Mark Weir Hospitalized Following 'Widow Maker' Heart Scare

Dec 3, 2018
by James Smurthwaite  
Mountain bike legend Mark Weir has survived a serious heart health scare and is recovering in hospital. Weir posted the news on Instagram four days ago, saying that his left, main artery had become 99 per cent blocked by plaque. A blockage of the left anterior descending artery has gained the moniker "widow maker" due to the high risk of death it causes.

bigquotesThey said I am lucky to be alive. Just thought I would share, just cause you are fit does not mean you are immune. I feel lucky to look in my son's eyes and grab my wife's hand as she walks by. Knowing I'll never be what I used to be but I'll be the best I can be today and maybe a little better than I was yesterday.Mark Weir


The left, main artery is crucial for supplying blood to the heart. If it becomes blocked, the heart muscles will start to die and it can induce a serious heart attack. A widow maker heart attack can kill within minutes if not treated.

The full prognosis of Weir's condition is not yet known but other pictures he has posted show that he does not currently need any assistance and that his short-term goal is to "go home". At this point, it is also unclear how much damage Weir's heart has suffered or the extent to which he will be able to continue riding however just surviving such a health scare is unusual and welcome news.

The scare happened despite Mark's healthy lifestyle and serves as a reminder of how crucial it is to be aware of your heart health. Mark said he had been feeling chest pains for the past six weeks before being admitted to hospital. If you feel chest pains, tightness of the chest or a shortness of breath that can be accompanied by sweating or nausea, especially after exercise, then consult your doctor as soon as possible.

Mark's full statement: “They call it the widow maker. Had chest pains for about 6 weeks. Never thought it could be me. Healthy and good numbers on blood pressure and cholesterol. Well I have a propensity to build plaque. My left main was 99% blocked. They said I am lucky to be alive. Just thought I would share, just cause you are fit does not mean you are immune. I feel lucky to look in my son's eyes and grab my wife’s hands as she walks by. Knowing I’ll never be what I use to be but I’ll be the best I can be today and maybe just a little better then I was yesterday.”

Our thoughts are with Mark and his family and we hope to see him back on his feet as soon as possible.


128 Comments

  • + 90
 Get healthy. Health and family first. The rest can wait. Godspeed.
  • + 53
 If this can happen to someone with his level of fitness, it can happen to any of us. Live your lives to the fullest people. Wishing you a speedy recovery Mark.
  • + 6
 Churchill said: "No sport, please..." and he lived over 90 years as far I know... Wink
  • + 13
 @zokinjo: yeah, but he counterbalanced that with a ton of scotch. #genius
  • - 38
flag pancakeflatted (Dec 3, 2018 at 16:37) (Below Threshold)
 This is one of the reasons for using an electric bike. You still get a workout (though not so damn intense) and you still get to live your life to the fullest as @metaam says. For people over the age of 45...it's worth serious consideration.
  • + 7
 @powderturns: don't forget the cigars. He was pickled and smoked like a good ham, no wonder he lasted so long.
  • + 4
 @pancakeflatted: i don't see the correlation. He has a genetic disposition to build up plaque in his arteries. How would a less "intense" workout affect that?
  • + 1
 @zokinjo:
That's how Churchill is always quoted - actually in his younger years he was an absolute sports crack.
  • + 6
 People get their Cholesterol checked. We know about HDL and LDL. What a lot of people dont know is that people like me and maybe Mark have a greater genetic chance of having naturally higher Lipoprotein(A) levels. The next time anyone reading this has a cholesterol test done or just a regular check up do a blood draw at a lab, have your doctor test your blood and check your Lipoprotein(a). It could save your life! Cheers Mark, get better!
  • + 1
 damn, now I am scared. Chest pains for 6 weeks though, those are signals you are supposed to take action on.
  • - 4
flag pancakeflatted (Dec 5, 2018 at 4:15) (Below Threshold)
 This sort of arterial plaque buildup is usually undetectable. That’s why it’s called the widow maker. So my point is that lots of men over 40 have this problem and are unaware. Heavy aerobic exercise can cause a piece of this plaque to break off and bang, you’re dead. That’s why the electric bike.

People often have a bad reaction to e bikes but sudden myocardial infarction due to either arterial plaque buildup or overexertion (or lack of fitness) is real.

So that’s the connection.

@motosinko805:
  • + 1
 @pancakeflatted: No thanks. I'll take my chances. Thinking I'm too old and better go buy an ebike, that's a way too slippery slope.
  • + 33
 At last, I can say I have something in common with Mark Weir as an almost member of the "gee he seemed so healthy, on his bike all the time and then he keeled over dead..." club.

Being a cyclist literally saved my life, because when my low horsepower motor was running even weaker than usual, for three rides in a row, I decided to see my doctor. Fifteen seconds on a treadmill and the doctor said "get off!" as he was reaching for the phone to call the cardiologist. I ended up getting married Saturday, getting a stent Tuesday and was back on my bike on Friday. Ever since, my personal soapbox has been to preach to other middle aged riders-pay attention!!!
  • + 1
 Yeah it's amazing that this can happen to someone that you think is supper health. They say a lot of it is hereditary and you can't really do anything about it. You think your healthy, doing things right, etc. and then you get hit. I colleague of mine, someone I look to for cycling training advice, had the same thing happen to him...and this guy is a Ironman Tri-Athlete. He's 50+ but such a beast, and apparently just has a propensity for this condition. Just makes you think a about what you're doing, what you can do, and what you should do to be even more healthy...
  • + 14
 So scary!! I had the same things happen to me last february... at age 43 I had one artery was blocked at 90% and my main left artery was blocked at 99%... lucky i was able to get to an ER in time! I had suffered a heart attack the week before during a winter fatbike race but nerve realized that's what it was... but the second time I made the right choice... there is just no way of knowing....
  • + 8
 I'm glad you're ok clalonde!

All of this is troubling... Is there a way to find out if our arteries are becoming blocked?

Mark mentioned that his cholesterol and blood pressure was good. So do we simply wait for chest pains and/or an actual heart attack to find out?

I have a neighbour who had a heart attack last fall. Women tend to have different symptoms...She had strange pains in her hand/thumb that came on suddenly. Luckily she made it to the hospital in time. I would have tried to ignore it, self medicated with Advil and probably gone to bed.
  • + 3
 @srh2: yes, they are a dozen ways or more to test for this. The big thing is to stay engaged with your own health, get your exams on schedule/on time and if it seems "wrong" or you're outa sorts talk with your Dr.

My dad ended up with a 5 vessel bypass and waited so long to "not bother" anyone that he died twice once he got into the hospital as they were scheduling his surgery (was initially a 4 vessel job, found the 5th when they had him cracked).

And to address some pseudo "scientist" above ~ there is a ton of scientific research to support genetic predisposition to specific diseases and conditions. If you have questions seek out a medical doctor and not a self-appointed authority on the genome and disease, monsanto or the Illuminati ....
  • + 4
 @tipsword: my dad had something similar happen - he had a silent heart attack despite being in otherwise very good health. was relatively mild so he ignored it for days, thinking it was flu or a cold or something. ended up needing a pacemaker as a result of ignoring it for so long but has lived in good, if not great health for over 20 years since then.
Would be nice if there were some economical and reliable way to scan our arteries every decade or so...
  • + 4
 As someone getting close to that age.....what were some of the symptoms you had on the first and second one?...Thanks
  • + 8
 @srh2: the first symptoms i had were chest pain and burning in my lungs at the branches level... almost like heart burn... but thought it was due to some time spent in a pig farm for a photoshoot i did early february. when i was really pushing on the bike i could feel the burn coming on and it would disappear when i slacked a bit. during the race on Feb18th i had major chest pain, pain in my jaw, pain in my left forearm and left elbow and also some numbness in the fingers... but i kept pushing!! at the ed of the race i felt like i was overheating and like i was going to pass out!! agin no clue it was the heart.. afterwards when simply walking i was getting the burning in the lungs again! during a trip to las vegas i woke up with major chest pain and again felt like i was going to pass out with over heating, pain in arm, numbness, jaw pain, etc... that time i rushed to the ER after talking to a friend who was also a doctor and then found out i was having a heart attack!! they had to rush me to the operatic table to unblock things after a heart stress test and realizing I was about to have full on heart failure... scariest moment in my life... when they said; " if you need to speak to someone, now would be the time..." took a few months after that but now my heart is stronger than its ever been and my riding is better and stronger than it ever has!!! could be due to the fact that my heart had created new arteries to feed itself while the blockages were taking place... Pretty crazy!! the only way of knowing is to go for a heart stress test... which i highly recommend if you are very active and in your 40s... you just never know....
  • + 5
 @clalonde: my guess is premature Coronary artery disease runs in your family. I’m guessing in mark’s case too. Blood relatives under 65 having a heart attack, or known blockages. It’s amazing how significant this risk factor is. I work in a cardiac cath lab, and see “healthy young” people, with no other risk factors other than genetics come through with heart attacks all the time. Cholesterol normal, and good blood pressure, etc.
Anyone who has parents or siblings with heart disease at a young age need to get screened properly, and treated properly, even if their cholesterol is “normal”.
Savebc.ca is worth checking out for anyone with “bad genetics”
  • + 2
 @powderturns: I'm glad to hear your father has had good time and a good life Smile I miss my dad every day and we're going into the first holiday season without the cantankerous old character & it's not going to be the same.

I'm very glad to have videotaped him at last years thanksgiving playing cards against humanity (think George Carlin/Archie Bunker) for the first time, it was epic.

I wish your dad another great 20 years at least!
  • + 2
 @clalonde: Thank you for sharing that, I for one am super glad you're okay and it all worked out.
  • + 1
 @patrickbatemanworldtour89: thank you!! i'm happy it all worked out for the best!! My riding buddies now all say ... whatever they did to you can we have it done too!! ...to me that is a compliment to where I am now in my riding and after such a short time after a life changing event!! i'm back with the physic i had wen i was 19 and way stronger than ever!!
  • + 1
 Bad genetics is not a great excuse for heart attacks. It's more diet related, too much cheese and meat, not enough fruit and vegetables. The plaque actually resembles hardened cheese when found in the intestines. Angina in the intestines mirrors what happens in the heart.

jonbarron.org/article/death-begins-colon
  • + 9
 My father in law (and the guy who got me into MTB) had this same heart attack while out building trail and thankfully also survived and has been able to get back on the bike. I have since seen a bunch of anecdotes of otherwise very healthy people suffering the same. It would be interesting to find a common thread on what causes this type of event. Good luck to Mark in the recovery process.
  • + 5
 The common thread with heart attacks is that there isn't one. Certainly there are factors that can increase the likelihood like age, genetics, smoking etc, but heart failure is the number one killer globablly because it can affect anyone at anytime, regardless of other factors. Sleep well!
  • + 7
 The say the number 1 symptom of heart disease is sudden death...
  • + 9
 Foods that cause plaque build up in the arteries. healthguides.healthgrades.com/taking-cholesterol-seriously/foods-that-cause-plaque-buildup-in-the-arteries

I dont know what his diet is, but genetics play a big roll as well. So you can eat healthy and get tons of exercise and still die young thanks to Grandpa Otis. Thanks gramps.
  • - 10
flag WAKIdesigns (Dec 3, 2018 at 11:45) (Below Threshold)
 @Boardlife69: I cannot open the article. But cholesterol nutrition science just like cancer nutrition science is full of shennenigans. Recently some doctors claim that it is about combination of foods. You can have as much bacon with eggs as you want as long as you don’t combine them in the same meal with refined carbs and God forbid alcohol.

But if we were to be trendy about it, then off course the only diet that makes you survive in 21st misogynistic century is keto vego, everything else is just as bad for you as drinking mercury. Red meat and corn fructose syrup will kill you instantly. The idea that certain people have certain predispositions to certain diseases is a hoax, a plot of Monsanto sponsored establishment.
  • - 19
flag colincolin (Dec 3, 2018 at 11:50) (Below Threshold)
 @WAKIdesigns: I'm on the vegan carnivore diet. I only eat p***y. What are my chances on getting CHD?
  • + 13
 @colincolin: yeah they say fish oil is good for you
  • + 6
 I don't want to make any assumptions about Mark's diet, but he strikes me as a dude who works hard and eats meat. It would be interesting to know what his diet was like.
  • + 14
 @WAKIdesigns: Interesting assertion based on your years of genetic/generational blind studies across ethnicities / geographic regions and cultures I presume? It's got to be a tremendous burden being the big brain in the room at parties.
  • + 3
 @Boardlife69: This is NOT accurate info on how to decrease plaque build up. Please don't post info here that you just pulled from the internet. Thank you
  • + 9
 @mtbjuky: I dunno, this article would seem to agree: www.nytimes.com/2018/05/18/well/live/plaques-heart-attack-diet-exercise-smoking-eat-stress.html looks like going vegetarian, quitting smoking, and Statins all help.
  • + 2
 @tipsword: waki aka Sheldon Cooper
  • - 3
 @tipsword: Nah I just imsterted what I heard on Joe Rogan and read on Rhonda Patrick blog as well as on Barbell medicine. But offf course they know nothing since keto vegan is the only way to go and has all unbiased researched with blind tests on its side. Health supremacy front strikes again!

@PHeller, I hate to say it, but I wonder how does a healthy and ethical nutrition nerd deal with a situation when he or she gets a heart attack or cancer... you won’t tell me it is impossible isn’t it? ...

“Of all the wonders that I yet have heard.
It seems to me most strange that men should fear;
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will come.”
  • + 5
 @mtbjuky: The article was about the foods that "can" "build" up plaque. Nowhere did I say anything about "decreasing" anything. I then followed about the importance of your genetic makeup being a contributer. Sorry if you misread that. Dont see how though.
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: It is possible to be a complete health nut with diet and excersie and still die young from cancer or a heart attack or whatever. This human body is still a big mystery even to science. No, we haven't completly figured it out yet so "scientific fact" is really still a therory. If we did know everything all of us would live to 120 years old. But I do believe its close to 85% genetics, 15% lifestyle. I do work at a private clinic so this is in my field. Not just keyboard warrioring here....is a warrioring a word?
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: nobody understands sarcasm...even with years of plotted history,its like you showed up today for the very first time.
  • + 2
 @Boardlife69: Our servers have detected that you are accessing this site from a country that is a member of the European Union. This content is not available in your region. hi article 13.., come on man
  • + 1
 @robdpzero: Schwexit since 1291. No satanic* human trafficking pedophile* unelected E.U bureacrats tell us what to do.
*more true than you know.
  • + 1
 @robdpzero: or just google it and see what pre approved info the E.U wants you to see.
  • + 1
 @Boardlife69: nah Sorry, Nothing against you, I am just amused with I know the best diet dick swinging.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: The best diet does not exist because every "body" has different needs. The best way to find out the best diet for you is to go see an orthomolecular practioner and get your blood checked. They do a more indepth anaylisis and can tell you excatly what you need and what you dont. We use it a lot at my clinic, with great results that I see first hand. We just rebrand orthomolecular medicine and sell it to the ultra wealthy.
  • + 1
 @Boardlife69: How much does such blood test cost at your place? The ridiculous thing is, in Sweden a full blood test can cost anywhere between 150 and 300€. In Poland an even more thorough blood test at a private clinic costs 50-80€... as you can see I don't get tested too often these days...
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: If you have to ask you cant afford it. But seriously, check out a OM practitioner and check it out. Its not the same blood test that your doctor would give you.
  • + 2
 @Boardlife69: give me a number of zeros
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: six zeros a week. Average stay per client is three months. Some shorter, some longer. Writing a check for several mil without blinking an eye, priceless. Our clients live in different reality then the rest of us. But orthomolecular medicince is available to the masses at affordable prices. Its not the only thing we do, but it is sort of our backbone if you will.
  • + 1
 @Boardlife69: all this to get your blood checked while you are quite probably not that fit and your lifestyle isn’t the healthiest? Interesting...
  • + 1
 @Boardlife69: maybe you could do a pdf of the page and email it to me?
  • + 6
 Scary to read about all the healthy people having heart attack’s in this thread and article. I guess it’s part of the human condition mixed with industrial disease.

Always remember to hug you kids and never skip out on a ride
  • + 2
 Your last sentence... well, for parents of small kids, these two come in conflict quite often
  • + 1
 I wonder if the way "healthy people" eat long term it affects... I mean it would this plaque grown anyway if Mark wouk be vegan? Just asking for reflection of us all and avoid more cases like this with such model people. Maybe we all have been lied regarding what we post to eat...
  • + 4
 My father died under similar circumstances. He survived a heart attack, despite "his numbers" looking good. Got a stent put in. Stent (or blood clot) moved. Not so lucky the second time around.

Despite low cholesterol and other health heart numbers, are bodies and especially arteries aren't very good at getting rid of a lifetime worth of junk.Once it's in, it stays in, and bounces around until it hit something crucial.
  • + 1
 If numbers were to be the absolute determining factor, both me and my dad should have been 6ft under ground. I have high cholesterol, my numbers sky rocket after alcohol, to the point where I took a test 2 days after a big party and the doctor said I need to go to the hospita for further examinationl because this is really dangerous. Next week did th test again and th numbers were only slightly above average. Went on a pretty much vegan diet for two months, got the test done again. No alcohol this time. Results pretty much unchanged... back to “regular” diet, two months later test again, no significant change... yes if someone doesn’t exercise much and eat loads of mixed with together, flushing it with alcohol, beer in particular, the odds are higher. But some people are just more or less lucky.
  • + 0
 Interesting about alcohol... always good info no matter how you get downvoted Waki.

Steer clear of statins as well, as even the drug companies don't know how they work: www.statinnation.net/blog/2016/5/28/creating-the-high-cholesterol-myth-why-your-cholesterol-level-is-normal-and-not-high

More good info: www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2015/cholesterol-myths.html

Then of course, just steer clear of sugar. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5793267
  • + 1
 @Thustlewhumber: it's not only about alcohol, but for quite many people, beer in particular (not due to alcohol level but due to glycemic index, so sorry light beer is as good for your health as diet coke) is possibly the most efficient conveyor belt of whatever you have in your belly into fat tissue and sometimes plaque.

But what can I know... I only listen to guests of Joe Rogans podcast (some of them are off for sure but can they all be? If Rhonda Patrick is super legit and then Steven Tyler wants us to use crystals for happyness does that mean JRE is full of sht?) and since I periodize my diet I know what works on me. Fake Facts.
  • + 1
 Good info here. Finally
  • + 1
 @Thustlewhumber: Good info! Thx
  • + 4
 Once you get past the title of the podcast (not trying to start a "diet war"), about mid-way through this podcast Dr. Joel Kahn makes some interesting points about cholesterol and the heart. I never knew about Lipoprotein A and the cheap test for it, but how testing positive for that could be an indicator of plaque build up despite fitness and other healthy cholesterol levels. www.richroll.com/podcast/joel-kahn-349 (...and another good episode with Dr. Kim Williams regarding heart health www.richroll.com/podcast/kim-williams)
  • + 3
 Interesting, but not necessarily relevant. I had great blood pressure, low cholesterol and a resting pulse in the 50s and still almost died from the same thing as Mark.
  • + 1
 @codypup: Damn, glad you're ok. I'm in the same boat, aside from not yet having a heart attack. According to leading cardiologists LPA is not part of the standard lipid test, so a healthy HDL and LDL cholesterol, healthy blood pressure, and low resting pulse are not indicative of the genetic LPA, which is attributed to plaque build up. I'm not a doctor or in health care and still learning about this stuff since going to a plant based diet in the last year. At 35 w/ 2 little kids I've started getting somewhat paranoid about my history, hard partying and shitty eating. I'm planning on requesting an LPA test as part of my next lipid panel, since my insurance does cover it and I grew up eating tons of processed meats, cheeses, etc. Another one to look into is the CACS test, www.mycdi.com/viewpoints/coronary_artery_calcium_scoring_cacs_warns_of_heart_disease_risk_76
  • + 4
 I would highly recommend that anyone and everyone get a Cardiac CT Scan. Not all insurances cover it but it's the only way to actually see if you have plaque in your arteries. It's simple and painless. www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/cardiac-ct-scan
  • + 3
 Don’t do it!!! CCTA is good for ruling out coronary artery disease (minimal false negatives), but has almost a 50% false-positive rate. Leading you down an unnecessary path toward invasive diagnostics.
  • - 1
 @kerfed: WRONG! I had a CT scan and it saved my life. Please don't post medical advise you know nothing about. Thank you
  • + 3
 @mtbjuky: was yours a random CT scan, or did you go in to Doctor/hospital with Cardiac symptoms? Like my post says - It's good for ruling out CAD for someone who presents with cardiac symptoms (angina, shortness of breath, etc). In that case, if it's positive, it's more justified to send you for an invasive angiogram (which is my job, what I do every day).
As a "random" check to see if you have CAD, like eddymack suggests, it's excessively risky. too many false positives, not to mention radiation exposure equivalent to roughly 600 chest X-rays!
Read some research articles, and find out some evidence to support your insults about my knowledge.
  • + 1
 Also get a lipid panel done on your blood.
  • + 3
 I had that happen to me a couple of years ago. Caught it a bit earlier. 90% blockage at the same spot. I was 42 at the time. Laying in recovery with a few others a lot older than me and the surgeon came in and called me the lucky one. Wow. Interesting part was that he came back again with a picture of a heart to show where the stent was put in/ blockage and pointed out that my heart had actually created its own bypass of sorts. A different artery from the back compensated for the lack of blood coming from the LAD and created another branch that wrapped around and was feeding from below. Hopefully Mark you will end up like me and be cleared for activities shortly because I didn't actually damage any tissue? The blood thinners they had me on for a year were crazy though. Massive bruises without even doing anything. I only felt the angina a few times before getting it checked out and was only at the start of rides when climbing. Not like the movies for me. Just felt like sore chest muscles from working out the day before. Second time I passed it off as camelback straps cutting off circulation all of a sudden. But could feel it in the inside of the arms to the elbow as well that time. Lol. Positive note. I was really handicapping myself for a few years. Amazing. How much easier climbing was after I actually had a full functioning heart.
  • + 3
 One of my fittest friends suddenly died in his sleep from this at age 48 earlier this year. Guy was a multi-sport athlete, followed an excellent diet and workout regimen, and didn't have an ounce of fat on him. Doctors actually missed his congenital affinity to develop plaque in checkups because he appeared too healthy to need closer examination. Left behind a wife, kids, friends, teams, businesses, lakeside home. A bunch of us got our hearts checked out after that and I'll always stay on top of it despite being quite fit.
  • + 4
 Something Im not seeing mentioned much here is diet. Arguably equal or maybe more important than exercise. Prevent and Reverse heart disease is a good book to read if anyone is interested in the topic.
  • + 1
 I had a great diet and exercised religiously but still had a heart attack. I'm afraid those two are no match for crappy genetics. Totally agree it can help some people but they are in the Rim Hortons drive through line up in their cars right now and not reading pinkbike!
  • + 2
 The scare happened despite Mark's healthy lifestyle and serves as a reminder of how crucial it is to be aware of your heart health. There's no point to this statement with any actionable steps to be truly aware of your heart health.
  • + 2
 One of the heads of the style of martial arts I used to practice had a big heart attack despite being incredibly fit, working out all the time, etc. He had a terrible diet though, even if he appeared fit. It is a good reminder that fitness is more than just how you look on the outside, and everyone should get regular doctor check ups. Now I just need to start doing those things myself.....
  • + 1
 I went to the ER yesterday shortly after a 3 hour ride. Had been experiencing chest pains on and off for a few weeks, and yesterday, it felt way worse. The great thing about chest pain is that when you walk into ER, you get pushed to the front of the line. The bad thing is you can count on a hefty blood test and EKG. The best news is that I'm fine, and it was likely a weird case of gas, which can cause pain similar to a heart attack. I'm happy I went to ER and got a solid check-up. Wondering what was causing the chest pains was making me a little crazy. Oh the joys of getting old. Get well soon Mark. Hope you'll be feeling better soon.
  • + 2
 Wow! That could have been the end of him. I guess his super-super human status is now just super human status. Glad his spirits are up. Betting on a fabulous recovery for him.
  • + 5
 Be safe Mark and keep being a bad ass!! Wish you the best buddy!!
  • + 1
 Get well soon Mark. If you do the right things, and I bet you will, you will likely get a lot of your horsepower back. Folks with MIs loose some power from lost heart tissue/scar, but I've seen those who stay active gain much of it back. Keep moving.
  • + 1
 There is a risk assessment calculator here in USA – it is a Framingham study –

clincalc.com/Cardiology/ASCVD/PooledCohort.aspx

Basically asking about your cholesterol level blood pressure diabetes status and smoking status

If anybody's interested this is the British risk calculator for heart disease in 10 years
similar to US one but except it is quite a bit more extensive in his questions ask
qrisk.org/three/index.php


Especially important is inquiring about – inflammatory status – such as having lupus or rheumatoid arthritis – family history even erectile dysfunction as a risk for heart disease
when I find telling is also how ethnicity counts into this – if you happen to know your blood pressure and lipid plug your numbers in include your height weight and if you're with your family status and then
check your status with your African Caribbean versus Caucasian versus somebody of East Indian background

one risk that could be counted – though not sure how to quantify this – is excessive exercising as this with increase whole body inflammation a bit more something that I'm guilty of increasing weekends
  • + 1
 If anybody is interested

there is a 10 year risk calculator used in USA – from the Framingham study

clincalc.com/Cardiology/ASCVD/PooledCohort.aspx

basically inquires about your lipid profile blood pressure status diabetes and smoking status

In Britain
this is used I imagine

qrisk.org/three/index.php

but notice it ask quite a bit more questions regarding mental illness the Erectilel dysfunction status family history your height weight corticosteroid use – your height and weight –
quite a bit more questions in the USA version

somewhat interesting is is calculating cardiac risk for different ethnicities such as having South Asian ancestery versus Caucasian versus Caribbean Black--


One marker I believe that is not included in either is whether not a person excessively exercise – something we all kind of do here on pink bike. I believe excessive workouts can cause whole bodily information to go up a bit. I'm not talking about moderate exercise on talk about pushing that extra gear going bit faster than before to the point of excessive exhaustion and then coming back down the hill shredding up your muscles along the way.
  • + 1
 Wishing the best for Mark and his family. I also think it's important to point out that diet has a major role in the incidence of heart disease, which is the most deadly disease in the US. The role of genetics in heart disease is not fully understood, but multiple studies (including one at Harvard) have conclusively shown that decreasing or eliminating the consumption of animal products greatly reduces the risk of heart disease. One can be an extremely fit athlete, but that doesn't change the effects of animal products on the body. It is a simple fact that meat, dairy, and eggs directly contribute to the buildup of plaque, along with other diseases like cancer. I know it's easy to dismiss this information because animal products are such traditional staples in our diet, but it's imperative that we give this further consideration. The healthiest populations in the world are found in Asia and Africa, where the consumption of animal products is minimal. Interestingly, Seventh Day Adventists in the US (who don't eat meat) have the lowest rates of heart disease in the US. Some of the most successful endurance, sprint, and strength athletes are also plant-based. Give it some thought; it might save your life.

More information:
www.virtua.org/articles/prevent-and-reverse-heart-disease-with-a-plant-based-diet
www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/the-right-plant-based-diet-for-you
nutritionfacts.org/video/how-not-to-die-from-heart-disease

Documentary about plant-based athletes:
gamechangersmovie.com
  • + 1
 This is surreal. I'm 48 and had a heart attack this summer after doing the NIMBY 50 and the Spakwus. I was training for the High Cascades 100. I'm no Nino but I'm in pretty good shape. While out for a run in the morning I started getting indigestion and thought nothing of it. Got on a plane and went to Calgary for a work trip. Throughout the day I developed back pain, jaw pain and eventually flu loke symptoms. I googled it a full 12 hours after it started and decided to go to hospital. Never had any chest pain. Five stents and loads of drugs later I'm good. Not all heart attacks involve chest pain. Get well my man and you'll be back riding in no time!
  • + 1
 1. Happy to hear you have identified the problem and are taking steps / have the support to get help.

2. (And this is more a PSA for the rest of us) if you are experiencing chest pain for any amount of time, get your a$$ into a doctor. Do NOT wait six bloody weeks experiencing chest pain before doing something about it. Bloody amazing to be alive.
  • + 1
 Hang in there, Mark.

I suffered my first heart attack (MI) at age 33. Didn't feel well for a few days and told myself to HTFU. Saw a few docs after and as others have said, described it as heartburn. Six weeks later I keeled over from the cardiac arrest.

I was fit at the time and leading a fairly healthy lifestyle. In my case it was all genetics.

The physical recovery is easy. It's the mental aspect of it that is the worst. The body says "GO!" the brain says "NO!".

Don't mess around! If something doesn't feel right go get checked out! Advocate for yourself as no one else will.
  • + 1
 Get well and good health to Mark and riders alike. Seems like lots if my buddies have ahd heart ussues lately, my self included. Is there a correlation with riders and heart problems? Will it be carbon hearts for us in the future?
  • + 3
 I think heart disease is also hereditary, so he could have done everything right ate well, exercised etc. but still got heart disease because he's just abnormally prone to it
  • + 1
 I saw this on his IG feed and immediately booked a physical with my doc. If it can happen to a guy like MW it can certainly happen to a weekend warrior like me. Get well soon man!
  • + 2
 Tree limbs, bad heart..... this guy is unkillable. Lets get get him on a train and crash it..... 10:1, he walks out & starts bench pressing paint cans.
  • + 4
 Protected by that glorious stache
  • + 4
 Glad you caught it. Hope to see you back at it.
  • + 3
 Vegan as Ph-uck. Get busy living! or Get busy dying? Heal up for good Mark.
  • + 1
 Anyone who is over 30 and concerned, see your doctor, have them order a calcium score test..... i just went and requested one fter seeing this and talking to my doc.
  • + 3
 Mark, wishing you a fast and full recovery!
  • + 1
 It is strange since he rides so much. I really wonder how healthy his diet is and if he was eating a lot of higher fat and cholesterol foods.
  • + 3
 A nice chap. Hope he's back riding soon.
  • + 1
 Thanks for sharing Mark. Super scary. A good reminder there are more important things in the world than this beautiful vacuous hole of biking. All the best on your recovery!
  • + 3
 YIKES! reality check for us ALL. Godspeed, Mark!
  • + 1
 Had the pleasure of meeting Mark earlier this year. A really great guy. I am glad for him and his family that he caught this in time.
  • + 2
 Heal up, man, glad you caught it. You'll be back on the bike in no time, just don't overdo it!
  • + 3
 Get well Mark you freaky legend.
  • + 2
 Always look up to mark as the kind of mountain biker I'd like to be, an absolute boss. Get well soon mr weir!
  • + 1
 LAD blockage killed my father, an avid roadie and overall great man. Don't take this second chance lightly.
  • + 1
 If I had chest pains for 6 minutes id be driving myself in. Im such a hypo. Dont ignore those!
  • + 1
 Same guy who had a tree limb fall on him and fracture his pelvis! Weir is near indestructible.
  • + 1
 Yikes. I'm a good deal Mark's senior in the age department. The lesson here is, "listen to your body".
  • + 1
 Get well soon, Mark! No more Red Horse Beer for now Smile Heal well and family first.
  • + 1
 No mention of Paul Sherwen yet? Sounds like the same spider jumped up and bit him too.
  • + 2
 Thank you for sharing Mark, heal well
  • + 2
 Switch to vodka and drink nettle tea
  • + 1
 scary stuff, just found out my wife has an 8 cm cyst on her right kidney. glad it isn't cancer. heal up mark!
  • + 1
 When I grow up, I want to be like Mark! But not the heart attack thing, just the cool guy thing...
  • + 1
 Calcified plaque scans are an easy test to scope out artery health.
  • + 1
 Happy/Glad your still with us, hope you up quick
  • + 2
 Get well soon.
  • + 1
 Wow. This has given me a lot to think about. Heal up, Mark!
  • + 1
 Get well boy!
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