear suspension (they tell me it uses 40% less compression and rebound compared to a standard Fox X2 damper). I had learned to equate mid-stroke firmness with superior cornering traction, but the Marin poked a hole in that logic. As long as I could manage to hold a line with the front wheel, the tail end would follow through with such ease that I thought I could hear it whistling tunes while I was mashing from corner to corner. Well, okay then.


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The mono-stay swingarm is nearly as wide as the crankset will allow. My shoes, however, did not rub against it during testing. - Marin photo

With all of that cushion back there and minimal rebound control, I anticipated that I'd nose case every landing, but there is enough energy in the chassis to naturally level the bike when popping off of boulders and smaller jump faces, and a normal tug on the bars will do the trick on larger ramps and drops. No drama there, and to be truthful, the Marin didn't feel like it out-performed the better 160-millimeter travel bikes I have been riding down technical steeps and the boulder fields which are common fare in these parts. But, if pedaling is involved, even in short bursts to power over rock gardens and such, the Wolf Ridge move forward with measurable ease.

I sensed a similar situation under braking, where I could use the rear brake with slightly more authority on the downs without risking a lockup That may have been the result of tacky DH tires, but it was consistent, regardless of the trail surface, so I speculate the R3act system offers some real benefit there. That said, however, it was under braking, while descending some chunky steeps, where I discovered a chink in the Wolf Ridge's armor. As the fork compresses, the lower section of the frame that cradles the R3act's sliding element can drop low enough to slam rocks and roots. It is not a regular occurrence, but there is no mistaking it. Ba-boom! I added a couple of clicks of low-speed compression to the Fox 36 and another ten psi to encourage the front end to ride higher, which helped.
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The frame extends well ahead of the bottom bracket, where we whacked its plastic guard against rocks a handful of times. – Marin photo

bigquotesI'll have to admit that the damn thing works as advertised.

Saving the best for last, there is no question that the R3act-equipped Wolf Ridge has something special going on in the pedaling department. Hey, it's a massively huge 29er, which automatically qualifies it for lackluster acceleration and those three leg-sapping pedal strokes that follow each time you bog down in a G-out or are forced to push over a steep roller in a taller-than-anticipated gear selection. In spite of its big-wheel genetics, however, it is an efficient pedaling machine. My times were four to six seconds faster on my two-mile test climb, and I bettered most of my popular test loops. It defies reason that those events occurred on a thirty pound, softly sprung, 160-millimeter-travel bike with the fork and shock set wide open.

Is the Wolf Ridge the perfect trail bike? It's delightfully good, but thirty pounds is the borderline for a do-it-all trail bike, and the mono-stay swingarm occupies the full width of the crank arms, so if your heels drift inward, you will be scraping it often. Caveats aside, there is much more to love about the product of Marin's partnership with Naild. I'll have to admit that the damn thing works as advertised. So, what's next? A trip to B.C., where we will hopefully get a chance to put the Wolf Ridge Pro and its R3act 2 play suspension to task in an entirely different and perhaps, more hostile environment for a comprehensive review.



MENTIONS: @MarinBikes, @Polygonbikes


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Must Read This Week

294 Comments

  • + 365
 "Looks like a Polygon"
  • + 6
 Exactly what I was thinking....
  • + 88
 Surprised to see its not an exact copy of the Polygon, it appears the lower linkage is different. I know its ugly but I must be part of the small percentage more interested in how it rides, and believe it could be worth dealing with the looks. Maybe its just the engineer in me who's more interested in performance over looks.
  • + 36
 @MCsession7: I'd ride it! If it rides as well as the write-ups, I feel like this might be the future of linkages whether people are ready for it or not.
  • + 27
 Well, it is a Polygon. Same company.
  • + 9
 I cannot give you enough upvotes to accurately express how loud I laughed at that
  • + 7
 @MCsession7: I agree with you. I want to like it, especially if it rides as good as they claim. But it looks so out of place. I still can't wrap my head around riding it.
  • + 10
 Missed the Polygon release but the way that it works reminds me a ton of what Yeti was doing years ago with it's track system on the 303s.

It has a funky visual weight though :/ Reminds me of the old GT and mongoose frames with their floating BB before they figured out the right way to massage the design so it looked less blocky. Or the original Giant Glory with it's very bottom heavy visual weight.
  • - 1
 I was thinking it kind of looked like a carbon version of a GT in a way.
  • + 5
 @MCsession7: same. I could not care less how a bike looks if it makes riding better. Looks are certainly icing on the cake though
  • + 9
 Looks like a Transformer or something robotic to me. The rear swing arm looks like it belongs on a 450 Honda. Kudos to Marin for always having a unique look.
  • - 8
flag BeardlessMarinRider (Apr 20, 2017 at 10:21) (Below Threshold)
 I was actually thinking, Polygon take an ugly thing and ride the hype all the way to the bank and somehow Marin continue to make ugly things uglier! Smile
  • + 3
 @MCsession7: Yeah I am curious about the rocker link length. The final Polygon has a much shorter rocker link but the prototype shown in this video is about the same length:
www.pinkbike.com/video/469250

IMO I think the shorter link is much more visually appealing but I think the sharp center ridge styling on either link does not match the rest of the bike at all.
  • + 0
 i wanted to comment that as well, you were faster Smile
  • + 3
 Looks better than the polygon somehow...
  • + 3
 looks like honda mopeds you see around the world with vietnamese brand, china brands, russia brands, southafrica brands ecc
  • - 3
 @Bromaphobe: keep eating those gimmicks they're spoon feeding you man!! I said it on the polygon review and I'll say it again it's no better then dw vpp or meastro!!!
  • - 2
 @mhoshal: I agree with you. I ride a Horst link bike and although I know there are better pedaling bikes im happy with what I've got. Im not sold on this Polygon /Marin thing. I feel like some of the bigger companies probably already have something in mind for the future in afew years. Something that will really get us to spend our hard earned cash.
  • + 5
 @tblore: interesting, you sound like you'd be sold for it in case it was a Santa Cruz or a Spec...
  • + 0
 @ismasan: Maybe. I think those bigger companies plan for stuff like this. Always refining they're product. If I buy a new bike I want it to be something I really like. Im not sold on the looks of the Polygon/ Marin devololment. Would I love to ride one and compare it to mine? Yes. To buy it though, it would have to be extremely better than anything else I want. I don't really care about one brand vs the other I just want a bike I can ride and I like.
  • + 1
 @MCsession7: It's a 160mm 29'er vs 180mm 650B Poly so, it's a little different.
I'm still trying to wrap my head around both of these bikes, but it'll be interesting to see how they look and perform with a few years refinement.
  • + 2
 Cannondale want their 1993 Carbon swing arm back,!
  • + 2
 Every Marin bike comes from Polygon owned company, PT. Insera Sena in Indonesia. Isn't strange if they work together
  • + 2
 Looks like the shock has shit itself
  • + 3
 @mhoshal: I rode a polygon today for 1hr. It's the best system in the world. It's working differently than all the others. You have to ride it to understand. Ride one if you get the chance.
  • + 1
 @eriksaun: that good huh? When I get the opportunity I'm going to demo one.
  • + 2
 @tblore: who cares what it looks like if it rides well? Everyone is so concerned about the looks of a bike and I just don't get it. It's a tool for having fun and if it pedals better and descends better than the rest I'll ride the worst looking bike out there. And for the record I like it looks rad! Nice job Marin! I still rock my 2009 Mt vision around town... Manuals better than any full suspension xc bike I've ever ridden!
  • + 2
 @TheR: GT has been trying to achieve the same thing, but in a different way. I ride a GT sensor, and I like it, but this thing has me interested.
  • + 79
 In a world of steep seat tube angles, long top tubes and sexy bikes, one design dared to stand apart...
  • + 8
 Current Marin CEO, Matt VanEnkevort, is not only an industry veteran on many levels with humble beginnings as a shop employee, but was a serious force to be reckoned with in his PNW XC racing days. Definitely a role model for those who aspire to pursue a career in the MTB business. Major props to him for having the courage to embrace change!
  • + 15
 Speaking of seat tube angles: "KS LEV, 150mm with custom offset head"

Sucks to be stuck with a proprietary dropper post. This is a major turnoff for me. You know down the road you're going to want to replace that thing with the next generation dropper and you're going to be ass out.
  • + 2
 Literally laughed out loud reading this comment
  • + 2
 @teamtoad: Thanks! Appreciate the props.
  • + 64
 Kill it before it spawns... oh wait too late
  • + 31
 Then again, who would be so naive to pick their next $5-10K bike solely on aesthetics.
  • + 90
 @CaptainSnappy: Then again, who would drop $5-10K on a bike they think is ugly?
  • + 24
 @mistermtb: Yeah, I think a lot of people give lip service to not caring how their bikes look, but in reality people care and want to be stoked about the way their bikes look as well as ride. They can deny it all they want, but that's reality.

That said, a lot of people may love the way this looks and if it performs well, then all the better.
  • + 7
 @CaptainSnappy: I have a feeling that if the bike performs well as advertised, the look will definitely grow on the owner and others over time.
  • + 7
 Mommy I'm scared. Kill the bad bike with fire.
  • + 4
 @mistermtb: people that ride orange bikes....runs for cover
  • + 3
 @teamtoad: I mean, I actually like the design of this bike, but I have an example of what you're talking about: I hated the reverse arch on the Ribbon just like everybody else at first, but it's grown on me a lot, so much so that it's my next fork.
  • + 0
 Kill me too but I like it, especially the paint job looks great. If it didn't have wagon wheels... I still wouldn't be able to afford it Big Grin But I like it.
  • + 58
 I'm sure they'll sell tens of them...
  • + 20
 Until someone's mate has one, then everyone rides it and it leaves the rest behind. Then everyone will have one & it'll look normal before you know it.
  • + 11
 But I'll stick to my steel hardtail all the same! Although I wouldn't mind this. It's different and I like that.
  • + 10
 @cunning-linguist:I'd try one one...let me know when you get one so I can try it out! But yeah...for now most of my bikes look like Treks Smile
  • + 1
 You got me laughing there pete!
  • + 2
 @cunning-linguist: and the beauty of a steel hardtail is it will still be relevant in 10 years time. The same can't be said about most full sus bikes.

The thing I like about this bike and the Polygon is they show how much hype other companies make of their very ordinary suspension designs.
  • + 54
 Points for bringing some new flavor to the table!
  • + 25
 Who gives a shit what it looks like if it can perform at the level Marin and Polygon says it can. Of course I would have to ride it first, but it is rips like nothing else it is the perfect do-it-all bike. Very cool and techie bike, my only concern is the steep head tube angle, I know its for climbing, but I do love me some long and slack.
  • - 1
 yeah! just like how ferraris/lamborghinis/mclarens/porsches are all really ugly!

oh wait, they all look good and perform at incredibly high levels.

why settle on something ugly af at this pricepoint?
  • + 5
 @jaycubzz: loads of people in the UK are buying Orange, which are ugly heavy, have questionable performance and cost an arm and a dick. Market it will and you'll find a buyer. This at least has some progress in it, Orange have stopped development in mid 90s.
  • - 3
 Sorry for the typos. I've no idea what happened to me, I'm usually better than that.
  • + 8
 @pooceq: "Market it will and you'll find a buyer." Tell that to BlackBerry.
  • + 7
 @pooceq: what a load of shit. Orange bikes are awesome and I've seen 322 builds at 33lbs.
  • + 0
 @jaycubzz:
A ferrari will give up when you have to cross the first serious bumb with it... same for the rest of your dreamcars...
They perform at only one thing, speed... oh and drools Wink

As far as I am reading this article, these bikes are far more allround...
  • + 1
 @Trailstunter: oh sorry l, okay rally cars are also ugly af.

oh wait, they look cool too.

unlike this bike.
  • - 1
 @jaycubzz: that is just your opinion..
I think the mtb is quite comparible with rallycars...But is every rally car beatifull? Even the old Subaru Impreza's? ???? but they were fast right? ????
Btw... what we find beautifull is mostly conditioned anyways...
  • + 2
 @Trailstunter: yes all rally cars are beautiful, and all sound amazing, some say the old peugot 205 is ugly i personally think its gorgeous, not just because what it looks like sitting still but everything added up is awesome, looks, sound, agility, speed, all contribute to my perception of this. so who knows first impressions of this bike could be its ugly but with the right paint job and piloted by the right top athlete this could grow to be considered a sweet lookin bike.
  • + 0
 @thenotoriousmic: awesome if you like to experience brake jack or if compared to a hardtail. And that's why you'll see so many of them at racing events or outside UK, right? They don't compare to modern bikes, especially at given price points. The only selling point really is that they're hand build by some blokes in Yorkshire and this is where a lot of people will leave common sense aside
@Macropod: good point, sometimes it doesn't work out, though blackberry had a lot of issues
  • - 1
 @jaycubzz: From the four brands you mentioned, I'd call Porsche the only one that makes good looking cars. I'm not saying the others are ugly, but you can clearly see it's "function first, design second".
  • + 2
 @pooceq: brakejack is a myth - do your homework (study linkage or read new vital mtb reviews). oranges bearing assembly is said to be not ideal and i do not personally like their looks but singlepivots can be very good. furthermore they actually improved their lineup for 2017 - most of the bikes lost the degressive leverage curve. an orange with agood shock will outperform a yeti with a standard shock any day.
  • + 2
 @pooceq: who have literally no idea what you are talking about. They are some of the best bikes you can possibly buy there's a reason why they are so popular and you never see a bad review for one. Out of interest what do you ride mate?
  • - 2
 @optimumnotmaximum: you will get a bit of brake jack with any single pivot when the back wheel is locked but the second you let go of the brake the shock will rebound and fire you out of bends but how often do you have the back wheel locked for it to become an issue?
  • + 2
 @thenotoriousmic: not an orange -never did, probably never will. i have ridden quiet a lot of bikes and i like how (some) singlepivots feel. as i said please check out the kinematic differences of the available systems -you will be surprised. for instance the antirise ("brakejack") of an average vpp bike is not that different to the one of a good singlepivot. with modern airshocks like the x2 or those with luftkappe upgrade, loosing their midstroke degressivity, mildly progressive singlepivots make a lot of sense. what you can not do with a singlepivot is to compensate for the inconsistent springrate of old airshocks- in short: equipped with basic shocks a good linkage bike will be better. if you do not hit things like richi a good singlepivot with coil will also be great -good sensitivity and midstroke, you might just bottom out a bit more often -it has a bumper though. best singlepivot and one of the best bikes in general is the guerilla gravity gg dh (imo) -look the kinematic details up. P.S.: I ride a starling swoop with a slightly different shockplacement to create a (slightly) progressive system.
  • + 2
 @thenotoriousmic: the rear suspension of singlepivots (with or without linkage) will stiffen more under braking than most horst bikes -i think that is a fact. the next question is if this is a real flaw. in my experience it is not, other people might disagree. P.S.:sorry i wanted to reply to @pooceq just messed up reading your comment - it is friday afternoon after all. cheers im of to the woods
  • + 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: I definitely don't think it's a flaw. I've never really got on with Horst links, four bars etc they've always felt dead to me. Link activated single pivots is what works the best for what I want out of a bike.
  • + 2
 @thenotoriousmic:

For if you guys really want to know about this.... it is not the suspension type that decides wich is best Wink

youtu.be/78DD82fx4M8
  • + 1
 BTW it is very interesting to see more video's of this guy... he is unveiling the marketing BS from the real world and showing how a bikesuspension performs... Also great vids about airshocks vs coil and differences between big air and normal.
  • + 2
 @pooceq: have you ridden one?
  • + 2
 @multialxndr: you know he hasn't or he wouldn't be chatting bare shit.
  • + 21
 Funny, that - out here in the real world, 30 pounds tends to be considered pretty light-weight for do-it-all trailbikes. Short travel aggreessive 29ers like the Process 111 and Transition Smuggler all come in around or above those weights (yes, you can lighten up the Smuggler if you go with the really high end versions - but that's not what I see people actually riding, even here in Transition's hometown).

I like that they're thinking a little differently, trying something a bit out of the mainstream. I'm not so sure, though, that this route is really all that feasible - adding massive complexity to the system with all these funky linkages and telescoping doodads and such. If you look at the bikes that people have been able to deliver value in ways that have led to widespread adoption, you're generally seeing simple designs (keeping cost down), with capability added not so much through massive suspension but through more aggressive geometry, and a conscious tradeoff that maximizes overall Swiss-Army-knife versatility at the expense of that last bit of monster truck ability to plow through rock gardens and huck to flat. So you end up with the mass market getting really excited at bikes like the Stumpy, Jeffsy, Tallboy and Hightower, Process 111, Smuggler, Following, etc. You can go more capable or more playful (the Hightower is pretty monster-trucky already) depending on your preferred speeds, the degree your local trails demand or punish it, etc.

Super-clever suspension, if sorted properly, could make a bigdifference - but as long as it adds a grand or more to the cost of a bike, I just don't see it being the wave of the future. And making super-clever suspension work is expensive - not just in terms of R&D, but also in terms of higher costs for molds and materials and assembly. And then, later on, in cost of ownership (more linkage pieces, more wear parts, more maintenance needed; more complex to work on).
  • + 13
 When I read that bit about 30 pounds I thought that I must have been redirected to Cycling News.com. But no it's Pinkbike. World is changing...
  • + 7
 @WAKIdesigns: If 30lbs is heavy I'm in a lot of trouble.
  • + 3
 @Rucker10: my boutique Antidote Carbon Jack weighs 32,5 lbs with 1,5 ply tyres. Once some dude asked me how much does it weigh, I said 14,7kg - he looked at me the way you look at a guy who just farted in an elevator and said: I thought it is under 12kg
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: My old coach used to tell me: "If you can ride a heavy bike and make people think it's a light bike just by your riding, then you are a good rider." Weight isn't nearly as important as pedalling efficiency and suspension action, anyways.


...but light bikes are great too Smile
  • + 3
 @AydinR: light bikes are great no doubt about it. But who said 30lbs is heavy? That's barely weight of dumb bell I use for most exercise I do... 1,5ply tyres alone add almost 2lbs, then I have huck norris, Lyrik instead of Pike, coil shock, dropper, alu rims, brass nipples, alu cranks, bars - fkng durable functional stuff. 30lbs is edge of sanity for 150+ bikes.
  • + 1
 static sprung weight is not very important-unless we are talking about a couple of kilos-especially since a lot of people still run heavy backpacks
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: do you really need 1.5 ply tires +huck norris -is the terrain really that rocky where you live. i run ethirteen tires even on the fast and rocky trails of southtyrol (at 25 psi)without a problem, and i am a former dh racer with a quite agressive style
  • + 2
 @Rucker10: my sensibly built steel 29 hardtail is bang on 30lb and thats single speed without the dropper post on. Its about 32lb fully kitted up. Im 95kg so its relative.

30lb (or thereabouts) aint bad IMO.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: it's lucky you didn't say "locally sourced and hand crafted" in the description of your bike otherwise I would have had no choice but to label you a hipster ;p
  • + 3
 @optimumnotmaximum: I punctured Slaughter Grid once. Huck N is a rather light insurance policy.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: not the biggest fan of the big s tires- but i rode just the normal casing which was horrible. in my dh days i punctured once a michelin c16 on the front- so i think you can smash everything. like with every insurance -you have to pay for it
  • + 18
 I'd rather have no image set.
  • + 5
 good to know i am not alone... i honestly thought it was just that i was too hungover.
  • + 15
 It's good to see something new that doesn't have to do with wheel size, metric sizing or boost. And I am so tired of seeing so called new designs that are just ripoffs of the horst link.
  • + 17
 The blokes at work always said " the ugly ones ride the best!"
  • + 6
 How is your mum these days mate?
  • + 2
 @lee-vps-savage: same as yours mate. Rough as....
  • + 11
 So apparently 20% Sag in the rear and 40% less damping in comp AND reb are on par or better down the hill than "conventional" bikes and dampers with pretty refined damping circuits? How did that happen? Down the hill the kinematics can't do wonders, it just has a fairly vertical axle path (especially later in the stroke) and fairly low brake squat. No additional support or anything (just from spring rate). God, I'd love to try one of these and see what all the commotion is about. Just hard to get your head around it. Steve?
  • + 7
 I'm going to ride one tomorrow. I'll let you know. My heads fragmented.
  • + 2
 @Loamhuck: please let him know in this comment thread
  • + 3
 @JoseBravo: I'll do everything I can. My buddy is one of their racers and he gave me the okay this morning for a few laps. Not sure what kind of chunk I can find, but I'll let you know. Mind is still exploding a bit.
  • + 2
 @Loamhuck: my comment is only here to subscribe to your report. Please.
  • + 1
 @Loamhuck: subscribed
  • + 9
 You know this bike could save Marin fro the most boring bike award, these are very distinctive and hopefully ride as well as they look, yes they share Polygon DNA but that's not a bad thing as all their reviews are getting rave reviews!
  • + 9
 Every time a completely new-looking design comes out, the looks are super polarizing and many people complain that it looks ugly because it is so different than what they are used to. It shocks a bit and takes some getting used to. There are some who like it though. Style and looks are super subjective. I don't think people should state it's ugly as a fact (or even as a knee-jerk opinion). Those same people may grow to like the looks as they're exposed to it more and more. A huge cassette like the Eagle that looked so out of place and strange is now commonplace and accepted as normal now that our eyes have adjusted to seeing it. Look at car design and how much it has evolved. Look at how square and blocky and drab most mainstream cars used to be. Just Google image search Mercury Topaz (same body as Ford Tempo), which is what I drove in high school (it was ugly even back then). You have to remember that super curvy and flowy designs of today were ugly to many people when they first came out, despite their increased aerodynamics. Just don't be too eager to jump on the hate train right away, as you may one day be changing your tune. I personally like the looks. Call me crazy!
  • + 10
 The only answer to promoting this Naild technology is to make all the frames Matte Black. There is just no other way to avoid the ugly.
  • + 3
 Agreed, but I'm also totally down with that aesthetic.
  • + 2
 I usually hate black bikes and wouldn't say the polygon is a looker, but I like the looks of this Marin very much.
  • + 8
 Anyone else see an old San Andreas? Obviously vastly improved, and totally different frame shape // system but something about the orange and that rear swingarm shape...
Maybe I'm getting old. Sure lusted after them back in the day. Looks like a neat machine.
  • + 3
 It def has a Mountain Cycle look too it!
  • + 5
 I see more of the Trek VRX. Remember those?
  • + 2
 @nozes: nailed it.
  • + 1
 As an owner of "three" San Andreas back in the 90's, I can say at first I thought the same. That rear swing arm looks similar. But the San Andreas had a gorgeous monocoque main frame. I wish I could say the poly/Marin main frames of these bikes looked gorgeous, but imho they look broken to me. I know...looks are subjective, and if it works great then who cares. But I guess to me a bike isn't just about function, but it has to look beautiful too. It's like Pagani the super car builder. Fantastic performance! And also looks like art. Maybe v2 of these bikes will look better.
  • + 5
 When is someone going to put this on a 100-120mm bike at 25lbs. and then release the talent on that bike? Most all trail bikes are way too much bike for a good rider and the rider would be better served by thoughtfully less.
  • + 8
 I'm liking the integrated rear mud flap. Hope that becomes the norm...
  • + 4
 It's a good thing people buy bikes based on how it looks rather than how it performs, I for one think it's great to see some innovation that's actually unique enough to maybe actually live up to the claimed performance. Innovation is healthy, unless the bike industry wants to follow apple and make claims to performance change that are so subtle nobody can actually notice them.
  • + 3
 I have just realized that, from reading the comments here. I had no idea that people were choosing bikes because of aesthetics. Actually, I have no idea what these aesthetic standards might be. It's just a factor that I never thougth about in the slightest.
  • + 4
 i dont get it, everyone complained that every bike looked like a session -now someone does it very different and everyone screams-kill it with fire. i think it is just about complaining. diversity is good even better if someone does build a not so pretty bike because he thinks it rides dope.
  • + 7
 Who here wants to see YouTuber "andrextr" do a video on this bike?
  • + 9
 I didn't looked for this one but regarding Polyong's bike the anti-squat increases along the travel (where you don't need it), resulting in a slightly higher pedal kickback and chaingrowth than traditional bikes. Secondly, the leverage ratio is almost constant along the travel, therefore the bike has too low progressivity for a 180mm Enduro/FR bike in my opinion. It's always nice to see some inovation but overall I'm not very conviced about this particular design. But the marketing and "wow" factor is working well Smile
  • + 1
 @andrextr: Well said! I guess only time will tell when more and more test riders get on the bike and do a long term review before we really know how this bike is in the real world.

Definitely respect and trust your knowledge and expertise when it comes to suspension kinematics~
  • + 1
 @LiquidSpin: Thanks. Unfortunatly most riding tests have some bias or some subjectivity (each person feel it differently)... that's why I like the numbers Smile Of course the ideal would be to combine the numbers with non-biased testing Smile Bye
  • + 1
 @andrextr: Where have you seen the leverage ratio graph?
  • + 1
 @blacksim549: I modelled the Polygon bike on Linkage software. Not sure about the Marin (didn't looked yet)
  • + 1
 @andrextr:
very cool ... any way of sharing that information?
so we can see what the actual curves look like?
  • + 2
 @andrextr: Does the linkage software take into account that slider mechanism balancing forces? Furthermore I don't understand how you're coming up with accurate numbers for the pivot locations when you say you do this. Or is it just a rough guess? Don't get me wrong I appreciate what you do. But I think those are fair questions to ask.
  • + 1
 @bsavery: Hi, no problem. Yes Linkage can simulate sliders since a slider it works as a perpendicular infinite-sized link (this is why yeti calls to their system as switch Infinity....). Here you have the video: www.pinkbike.com/video/469975
  • + 1
 @andrextr: Thanks for the video. The leverage ratio looks quite progressive too me, and not "almost constant" as you said.
  • + 3
 @blacksim549: Yes both Marin and Polygon are a bit more progressive than I initially though, still we can put both on the slightly progressive category (25% total progressivity for Marin and around 30-35% for Polygon, which are values used on most bikes....but for comparison, YT Capra has 70% progressivity and RM Slayer or Intense Recluse have around 50%...). To conclude this, the Marin and Polygon are normal bikes and they have some not very important "problems" as the increasing anti-squat. There was too much marketing around this. These bikes are not better than the others, they just look different. Bye
  • + 3
 Well, I hope it's fast so we don't Have to look at it for long.

Not sure I understand the need for the overly complicated suspension design and materials when chances are something like this Murmer made out of steel with a simple single pivot suspension design will blow the tires off this R3act complication. And that murmur looks so good ????

dirtmountainbike.com/bike-reviews/trail-enduro-bikes/starling-murmur-steel-bike-thats-blown-us-away.html
  • + 2
 Anti-squat and virtual pivot point look a lot like Canfield Balance Formula. Except this is a much more complex solution to the same problem... Excited to hear more about how this rides though- and glad to see some companies investing in new ideas.
  • + 2
 Glad to see the industry pushing for progress, but this thing is ugly as. It's not like current bikes ride like crap...quite the opposite actually.

It seems like someone came up with a radical idea to sell bikes - and who knows, it may work well - and then attached radical rhetoric to the marketing materials to make everyone feel like their bikes are inadequate compared to this technology. People are absolutely ripping on existing bikes.

I also do not entirely buy the explanation of how this design somehow require less damping. Sure, the design may account for rider mass, but when a bike encounters a high speed hit, the shock still needs to respond to and control that hit. How can a mechanical design account for that while allowing for what sounds like much less damping from the shock? We already have a number of systems that, through the use of anti-squat, allow riders to run less low speed compression damping to better respond to small bumps, but still pedal well.
  • + 3
 It's good to see a bike maker try something different to the typical Hörst link. Who knows maybe one of Liteville, Orange or (now) Marin are right and the rest of the market are wrong.
  • + 2
 "...brings ultra-efficient pedaling to a chassis designed with numbers that once were the domain of gravity-oriented all-mountain machines with lackluster acceleration and climbing performance."... says the press release of every single bike released since late 2014.
  • + 2
 Great to see a company thinking about biometric sizing and trying to pinpoint the actual relevant factors to sizing. Unfortunately, it looks as though they've continued to make the false assumption that one wants their knee over the pedal spindle when then crank is at 3 o'clock, when really you want to start dropping power with the knee over the spindle when the pedal is at 1:30. And, still need on a cleat position that looks too far forward to my eye.
  • + 3
 73.5 deg SA...'a necessity, says Marin, to position the rider where the suspension's kinematics are optimized'...so force the rider into a non-optimal pedaling position to suit your kinematics?! Ha!
  • + 2
 It will be fascinating to compare this to the Tantrum's when they come out.
Marin/Polygon obviously has a big advantage in the marketing and distribution department.
I'm wary of anyone that doesn't sell a bare frame though.
  • + 3
 I've been wondering when Marin was going to redesign their bikes 'cause they looked a bit outdated, but I was hoping for something a bit more "normal" so to speak.
  • + 1
 I'd be interested to see the business model. Naild will take a big chunk (as they should) for licensing but how much do Polygon, Marin and any other future licencees work together? If I was buying the Naild system, I'd want to know who else has it.

Is there an argument that bike companies are going backwards in R&D, if they're not developing their own bikes any more? I guess this is already happening with branded bikes coming out of single studios as per the Cesar Rojo example. Interesting times.
  • + 1
 So it looks absolutely bat shit insane, but I ride a GT so I don't care what bikes look like. If this thing works as advertised and they can get the cost down a bit I'm on board. Looking forward to a full on ride review of this.
  • + 1
 Directly compare this to an equivalent Orange bike. Both well made, well designed, but ends apart in terms of suspension complexity (and performance?).

Does the average rider really need this, or will a much simpler single-pivot operate to 90% of it's performance?
  • + 1
 I'm actually very interested in this bike. Too bad it's 29er, one thing I've learned is dudes with legs can put in a few pedal strokes on 27.5 and immediately cancel out the speed advantage of 29er. But anyways, this bike has my attention.
  • + 2
 Then check out the Polygon one.
  • + 2
 And of course the dudes with legs on 29ers cannot pedal and reinstate said speed advantage??!! Say you don't like 29ers cos of how they handle, how they look, whatever, fine! But say they are faster but that's ok cos you can pedal harder on a 27.5??
  • + 1
 I actually kinda like it...the more I look at it, the more it grows on me. I don't think the photos on here are particularly flattering to the bike really. The ones on nsmb do the bike a bit more justice I reckon: nsmb.com/articles/marins-2018-wolf-ridge
  • + 1
 Apparently less sag translates into 'foolishly soft' suspension...

"R3act requires less suspension sag—20 to 25 percent and it tends to remain at that height in motion"

"suspension set foolishly soft for any 160-millimeter-travel bike I had previously ridden"
  • + 1
 I Like that, but every time i look at the downtube i think is there really enough clearance there for the front tyre. That really looks like it will hit if it bottoms out. Certainly if there is any fore/aft flex involved in such a hard hit. Does this mean that this bike will need forks that ramp up?

I must assume this has been thought of and still works though but with a fat tyre i'm not so sure.
  • + 1
 $8,599 for and ugly bike that performs really well per company marketers, or $8,599 for a good looking bike that pedals OK? The majority will pick the better looking bike. Sorry but industrial design and presentation counts. If it didn't all of us wouldn't have upgraditus.
  • + 1
 RC - "My times were four to six seconds faster on my two-mile test climb, and I bettered most of my popular test loops."

I think its pretty disingenuous to drop this in a review for a new bike. What other bikes have you ridden these test loops on ? How much deviation in time is there ? Is this truly the fastest bike you've ever ridden on it ? If the average guy buys a new bike and says "I dropped X seconds on trail Y" then I can be stoked because he sees a definitive difference on a very known quantity between two discrete pieces of equipment. But for PB editor and 20 year veteran of bike reviews, who we know is always riding different equipment to just drop a statement in his review like that with no context is kind of cheesy.

For the record I've long been a fan of bringing in more scientific comparisons for bike reviews and as flawed as "average lap times" are between different reviewers, bikes, and time periods, they could still provide some quality knowledge and I wish they would be pursued more.
  • + 1
 Remembering back when cars were made of metal and showed a graciousness amount of style real class, then science hit the morph button, and every car started to look the friggen same, well now it seems to have arrived here for us in bikes.... Not saying there is anything wrong with this it's because... they are going to refine on this thing.. aren't they?
  • + 1
 Many say it's not ugly and yhst design will grow on people... but remember this, golden ratio were always here it is in our brains coded since begining and by laws of it this bike is ugly and it always will be. People no mather what they say will always want to ride a bike that is visually appealing to them, and this design is not in any way a pretty one...
  • + 2
 Are the seattube angle actual and virtual numbers mixed up? Seems like the actual should be the 65.5 and the virtual should be the 73.5.
  • + 2
 Awesome! I hope this is the start of some crazy new alien bikes. The modern mountain bike is damn near perfected anyway, let's open the box up!
  • + 2
 Looks weird... But I really like the look of this thingSmile The only thing that I don't like is the head angle, but that's can be fixed easily
  • + 2
 Numbers look good to me.
  • + 1
 It is a 29er. Those numbers are right on par for shredding that wheel size. Slackening the HA another degree would not be good for an all rounder that you would want to ride on everything from xc pedalfests to steeper and gnarlier descents.
  • + 1
 @Lastpikd: Well TBH I've never ridden 160mm 29er, but 65 degree HA looks better for me on paper Smile
At the moment I'm riding 160mm 650b, with 66 HA, and I need to slacken the HA by degree, as it doesn't descent as good as my old bike that had 65 HA, but yah there could be few factors to that
  • + 1
 @seraph: fair enough mate Smile
  • + 2
 Way too long of a seat tube on the XL. Just because I'm 6'4" doesn't mean I have really long legs. Another frame I don't have to worry about.
  • + 2
 Me too. The long'n'low bikes of the past few years have really suited our body shape.
  • + 4
 I am at the other end of the seat tube, I am 6"4' and have very long legs...super happy to see these numbers!
  • + 2
 They almost got it right (over the polygon). . Got the bb lower than the other but still way too steep in the HA... and that paint job makes it look alright too..
  • + 2
 Ellsworth: I think we clinched the ugliest bike of the year for the 3rd year running.
Polygon: Hold my beer....
Marin: Im in to !!!
  • + 2
 If i see someone race and win a UCI XC race and enduro or better yet.....this weekend at Sea Otter...then it will spike more interest.
  • + 4
 Definitely doesn't look like a Session.
  • + 1
 I always wanted a Bear Valley SE as a kid, never had one, then they seemed to go a bit shit. I quite like this one in a weird way. Like that girl at school you dug, but no one else did.
  • + 0
 Is this the year of "create the ugliest bike"-award? What happened to all these product Designers? Scribbling the blue prints with a hangover? Sniffing the white line before the pencil party? Gimme a break, you can't be for real!
  • + 0
 this one looks much better than Poligons colours. anyway the frame design is ugly.
  • + 1
 From my perspective as a bike designer, what matters is that it works. Lightness, rigidity, and the fulfillment of the various kinetic parameters. You don't set about creating a beautiful looking bike, whatever that might be. It's completely irrelevant, to the degree that the word has no meaning whatsoever, besides what concerns the fulfillment of the aforementioned parameters. What happens is actually the opposite. When a design works well, it becomes what people want and it becomes coveted and admired, namely aesthetically. For example, the Santa Cruz VP Free in my opinion, looks rather cumbersome, not aesthetically pleasing at all. Still, its suspension system has now become widely adopted by many brands. It's no longer hurting eyes because it has been proved to work.
  • + 0
 looks like an ebike and cost more than husky wr450 on the road,i dont think it would be that much better than high spek foxy xr or even a high spek15 year old m5 enduro fsr,its a push bike it will only go as fast as the person rideing it, if your fat and shit it will be 7grands worth of fat and shit clipped to your feet lol.
  • + 1
 Can't wait for version 2 or 3 when I might be able to afford something with this suspension design and all the kinks are ironed out.
  • - 1
 Sorry for my lack of knowledge, but by the sound of this and they goal of the suspension and the Kinematics (sp) this is pretty much like what Yeti has on the switch Infinity link. Or any of the rail system it has had in the past.

Or I could be bias and just think everyone is just trying to copy the best bike on the market, since I have a SB6 hahaha
  • + 1
 At least Marin has the balls to use big wheels, not like Polygon who made the compromise of going bigger but not really big. Thank you Marin.
  • + 1
 Does Marin own Polygon or vice versa? How are they connected? They have literally the exact same bike, with the exception of the lower link being extended on the Marin!
  • + 3
 Both companies are using the suspension design licensed to them from a third party.
  • + 1
 @BullMooose: Somewhat like Pivot and Ibis both use DW-Link.
  • + 1
 @BullMooose: that has a vested interest in BOTH companies
  • + 1
 @BullMooose: My comment below should appear here...
  • + 2
 Yes. Polygon owns Marin.
  • + 0
 Im not a pro so ultimate performance is not necessary but looks are, if I'm spending my hard-earned cash! Most bikes these days are good to ride and look at...certainly not this one!
  • + 2
 It can hug the ground and pedal as well as a XC machine and that just great and all but..... IS IT FUN!!!???
  • + 2
 Is that the 'Fonz' jumping a shark on water skis in the background of the second picture?
  • + 1
 Chainstay length is 435mm or 430mm? Someone made a mistake here. The geo chart says 435, which isn't THAT short, is just kinda short.
  • + 1
 @richardcunningham: or anyone... randomly happen to know what stem that is, on the stealth-black model with red Deity handlebar (next to "Wolf Ridge Pro Specs" sheet)?
  • + 0
 Credit to Polygon for taking a radical - yet somehow 'classic looking' design- and making it look... good? I am NOT a fan of the Polygon aesthetics. They look every bit as weird as this rear suspension design.
  • + 1
 i'm late to the comment party. seems to me it does kind of the same thing as yeti/ibis with their eccentric pivots. in a much less visually appealing way.
  • - 1
 Honestly, really surprised by the comments on here. I personally dislike the look of this bike. In a world where geometries, shocks, and high end components are matched across the board; the bike i'd like to own comes down to art form and warranty.

This simply doesn't have that.

Off topic, these bible of bike tests, reviews, etc are somewhat mind boggling to me. Every review is based on the riders perspective of the bike they are used to riding. In my opinion, these millimeter differences play no part when you've learned how to ride the bike you already have. This is apparent at any race, i've seen guys and gals on enduro bikes absolutely destroy these "ultra quick, super-light" xc bikes in their own cross-country races. It's apparent the fastest riders are those who simply ride the most (ergo the most experienced and strongest).
  • + 2
 Marin adopts a new suspension design every year, wonder what next year's will look like..
  • + 3
 Looks like a dog trying to have a shit
  • + 1
 perfect defenition
  • + 2
 Feel like maybe someone else should have reviewed this bike as we know the author likes this suspension platform.
  • + 3
 Marin, wait what? Looks familiar!
  • - 3
 DW Link variations: Ibis, Pivot, Devinci, etc...

VPP variations: SC, Intense, Giant, Niner, etc...

Horst link variations: almost everyone else...
  • + 3
 Orange bikes made love with a not so distant cousin.
  • + 3
 Southern People.
  • + 4
 Want to try X 1000
  • + 2
 I haven't seen bike press (not Pinkbike specifically) get swept up in hype this hard since the GT i-Drive.
  • + 1
 MIGHT look a bit better if the swingarm was straight instead of that shape. But it looks like an e bike. Took me a while to realise it wasnt.
  • + 0
 I think the brilliance lies therein: an eBike version of an R3ACT bike won't look drastically different.
  • + 2
 Too rad to be true...I ll test in a heart beat!
  • + 2
 Should be re-named the Medusa.
  • + 2
 #butterframe , as in everything looks good but the frame !!!
  • + 2
 Looks Like a honda (Greg minnar sans gearbox)
  • + 3
 Best looking Marin yet!
  • + 1
 mtbr.com has some interesting pictures of this system.
reviews.mtbr.com/marin-wolf-ridge-first-ride-review
  • - 2
 This isn't revolutionary, or all that different. Think of the yeti design with the rails tilted forward a bit instead of vertical, and the rail moves (mostly) opposite of the yeti. Its like comparing VPP to DW.

Its true, just like a dual link design, the placement of the pivots and length of the link dramatically alters how the bike can perform, but theres nothing new here, other than the looks. This is not like the magic link of old (or the new missing link) where pedaling changes the relative positions and performance of the suspension.
  • + 3
 The Yeti design simply isolates the rotational forces once present in the counter-rotating links of the SB66.

This is far different. The essence of DW is here but the format of the third low link is the key.
Again; Just because it looks similar it could be entirely different. And vice versa.

I need to throw a leg over one of these either way, to see if it was worth the hassle of designing a new link.
  • + 2
 @siderealwall2: the top 'link' isn't a link at all. Its just an extension yoke like what specialized does, but longer.
  • + 2
 ^ this. @hamncheez

Even with the telescoping doodad, because of the middle link the axle path follows a consistent shape, whatever that may be, so this system still has to choose among the well-established compromises of Anti-squat, pedal kickback, leverage ratio, and brake squat.

Also funny how they're re-marketing standard enduro geometry and 160mm travel as do-all mountain bike geometry. Sure that's a fine geometry but it aint anything new
  • + 2
 @bvwilliams: Yes! It doesn't have an idler pulley, so it is still constrained by balancing all those things you mentioned.

Geometry and wheel/tire weight will make a bigger difference on how fast you climb than the linkage (at least with most modern designs).
  • + 1
 @bvwilliams: The axle path is due to all links, including the slider, the slider here just seems like a heavy replacement for two links.

But that just bolsters what you're saying as they have to decide what they want just like any other 4 link bike.
  • + 1
 They might as well go full "San Andreas" and make a monocoque aluminium "Y" frame, that would make it a pretty stylin' rig!
  • + 2
 Once they work out the rear swingarm, it's gonna be awesome!
  • + 2
 First good looking Marin I've seen.
  • + 1
 I think it's kind of hot looking. Like the original hardcore dually, Mountain Cycle San Andreas.
  • + 1
 Short top tubes (well not if you designed it 5 years ago I guess...) and no bottle mount. I'd be keen otherwise.
  • + 1
 Walking through sea otter today and saw this bike. Thought I was at the Polygon booth.
  • + 2
 Wolf Ridge or Wolf Creek?
  • + 1
 haha, I was thoroughly confused when I read Wolf Creek too!
  • + 0
 That swing arm is hideous and the mudguard takes it to another level. Marin's earlier swing arms were also pretty hard on the eye
  • + 1
 April Fool! Must be, I thought it was an E Bike at first. Minging!!
  • + 0
 The designer could not find the curve template and just used the straight edge, pretty fugly!
  • + 1
 Just wait for the e-bike version on this one
  • + 0
 So dam ugly! Not buying into it at all, function is one thing, but something that ugly ain't gonna cut it..
  • + 1
 The Pontiac Aztek of bikes...
  • + 1
 This bike is mindblowing UGLY
  • + 0
 what if the popular brands release similar bike like this? would you hate them also? lolol...
  • + 1
 bcause its same a developed rearshock mecanisme Voss on NAILD like a Polygon Square One
  • + 0
 So is the this 2003 model?? Im confused.. which standard .. aw to hell with it some cryo me n wake in 20 yrs
  • + 1
 Looks ugly as hell but also sure will work well
  • + 0
 This suspension design and Pinion gearbox must be the best thing that can happen to mountain bike world.
  • - 1
 Only Marin could make an ugly bike and make it even uglier. I agree that looks arent everything, but its like they didnt even try. lol I truly hope it rides amazing though!!
  • + 1
 It's just so damn fugly!!!
  • + 1
 cable routing nightmare!!
  • + 1
 a swingarm only a mother could love
  • + 1
 Is 30 lbs really borderline for a trail bike these days?
  • + 0
 I can't tell which way they mean it, whether it's supposed to be too heavy for XC or too light for DH.
  • + 1
 Mountain Cycle called, they want their swing arm back
  • + 1
 Why is the stabdover so high?
  • + 1
 Is it just me or does this bike look heavy?
  • + 1
 Can't wait to ride it. lyrik 180 and a custom tuned eleven six!
  • - 3
 1.) Looks essentially identical to the Polygon Square One. So is this a licensed suspension technology, or just a slightly tweaked rebadge of an already existing bike? I don't see many other companies jumping on board with this since all their bikes will essentially be the same.

2.) NO ONE (except perhaps some unwitting dentists or others with more money than sense) is going to spend $6,800 on a Marin.
  • + 2
 it has been called a 'partnership' a few times in other articles
my guess is that naild is either licensing or supplying the moving parts (swingarm + sliding/rotating parts)
not sure if the design will (or could) look different if different brands want to deploy
  • + 2
 @little-star:

Didn't know this but apparently Polygon owns Marin. So that at least makes more sense.

I'm all for this design, and would love to give it a try, but I think it's going to have a hard time breaking out into the mainstream unless more popular brands license it. It may truly be a game changer, but until a Specialized, or Giant, or Trek type company adopts it, I fear it will languish in the realm of bike brands that people just don't care much about.

Not sh**ing on Polygon or Marin, I'm sure they both make great bikes, but they're not exactly marquee brands. And I fear that's what this tech needs in order to break out into the mainstreams consciousness.

Or, perhaps a few well informed, discerning riders will not care about brand and will reap the benefits that all others will never know!
  • + 1
 Show me the vid how it handles pedal forces under high load
  • + 1
 Looks like it may have some log clearance issues
  • + 1
 No space for bottle, so... I believe it rides well, but no thank you.
  • + 1
 It seems funny that a 30lb bike is a problem.
  • + 1
 Just needs a Lefty
  • + 1
 looks lame. wtf?
  • - 3
 At what point at the boardroom meeting did they all agree that the aesthetics of this machine was a step in the right direction? Before or after the midget throwing drug fuelled orgy???
  • - 1
 Ugly but interesting. Hey wait a minute... 160 mm and 66.5 HA are, IMHO, oxymoronic. Or for brevity's sake, moronic.
  • + 5
 Edit: sorry, didn't see it's a 29er. 66.5 head angle is just right then. My fault.
  • - 1
 you'd think more than one brand using the same suspension design would make it cheaper, but nope.
  • + 1
 Woof....
  • + 0
 OMG this is digusting...
  • + 0
 ewww
  • + 0
 It looks like an e-bike.
  • + 0
 Spew bag!!
  • + 0
 I'll sit this one out
  • - 1
 That colour scheme really reminded me of a Devinci
  • + 0
 Looks like an...e-bike?
  • + 0
 ^beat me to it
  • - 3
 still ugly
  • - 3
 is that not polygon ???
  • + 4
 Polygon owns Marin, and both companies have suspension designed by Naild.
  • - 3
 Deleted Photo>
  • + 2
 The photoset is loaded now, refresh the page.
  • - 2
 Looks like a e-bike
  • - 2
 Looks like an E-bike...
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