Martin Maes Tests Positive for Masking Agent at EWS Rotorua & Tasmania, Receives 90 Day ‘Non-Intentional’ Suspension

Jun 26, 2019
by James Smurthwaite  
Martin Maes calm and collected before the start

Current Enduro World Series leader, Martin Maes, has failed anti-doping tests in Rotorua (March 24th) and Tasmania (March 31st).

Maes returned an Adverse Analytical Finding for Probenecid, a masking agent prohibited by WADA. Probenecid is named under S5 of the WADA list as a Diuretic and Masking Agent; it is a specified substance, which means that it can be ingested accidentally and in some cases can result in a more lenient sanction. Maes apparently took the drug on the advice of doctors to help him recover from a cut he sustained on his leg at the NZ Enduro (March 7th-10th).


Dr Tom Jerram, who prescribed the drug to help boost the effects of antibiotics, described the wound as “life or limb threatening”. Both Martin and his team manager Mark Maurissen inquired if the drug was banned but there was apparently no phone signal to check.

As the Probenecid was prescribed by a trained doctor, the GT team applied to the UCI for a TUE (Theraputic Use Exemption), which allows athletes to take prohibited substances without punishment if they have a medical need. The UCI denied this request on June 1, after the failed tests, but they did accept that the drug would not have enhanced his performance and was administered by a doctor so handed down a more lenient punishment than the maximum possible two year ban.

Maes was tested again in Madeira (May 12th) where he returned a negative. The UCI have imposed a 90 day suspension starting from the weekend after Madeira that will end the weekend of the Whistler EWS. He will be stripped of his wins from Tasmania and Rotorua but will be able to keep his result from Madeira. He will not be eligible to race the Whistler EWS.

UCI statement on Martin Maes
Jun 26, 2019

The Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) announces that the Belgian rider Martin Maes has been suspended for a period of 90 days for a non-intentional Anti-Doping Rule Violation (ADRV).

The affair concerns an ADRV for the presence of the prohibited substance Probenecid* in samples collected in-competition on 24 and 31 March 2019.

As per the World Anti-Doping Code (WADC) and the UCI Anti-Doping Rules (ADR), the sanction began on 13 May 2019.

Moreover, the results obtained by the rider in rounds 1 and 2 of the Enduro World Series have been annulled. This is not the case however for round 3, where he tested negative.

The case has been resolved via an acceptance of consequences as provided for by the WADC and the UCI ADR.

The UCI will not comment any further.

* Probenecid is classified in the category “Diuretics and Masking Agents” and considered a specified substance as per the World Anti-Doping Prohibited List.

Martin Maes' doctor, who provided him with the probenecid at the NZ Enduro had the following statement:

bigquotesI am a Specialist Emergency Physician, and have been practising Emergency Medicine for over 15 years. On March 8th -10th 2019, I was acting in a voluntary role as a event doctor on the New Zealand Enduro, a backcountry mountain bike race in Marlborough, New Zealand.

On the afternoon of March 8th 2019, I was reviewing and treating a number of riders who had been injured in the day’s racing. Mark Maurissen approached me, and asked me to review Martin Maes, who had sustained a significant laceration to his right pretibial area (lower leg) during the day’s racing. Martin had sustained an approximately 5 centimeter long vertically orientated burst type laceration to his lower leg. There was significant soft tissue damage, and the wound was grossly contaminated (conditions were particularly muddy that day) I irrigated and debrided the wound extensively, applied a topical antiseptic solution, and sutured the skin using 4 x interrupted sutures. I was concered about a significant risk of infection given the wound location, tissue damage, and initial contamination. At that point I dispensed a course of flucloxacillin (an antibiotic) in a standard dose (500 milligrams 4 times a day for 3 days with a goal of preventing infection). I gave Martin standard wound care advice, and planned to follow him up in 2 days

On March 10th 2019 at around 10 am, I reviewed Martin’s wound. At that point, he had a clearly established serious infection surrounding the wound, despite the prophylactic antibiotics. This infection had developed over the last 24 hours. I removed 2 of the sutures, draining a small amount of pus, and irrigated and further debrided the wound. A higher dose of antibiotic was clearly indicated, as the infection was significant enough be life or limb threating if left unchecked. My standard practice in a case like this is to give a higher dose of flucloxacillin in combination with a medicine called probenicid. In this case, probenicid acts to reduce the excretion of penicillin type antibiotics from the kidneys, thus boosting the blood levels of antibiotic. These higher levels of antibiotic are particularly important for treating serious infection, and I do not believe Martins infection would have resolved without them. The only other option would have been hospitalisation for intravenous antibiotics, which carries its own set of risks and costs, and would not necessarily be more effective than adding probenicid.

I provided Martin with a prescription for 2 grams of flucloxacillin 3 times a day for the next 2 days (dropping to 1 gram 3 times a day for a further 5 days), and probenicid 500 milligrams 3 times a day for 7 days. I discussed all of this with Dr Julian Balance, an Orthopaedic Surgeon also volunteering as a race doctor. He agreed with the management plan as above.

Both Martin and Mark asked if the medications I were permissible for racing. I informed them that probenicid has no performance enhancing effects, and as far as I was aware was not a prohibited substance for racing. I checked this with Dr Balance, as well as Dr Sam Grummitt (another of the race doctors), neither of whom were aware that probenicid was a prohibited substance. There was no cellular data coverage at the event to enable us to check this. Martin began vomiting that afternoon, likely as a result of the higher doses of flucloxacillin, which often cause significant gastrointestinal upset. At that point we discussed referring him to hospital, and elected to give him a trial of an anti-vomiting drug prior to this. I dispensed 4 milligrans of ondansetron, which settled his vomiting, and enabled him to take the prescribed antibiotics.

I understand Martin made a good recovery, and was able to race 2 weeks later. I also understand that Martin returned a positive urine drug test for probenicid at that event. I have subsequently learned that probenicid is on the UCI prohibited substances list, and has previously been used as a masking agent, although it has no performance enhancing effects.

The probenicid I prescribed Martin was clearly medically indicated and I would do so again given the same clinical scenario. I believe he would have experienced a significant impairment to health had I not prescribed it, with the potantial for life threatening spread of infection. Had I known it was a prohibited substance, I would have been happy to fill in a therapeutic exemption form. I am confident that there was no performance enhancing benefit from the prescription, and in fact the severity of the infection was likely to have been detrimental to his performance in the next few weeks
Dr Tom Jerram

Maes is now the third rider to fail a drug test in the EWS after Richie Rude and Jared Graves tested positive in November. Richie Rude was judged to have ingested Higenamine and Oxilofrine accidentally and has now returned to racing after an 8 month ban. We are still awaiting official confirmation on Jared Graves' ruling for the same two substances. Martin was tested at the same time as Jared and Richie in Olargues but did not return a positive result.

GT statement on Martin Maes
Jun 26, 2019

On May 21, 2019, GT Factory Racing athlete Martin Maes was notified by the Cycling Anti- doping Federation (CADF) of an Adverse Analytical Finding (AAF) for a prohibited substance. There was a high level of Probenecid in his test samples from EWS Round 1 in New Zealand and EWS Round 2 in Tasmania in March 2019. Probenecid is on the UCI’s List of Prohibited Substances and Methods. The Probenecid and a related antibiotic were prescribed by an official race doctor at the New Zealand Enduro to help treat a serious infection in Martin’s leg.

According to the official race doctor: “Martin sustained a lower leg laceration which developed a serious infection while racing the New Zealand Enduro (March 8-10, 2019). The infection was worsening despite standard doses of antibiotics, and it had the potential to become life threatening. The doctors at the New Zealand Enduro elected to add Probenecid, which is commonly used to boost blood levels of penicillin-type antibiotics, and it was effective in treating Martin’s infection. It is a common part of all of our practices to use this medicine in the setting of serious infection.

“At the time, neither the volunteer medical team nor Martin considered that Probenecid would be on the banned substance list. It has no performance enhancing effects, and in fact, Martin’s performance was likely to have been impaired in the weeks following due to the severity of the infection.” - Dr. Tom Jerram MBChB (Hons) FACEM Emergency Physician and Volunteer Medical Director of the New Zealand Enduro.

On June 1, 2019, Martin received a denial for his Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) request. While the CADF TUE committee recognized the Probenecid was purely for medical reasons and that it would not have provided additional enhancement to Martin’s performance, the TUE was still not approved.

GT Factory Racing fully supports Martin Maes in this situation due to the understanding that neither he, nor the team, took any actions to intentionally violate anti-doping rules or regulations. On the contrary, Martin inquired with the official race doctors if the prescriptions they had given him were acceptable for use by a UCI athlete and the race doctors were acting within their clinical responsibility to treat a potentially life-threatening infection in Martin’s leg.

GT Factory Racing is committed to creating and fostering an environment where riders can perform to the best of their ability, within all rules and regulations mandated by the governing body of the sport. GT invests in teams and athletes because of the love of the sport, and racing is a way to connect with their passionate fan base.

Each GT team and rider understands that support comes with strict requirements regarding the rules and regulations that govern the sport. It is for this reason that Martin will accept the UCI’s ruling.
“I’m speechless at the moment. My entire life has been dedicated to cycling and racing since 2013. I’ve trained so hard to make my dreams come true. There was an emergency to treat an infected wound, and we did not double-check the prescription from the doctors. This is our sole mistake. Now, it’s time to face the situation, train harder than ever, and get back very soon to convert that frustration into pleasure and performance on my bike.”

The UCI complies with a set of strict rules and regulations, but also fully acknowledged the circumstances and that this was not a deliberate violation of any antidoping rules. As a result, Martin will be prohibited from racing for a period of ninety days. He will be disqualified from rounds 1 and 2 of the EWS and will be required to pay a fine of 2,500CHF. However, his win and results from EWS Madeira will not be affected as he returned a negative test result after going through doping controls at this event.

Martin is and will remain an advocate for clean and fair racing. He will return to the season stronger than before. Meanwhile, he’ll stand next to his teammates and will fully support them during the next Enduro World Series’ events.


EWS statement on Martin Maes
Jun 26, 2019

We write this as we learn of the adverse analytical finding and subsequent penalty imposed by the UCI on Martin Maes following anti-doping tests carried out at Round 1 and Round 2 of the 2019 Enduro World Series.

We will not pass comment on the details of this case as that is the duty of the UCI and the athlete involved but we acknowledge and respect the outcome of this unfortunate case and 2019 series rankings will be updated accordingly.

We will state that from the beginning of the Enduro World Series, as we celebrate our 50th event this coming weekend, that we have always placed athlete health and safety at the very fore and have worked hard to create everything a new sport needs, ultimately partnering closely with the UCI and adopting all associated international sporting laws and practices while taking the international lead on others, including medical and head injury guidance. This week in Canazei we host our first anti-doping rider and team educational seminar alongside the UCI Legal Anti-Doping Services, a further investment of the EWS in athlete education and best practice.

What is important in this and previous cases is not to apportion blame, but to look at how everyone can avoid these occurrences from happening again.

Therefore, the prescription of medication outside of EWS racing that has ultimately lead to the penalty imposed on Martin Maes must serve as a lesson to all athletes, organisers, teams, coaches and medics that although the athlete will always be held responsible in the outcome of an adverse anti-doping finding, all parties in mountain bike sport must be responsible at all levels for learning and operating at the highest level, and with the best knowledge available.

We will continue to work to educate all parties in and out of the EWS family of riders, teams and events and urge all other parties in the sport out-with the official EWS sphere recognise the potential impact of their actions on riders and seek as much education as possible in order to protect the sport, and every rider within it.


More to follow.

Regions in Article
Rotorua


648 Comments

  • + 372
 Big bummer for Maes, especially with how well the season was going for him.

Under the circumstances I’d always take a healthy leg over two EWS wins, but it still sucks, considering the reasoning of his doctor and no other previous or suspicious results.

I fully support a zero tolerance policy towards doping, but this just shows that there’s no clear black and white solution in some cases.
  • + 66
 Definitely a big bummer for Martin but never underestimate an infection. Even small cuts can have horrible consequences. So rather loose some races than a leg.
  • + 462
 Well, the TUE process should have covered this exact scenario - but as per the GT statement reproed my post below, the application for a backdated TUE was not approved - even thought they accepted there was a genuine medical need, and there was no performance enhancing benefit. Absolutely appalling. I don't know what the UCI actually adds to MTB in general at this point.
  • + 345
 This is getting pretty stupid. You can't accept medical treatment without being stripped of your results? They denied the request. UCI, get your shit together.
  • + 350
 So, now this makes me curious. What does UCI recommend to do in a situation like this? Let Martin lose his leg, lose his life. All for the "integrity of the sport"?

I definitely would appreciate a response from the UCI on this. They just took Martin his wins and his chance for the title. Because he cut his leg when racing.
  • - 8
flag FloriLori (Jun 26, 2019 at 4:02) (Below Threshold)
 @vinay: there could be an medice which works the same way but does not lead to positive dopind tests. Nevertheless it was an emergency and you can't blame Martin or the doctor for not looking it up.
  • + 54
 @vinay: similar happened to a roadie who got stung by bee, showing allergic reactions immediately. He had to chooose between, getting it treated and being pulled from the race or wait till he falls over with not being able to breathe anymore. How can something like that make sense at all?

No idea why the UCI officials at the races can't have the power to give a go on such a treatment on location. Give them a radio that works and make them be available around the clock in case needed.
  • + 12
 @FloriLori: They specifically said there was no cell reception in the area so they couldn't look it up.
  • + 21
 TUE’s especially backdated ones have been abused extensively and that’s led to unreasonably conservative decisions. It’s not helped by the other two doping issues in a Enduro right now.
  • + 35
 @vinay: could not agree more here
  • + 16
 @chriskneeland: There must be good reason. Reading between the lines a little it sounds like the positive tests had already been registered so this probably means a TUE can not be applied for. If Maes got in sooner then it sounds like it would have been approved.

UCI stuff doesn't always have to be a conspiracy but they could do with a better statement along the lines of the doctor's which explains why the end results was as it is. Communication is key
  • + 9
 @KxPop: okay I did not see that. I am pretty sure that the doctors did not get a training from the UCI about forbidden substances. And even more they are volunteering and when something like this occurs the most important thing is to take care of the wound.
So from my point of view the UCI must train the docorts and should have decided in a different way for this case
  • - 39
flag StFred (Jun 26, 2019 at 4:13) (Below Threshold)
 So Probenecid it's the unique component in the entire world that can stop an infection?

tell me more about it
  • + 34
 I can only imagine how powerless he must feel right now! He was being treated, he was in the hands of doctors, sick and having to trust them and then this outcome on a wining streak. What could he do?
Sometimes I feel UCI and WADA are like a Saudi court, seriously, all the blanks are filled with perfectly reasonable and verifiable explanations by the responsible officials. No shady answers.
HEALTH should always be first, not rules and regulations, no athlete or doctor should have to choose between life threatening, life time injury over a regulation that can be temporarily overruled. F*ck them.
  • + 7
 @davetrumpore: Are you in a the position to get the official word from UCI on this? I've got my opinion but I've only read the response from GT and the doctor. I'm really interested to see how UCI is going to defend this decision.
  • + 41
 @vinay: I do not think the UCI returns anyone's emails ... Especially regarding things like this.
  • + 5
 @StFred: no but the antibiotic flucloxacillin could not stop the infection so probenicid was given. This helps to raise the level of antibiotics in the blood.
You just can not just mix up antibiotics
  • + 46
 @Marc2211: The UCI adds absolutely nothing to mountain biking. How this was not a situation where an exemption would be approved is beyond me.
  • + 98
 @fourcross: They should have a UCI approved medical doctor onsite to sanction the use of any treatment when necessary. If they don´t have one, then they can´t punish an athlete for getting the adequate treatment.
  • + 38
 @StFred:
yeah, you certainly have access to whole array of drugs, in the middle of a forest in tasmania, being a volunteer doctor at a bike race.
get your sh*t together man
  • + 1
 @cgmorais: couldn't agree more with you bro! Totally no sense.
  • + 27
 The only thing i don't understand is why the team didn't check the WADA list and apply for a TUE immediately after their return to a city or to home. The statement reads like both the team and the doctors were aware of the potential for problems further down the line and might have benefited from trying to get a TUE before the next race.
  • + 18
 @davetrumpore: That's not true, PB have a good relationship with the UCI and they answer the tough questions we send them, I don't know of them ducking anything. I spoke to a former elite road racer about this and he said simply "don't race". That's easier said than done in a sport with as few opportunities for elite competition as enduro (it's easier with the much busier road calendar, I would say). None of this is to say I don't think Martin got a shitty deal here and that I'm heartbroken for him considering how his season has been going...
  • + 16
 @mattwragg: was referring more to their statement above where they explicitly stated they will not comment further... Cheers
  • + 19
 Absolutely ridiculous to get suspended and lose wins for going to the doctors that the race provides for legitimate medical help. This “infraction” is understandably part of the growing pains of having the UCI now involved with EWS and should have been given absolute leniency. Feel gutted for Maes.
  • + 14
 @mattwragg: Too true, on many levels. Not only are road races more frequent, but they are also highly regulated, having a stack of UCI support on hand - be it medical cars, doctors at the start finish, officials, commissaires. This scenario makes it much easier for a Doctor to radio questions about certain drugs or treatment to officials to ask clarification before administering. In the case of Enduro, as Maes states, it was impossible to contact officials as there was no cell reception, only an volunteer medic on hand etc. It was 'treatment or potentially lose a leg to infection?' He made the right call, UCI or not.

I think it's highly unfair to use the same strict liability system for Enduro that's used for road racing. The setup and facilities are totally different - it's apples and oranges. Maes has been very very hard done by.
  • + 4
 @mattwragg: Oh c'mon "I spoke to a former elite road racer about this and he said simply "don't race"."

Road cycling is full of injured cyclists racing day after day after sustaining horrendous injuries in crashes, that's not in an athlete mind specially due to their competitive nature, the goals ahead and because their job is to race, and other problems are for other people to care - that's why they have a team, to decide for him. I'm not sure how Martin could have decided between a medical opinion on how to treat a certain infection or just don't race cause it may be tainted? Who in the world would even think about that? That would probably transform me in a crazy tinfoiled hat rider.
  • + 8
 @FloriLori: Why would it matter if he test positive if it is not enhancing his performance anyway? It's not the medicine that's the issue, It's the UCI.
  • + 5
 @fourcross: Yes, Jonathan Vaughters.

However, Vaughters spent his career on EPO, hot sauced to the gills, so it's tough to give him a pass overall. But that situation was silly.
  • + 16
 @JoelAllport: It's a masking agent that can be used to cover up all kinds of performance enhancing drugs. There is no way of knowing what he "could" have been using during and in between those two races.
  • - 32
flag endurocat (Jun 26, 2019 at 5:47) (Below Threshold)
 Another one that falls from grace.
  • + 11
 @Ttimer: The event's attending physician provided the circumstances under with the medicine was administered. There was no 'masking' going on. Someone at the UCI must be able to discern between the two.
  • + 8
 @vinay:
Absolutely, this decision from the UCI is totally ridiculous/absurd/nonsense
  • + 2
 I´m sorry, but this is BS. I like Maes, he is a great rider, but this statement sound false. Their statement is that when a reduce spectrum antibiotic fail as initial treatment, (considering that in a contaminated wound the first choice is a wide spectrum antibiotic) the reasonable action is to change the antibiotic that is showing no benefit, not increased the concentration of the already failed one. Probenicid is standard for gonorrea treatment, where the causal agent is well identified and penicillin is the first choice.
All this sound too familiar, too close to allegations of the past that were fabricated hastily to cover doping.
  • + 21
 Seems like a phone app with the list of prohibited substances could be a good idea. It could continually update itself and you wouldn't need a cell signal to do a search.
  • + 12
 @vinay:
If UCI is going to be that strict and deny TUE from doctors at least make sure you provide web connections so athletes teams and doctors can access UCI banned substance lists
  • + 10
 @Marc2211: The UCI like the IOC is only here to take.
  • + 17
 @chriskneeland: Teams will make stuff up jut to get a TUE, Shadey doctors and such. It really has to be black and white. It also has to be black and white because the UCI can't afford to get into Lawyer fights with the big teams, some of the big Road teams almost bankrupt the UCI with court battles. If they get into to "Case by Case" basis that will open a can of worms. It sucks but just don't blame the UCI.
  • + 14
 @Jesusdorte: whilst its true you would use a broad spectrum if the causative organism is unknown, the doctor may not have had one with him. So in this case a narrow spectrum like flucloxacillin is a good bet in a skin wound where the causative organism is likely to be gram positive bacteria such as staph aureus or streptococcus. Then the reason he prescribed probenecid is mentioned in his statement, to boost levels of flucloxacillin so that Martin didn’t have to go to hospital and get IV antibiotics.
  • + 25
 @chriskneeland: He did, and i believe it, but that is no proof. Looking at this from the perspecive of the UCI, there is no way to distinguish between genuine medical necessity and well thought-out rationalization after the fact.
There are very good reasons why this stuff is prohibited and why the UCI requires the TUE to be approved before treatment. If they don't, this would open up a ton of loopholes for crafty teams to avoid the consequences after being caught. Keep in mind that many professional athletes would do anything, and i mean absolutely anything including life-threatening procedures to win immortal fame.

The UCI is no saint and their handling of the Rude/Graves situation was shameful, but i believe that this time they did well and Maes is the victim of a series of unfourtunate events.
  • + 0
 @chriskneeland: totally agree. This is a ridiculous ban!
  • + 10
 @glen-allaire: I don't think web connections are that necessary. The list should be that dynamic. Distribute the list before each season between event organizers and they are responsible to distribute it between medics on duty at these events. It can be digital in database (spreadsheet or otherwise) or .pdf format or it can be a printout. Or both, because batteries and devices can die and printouts can get soaked. But having to rely on cell service can be tough in the remote areas these events are being held. Especially as the cell service may not be sufficient for the sudden huge crowds (of ever-connected millenials) such an event attracts.
  • + 14
 So the UCI agrees it didn't enhance his performance and it was for a medical need and yet they strip him of his wins?



That maes complete sense.
  • - 7
flag sevensixtwo (Jun 26, 2019 at 7:18) (Below Threshold)
 @upduro No, it clearly shows there is a line with absolutely no grey area. He took a substance on the list, and he’s out. Athletes need to be hypercritical of everything that goes into their bodies.
  • + 9
 @Ttimer: But this clearly isn't one of those 'crafty' circumstances. We have a seriously infected gash requiring an antibiotic booster and an unconnected volunteer physician explaining his reason for treatment. It's not quantum physics we're talking about here.
  • + 5
 Lance Armstrong worked with licensed doctors too; doesn’t mean shit.
  • + 11
 This is an absolute joke! It's one thing to not give a TUE if some obscure excuse (eg some performance enhancing drug by his team doctor for a claimed cold or whatever) is given but hey: LOOK AT THE WOUND! There is an obvious deep laceration and the official race doctors prescribed a non-performane enhancing drug for a very good reason. Why the hell would you not give a TUE in this case? Do they think Martin intentionally stabbed himself to probably receive probenecid later? Ridiculous!
  • + 13
 @KxPop:
So they knew it was questionable so could have applied for a TUE at the time instead of after the failed test.
  • + 7
 No performance benefit yet they strip the results? It is a masking agent to hide the use of other drugs. This is the exact opposite of what should be happening.
  • - 19
flag stacykohut (Jun 26, 2019 at 7:57) (Below Threshold)
 @chriskneeland: the only people that need to get their shit together are the ATHLETES !!!! Late T.U.E.'s ?? Come on.... just another example of how wack enduro is. More drugs and triple clamps for enduro next year!!!! So cool, so edgy, so extreme.......what a joke............
  • + 11
 @stacykohut: So what are you saying? They should provide their own medical care too? Fly in their personal physicians? Get a medical degree? Or just let the infection fester? Not really sure what shit you want them to get together.
  • - 1
 @davetrumpore: So if you're an EWS team doctor, you would have on file all UCI banned substances & could easily have them on your cell or data drive, which you'd think a team specific doctor would always have on them.

I think the reason the UCI took this action is because it's his own doctor whose job it is to not administer any banned substances to his patients/clients. If Maes team doctor had administered the drug to a different team's rider, the rider would be essentially blameless, but this is his staff taking the action.

Sucks all around, but I can see the middle ground on it.
  • + 2
 @vinay: This it´s clearly an introverence from UCI to the development of our season so far and our sport and his revenge for having build this nice "spirit of enduro" far away from they... Now they couldn´t miss this opportunity to spread their shit in our face..
  • + 2
 @Marc2211: yeah tbh this is like in school if you didn't do homework but had a note from your parents. But it's like the teacher acknowledged you had a legitimate reason but then gave you a detention anyway.
  • + 2
 @fourcross: Yeah that was Jonathan Vaughters who later came clean about his doping. I’ve been following bike racing for a long time. I knew probenecid was a banned masking agent because Pedro Delgado was caught with it in his system back in the late eighties early nineties era. Back then it was not prohibited yet but was a known masking agent. Delgado claimed it was a medication for gout. I think it’s a masking agent for steroids which aid recovery amongst other things.
  • + 12
 @vikb: just download the list www.wada-ama.org/sites/default/files/prohibited_list_2018_en.pdf prior to the events and store on phone.
It took me literally 30 seconds to search for 'Probenecid' in google, find this list then use cntrl & F to search the PDF for this substance.
  • - 1
 oops.
  • + 6
 @FloriLori: They tried looking it up, but there was no cell access where they were. Which raises other questions, like at an EWS level event, where doctors are treating injured riders, the doctors have no way of double checking if what their prescribing is banned or not??!! That is a huge failing of the EWS to provide proper infrastructure for a top level world championship event.
  • + 1
 If you were in charge would you accept a back dated TUE? @Marc2211:
  • + 20
 I had a very similar experience with a nasty arm infection right before a UCI road race. The doctor prescribed IV antibiotics with probenecid. A quick search on the WADA app on my iPhone (which has all banned substances pre-downloaded) showed that probenecid is a banned substance. As a result, the doctor switched me over to a different IV antibiotic that didn't require probenecid to be used with it. The arm eventually healed up, I raced the race, doping test was negative.

Super bummed for Maes, its a tough situation. It might be time for all disciplines in our sport to receive the same kind of doping awareness education that we get on the road. I would hate for the EWS to start getting a bad rep for this kind of thing. The resources are available (even without cell service), seems like the education component is lacking.
  • + 5
 @chriskneeland: thanks for sharing.
Pure class from Martin
  • + 5
 @ukr77: I would look at each case on it's own merits. In this case he presented a clear and precise narrative. Confirmed the serious medical condition that needed treating. Presented statements from the Doctors involved. Maes even presented the bottles the medicine came in. He also tested 'clear' again within 2 weeks.

In this case it appears the WADA/UCI (whoever) accepted the facts presented as genuine and coherent and gave the minimum ban possible under the rules. If this doesn't say anything, nothing will. However they did not give the TUE due to the strict liability of the failed test...

They did not do this for Armstrong, Froome, or the other multitude of other road riders who have failed tests.
  • + 2
 Death by a thousand cuts? Nope, just one in the jungle and the UCI's hamfisted modus operandi.
  • + 11
 @islandforlife: This happened at a local NZ enduro race, not an EWS event.
  • + 36
 @bizutch: this wasn’t his own doctor. This wasn’t even at an EWS event. It was at the NZ Enduro where a doctor who volunteers his time outside of the ER to support local bike races provided medical help in a remote part of the country.

Sucks for Maes. Like genuinely brutal shit.

Sucks more for Tom. Guy is a legend, without his support in the region there would be so many fewer events, far lower standard of care at the events he volunteers at. Just providing the care he is somewhat obligated to give to help a human. Not a racer, not a competitor at that point, just helping a human with an injury.
  • + 1
 @ThinkTank45: Ahh, I see, that makes more sense...
  • + 2
 How about a less-creepy black and white picture of MM looking sketchy? Of all the stock photos of him, why lead with that one?
  • + 5
 @Marc2211: One of the best parts of the EWS was that it was didn't involve the UCI. It's a shame they've got involved and are already having a negative impact.
  • - 7
flag B650wagon (Jun 26, 2019 at 9:40) (Below Threshold)
 Lame excuse from the race doctor and team. They should have a complete list of banned substances with them at all times and not need to use a cell phone to check with UCI. The doctors should have a solid plan for dealing with cuts that don’t involve banned substances, I’m sure it could and will be done.

I think UCI did the right thing.
  • + 4
 Exactly this! It’s beyond bizarre. Gutted for him @Marc2211:
  • + 4
 @Marc2211: Agreed...not sure what the UCI actually contributes to cycling in general.
  • + 5
 @StFred: You are assuming they have an entire pharmacy of options at their disposal, out on the course. Don't assume.
  • + 4
 Sooo how are you liking the UCI and EWS partnership EHH??? Hahahahahahhaha
  • + 1
 @vinay:

"Are you in a the position to get the official word from UCI on this? I've got my opinion but I've only read the response from GT and the doctor. I'm really interested to see how UCI is going to defend this decision."

LOL! You don't understand the protocols in place here at all.
  • + 2
 @cgmorais: That's why the article stated they tried to call but there was no cell service:

"Both Martin and his team manager Mark Maurissen inquired if the drug was banned but there was apparently no phone signal to check."

Secondly, Maes was injured on course. You can't wait an hour for a doctor to show up, and give their approval, when your next start time is in 15 minutes.
  • + 8
 @Marc2211: Perfectly stated. This situation is so ridiculous and frustrating it's hard to finish reading this article without getting angry. It seems the UCI has become just another example of a bloated bureaucracy where the decisions made by officials is more about flexing their power or justifying the existence of their job than about making an intelligent judgement and doing the right thing.
  • + 2
 @sevensixtwo: best comment so far. Not saying he’s guilty but for a team doc to use a diuretic on a very effective antibiotic (all penicillins are very good for gram positive type of infections) and retrospectively apply for a TUE just makes things very murky. I feel for Maes but his team should take the hit for not being more cautious specially with the recent suspensions.
  • + 1
 @Ttimer: "no way to distinguish between genuine medical necessity and well thought-out rationalization after the fact." Seriously? How about looking at pictures of his injury or reading the statement of his medical doctor?

Also, Maes is not a "the victim of a series of unfourtunate events". More like a series of bone-headed and short-sighted decisions.
  • + 3
 @AdamBowden: But he says in the statement that the probenecide was prescribed two days later, on a follow-up visit.
  • + 3
 @B650wagon: I think that's what Martin himself alluded to in his interview, where he said in certain aspects enduro is still quite "naive and amateurish"
  • - 2
 @CaptainSnappy: They called Dr. Feel good by "accident".
  • + 1
 @vinay: UCI should provide the races with approved doctors to avoid this situations. It a bullshit when you have to choose between health and racing
  • - 2
 @vinay: UCI has the dumbest rules I have ever seen.
  • + 1
 Does the UCI permit medical marijuana because my doctor said I have to get high.
  • + 8
 Guys please note that the doctor who prescribed the medicine was not an EWS doctor. The injury happened during a local race in NZ.
  • - 5
flag mgillign (Jun 26, 2019 at 11:43) (Below Threshold)
 @sevensixtwo: No, it shows there is a line and it is NOT reasonable. He was prescribed this by a doctor working AT the EWS. Now athletes won't want proper treatment when they need it. And, at this point the overall results for this season shouldn't matter to anyone.
  • + 4
 @mgillign: It wasn't at the EWS, but nonetheless it was a medical treatment. Where are we in the world when organizations can't reasonably make exceptions for legitimate medical reasons. Makes the UCI look incompetent.
  • + 3
 @Marc2211: and this is why uci shouldn't have messed with ews, now we are going to see even more pointless arguments and decisions that make no sense.
  • + 3
 @Ttimer: because actions to treat an athlete for doctors and teams is intuitive, filing papers, TUE can wait. Treatment is a right that cannot be denied, paper filing on the other hand can wait, no one is going to loose a leg over it. Formalities can wait
  • + 4
 @islandforlife: The injury and subsequent treatment occurred at the NZ Enduro, 2 weeks prior to the first EWS round in Rotorua.
  • + 1
 @jorgeposada: B.I.N.G.O.
subtle introduction so far, cant wait for the second half results to really measure performance.
  • + 1
 @Slabrung: And you can so quickly see how track selection becomes compromised, large parts unavailable - unless the "infrastructure/[risk]" in place from high command, sterile and controlled.

haha
  • + 1
 @chriskneeland: Thanks for that. Most important point is at the end in that Richie and Maes' cases could not more different. Richie and Jared guilty of using DAY OF EVENT performance enhancers. Could have been using for years.
  • + 4
 How many athletes are now going to refuse treatment and potentially sustain terrible injuries because of this?

It is a non enhancing drug, the doctor made a statement, other doctors confirmed, all on paper and still the UCI decides to penalise the rider. A terrible decision from the UCI and with poor oversight of the whole implications for the future.

The EWS was so much better before the UCI started meddling... and they are just starting...
  • + 8
 @Marc2211: UCI gave the minimum ban. They were as lenient as they could. They really can't approve back dated TUEs as everyone knows the Armstrong story now about the backdated TUE from the "saddle sore cream with testosterone" his team invented when he was first popped for testosterone at the TDF. Definitely wasn't microdosing a T-patch overnight! Also, unless you know nothing about cycling you're probably aware that there is now way Bradley "Wanker" Wiggens would have won the TDF or other marquee events without his TUE for triamcinoclone right before big events that would strip 10 pounds away and juice up his muscular system right before the race. It's for asthma!!!
  • + 2
 @vinay: I would be interested to hear the EWS' point of view on the UCI's involvement after 1+ year involvement.
  • + 6
 You would think there would be an option for the top 30 finishers to sign a petition saying they would prefer Martin not be stripped of his wins and no one's points or positions change. Basically if the top 30 racers he competed against believe he didn't cheat, then they would be able to override the decision by UCI to strip wins. He still would get a suspension possibly, but losing a win has to be worse.
  • + 1
 @chriskneeland: The problem is there in you´re text...UCI
  • + 2
 @adespotoskyli:
@Ricardo-Sa
@chriskneeland
Yes, medical treatment of something urgent takes precedence. But if it requires a banned substance and it is not possible to file a TUE, the athlete still has the option not to race in a UCI event until he is clean again.

There are many injuries which make it impossibe to race for the duration of treatment for a variety of reasons. Requiring a banned substance is just another of those reasons.
  • + 2
 I blame EWS management for this. Let's not forget that EWS all started as something for the riders, away from the bullshit of UCI. It's clear here that Martin and the medics involved acted in good faith, simply to save the man's leg.
I say f*ck the UCI, if they wanted to, EWS COULD totally ignore and overrule this crazy decision, reinstate Martin, and if necessary withdraw from UCI affiliation altogether.
Of course they won't.....nor will they even dare to publically condemn it in their public statement, because they have already sold out to the UCI gravy train.
Cash is king, as they say. Sad.
What a shame for the sport of Enduro. It all started as a grass roots idea, by riders, for the riders.
Is that what it still is today? I don't think so.
  • + 4
 @CaptainSnappy: Makes no sense - wounds don’t get “infected”immediately, they can be full of shit and flushed hours later and heal fine. If it gets infected that only shows later with swelling, pus and going red. He was in NZ hardly the arse end of no where. It’s not hard for anyone in the team, rider included to have a pdf of banned substances in their phone and say ‘can’t have that banned’ to a Dr. This wasn’t immediate treatment it was after the fact when it could have easily been checked - what it is is incompetence.
  • + 1
 @MatthewCarpenter: This is total bullshit. Maes got the wound in Day 1 of the race, and finished the second day.
  • + 2
 @mattwragg: god to know that they respond everything from pinkbike. In this case It’ll be a good idea to ask them what should he have done? Don’t treated and possible lose a leg or treat and been disqualified.
  • + 1
 @Ttimer: then fix the god damned rules and procedures, this is about racing, it's stubit getting a treatment and hope not to be cought doped instead of asking if you are ok, there must be a way to adjust it, those suit wearing asshats can get out of their offices in Aigle and do same real work! Walk around the pits and ask if anyone needs help. This is a classic situation, were people that don't get affected by the rules procedures get to cook them up just because
  • + 2
 @AdamBowden: that's retarded. If it meant saving a life or limb, you send someone to the hospital. You dont practice experimental medicine to avoid going to the hospital. Been practicing for 13+ years and never prescribed probenecid for an infection and never will because it's not evidenced based medicine.
  • + 1
 @msmtime: practice and ongoing learning aren’t the same thing. There’s research showing efficacy going back to AT LEAST 1980.

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/7433922
  • + 1
 @chriskneeland:

1995 Pan American Games. Canadian women's rower Silken Laumann was stripped of her gold medal for taking an over the counter cold medicine because you know... nyquil is going to make you faster racer...
  • + 2
 @TransSavoie: Clearly, the EWS has evolved into a professional sport, so I guess UCI is here to stay. Perhaps it is the responsibility of the EWS to look into this into more detail with the UCI, to see if the ban should or can be lifted, rather than standing on the fence.After all we are taking about the best rider of the moment. The way both the EWS and the UCI are perceived as fair and competent, is a joke if it’s just left like this.
  • + 1
 Ha I see, not an ews race, but anyway, if UCI wants to have some athletes on course, they should care about them more. They are pretty good on forbidding, but support is something hardly seen
  • + 1
 @chriskneeland: Belgian mag!
  • + 1
 @deeeight: take enough ephedrine and it does help. NHL players were rumoured to take a dozen or so before a game.
  • + 1
 They did the right thing. It was a potential loophole, where a rider treats a cut then gets to take a masking agent to take performance enhancing drugs. The rider,team and race doctors should all have an appropriate plan in place on how to treat a minor cut using approved medications.
  • + 1
 @bonfire: Yeah...I read the releases on VitalMTB and my misunderstanding came from the sentence in bold in the article just before the doctor's quote. Guess Pinkbike phrased it wrong because I just looked again and it still says: "Martin Maes' doctor, who provided him with the probenecid at the NZ Enduro had the following statement:'

Misworded sentence gave me the impression. Wink
  • + 2
 @islandforlife: the WADA list is released every year as a PDF. The updated list comes into effect every year on 1 January. Download to a phone and job done. The mistake here is probably lack of education of Enduro riders and managers about WADA, processes etc.
  • + 1
 @cgmorais: agreed. It's also 2019 and offline access to data on approved drugs shouldn't be an issue or reliant on phone reception to gain information considering the remote locations of these races. I worked on a project for vets to get access to drug information and administration offline with an app whilst they're out working in the field - and that was years ago, you'd think the UCI could invest some money to do the same to avoid this.
  • + 1
 @pizzle1983: It's not a UCI issue, it's a WADA issue. The searchable, authoritative PDF is here. Any athlete or manager can download, save and search.

www.wada-ama.org/en/resources/science-medicine/prohibited-list-documents
  • + 240
 Liked it better when de UCI wasn’t involved in enduro events
  • - 1
 Vote this comment to the top!
  • + 3
 Cant upvote this enough. We wanted to keep uci out of enduro. Now this
  • - 14
flag H3RESQ (Jun 26, 2019 at 9:06) (Below Threshold)
 The only reason UCI is in EWS is because of Graves and Rude postitive test. If you follow the timeline correct its pretty obvious.
  • + 16
 100% and the reason we won't host another EWS Continental Championship Enduro or continue our pursuit of an EWS round in the future. We will continue to offer EWS Qualifiers until they are required to be UCI sanctioned .

We love working with the EWS but not the UCI or especially USAC
  • + 4
 I thought that was the whole reason Chris Ball left UCI to start the EWS and say "FU UCI."
  • + 4
 Maes' story seems to check out since there are multiple doctors who can attest to it, but Graves and Rude absolutely deserved the ban. The EWS is the wild west for doping in MTB and I'm glad they're starting to do something about it.
  • + 3
 @Patsplit: People hate the truth, look at my downvotes, Chris was put in a situation that he had to work with UCI for lack of an ability of EWS being able to manage doping on its own.
  • + 1
 @H3RESQ: Sad that EWS couldn't manage doping on it's own without involving UCI. Curious what the UCI brings to the table for the EWS. Funding? Expertise? Legal processes? It did seem a bit naive to think with rapid rise of EWS that doping wouldn't ever be an issue. Still, in the post Graves and Rude world, couldn't EWS work with WADA and national cycling bodies? French cycling was what caught Graves and Rude in the first place by sponsoring their own drug testing.
  • + 187
 Reading the GT Statement;

"On June 1, 2019, Martin received a denial for his Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) request. While the CADF TUE committee recognized the Probenecid was purely for medical reasons and that it would not have provided additional enhancement to Martin’s performance, the TUE was still not approved."

Absolutely appalling. I'd love to see the reasoning for this.
  • + 53
 Exactly, someone get a UCI press rep and make him explain their decision without losing the little respect completely that UCI has left
  • + 35
 The reasoning behind it is that the UCI doesn't care about mtb in any form. If it had been a high profile road pro in the same situation, then the ban would have coincided with a gap between two big races, or ended the day before the Tour de France, applied over winter when there aren't any races etc etc. It's totally unfair what has happened to Maes here.
  • + 9
 @joelm76: Totally.

If it was a roadie there would definitely not have been a ban, they would have given a back dated TUE. Probably it would have been in the large pile of applications they deal with for things like steroids for Asthma or Allergies etc (like Wiggins in the TdF). They protect road cyclists at all costs as that is where they get their money.

In this case, someone innocent has been banned unfairly. I'd be all for the UCI not being involved in MTB at all.
  • + 19
 "On May 21, 2019, GT Factory Racing athlete Martin Maes was notified by the Cycling Anti- doping Federation (CADF) of an Adverse Analytical Finding (AAF) for a prohibited substance."

Maybe it is as simple as you can't apply for a TUE having already registered a failed test?
  • + 13
 @BeardlessMarinRider: I suspect that this is the case. Which for me goes against the principle of fairness - there is no way to prove your innocence, as a genuine explanation is automatically not accepted.

...Yet they let Froome get away with the whole Ventolin thing. Clear double standards.
  • + 1
 @Marc2211: The whole thing stinks. It was a case of do the meds or lose your leg. What a mess.
  • + 53
 I wish we could ban the UCI for 90 days and strip them of their appalling regulatory performance.
  • + 7
 @BeardlessMarinRider:

It makes sense especially since this really is open for abuse (even if in this case this is really, really unlikely to be abused).

It's the dog ate my homework defense, but with proof that indeed the dog just did that. I get the anger and disappointment, but I do understand the reasoning/process behind it. I also don't think the UCI is happy about this.

In this case CAS would be an option (I bet he would get a nod and handshake there), though probably too expensive.
  • + 13
 I think Martin is paying for all the previous cyclist (road or MTB) that were actually cheating. UCI, WADA and others have seen so many people trying to out-rule regulations that there is no more margin for error.
See what I mean?
  • + 6
 It makes zero sense. The policy is in place for EXACTLY this situation, yet he was denied the application and loses two race wins? f*cking UCI. I knew this would be a gong show.
  • + 8
 @Rideuse67: yes, exactly. Prime example of what happens when you implement the zero tolerance policy people scream for. Look at the 'UCI is too easy on dopers' comments on the Rude case post.
You can't catch all the crooks without also convicting some of the innocent. Pick the lesser of the two evils and be a dick about it.
  • + 19
 I totally agree that this is a shitty situation for Maes. But the UCI and WADA have no choice in this. The cheaters are clever, so there has to be a very clear set of standards even when all agree that no cheating was intended.

Read Maes statement in the newspaper that ChrisKneeland posted above. Maes understands that this rule is for a reason. He and his team were negligent in not looking up the substances, in not having the WADA banned list with them (there's an app for that), and not applying for a TUE prior to the testing.

Maes is pure class. His handling of this will only boost the respect we all have for him. Enduro is getting more pro, for better or worse, and there's growing pains with that.

I also don't get the hate for the UCI here on pinkbike lemming-land. It's just herd mentality to pile on that popular sentiment. The riders, including Maes, are all in favor of UCI support for the events and keeping the sport clean.
  • + 4
 @JustinVP: If UCI regularly makes exceptions for road athletes and gives TUEs after the fact (according to some people in these comments, this is common), why is he being denied it now, when this is VERY clearly a therapeutic? It seems like they're making an example of him.
  • + 2
 @JustinVP: spot on
  • + 5
 @jayacheess: They wanted a TUE after returning an adverse analytical finding. One would assume that is never going to fly, roadie or not
  • + 6
 Unfortunately, there's still a lack of due diligence on the team/rider. The key aspect of not knowing the list of banned substances is on them. I doubt if knowing would have mattered in this case as he needed it for medical purposes, but just because you don't have cell service is not good enough. They could have checked a week or a month later and submitted a TUE. The TUE not being started ASAP until there was a positive finding is what got this Martin this penalty.

Now whether the UCI has allowed backdated TUEs for roadies or other racers remains to be seen. That would be an area I would think GT/Maes could appeal or protest.
  • + 1
 @jayacheess: If they are doing that, (making an example or not), or if they give exemptions after the fact to some and not others, this problem exists because the correct process wasn't followed by the whole team. If you're familiar with Quality Assurance procedures in place for say manufacturing an item, if the processes are all followed after an error, it's much much easier to correct and show you've done the right thing. Unfortunately it doesn't seem to have been the case here.

The procedures are in place for riders and teams to follow not because they want to get in the way, but it DOES help them when something has gone wrong.

It sucks majorly for MM, but he'll never make the mistake again himself of not informing/making sure the lines are followed. If it helps one future rider in the future to avoid this kind of mistake, they owe Martin a beer.
  • + 9
 The reason he didn’t get the TUE is fairly clear: he appears to have applied for the TUE after an adverse analytical finding was registered. I strongly suspect that he would have been granted the TUE had he applied for it after receiving the therapeutic drug but before registering an AAF.

The reason why this policy exists with regard to TUEs is a direct consequence of athletes and doctors abusing the TUE system to their benefit in order to cover cheating. I am not saying that happened here, rather to the contrary I believe this story to be entirely truthful, but Maes is simply paying the penalty for dirty racers and doctors of years past.
  • + 0
 There is no reason, they have to come up with something just because they like to be called assholes, fucking cunts, a bunch of useless bureucrats that all
  • + 1
 @Ronkol: Money should not be an issue here.
  • + 1
 In the Martin Maes interview by Vital, Martin made it sound like the TUE was denied because the UCI felt the doctor could have chosen another drug besides Probenecid and still gained the same affect. Not so much a late application for a TUE... So that points to the Team/Rider choosing wisely when taking medical advice, which is a tough position to be in when you are there in NZ worrying about infection in your leg ahead of the first EWS. UCI/WADA rules are not at your forethought.
  • + 128
 Stripping 2 wins seems super harsh given the context and clear causation chain (unlike Rude and Graves story). This to me is clearly NOT doping, and why I hate the path the EWS is going with this. Road cycling is bad enough.

Could Maes not have been given a back dated TUE as it was clearly merited, and the substance has no performance enhancing effects?
  • + 13
 I don´t get this either.
While i do not suspect Rude and Graves to have doped intentionally, i do see it as fair to ban them on the basis of negligence, even though i see the problem here with the EWS and UCI and their banned substances list as well.
Their case was much less clear cut though and therefore i cannot understand how Maes gets issued a longer ban and loses his wins, when the chain of events leading to the ingestion is as clear cut as it is in his case. Especially when it seems like Rude and Graves have gotten a lot of lenience, as they should have been issued a lifetime EWS ban under the applicable ruleset back then (which i do not wish upon them, but it would have been the correct thing to do according to the ruleset).
EWS really needs to step up their game in this regard, as the current situation makes their sanctioning seem rather arbitrary, especially if the claims are true that it was not possible for Maes to reach an official for an inquiry about the medication.
  • + 3
 When I see people state that these organizations are composed of highly educated and seasoned professional officials and that they're decisions are infallible, I wonder what they're response is when things like this happen. Ridiculous
  • + 22
 If you look at from the point of the UCI you could argue they had little choice. Masking agents have traditionally led to 2 year bans, showing a way to use masking agents and avoid a ban sets a bad precedent. - Crash in a race, cut yourself, take something EPO like plus a mask and retrospectively plead innocence when caught. Really the UCI couldn't win when you view it in a wider context of what they police. That said, I think Martin has paid a high price for human error here.
  • + 4
 @Loki87: longer? 90 days is less than 8 months...
  • + 5
 @Riggbeck: Given what we know of professional athletes, many would be more than willing to inflict an infectious injury on themselves just to have an excuse for heavy doping under the cover of a masking agent.

Although this tactic is not very effective in a longer running event like the EWS, it might be appealing for short term goals like the Olympics.
  • - 1
 @jzPV:
Must´ve misread that as 9 months somehow.


I get the argument, but still, how are we supposed to keep athletes healthy then?
Imho it´s not too hard to handle that problem really. IF an athletes does such a thing in order to legally take a masking agent in order to hide a PED, they should just make sure to rigorously test that athletes samples afterwards. They should also implement more effective testing methods for these specific athletes, because by now we know that regular testing is not as specific and precise and in other sports disciplines many athletes have been found guilty through specific testing despite not failing the regular tests. So the UCI really only needs to make it clear that a TUE has massive consequence in the form of an extended test regimen for a year after the TUE or something along those lines so it can only be a one time benefit for the athlete at best.
The problem here isn´t TUEs or how they can be misused, but rather how they´re not properly implemented in the rule system.
Either make exceptions and have a very specific ruleset for them, or don´t. The second isn´t really an option due to athlete health, so the UCI needs to make clear what the exact terms for a TUE are and how an athlete in Martins situation should deal with the problem at hand. It doesn´t paint the UCI in a good light when their athletes are neither able to reach them through an appropriate channel nor can be administered an exception afterwards given proper documentation. I mean, what are the TUEs for then?
An athlete undergoing some serious medical procedure like cancer treatment surely won´t need a TUE as he´s out of the sport for a longer time period anyway, but apparently some minor infection doesn´t justify a TUE so i´m certainly a little baffled by the question what the TUEs are for.
It´s not on us to find a solution to this problem but rather the UCI, and gambling with an athletes health and livelyhood like that is exactly why the UCI is under such scrutiny on a regular basis. To me it´s just baffling how these things can still happen. They paint themselves as THE AUTHORITY and then controversial things like this can still happen in 2019 because apparently they didn´t think of an obvious situation like this.
This must be incredibly frustrating for an athlete to deal with as whatever you do, you´re f*cked.
  • + 2
 Agreed - gutted for Maes on this one. There is no gray area on his end with them being so forthcoming. I understand the ban given the zero tol policy, but losing his wins is a bit of horse manure.
  • - 12
flag High-Life (Jun 26, 2019 at 9:05) (Below Threshold)
 Anyone else think it's odd he fails a drug test the same season he is destroying everyone in EWS and DH?
  • - 1
 I think there should be a poll on the UCI website. All UCI members can decide what the think happened, and then vote for the punishment they think he should receive, if any. The option with the highest number of votes wins! In the case of Graves and Rude, I guess most people think there was deliberate cheating. In this case, most people probably think it was an honest mistake.
  • + 73
 www.vojomag.com/ews-interview-martin-maes-suspendu-une-negligence-qui-me-coute-cher

Full itw from Martin in french, everything is well explained.
  • + 5
 Not sure why you're being down-voted, it's a good article.
  • + 5
 thanks
c'est clair au moins
pas de bol pour lui :-(
  • + 6
 Merci pour le lien. I am sick for him, this is absolutely UNFAIR. Godverdomme!!!!
  • + 3
 Now things are much clear. Exceptional material from Olivier, as always. Come back strong Martin!!
  • + 1
 Can someone give an english abstract?
Not much french left from school
  • + 1
 Fantastic article, every one that gets a changed should read it. I cant under stand why the EWS did not have at least one official UCI doctor with in radio reach. They knew there was no cell signal there, also how come no one there have a list of the ban substances in a PDF format or hard copy. The doctor acted with integrity, i am also trying to see it from the UCI view and they just dont want to open the smallest window of opportunity for cheaters. Feel horrible for Maes, you will be back stronger !!
  • + 1
 @fedfox: Indeed, should be at the top!
  • + 4
 Gutted for him... So close to become EWS champion but now he will be able to be Downhill World Champion
  • + 8
 @fedfox: Did you read the article? This wasn't at an EWS race, it was at the NZ Enduro weeks before the EWS even started.
  • - 4
flag fedfox (Jun 26, 2019 at 9:05) (Below Threshold)
 @gigamike: I missed that part, nevertheless anything that can potentialy be sanction by the UCI should have UCI doctor there. Again it is ultimately the decision of the racer, but that will help a lot.
  • + 3
 Even through Google Chrome Translate Martin comes off as incredibly well spoken and professional. I love the line about how World Champs DH is now in the "viewfinder."
  • + 2
 @fedfox: This was at the NZ Enduro, 2 weeks prior to the first EWS round in Rotorua.
  • + 66
 Wow. Surely with such a thorough and credible response from the emergency doctor, who from the looks of it acted with complete integrity, Martin's ban can at least be reviewed if not overturned??
  • + 26
 Exactly, the doctor's treatment seems totally legit, unfortunately the UCI doesn't seem capable of applying the rules fairly and reasonably.
  • + 10
 I agree and totally believe the doctor in this situation but doctors have been part of the cover up in pasts doping cases. They use there experience to get the riders through, often for a lot of money. Not saying that happened here but you have to draw a line somewhere.
  • + 3
 Not only that, the Dr was event medical staff, and checked with other event staff before administering the medication. Event staff is EWS staff, EWS staff is UCI staff, a UCI staff member administered the drug that the UCI punished him for taking. Such utter bullshit.
  • - 8
flag skelldify (Jun 26, 2019 at 10:33) (Below Threshold)
 I mean, I get "lacerations" like that on my shin pretty much monthly. Doesn't look that bad, just a lot of blood.
  • + 8
 @maxyedor: You didn't read the article! The incident happend on the NZ Enduro race, which is not the EWS race in Rotura. That's where he was tested.

From the article:

Maes apparently took the drug on the advice of doctors to help him recover from a cut he sustained on his leg at the NZ Enduro (March 7th-10th).

Current Enduro World Series leader, Martin Maes, has failed anti-doping tests in Rotorua (March 24th) and Tasmania (March 31st).

The doc had nothing to do with the EWS. It happened on a more "amateurish" race.

Where GT and Martin failed is that they could have opened the TUE between the races before he was tested positive. The article is not very precise here.

As the Probenecid was prescribed by a trained doctor, the GT team applied to the UCI for a TUE (Theraputic Use Exemption), which allows athletes to take prohibited substances without punishment if they have a medical need. The UCI denied this request on June 1, after the failed tests
  • + 3
 @ollinist: Reread and yep, my bad, NZ Enduro and EWS Rotorua are two different races, I read them as the same thing.

I think I see why the UCI isn't budging, punishment for racing a non UCI event.
  • + 11
 The US Postal Service doctor created a back-dated TUE for a "cream containing testosterone for saddle sores" when Armstrong was popped for drugs the first time at the TDF. He was clearly microdosing with T-Patches overnight that would clear by the morning. Anyone who follows cycling knows this is the most famous TUE backdating story. The UCI really can't accept backdated TUEs now period. They were as lenient as they could with a 90 day ban. UCI's hands were tied. On the other hand, Richie and Jared were cheating, maybe for years, with DAY OF EVENT performance enhancers so this is clearly why Enduro needs the UCI.
  • + 2
 Since Lance and others, and their doctors started (an likely continue) to abuse the TUE system, the UCI (and most other sports) do not accept TUEs after an AAF.

It’s an unfortunate reality that honest people like Martin Maes now have to suffer because of dishonest athletes and medical staff of the past.
  • + 61
 I absolutely feel for him on this one, and fair play to the doc for sticking by his decision and admitting partial liability
  • + 15
 Upstanding doc. Obviously a good dude. What a terrible thing to happen.
  • + 56
 Dr Tom is one of the nicest, kindest, and most straight trustworthy dudes on the planet, and this is one of those very very rare situations where I give the athlete the complete benefit of the doubt.
  • + 47
 #martinmaesgotrobbed
  • + 38
 As a medical doctor, this is dumb. Probenecid is a drug used to treat Gout, and as mentioned to help boost an antibiotic to prevent infection.

“Because the original use of Probenecid by athletes was in amounts that far exceed therapeutic doses (normally 1 gm per day), it was extremely easy to detect. Because of ease of detection due to the unusually large size of doses, Probenecid is no longer used by dishonest athletes. Probenecid no longer can be used as a weapon for cheating. As soon as it became a substance on the banned drug list (believed to have been in 1987) it ceased to be used by athletes for cheating because of its very ease of detection.”

After this and Richie Rude/ Jared Graves scenario, it seems pretty clear that the UCI isn’t interested in punishing cheating athletes. From a medical standpoint, to punish an athlete for such inconsequential “substances”, is more shameful than being the athlete who took the “substance”.
  • + 15
 WADA determines which substances constitute doping, not the UCI.

There's much to scoff about regarding the UCI, but putting probenecid on that list is not their decision.

What UCI did here also seems reasonable: Shortest ban possible due to a procedural error of Maes and his team. Because if Maes/doctor had acted the first day instead of months later it would have been a very different story. I feel sorry for Maes, but these things really are the athletes responsibility.
  • + 7
 yeah meant to say WADA. Elite level athletic competition,especially individual type events, which of course include bike racing, places both governing bodies and athletes in tough positions. As is obvious with cycling, many athletes will find and utilize very meticulous and organized means to gain a competitive edge. At the same time, governing bodies exist to codify what is fair and what is not. This decision in my mind shows that this athlete was in the right and the governing body responsible for the decision was in the wrong.

What’s the alternative from the perspective of the athlete???? Hey doc, even though that med is clinically indicated, don’t give it to me.

That’s not a choice any athlete should have to make.
  • + 1
 @aprado10: The medicine itself is not really the problem (the UCI clearly recognizes this) But what an Athlete should do is immediately notify the governing bodies.

It's exactly that part that Maes forgot to do (not strange as as he said it was quite new for him). The sad part is that it did go through their minds at the time, but they simply let go afterwards. Understandable considering the assurance of the doctor, but still a mistake.
  • + 37
 Dear riders (and race doctors with bad phone reception)
Download the list to your phones so this doesn't happen again unconsciously, naively, unintentionally, however it may arrive

www.wada-ama.org/en/resources/science-medicine/prohibited-list-documents

Show the UCI that mtb isn't riddled with pseudo asthmatics, unrepentant cheats and lovers of steak, unlike their beloved tarmac-based medical experiment.
  • + 4
 Lovers of steak? Hormones in beef are returning positive results or something? Genuinely interested here.
  • + 6
 @Rubberelli: there was a roadie several years ago (Contador I think) who used tainted beef as his excuse for a positive test...
  • + 5
 @Rubberelli: ask Contador, he might know something about performance enhancing steaks.
  • + 1
 @lumpy873: I see. But does an honest rider have a chance of getting a positive result just from ordering steak at the local restaurant? I understand that the answer may speak more to the tainted food supply of developed nations rather than to UCI guidelines here.
  • + 3
 @Rubberelli:

It was possible to get a positive(and did indeed happen a few years ago in China and Mexico), but not anymore since WADA put the treshold a lot higher.
  • + 5
 @Rubberelli: Hard no. So when Contador made this claim, WADA went out and tested meat from the butcher that Contador ate the steak from. The result? Zero clenbuterol in the cattle. WADA then examined the results of close to 100K tests on meat in Europe in 2008 and 2009. How many clenbuterol findings? One. Literally one positive clenbuterol test in close to 100K tests.

I don’t know where Alberto Contador got his clenbuterol from, but it certainly wasn’t from the cattle. Perhaps it could be related to the plasticizers (indicative of blood doping) found in his urine as well (found by a test not recognized by WADA, therefore there was never action taken)...
  • + 1
 great post dude. pure truth. athletes get your shit together or get suspended.
  • + 1
 @Rubberelli: most likely not... (see the other posts...) An average person might get popped for something like a poppy seed muffin or cold medicine... Or, in my case, too much caffeine...
  • + 39
 Thanks UCI for bringing your shady anti-doping methods with you : Froome gets a free pass with ventoline, Maes gets 90 days + win strip for a documented injury.
  • + 2
 Froome probably did a sabutamol nebulizer (inhaled) the morning of the event knowing he had to put in a huge day do seal the Vuelta on stage 17 (or 18?) He just threw enough money and lawyers at the problem. Froome clearly cheated and Sky had probably tested that 99/100 times that nebulizer would of dropped the Sabutamol well below 1200 by the end of day (what you are allowed if you are asthmatic).
  • + 30
 The difference between a serious explanation by a doctor (in a an effort to heal a wound) and a lame excuse involving accidental sips of water. just saying... (that makes sense and it is a bummer for Martin - the other is crap. Sorry).
  • + 29
 Completely stupid decision by the UCI, the story is completely transparent as to why he has a masking agent (not even a PED) following serious injury. All this ban does is create negative headlines for the sport, and raise questions for the other athletes about whether they should take bigger risks with their health in order to compete by not seeking full care for injuries.
  • + 29
 RR: "This doping violation management is tough"
JG: "Tell me about it...."
MM: "Hold my beer"
  • + 5
 Thanks, I needed a joke and you delivered in fashion :-)
  • + 38
 *hold my water bottle
  • + 1
 @fabdemaere: *gin and tonic
  • + 7
 *sample cup
  • + 26
 The half life of Probenecid = 4 to 12 hours. You'd have to take it the day of racing to dependably mask a performance enhancing drug, yet Mae's tested clean by round 3 for both Probenecid and any/all performance enhancing drugs. The checks and balances here point overwhelmingly towards an athlete actually using an admittedly non performance enhancing drug prescribed by EWS medical staff for very necessary medical intervention -- handing the UCI likely the best opportunity they'll ever get to appear as something other than a trigger-happy hammer. If this ban and vacating of two wins stands, will fanboys of ever racer to test positive before and after Mae's case not point to it to cast doubt on UCI rational?
  • + 7
 Given the the half life that you stated doesn’t that raise some serious questions about why he tested positive for a ‘high level’ of Probenecid during Round 2 weeks after his prescribed dose had ended?
  • + 4
 @Tim2: "I provided Martin with a prescription for 2 grams of flucloxacillin 3 times a day for the next 2 days (dropping to 1 gram 3 times a day for a further 5 days), and probenicid 500 milligrams 3 times a day for 7 days."

Seven days, that's a fair amount of time, maybe the drug doesn't vanish so easily after repeated use. 500m 3x a day seems a lot too
  • + 1
 @t-stoff: Maybe something along those lines, although the dosage is not especially high. I’m certainly no doctor and without a more qualified opinion available it leaves me with some questions.
  • + 6
 @t-stoff: And the half life of a drug is regarded as the amount of time it is dependably biology effective in the patient's system. Elimination time from the patient's bloodstream is often x5 or x6 of the half life. He should probably have been expected to urinate trace amounts at week two. Again the checks and balances against the doctor's statement handed the UCI the perfect scenario to fairly and publicly distinguish themselves from a computer algorith. Just not sure the EWS is getting a good return on their investment in human intervention here.
  • + 2
 @Tim2: Round 1 and 2 were back to back race weekends, he apperantly was ordered to take probenicid that day by the doctor. Also with a half life of up to 12 hours there will still be trace amounts days after you stop taking it. assuming he had about 750mg in his blood when he took the last dose he would have up to 46mg left 48h later
  • + 7
 @F22: Yes but from what I understand the Probenecid was prescribed on the 10th at a non EWS race and should have been finished on the 16th. So to test positive at a high level on the 31st seems very strange to me.

The earlier test at Rotorua seems to line up with the explanation but I just feel that the second test in Tasmania needs some further explanation. It may be as simple as the fact that it can be tested for well afterwards but I really don’t know.
  • + 2
 @Tim2: We'll never know. Maybe it was trace, trace amounts. There is a post somewhere above that Probenecid was first banned in 87 so it's a masking agent that hasn't really been used in decades. Post alludes to the fact that is is not a good masking agent because it hangs around for so long and can be found?
  • + 1
 @Tim2: yeah, I missed that it was prescribed at the open enduro, thought that happened during the ews round - my bad. But I still think trace amounts could possibly be found, depends on how well it is picked up by testing procedures
  • + 26
 Well done to the farce that is the UCI for ruining this season for racers and the fans. Whoever wins this season now will always know they didnt earn it and didn’t deserve it.
  • + 2
 Maybe if I donate enough I could win EWS overall
  • + 3
 My thought exactly. A giant asterisk next to the overall winner.
  • + 27
 What a load of shit
  • + 5
 Agree: Total BS!

UCI, get your act together. This is a scandalous display of utter crap. Read the medical report. Persistent infection despite initial antibiotic treatment, pus coming out of the wound. The treatment was 100% indicated.

Is there any way to appeal this? Even if there was the season would be lost for Martin, bit still.

Martin, I and I'm sure everyone else is really sorry for you. Hang in man!!! You did NOTHING WRONG!
  • + 2
 a massive one. straight up.
  • + 20
 Absolute bullshit from UCI. Team Sky can swindle race after race on the back of bullshit TUE's, but a bloke needs genuine medical treatment and this is their response? I don't give a flying f*ck if they applied for the TUE after the fact. Show a bit of common sense.

I see a 2019 DH World Championship in the future of Maes.
  • + 2
 DH World Championship is still governed by UCI =(
  • + 19
 Why again needs the UCI to be involved in Enduro? Wasnt Enduro supposed to be not as annoying as DHI?
  • - 6
flag Rubberelli (Jun 26, 2019 at 6:44) (Below Threshold)
 Well, a lot of people thought it was physically obvious that a former EWS champ was on some serious performance enhancing substances for one.
  • + 0
 Are you referring to RR or JG or someone else? Proof or just idle gossip? Since we all know “a lot of people”...
  • + 0
 @phclaw: It was not gossip. It was pure speculation without a shred of evidence and there was a lot if it right here on Pinkbike, before EWS brought UCI in to test
  • + 3
 @Rubberelli: In this context I would equate pure speculation on whether RR, JG or any other enduro champ being on serious performance enhancing substances as Total Gossip.
  • + 0
 @phclaw: I'm not sure anyone suspected JG of it before they began to test. However, there was a lot of talk that a great many athletes must have been doing it since the advantages would be so great in Enduro and there was no testing. But now we have gone from the hazy era of speculation and gossip and we are firmly into the era of positive test results coming in. I doubt there is enough $$$ in EWS or mtb in general to pull off the elaborate schemes that was seen in road and at the Olympics.
  • + 0
 @Rubberelli: I’ll cut and paste what I wrote a couple hours ago lower down the thread...I kinda doubt JG and rr’s ingestions actually did much for them...but who knows...for that matter, the antibiotic Maes had coulda covered up other stuff he could’ve used (and the more that people unravel the story of the gash and why that antibiotic was prescribed, that story is now sounding more far fetched than the JG/RR one)...I kinda see the point of people defaulting to the stance of letting anyone use whatever they want....at the end of the day all the various ped’s in the world can’t teach you the skills needed to ride/fly a mountain bike downhill (or hit a baseball or dribble/shoot a soccer or basketball, etc....)...
  • + 2
 @phclaw: You think Minnaar, Gwin, Rachel etc will ever compete in a sport that is anything goes? That's like thinking Floyd Mayweather will join your basement bare knuckle fight club! No big names, no big $$$.
  • + 1
 @Rubberelli: I agree with you in principle, but you just named the old guard who most likely will be retired or won't be racing in 3-5 years, if not sooner. Not sure how the under-30, or under-25 set feel. Plus - there's not a whole lotta money in EWS or even World Cup DH. Even with the explosion in popularity over the last 5-10 years, DH and EWS are still really tiny dollar, niche sports.
  • + 17
 This is far more credible than the “I drank from another riders water bottle excuse”
  • + 3
 True. But even so this incident has a ton more exculpatory evidence, it doesn't prove the other explanation wrong. Maes is getting a raw deal for sure. But Rude didn't put up a fight, accepted his fate and served his punishment according to the rules. Personally I don't see the need to pile on but I do realize that is a crazy statement to make on a forum.
  • + 16
 The fact that the UCI denied the GT team a therapeutic use exemption says it all about the UCI and the direction the sport is heading
  • + 18
 There's a huge nuance here, they denied it when after a positive Maes and his team tried to get a tue months after the incident. Sorry, Maes and his team blundered here. It's the athletes responsibility, not Wada or UCI to follow the process in a timely matter.
  • + 16
 In my eyes, Maes and GT made only one big mistake, that is not using Froome's lawyers.
  • + 2
 Comment of the day! True!
  • + 12
 This is the strongest endorsement of good intentions by these
VOLUNTEER doctors and Maes; give him his wins back.

On the other hand, UCI should insure that everyone involved in racing has a copy of the latest banned substance list to keep as a document on phones/devices so a cellular signal is unnecessary, and kill a few trees and print them out for healthcare staff to keep at each stage.

Third, who’s gonna come out with socks or guards that cover the back of one’s calves?
  • + 15
 Sometimes I wonder if the UCI staff doesn`t use drugs as well for taking such shabby decisions. Shame on them.
  • + 6
 Their drug is money!
  • + 15
 Maes: Can the EWS get any more messed up at the moment
Rude: Hold my water bottle
  • + 2
 @yetistew
Savage!
  • + 13
 its a bummer but i wonder why uci denied tue for maes, since everyone on the road gets it Smile
  • + 16
 Yep, and it's amazing just how many of those roadies have terrible Asthma and allergies...
  • + 8
 @Marc2211: "I have an allergy to having a hematocrit level lower than 49.5 - I need EPO stat!"
  • + 10
 Road teams have bigger budgets to grease UCI's hand, that's why.
  • + 8
 1. It has been months, which is quite long for antidating.
2. Did you miss the lengths Froome had to go at CAS before the UCI yielded? And that was indeed a question of big pockets.

Maes got a very short sanction for a procedural error by him and his team. I'm not a big fan of the UCI, but this seems reasonable
  • + 1
 @Marc2211:

Interesting how most of the peloton does
  • + 7
 Because the doctors on the road teams know the rules. They apply before the positive test comes in the mail. Maes' team should have noted down what was administered, gone online to check as soon as they got back into cell phone coverage, and applied for the tue immediately.
  • + 4
 @ak-77: Yes, the doctors on the road teams are far more experienced. [coughs]
  • + 13
 Even with drugs 90% of you wont be able to ride like him
  • + 18
 You're not wrong, on drugs I don't usually manage to establish which of the 3 blurry machines in front of me is my bike never mind race on it!
  • + 2
 I dunno, I got overtaken on a big climb twice by the same guy who was off his face on speed or something similar, he had no other way to have done it but to have completed about 40 min loop (climb was 10-15mins). At least for fitness you'd be able to keep up with a pro if you were on meth lol
  • + 12
 only 90% you're being generous. 99.999% more like it.
  • + 2
 I think is more like 99%, Maes is a beast. They are in such an elite level, is very humbling to see what the pros do on those bikes live.
  • + 9
 Very relieved to read this and hear the circumstances. The headline suggests much worse and I hope others take the time to learn about what has happened and not choose to ruin the reputation of one of the most talented young riders in the sport. UCI could have dealt with this better imo.
  • + 9
 I feel like this is BS for Martin. However, how about some objectivity by Pinkbike and posters?

Overlaying the timeframes we can ask the following question:

If Martin took 7 days of Probenocid at 3x500mg starting on 3/11 (likely started on 3/10 actually) how likely would he be to still have it in his blood at the Derby event?

The half life of probenocid is 3-8 hours at that dose and the derby event started on 3/31. Using 3/17 as the last day that he took the probenocid and assuming a 8 hour half-life how likely would he be to still test postive on 3/31 (14 days later)?

Calculating the total does and the halflifes we estimate that on March 31st he would have had ~0.0000000003mg in his entire bloodstream (ie 0.3 Billionths of a miligram) in his entire body.

So in a 50ml draw of roughly (1% of average human total blood supply) there were likely no more than 0.000000000003mgs of Probenocid in this sample.

I do not know that the limit of detection is for the WADA testing but that seems astronomically small amount and I am not certain if that low of a concentration would even be able to mask other agents. So despite feeling bad for Martin I think it is a bit suspicious that he would still have tested positive on 3/31. That does not prove he was masking anything but it is a bit suspicious.

Oh and to the idiot who said the doc should have switched to a broad spectrum antibiotic, no the primary oral class are fluoroquinolones which can permanently destroy your tendons, nerves, heart etc.. As someone who took 2 doses 7 months ago and cannot hardly walk and am in chronic pain (no mtn biking anymore either), I applaud his doc for sticking with a narrow spectrum antibiotic.
  • + 8
 Gutted for Maes. The UCI you sometimes feel gets a bad rap because this sport like every sport needs a governing body. A lot of the good they do goes unnoticed and unmentioned but with decisions like this you they're loading the gun and passing it to the shooter. Totally shocking decision. Go sanction another snow downhill series and leave enduro to be. If it was an EWS panel who decided on this you'd hope they would've seen sense.
  • + 5
 What/ The EWS would have swept evidence of cheating under the rug? That's not what I want from racing governing bodies.
The UCI did exactly what they should have done, and it's GT that has let Martin down immensely here. If they had done their due diligence when they were back in internet coverage they could have applied (and would have been granted) a TUE. Applying for one 12 days after a failed drug test? That's just lazy.
  • + 7
 A bit harsh to strip him of two of his wins, as he has dominated the EWS by such a significant margin this season that the effects of the masking agent probably wouldn't have made a significant difference to the results anyway.
  • + 11
 As I understand it it's not the masking agent which enhances, it is the drugs which the masking agent is potentially hiding.
  • + 5
 @Mattgc: I understand the reasons why 'masking agents' are prohibited, but in this case we have a medical professional giving a clear statement that they administered the drug for medical reasons.

Seems like a TUE could/should have been applied for, or a request made to have a backdated TUE if this is still allowed. This is not a case of doping, or an attempt to mask other PEDs IMHO and the punishment is super harsh.
  • + 4
 @Marc2211: Agree with you there, just saying its not the masking agent which enhances. Its certainly the most thorough response I have ever seen for a positive test, and following road cycling I have seen a lot... The thoroughness and reasoning gives it a fair bit of credibility.
  • + 5
 @Mattgc: Agreed. Maybe if he said he got it from contaminated meat, or saddle sore cream he'd have had more chance of the TUE. :/
  • + 1
 "Apply double standards"
  • + 3
 @Marc2211: Exactly it should have been applied for as soon as his team checked what he had been given and were back within cell service. Which would have been the next day at worst.

GT took 12 - TWELVE - days AFTER they were told of a failed drug test before they applied for a TUE. They didn't do it a week after the race, they didn't do it until nearly 2 weeks AFTER he failed the test; which was 7 weeks after the race.
  • + 7
 I recently watched a documentary on Team Sky and British Cycling on YT. Bradley Wiggins won his first TdF with a TUE on a drug that makes you lose weight and gain power...and maybe something with helping curing a cold...Very controversial. As I understand the UCI is issuing these TUEs. So this not granting him the exemption feels deliberately harsh to sort of make a point against doping.
  • + 10
 The bank transfer from GT wasn't consequent enough to be granted a TUE, worst it was so small that UCI felt insulted and issued that disgrace of a judgement.
  • + 3
 Swiss Mafia, lost the half % of respect now I still had for them.
  • + 7
 I'll likely get downvoted into oblivion for this but here we go.

Both of these doping cases have been a disappointing blow to my own motivation to race. I had always dreamed of making that next step, I've been close and it's huge motivation to train hard, especially when you find most of your time gaps come down to the sprints.

As a 9 to 5'er (more realistically 8-7'er..), it can be extremely challenging to commit to training this hard, as most of Pinkbikers will know. You sacrifice a lot. When doping infraction after doping infraction come out from these people who are on this next step, it really brings things into question. Yo, who is known for putting nothing but water into his body even once mentioned that the start of the top 30 men is like stepping into a pharmacy.

Yes, it's unfortunate for both Jared, Richie and Martin.. But do we just blindly trust that all these incidents are nothing? I have a friend who is close with Richie and is very offended that I consider him a cheater. And in this case with the limited information released, it's very hard to trust that it was accidental as well. A team's doctor would be smart enough to not prescribe one of the better known masking agents... and definitely smart enough to file for an exemption if it was truly required.

Are the UCI the evil ones for punishing these multiple "accidents" from the top of our sport or is enduro really just a dirty sport? It's really hard to trust either side of the story...
  • + 6
 Update: After reading Martin's interview, I can see how this is a mistake. I feel for him, that's an incredibly tough situation to be in after pouring so much effort into being at the top.

Hopefully, the athletes are much better with ensuring that no controlled substances enter their body, and if they do... there's good enough reason and knowledge applied to prevent this type of scenario from happening.
  • + 8
 Still I don‘t get why Richie gets tarred and feathered here and everybody is bummed for Martin.

As far as I get the story JG didn‘t take anything intentially nor was he passing his bottle to RR to do any harm.
Yes, information were given poorly and it sounds like a cheesy excuse but I can not find a big difference from Martins or Richies perspective.

I am bumned for both !
  • + 1
 (removed PD double post)
  • + 2
 @firewalkwithme: I’ll answer that. I quite frankly do not believe the statement presented by RR in the slightest. He claims accidental ingestion but gets an 8 month penalty. As Maes has clearly demonstrated, 8 months is not the minimum for accidental ingestion. RR’s statement suggests that he got an AAF off a couple of sips of water that contained a tainted supplement but then he does not release what the actual finding in his test was. If it was a trace, release the number.

Furthermore, in the case of Maes I believe it is very clear that he took the specified substance on the advice of a medical doctor to treat a legitimate medical condition. It was not the case of dubious supplements being involved. I think it is very much the case that Maes would’ve certainly received the TUE had he applied for it before registering an AAF.
  • + 3
 @firewalkwithme: I'm with you... The laceration pictured doesn't warrant this drug that was given that also serves as a masking agent for PEDs. If it was a life threatening injury he should have been in a facility equipped to treat it. As a huge fan of Richie, I do believe that he was guilty of intentionally taking the drugs he tested positive for, and that's painful for me to say. But I think in this case of Mae's, a pretty good story was concocted here. I think people don't want to believe that their heroes could be guilty of not playing by the rules... I am still a huge fan of Rude, Maes, Graves, etc... Even Armstrong. They earned their wins, but they are in the spotlight because they got caught.... Don't pretend like it's absurd to think doping doesn't go on in every level of the sport. I see it in my local community, and you can bet it continues the farther you climb the ladder.
  • + 6
 What a bummer for Maes! The explanation seems legit, but no one can proof that Maes didn't take that substance before the doctor prescribed it. So I also understand the UCI's ruling.

What to learn from this situation? UCI needs to provide all medical staff with a full and easily accessible list of prohibited substances. Maybe design an app for that, I mean it's 2019 folks, there are apps for everything. If medical staff judges the prescription of a prohibited substance (with the app they can check, maybe there's even an alternative substance, not on the list) necessary for the medical treatment, the athlete has to provide a urin sample AHEAD of the prescription and the first dose of that substance. I know, analysis takes time, but that does not matter here. Athlete takes his medication as he was told be the doctor. Also he provides several more urin samples after the end of his treatment. If the initial urin sample turns up positive on anything, ban him.
After a certain time of the treatment, the follow up urin samples should be clean of the prescribed substance. In that case let the Athlete race. If anything turns up, ban him.
I know this costs time and money, but if you want clean sport, healthy riders and avoid situations like this one you have to come up with solution.
  • + 4
 There are many apps.
You would think the team would have some kind of foresight to have 1 person responsible for checking these things. Professional cycling is tainted enough, and most teams have atleast physios/massage therapists/trainers with them, this should fall in their job description.
  • + 2
 Very good points! The app if it doesn't already exist is a must you would have thought. Put the athlete educational material on it, steps of good athlete practice etc on it too and that would solve a lot of the worries these ews guys and girls must be having
  • + 15
 Maybe he cut himself on purpose and put mud into his wound to get the doctor to prescribe the medication he previously used to mask his doping efforts. *puts on tinfoil hat*

Can the UCI hire me now?
  • + 3
 @frerichs91: I can easily see how having no cell reception would totally cripple any attempts at "checking" anything.
Many people (and expecially something like the suggested app) rely on the internet for even the most basic information. Cut that of and no one knows anything anymore and sometimes isn't even able of doing their job. At least the doctors were still capable under those circumstances.
  • + 1
 @BeardlessMarinRider: I agree that app sounds a lot more intuitive. Wouldn't be surprised if EWS is working on something, they seem very involved with he medical research side of the sport
  • + 4
 For the record I believe his explanation, and anything given by an official race doctor should qualify for an automatic TUE. I hope this doesn't discourage injured racers from seeking treatment during a race. I hope this didn't set a precedent.
However this is their livelihood, they need to be better, blaming lack of internet is akin to "my dog ate my homework".
Aimed at the trainers/manfriends: print a copy of the banned substances list and do your job.
  • + 2
 @frerichs91: Unable to check the internet excuse only works when you're in the woods. Was the team out of cell service for the 7 weeks from then until when the failed test result came back?.
  • - 2
 We can be certain beyond a reasonable doubt that he was not taking the drug, or the drugs it can mask prior to the injury because he never tested positive prior to this injury. WADA uses frequent tests specifically to check the voracity of an athlete's claims if and when they piss hot. Maes says he only took it as prescribed after this specific incident, and their drug test records showed that it was true.

I can't fault Maes or GT for not applying for a TUE, a Doctor acting on behalf of the UCI prescribed the medication and assured them (in error) that it was not a banned substance. They did everything right, and a race official made a massive error. The solution is for UCI for come up with better way to inform their people, not to wreck Maes season.
  • + 2
 @maxyedor: A volunteer doctor at the NZ Enduro (not a UCI or EWS event) prescribed the medication.
  • + 7
 That's a tough pill to sallow. The UCI needs to reassess some of it rules. What's a man supposed to do - risk infection or take medicine to help heal? Stupid decision by UCI IMO
  • + 3
 "Tough pill to swallow"

I see what you did there.
  • + 6
 This is so obviously bullshit, I’m no doctor but an injury that serious seems like it should be treated in a hospital. Also where did this treatment take place I’m assuming so where in the NZ enduro village at a medical tent of some sort (correct me if I’m wrong as I genuinely would like to know) and your telling me that no one in the whole of the village had phone coverage surely that seems like quite an essential thing to have whilst organising a race.

Also injury happened on the 8th and racing was on the 10th, why did they not look it up before that time and realises that he had taken something banned and then not race and EWS wasn’t until the 24th and they still hadn’t looked it up but apparently both were concerned about it, Such Bullshit.
  • + 3
 Was thinking the same thing, if it was that serious of an injury, surely you'd of gone to a hospital to get it treated properly?
  • + 6
 Poor guy. Big respect to the Dr. for checking everything he could while under an immense work load no doubt. As mentioned previously, hopefully this does not encourage other riders to avoid medical attention and risk other potential illness or injury.
  • + 6
 It seems like the TUE was totally at the discretion of UCI, they are just being ars*holes in this situation...
From WADA website:

There are situations for which TUEs may be granted retroactively. The evaluation process is identical to the standard TUE application procedure i.e. the TUEC evaluates the application and issues its decision. The ISTUE stipulates which situations may result in the granting of a retroactive TUE, as follows:

Emergency treatment or treatment of an acute medical condition was necessary*; or
Due to other exceptional circumstances, there was insufficient time or opportunity for the athlete to submit, or the TUEC to consider, an application for the TUE prior to Sample collection; or
Applicable rules required the athlete or permitted the athlete to apply for a retroactive TUE. This is applicable to Persons who are not International-Level or National-Level athletes (Code Article 4.4.5) and (where the relevant NADO so chooses) to National-Level Athletes in sports specified by the relevant NADO (ISTUE Article 5.1 Comment); or
[Comment: Such athletes are strongly advised to have a medical file prepared and ready to demonstrate their satisfaction of the TUE conditions set out in ISTUE Article 4.1, should an application for a retroactive TUE be necessary following Sample collection.]
It is agreed, by WADA and by the ADO to whom the application for a retroactive TUE is or would be made, that fairness requires the grant of a retroactive TUE.
*A medical emergency or acute medical situation occurs when the athlete's medical condition justifies immediate Administration of a Prohibited Substance or Method and failure to treat immediately could significantly put the athlete’s health at risk. It is always preferable to address a TUE application prospectively rather than retrospectively. ADOs granting TUEs should have internal procedures to expedite the evaluation and granting of TUE for emergency situations, whenever possible, and without putting the athlete’s health at risk.
  • + 11
 Retroactively does not mean "after you fail a test" it means after you take the substance.

The race was in March - what was the team doing till May 21st? Ignoring their cell phones and the internet?

They were informed May 21st of the failed test and it STILL took them 12 days to apply for a TUE.

I hope GT is apologising to Martin, because it's their apology he should be getting, not the UCIs
  • + 3
 @nouseforaname: Yup. It is GT's fault. They should know their sh*t with athletes in other UCI cycling disciplines. They screwed over their star.
  • + 11
 UCI can go to hell.
  • + 8
 Well at least I now know what the C in UCI actually stands for! Unfortunately I'll get a 3 month ban from Pinkbike if I write it in the comment section
  • + 10
 it's c*nt!!! I'll help ya out @KezWallace and take the heat.
  • + 8
 Welcome back Richie! UCI found a perfectly timed way to reopen the race for EWS championship!

*move on - there is no conspiracy theory around here*
  • + 6
 That's a shame, no one really wins here. Health comes first, but what a stand up guy for not fighting the ruling and moving forward. Good on GT for standing behind their athlete. I'm all for zero tolerance, but I feel for the guy when it was out of his control, and there was no malicious intent. In cases like this, it would be great to be able to poll the racing field and get their thoughts on the ruling, as I'm sure no one sees this as a case of unfair advantage.
  • + 6
 EWS - you need to make a statement about this. Not the politically correct support of the UCI. You need to stand up for the riders. So little UCI support to teams about this, and I 1000% support Maes and the Doctors. They felt it necessary and a severe infection with potentially life/limb threatening risks if left untreated as TWO field doctors decided. mars, GT - even if everyone knew it was banned - doctors far more experienced and knowledgeable than 99.99% of people, felt it NECESSARY for the health of Maes. I’m good with the decision.
Now EWS, stand up for your athletes here. Won’t change the outcome, but strengthen a lot of support.
Martin Maes, EWS championship out for this year (next year win them all) so let’s see you crush a few DH races after this BS is behind you
  • + 8
 Bull shit. Bull shit Bull shit!!! Especially because it was given to him by Race docs. Feel terrible for Maes
  • + 9
 It's safe to say the EWS was better without the UCI.
  • + 5
 Thanks EWS management for shooting yourself on the leg... UCI has now managed to f@ck enduro.. This is why the UCI has not been generally welcomed by MTB'ers..they are generally a bunch of stoict, old, regressive and in ways short sighted organization...
  • + 7
 looks like teh UCI did exactly what they promised to do - clean up Enduro. They caught someone using a masking agent. That's LITERALLY what they are supposed to be doing. It's not the UCIs faul, or the EWSs fault that martins team are morons.
It's OK to not know what's in a substance when you're in the race was in March and the test came back positive May 21st. Why didn't GT check the substances used before then?
  • + 5
 I am a pharmacist by training and when I saw a diuretic prescribed with an antibiotic I immediately questioned that doctors motives. That excuse is as good as “drinking from a buddie’s bottle” one. If you know what I mean?
  • + 2
 Could you elaborate your thougts? I read that it's also kind of a strange choice of antibiotic.
  • + 3
 @jmjr: my point is that penicillin is such an effective antibiotic alone that if the doctor thought the antibiotic wasn’t effective then maybe use a longer acting penicillin or another antibiotic. Point being, it’s an old school approach to increase the concentration of penicillin in the blood. This approach is clearly extra risky to any athlete who may be perceived as trying to hide some other performance enhancing drug. There has been enough of these cases that you’d think any team doc would stay away from use of diuretics but then again take it with a grain of salt.
  • + 2
 @Batipapo: he wasn't a team doc, he was a Kiwi doctor volunteering at a non-EWS race. Maybe he is older and is using old school methods.
  • + 3
 @dr-airtime: Hmm, my previous reply to @Batipapo, didn't post, so here's another try. While I genuinely think Martin is innocent in all of this, I find the excuse a bit strange. Now, I normally don't treat a lot of soft-tissue infections, but I have treated many patients with life threatening infections, and the same principles of antibiotic therapy apply - and never ever have I used, or seen anyone use, probenecid...
  • + 0
 @ywos: Thanks. Are you an MD? (I'm not, I've just read a ton on sports doping as a result of having my childhood idealism shattered at age of 7 from Ben Johnson's 100m 1988 finals doping in Canada). The doctor that posted the official comment here has been a specialist emergency physician for 15 years. Also, New Zealand is a bit isolated so maybe they do things differently there? Maybe the doctor is quite old and was a regular MD before and was using old school methods?
  • + 1
 @ywos: Sounds like the probenecid specifically is a trick for life threatening infections? Doctor who responded said it would delay the Kidneys from flushing the antibiotics out of the blood system. This is the opposite of what you expect if Probenecid was a diuretic (it would flush your system of excess water and carry lots of substances away with that water). If it is a diuretic it sounds like it acts like one (so your blood get thicker as you loose water), plus you didn't get antibiotics flushed out so net, net, you have a higher concentration of antibiotics in your blood than before.
  • + 1
 @ywos: Found this in a 2014 article on a cyclist that tested positive for Probenecid: "While probenecid has been described as a diuretic, it actually is a ‘uricosuric’ drug that increases the urinary excretion of uric acid, which causes gout. But probenecid’s masking properties are assumed because of another property that it possesses: it acts to reduce the renal excretion of some drugs by competing for receptors in the kidney. So less of the active drug would be excreted in the kidney thereby increasing its concentration in the plasma. This would have dual benefits for those using certain performance enhancing drugs: it would increase the plasma concentration of the drug, enhancing its effects, and at the same time reduce its excretion in the urine thereby avoiding detection in urine base doping control tests."

www.groundup.org.za/article/daryl-impey-very-unusual-case_2192
  • + 2
 @dr-airtime: Yes, I am a medical doctor, but my specialty is far from emergency trauma medicine, so my post is not to be taken as any form of judgement... I just find the use of probenecid strange. Thera are of course well established national and international guidelines for ATB therapy, but there is also a lot of personal experience in medicine that may not correspond with the latest, and "greatest" medical know-how, but is still medically sound. I still think that this was an honest mistake, but a mistake nonetheless. As for losing your sports idealism, well, I have too... I firmly believe that any top level sport is far from physiological, and to achieve these super-human feats, you have to "dope" in one form or another... A normal diet, and training schedule won't do, so taking a ton of supplements to keep the body going is the only way. Some may help regenerate your body, some may enhance your performance, some are straight-up illegal drugs, some are perfectly legal food supplements (for now)... I think all competing athletes walk a very thin line in regards to this.
  • + 1
 @ywos: Dr Tom is an emergency trauma specialist. He ain't old and he rips on a bike.
  • + 1
 @dr-airtime: I correct myself describing probenecid as a diuretic (instead of anti-diuretic) with masking properties by increasing plasma levels of most drugs excreted via these particular channels being blocked in the renal tubules by probenecid. Like i mentioned, there is some literature to support the use of probenecid but ideally you'd use longer acting penicillin agents or another antibiotic class (although penicillin is so effective with its cidal capabilities on gram pos type organisms). Overall it's just a bummer to see it go down like this. But i also don't want to get my fork and pitch out after the UCI because i believe the required level of fitness in EWS is so extreme these days that performance enhancing drugs will most certainly deliver performance edges on these high performing athletes. But also not a big UCI fan either.
  • + 5
 As predicted, the UCI is destroying enduro. With a ruling like this, now people will question getting proper medical treatment and that is no a good prescient to set. Riders health should be at the top of any governing bodies list.
  • + 5
 Pleading ignorance is not excuse for not knowing the rules that govern your career. Even as a teenage amateur athlete, many years ago, it was made clear to us that it was our responsibility to know what was on the banned substance lists.

Now, many years later, I have a career that often has me working for long periods of time without phone or internet access. It is still my responsibility to know the laws and regulations that govern my profession. I just checked WADA's website and "the list" and TUE for are available has a pdf to download. That took less than 30 seconds. These documents should have been downloaded prior to the EWS season. The lists should have been checked and the TUE submitted long before it was in this case.

At the least this speaks to very poor management of Maes' team. Perhaps this is merely a case of poor knowledge of the system, perhaps not. Fans, sponsors, and team owners should expect more from their athlete's and teams than weak excuses. Unless of course they want to win at any cost.
  • + 1
 Yeah- but knowing the chemical ingredients track side of all branded drugs is a tough one- especially with newer ones and non-performance enhancing ones. Further, he needed medical care and a Dr. volunteering for UCI prescribed it to him. Not sure it is as black and white as him not knowing. It may be...we weren't there and I also agree that at this stage of the sport it would be a dangerous line to not set an example. But this one sounds more like bad luck and them trying to set that example when I would say the example is more on them to learn from. If you are going to have Dr's wearing UCI vests and handing out meds you should make sure they know your rules for doing so. They asked the Dr, he still gave it to them and said even if he knew it were banned it was still the right medical decision and the rider's health comes first. The exemption would make sense here as the drug was non performance enhancing and just a masking agent and if the Dr. would have known and understood how to file for it that seems the way to go IMO. Everyone is at fault but I see Martin as less at fault if the version of events presented here is accurate.
  • + 2
 @snl1200: I don't disagree with what you said. But, the TUE system was in place and there was plenty of time for the team to use that process prior to Maes' next drug test. The team manager essentially relied on the opinion of an unknown third party; vetted by EWS or not the Dr. was unknown to the team.

Unfortunately no-one truly looks out for you in this world, so you're best of looking out for yourself. I genuinely hope this was simply bad luck for Maes. He did have to do what he needed to do for his health. He also needed to make sure his career was properly taken care of afterwards as well. Filing the TUE isn't the doctors responsibility in this case. Nobody has to like the rules, but for the moment they are the rules and when you're elite among elites, you better make sure you know the book.
  • + 5
 Such bullshit to strip him of his wins due to an event doctor that administered some non-performance-enhancing drug to ensure his patient healed correctly. The racer is punished for being a racer and needing medical attention. Fuck this.
  • + 5
 It sounds harsh but it's 90 days instead of 730! I think this is more about the rest of the sport than Mae's case - certain lesser humans will cheat to beat those better than them and if word gets out a fail can be cleared with TUE well....
  • + 4
 It does seem rather unfair in the light of Rude´s and Graves´recent bans though, which are shorter and should have been lifetime bans under the applicable ruleset of the time.
Here we have an athlete with a perfectly legit reasoning for the ingestion, including a doctors testimony and prescription and even the application for a TUE, which ironically was declined by the UCI.
So given these facts, imho it´s simply down to the UCI´s incompetence and noone should ever be happy to not get screwed too bad by a governing body, just because it could have been worse, if they didn´t do anything wrong.
I understand where you´re coming from with the TUE excuse, but then again denying an athlete a TUE on that basis opens up a whole other can of problems, because it forces athletes to neglect their health if they want to compete. TUEs exist for a reason, so for the UCI to not issue them pushes the sport into dangerous territory imho.
  • + 2
 @Loki87: I think Maes is 90 days. RR was 8 months. Both bans were decreased because of the circumstances of each (neither seemed to get any benefit from the seemingly or allegedly accidental ingestion). Vacating the wins were harsh, but Maes got a much shorter ban.
  • + 2
 @phclaw:
You´re right, i somehow read that as 9 months for some reason.
Still as you say, vacating the wins is harsh given that he basically was given the choice to loose a leg or (potentially) loose his carreer. It´s just shitty how the uCI dealt with it, if this is really how things went down.
  • + 2
 @Loki87: TUEs absolutely exist for a reason. You take the substance, you apply for the TUE. You don’t wait for an AAF to apply for the TUE. TUEs after AAFs used to be a thing, but cheating athletes and conspiring doctors changed that because athletes and doctors were doctoring medical records and prescriptions after the fact to justify TUEs.
  • + 5
 I'm sorry but this is completely f*cked. We are now seeing the real negative repercussions of the so-called "partnership" with the UCI. Feel awful for Martin, he did everything he was supposed to. #ucisucks
  • + 7
 This is where rigid application of a rule without common sense leads to a poor outcome
  • + 4
 I’ve got a great idea. Let’s offer the top people @ the UCI the following choice: 1) Drop this ridiculous penalty against Maes.
2) Have them get dressed up in brightly colored spandex (Which is they’re normal dress code) put em on spindly bikes with really long downward facing stems and flat bars, raise their seat posts really high (so they can be in their comfort zone ya know) give em about 10 shots of espresso a piece along with a few goo packs and send em out into a remote location with no cell service on highly technical DH terrain. Upon sustaining the multiple inevitable life threatening injuries deny them treatment or make them pay a fine for taking a banned substance. 3)Tell them to get the hell out of governing MTB races and riders because they clearly know nothing about the sport. This is just plain wrong. Is there an address where you can send a letter of complaint to these spandex clad over caffeinated weirdos? Honestly.
  • + 1
 This is like asking the king UCI to not be king anymore. Send those lycras guys where they come from.
  • + 5
 Hmm, so the UCI doesn't make a difference between drinking from a bottle of a ghost rider and a medical treatment... bit harsh but thats just my cup o' tea

(Sidenote: Fantasy Team updated)
  • + 22
 Yeah, Richie's response would be like: "During the race I injured my leg, soon after I have met an anonymous maori shaman who gave me an organic white powder. I have never seen this shaman again nor can I recognize him because of face tatoos".
  • + 2
 @lkubica: :-D :-D :-D
  • + 3
 Interesting read:
coachsci.sdsu.edu/csa/vol56/rushall5.htm

"Small traces of this banned drug indicate therapeutic use, large traces indicate cheating. Only foolish individuals would use Probenecid for cheating purposes given the testing capacities of IOC accredited laboratories around the world.

The small amount detected in Australian swimmer Richard Upton's urine and the absence of any other banned substance is proof-positive that the drug was taken for therapeutic purposes rather than to distort test results (cheating). However, despite this information since Probenecid remains on the IOC banned substance list, Richard Upton was severely punished by two different Australian sports authorities even though the therapeutic use of just one day's dose by an attending physician was documented and freely admitted.

The criteria for evaluating the existence of Probenecid in athletes' urine samples need to be changed to avoid unjust punishments like those that have been recently handed down in Australia."

I wonder if the amount of Probenecid detected in Martin's test was considered in the WADA decision. And how long does it stay in one's system after stopping it?

Timing of the TUE application in this case couldn't have helped.
  • + 2
 You are right on the mark. He certainly would have had high amounts at rotorua that could have been detected and should be therapeutic (since he only would have stopped taking them 4 days before).

14 Days later at Derby though? The concentration in his blood sample had be less than 0.000000000003mg. So either UCI do not even care about the level in the bloodstream (ie any at all and you are banned=stupid) or Martin was taking Probenecid significantly longer than March 17, which would be suspicious.

Would be really nice for UCI to discuss this.....
  • + 3
 This is absolutely not true. Article quote below is Richie's crafted story. He was handed down a ban from a doping infraction. The AFLD has not announced anything publicly to say that the the infraction was "accidental ingestion".

Article says: "Richie Rude was judged to have ingested Higenamine and Oxilofrine accidentally and has now returned to racing after an 8 month ban".
  • + 6
 Can someone explain why the TUE was denied? This seems like a text book example of a legitimate TUE.
  • + 2
 Because there is a history in bike racing of doctors being used as excuses for failed drug tests. Since this substance is also a masking agent, there is no way of knowing if he already had it in him before the race as a masking agent for performance enhancing drugs. Yes he got cut, yes a Dr prescribed the drug, but did he have the drug in him already? We don't know. Was the Dr paid to be part of a conspiracy? We don't know. That's why it is risky to accept excuses after-the-fact.
  • + 1
 @thesharkman: Wait, you forgot to mention the possibility that he mangled his leg *on purpose* because he hoped that the doctor would prescribe him a drug that functioned as a masking agent. Or, doping space aliens.
  • + 2
 @Phillyenduro: that's the entire premise of what a conspiracy is. A plan between multiple parties to break rules. There was once a time when the thought of an entire team of roadies getting blood transfusions in a bus would have been considered absurd. As unlikely as any conspiracy theory is, some do end up being true, and the UCI and EWS can't pick and choose what seems believable and what does not.
  • + 2
 Michele Ferrari (and other doctors who conspire with athletes to enable cheating with the PEDs) is the answer. Doctors/teams/athletes were conspiring to forge medical documentation in the event of an AAF in order to justify a TUE for whatever substance was found in the AAF. Historically, you could get a TUE after an AAF but that was changed following the discovery of conspiracies to abuse the TEU system.
  • + 3
 Such BS!! This whole incident is just crap. The UCI sucks and has always sucked! Feel for Maes hugely here, he did not "dope".....period, and now his entire season is toast. I fear for all his competition when he returns to racing.
  • + 3
 Seriously tho. The amount of medicine he was given could not have increased his already superior performance in NZ and AUS. The limits of drugs/medicine in blood should not only be made by a UCI, but also with a common sense (which a doctor who treated Mase has). Some people have higher tostesterone concentration, some don't even have a protein to break down alcohol, some produce more muscle mass than others.... I could go on and on and on. I would say is that 75% of success is only in DNA, 15% in training sessions and the rest is all up to luck.
Antibiotics work in a way to kill bacteria, not in a way to increase endurance, focus... perhaps some might, however the down-affect of any antibiotics is a diarrhea (kills also good bacteria in intestines) which I can imagine is not commonly associated with increased performance (loss of water, minerals... you name it).
Just to think about: UCI limits should failed on drug test, due to their increasing "performance" (in next 10 years with that pace there will be no riders left just because of one molecule out of a gazzilion)
  • + 5
 If the story is to be believed, the UCI have made a poor decision here and should change it quick, before they do any more damage! Come on!
  • + 7
 UCI once again proving there inability to govern cycling.
  • + 3
 How does a team manager for GT not have the banned list saved on his phone? What a joke. Hopefully he's looking for a job right now, he just cost Maes a potential championship, not to mention the damaged to the image of the team and the brand.
  • + 4
 @#$@& the UCI Enduro needs its own cycling body. The UCI has proven over and over its corrupt and suspending and clawing back titles 3-4 or years later is not credible, Drug tests need results a lot quicker
  • + 6
 Oh look, WADA and UCI unjustly ruining careers in EWS just like WADA and the FIM do in SX/MX #shocked
  • + 3
 You cannot be serious with this bs...So Maes with very good reason to take this substance photos and I believe nice scar to prove it is guilty of what exactly? Using PEDs without the performance part of it? f*ck these UCI clowns, I think these decisions should be done by people who know what they are talking about and think about what they are doing, not only sending results based on bloodwork alone with obviously no context. It´s like doctor prescribing treatment without ever seeing or examining patient.
  • + 3
 This is absolutely nuts. I don't know the UCI process around determining suspension, but it seems like they have some kind of panel where UCI staff review the details of the case in light of the rules and make a determination on the whether to suspend and for how long. The fact that a group of people, who work for a cycling body (which presumably means they love the sport) came to THIS decision is complete bullshit. Maes clearly had no intention of cheating, he had a potentially life threatening infection, and he gained no performance benefit. The reason panels or tribunals exist is because black-and-white rules often don't account for the 'grey' of real life. The panel should have looked at the case and recognized a suspension was not necessary. Instead, they have gone through with a ludicrous suspension and effectively turned the EWS Series overall into a sham by eliminating the rider who was clearly the best from the running. They've tried to uphold the integrity of the sport by levying a nonsense anti-doping ruling, and instead completely wrecked the season's integrity by taking the series' best athlete out of the title chase. Complete nonsense.
  • + 3
 He needs money and Froome lawyers.

If the TUE is genuine I wonder what is wrong in UCI or WADA.

I do find that these guys (pro racers all disciplines) always have a ridiculous amount of weird medication no one I know in Québec (include me) ever gets for similar or worst injuries that obviously doesn't prevent them from racing world class level. Only thing banned I saw was a couple pills of cortisone low dose.

Maybe its that the idea is to keep them from actually racing and recover well, for their own good.
  • + 3
 WADA has been nothing but trouble for the US Motocross world. Sad to see the same happening to MTB, If I understand correctly when you sign on with WADA you forfeit control of your own series when it comes to these situations. They are the final say and they have no concern for who's careers they destroy. For anyone who cares, look up the Broc Tickle case. Took them nearly 2 years to even decide on his punishment.
  • + 3
 Would, be genuinely interested in seeing how the competing field feels about this, is the enduro family comfortable with this happening to Maes? I'd love to see a vote from them as a community body at the next round as to the general vibe around it.
  • + 3
 As a doctor it is not as if there is an infinite list of drugs to give especially in an emergency situation. I am surprised that all of the doctors on hand did not flag probenecid as a banned drug. I would hope UCI would make this list very accessible before the race. I get the no cell service, but may have been worth a ride from someone in the crew to check it out. I mean they were asked this question by Maes people. The doctor was there as a volunteer and really just making a choice in the best interest of the patient which is what we were trained to do. Having to ask a governing body whether it be an insurance company or UCI what is OK and not OK sucks, but it is the world we live in. That being said- any real world doctor would agree and support what this doc did.
  • + 5
 Sounds as genuine an error as you can get. What would the UCI like ? An athlete to lose a limb but stay clean? The TUE denial needs to be appealed!
  • + 4
 So the UCI did their job, and caught someone using a banned substance. How many others have slipped under the EWS radar over the years? Yeah it's a little shitty for Maes. But not being able to check the drug the doctor use 'in the heat of the race, with no cell phone coverage' doesn't mean the team couldn't check it when they got back to civilisation. This is just a failure of the GT team and should be treated as such. They were informed of the failed drug test May 21st - and it STILL took them TWELVE days before they tried to retroactively apply for a TUE. The race was back in MARCH. There's lessons to be learned here for sure, but it's not that the UCI is bad.
  • + 3
 I understand the fear that this might set precedent for someone to create a scenario that would allow him/her to cheat and get away with it. However this fear, is not only a demonstration of the UCI's brainlessness, it's also a proclamation of such brainlessness by their own mouths. They would allegedly be unable to tell the difference between a situation from which an athlete could not possibly have profited from, such as this one, and the hypothetical precedent-covered cheat. The result is terrible for the sport, and there is no one to fault in all this but the UCI. As simple as that.
  • + 3
 What I - as a team manager and care taker of my athletes - now would expect from UCI/EWS is a local point of contact that has a full list of ALL drugs that are prohibited and is easily reachable and responds within an hour. This would be a fair setup.

I get that the athlete is in charge of what he takes and what not. But their business is racing their best, not knowing the whole index by heart. Proper BS decision and gutted for Maes!
  • + 2
 People need to put their pitchforks and tiki torches away, the UCI did not screw up here. You cannot get a TUE after registering an AAF. You can get a TUE after taking a substance that is banned or specified by WADA.

Now, this may seem unfair, but let’s take a step back to perhaps the biggest cheat of all time: Lance Armstrong. Armstrong and his medical staff conspired to abuse the TUE system in order to explain away AAFs. The most famous case is that of the “corticosteroid chamois cream” for which Armstrong had an extremely dubious prescription and was subsequently granted a TUE after he returned an AAF. As we all know, some years after this (14 to be exact), it came to be known without a doubt that Armstrong was the biggest cheat in cycling of all time. However, Armstrong is not the only one to have abused TUEs in order to cover up his cheating. Numerous other convicted dopers have tried, sometimes successfully, often unsuccessfully, to get TUEs to cover for their doping activities.

If you want to blame Martin Maes’ suspension on anyone, blame it on the cyclists and athletes who came before him and abused the protections that WADA had in place for athletes to take specified and banned substances when a therapeutic need arises. If it was not for the flagrant abuse of TUEs, I strongly suspect we would not be here today where an athlete who did nothing wrong (except perhaps not have a copy of the banned and specified substances list) gets a 90 day suspension.
  • + 2
 To all the discussers and "wish-to-know-how"-ers: What ist Probenecid? This an uricosuricum, (what's that, everyone can google themeself), this medication has only a very marginal effect on woundhealing or infectionhealing. In Switzerland this medication is never used in such cases, even not in life-threatning infections. And the medical quality level in Switzerland is not the worst... And, here almost every medical beginner as assistant doctor knows that Probenecid is on the doping list. So, I do not want to blame anyone, but this medical treatment and the reasoning why it was necessary "to save the leg" is so what embarrassing. Please, open the eyes an be a little more critical.
  • + 2
 While im not suggesting that maes or his doctor did anything underhand, people attacking the uci over this are being ridiculos. He got caught with a banned substance in his body, with no tue. To not punish him would set a precedent that would be detrimental to the sport.
I think the blame lies entirely with the doctor. He said himself hes been in the job for 15 years, so claiming "he didnt know it was banned" simply isnt good enough. There may have been no signal at yhe event, but given that he had the drug in his kit, he obviously could have checked its status while preparing the kit.
The uci should have, and enforce, a zero tolerance policy on doping. While i like maes and feel for him in this situation, i agree with the uci decision. If anything i think it is lenient
  • + 2
 Weak sauce. Feel very bad for Martin. In general, the inconsistency around how the EWS handles doping, from specific cases to significant rewording of their doping policy year to year, is just creating way too much drama. And, as a viewer looking to get away from a day to day life with enough of it, this just turns me off. Add in my fav rider out for the season with injury and I'm just going to take my attention elsewhere. The entertainment market for sports is saturated with good product.
  • + 2
 Enough is enough. The health of an athlete is paramount. Martin did more then enough and required the medical treatments. There should be absolutely no punishment what so ever. It is great there is a governing body sure, and you can argue over semantics re: "don't rely on the Dr. to ask if medication on list or performance enhancing" vs "know and doing all that yourself" ... I don't buy any of it. I don't give a shit if it was performance enhancing in some small degree, what is important is that his health and well being and future well being was such that this was necessary. The Dr. was legitimate, the treatment was in accordance with regular practice and it was all transparent. Move on and do not put an asterisk beside an athlete like Martin. These things have a tendency to stick, and sponsor ship deals and opportunities and his livelihood can be impacted. What a turn off...
  • + 2
 Coming from an MD myself...been practicing hospital medicine for over 13 years. I have never, ever prescribed probenecid for a serious skin or soft tissue evidence. There is no evidence and not recommended by the Infectious Disease Society of America. This physician's judgment is poor. If an infection is not responding , you either change the antibiotic or add one for synergy. What a bunch of crap.
  • + 2
 I get the impression that this is more of a procedural infraction than a doping infraction. The Doctor should have made a better effort to check with race officials or others before prescribing the probenecid. Maes team should have checked as well. I seem to recall many years ago when I was racing XC and road that I got a list of prohibited drugs with my UCI race licence. This was before the internet allowed easier access to rule books. But the fact is that the doctors, race official, team managers, and racers all have or should have access to information needed to make the context decisions on which drugs to prescribe and how and when to make a tue application. If you look at it in this way it was not accidental but it does seem unintentional.
  • + 3
 UCI Go Ban Yourselves From Any Future Judgments On Bike Racing!! You just lost ALL credibility! Martin is a Superhero of a racer and you CAN'T take that away from him! SHAME BE ETERNALLY ON UCI!!! Fuck You!
  • + 4
 What an idiotic response from the UCI.

At some point 'intention' matters for fools. They should have fined him $500-$1K and been done with it.

I'll be cheering for Maes.
  • + 2
 the uci is going to ruin ews, just like it ruined street bmx comps. These anti doping policies are nothing more than a political way to change points standings and spice up results. Actions like these are a utter waste of energy, and resources on their part, and does far more damage to the sport than it does good. Cheers UCI, for taking another great thing and turning into utter rubbish, god on you mate!!!
  • + 2
 I’m a fan of Martin maes just like any other sane bike rider. But we can’t have doping in our sport. So rules and restrictions must be harsh. It is incredibly unfortunate for Martin and the whole community and I almost cursed out loud in the middle of the library reading that headline. This being said I believe the UCI would have approved his TUE if it wouldn’t have been filed after he tested positive. I’m not a fan of how the uci is handling our sport lately but I don’t think they are in the wrong here. As I said before no one wants doping in our sport. Really sorry for Martin. Would have loved to see him dominate the whole season
  • + 2
 Wood for the trees, maes seems like one of the more straight up and down characters in the sport. he has a legitimate reason for the positive test, and an explanation from a doctor with absolutely no malintent. You think it would be worth doping for someone like him who seems to have a bright future, and is starting to find some real success. stripping 2 titles and a what seems like a token 90 day ban? total load of shit
  • + 1
 @zyoungson: I’m certain that Martin Maes did not take any substances for performance enhancing reasons. Pretty sure he can be a runner up in every 2 wheeled non motor sport. What I was trying to say was that the UCI, EWS and other organizations should do everything in their power to keep doping out of our sport. And i think that they did just that. Is it harsh? Yes. But doping has no place in our sport and that should be clear. Again I fully believe Martin is a good sport and had absolutely no bad intentions with his actions
  • + 2
 What value does the UCI/WADA provide to enduro? They have thrown a bunch of honest athletes under the bus, deteriorating the sport and their careers. How many problem chemical cheater have they removed from the sport? Zero? Yup, zero. So UCI/WADA provide zero and collect a paycheque in the backs of destroying sports and athletes reputations. ???????? It’s been happening in road cycling for 20 plus years... UCI/WADA is a just a corrupt nightmare that any real sport can not afford to deal with.
  • + 1
 Riche and Graves guilty of using DAY OF EVENT performance enhancing drugs. The UCI just doesn’t dole out 8 moth suspensions lightly.
  • + 5
 Most importantly... will Pinkbike fantasy be updated to reflect the new result?
  • + 1
 Ya man, I was robbed by all those dudes with the doping rider on their team. So PB needs to claw back the prizes and give them to the rightful winner, being me!!!

Wait, what? I had Maes on MY team? Forget what I said.
  • + 2
 This just reminds me of insurance providers dictating medical care. Having to apply to the UCI to use a prescribed medication before using it seems odd, especially when time is of the essence. Sounds like attempts were made to determine whether it was a banned item, it didn't contribute to his performance, and was prescribed by a doctor supporting the athletes at the race. If the UCI is going to make decisions like this, they should have better guidance and support at the races. Unbelievable. This could lead to athletes making poor decisions about their health at races, which I am sure is not the UCI's intent.
  • + 4
 This is the epitome of the word BULLSHIT!! He deserves those wins and he deserves to race. What a joke this is all becoming!
  • + 2
 Clearly athletes cheat therefore the IOC and uci have tried to close the loopholes to further protect honest athletes from the cheaters.
Mayes is really a victim of this tightening.
I feel so sorry for him , he is a fine rider and from what I’ve witnessed from a far an even finer fellow.

If people hadn’t cheated in the first place we would not need these rules and common sense would provale .
I really hope he is able to go on and win many more races
  • + 2
 The way I see it UCI has neglected to train the doctors for banned substances. When you get injured with a life or limb threatening wound you have faith that doctor at the race who was appointed by the race director will take good care of you and not drug you so you get banned from the very same race director! This is absolutely ridiculous. The banned substance was administered by a doctor at the race that was governed by the UCI. It was their responsibility to make sure that doctors do not dope riders. If someone deserves a ban or get fired it is surely someone from UCI for endangering the career of a rider. Sue them!
  • + 4
 It's kinda weird how everyone always assumes innocence...the riders have the incentives to cheat the organization isn't out to do gotcha drug tests.
  • + 2
 Pro EWS racers should just boycott this round and form a riders union. UCI should be releasing a statement with a large amount of facts documenting their decision. It should not be left to only the rider to explain their failed test and the issues around. Pretty sad all around. Riders do not have that many chances to win a season title, let alone a just a race. I've done enough enduros to know how damn hard it is to put all the pieces of the puzzle together when it matters. 2019 mens overall will have a big asterisk next to it and guaranteed that no one wants that.
  • + 3
 LOOK OUT DOWNHILL! This decision is crap - he deserves the EWS title this year, but if this rules him out then he'll surely be back on the big bike for the world cup and world champs.
  • + 1
 So let me get this straight: Maes was prescribed Probenicd, which helps to increase serum concentrations of Pencillins, in order to treat an infected leg wound, and now the UCI is suspending him for doping?

We have reached next level absurd. The UCI is certainly making Enduro great again.
  • + 1
 Why is it that whenever i see uci involved in mtb decisions i think see you next tuesday. There is zero common sense or intelligence at work here. I totally support the removal of drug cheats from any sport but seriously................ This disgusts me !!!!!!
  • + 2
 Hey EWS racers, this could also happen to you... any one of you. To avoid this happening again, speak out, together, to the UCI... if you feel it the right thing to do. If not, ignore my comment.
  • + 4
 We all knew that the UCI getting their filthy paws on the EWS was not a good thing...
  • + 1
 Getting UCI involved with EWS was a mistake. HIs doctor prescribed it to him to keep him healthy after an injury, and there was NO cell service, and on top of that, it is NOT performance enhancing... yet they ban him from EWS Whistler and strip 2 wins from him? That is total BS... I bet he is pissed.
  • + 1
 Isn't it just so weird that no slower riders (who receive the UCI random drug tests at these events) are failing any of these doping tests... only the fast riders are failing... Too many of these riders are failing for me to believe they are clean.

I also think that if the EWS races were 35km with 1200 meters of climbing, vs 60km with 2000+ meters of climbing the riders would be less inclined to dope... the events are too long and too hard and the brutal nature of them encourages a doping culture.
  • + 1
 Is that true or is it just not reported because no one cares when some slow guy who is not famous fails? I'm not saying I know either way, but is there a way to really know? Does the UCI or EWS release a list of all riders who test positive or are suspended?
  • + 1
 WADA is a crap show, has zero ability to review and treat each scenario accordingly, and therefore is ruining careers. This is a.perfect example. Zero punishment should have been handed down. They followed the process WADA set forth and still got a punishment. This garbage is happening across all sports that WADA tests for. We need testing, but not through WADA.
  • + 1
 If this truly is the story behind what happens (and the accounts above seem quite honest), it's utter bullshit. Unless the UCI has contradicting claims (such as the substance does enhance performance, or whatever) - their punishment is not proportional. Sucks, both for Maes, for the doctor, AND for future racers who might get lesser treatment of fear by their team doctors.
  • + 4
 UCI is why we cant have nice things. The minute EWS got involved with the UCI I knew bad things would occur for the sport.
  • + 2
 What happens if after downloading the list of banned substances/medicines, the only available medicine and perhaps, the best one for the well-being of the athlete, is on the list?
  • + 2
 It sounds like, if they'd had the list on-hand or checked after treatment, they could have applied for a TUE before they got the results or even before he was tested. It's brutal to see while Maes was having such a great season, but if EWS is serious about being hardline on doping this action by UCI is completely consistent with that ...
  • + 2
 The question remain, what happens to my Fantasy EWS points... I think Martin has been unlucky but I also can't blame the UCI for handing out the ban but hey, at least it wasn't two years.
  • + 2
 Totally exagerated... At this point I don't see the added value of humans' deciding factor: mke a computer do this and you get 0 or 1 value and it's over. It's just vulgar display of power
  • + 3
 Oh yeah PANTERA, good idea to get over that shit decision.
  • + 1
 When it comes to important decision making, the UCI just plain sucks. Their stupidity is just starting to hit mtb, but they’ve Ben extra stupid in road biking, especially in the last year or so. What happens when you give a confederacy of dunces too much power.
  • + 1
 Im sure im in the minority, if not the only one-but, i've suggested to mates that he's doping and from what I know about that substance it clears out from the body very quickly, so the whole excuse about the wound is a BS cover up. WADA, UCI, EWS did the right thing. Spirit of enduro has always been cheating, from the line cutters in the early days, to the pre running courses, to now PED's.
  • + 2
 Now, what this also says is that they do not deem Rude or Graves to have accidentally ingested the banned substance they took.... or am I wrong.... Gutted for Maes and would air on his side in this.
  • + 3
 I think rr and JG got much reduced bans (lifetime) to 8 months because of the circumstances surrounding the ingestion was accidental - the supplements were not banned in ‘16 and ‘17 but banned in ‘18, and they weren’t listed in the pre-workout powders JG was using...or something like that....
  • + 1
 @phclaw: what a $*+# show.
  • + 1
 Maes is being treated unfairly. He should not be suspended or stripped of wins. Some sort of team fine for not following a procedure? Sure. Increased testing of him for a year? Yes, do it. But this punishment makes zero sense. And I say that as someone who's hardliner when it comes to dopers' excuses, and who's posted here a several times about not believing Richie Rude's lame story. We need to punish cheaters effectively to protect the clean ones, but clumsy misjudgments like this do that cause more harm than good.
  • + 3
 (Unless there's something to @ppp9911 's lucid comment here about the timeline, which I don't know enough to assess.)
  • + 1
 A sad day for mountainbiking, heaped on top of the less than satisfactory conclusion to the Rude saga. Missy smokin Maui Powee seems a long way from the feel of the sport these days. I hope this highlights the dangers of big brand money driving the sport and the greed that follows. If MTB wants to retain its honesty, i think lifetime bans for the proven cheats is the way to deter other ruthless individuals from trying to cheat other pro´s out of wages, wins and contracts. Pretty angry to be honest.
  • + 5
 Mae the force be with him.
  • + 1
 Too bad, MM killing it with confidence up to now.
The drug, WADA, rules are kinda whacked to not allow the exception for his injury.
These riders risk so much, then stuff like this happens.
Can he race DH with this suspension?
Now that would be a good move
  • + 3
 This is pure insanity. I'm going to go back to giving absolutely no fucks about racing. Especially when EWS has made it this petty.
  • + 1
 *uci
  • + 1
 This Is the Sports World We live in. Cycling is almost as Curupt as Baseball and Football. Why is this a Shock to anyone. Jared Graves and Richie Rudd Showed us that it takes the Best Performance Enhancing Drugs to Win. Who's Clean!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • + 1
 I kinda doubt JG and rr ingestions actually did much for them...but who knows...for that matter, the antibiotic Maes had coulda covered up other stuff he could’ve used. I kinda see the point of people defaulting to the stance of letting anyone use whatever they want....at the end of the day all the various ped’s in the world can’t teach you the skills needed to ride/fly a mountain bike downhill (or hit a baseball or dribble/shoot a soccer or basketball, etc....
  • + 2
 I do feel sorry for this chap. Having his name dragged through the mud for something that wasnt his fault. What was he supposed to do let the infection get worse? A ridiculous decision
  • + 1
 I remember seeing a comment when the original Richie news came out that Red Bull tests it's athletes to ensure they aren't cheating. Maes is now a Red Bull Athlete and think he donned the helmet for the first time at the first EWS race (but not at NZ Enduro). Can anyone confirm? It Red Bull tests to ensure their riders don't test positive (and thus cause significant brand damage) then this supports Martin's story even more.
  • + 1
 I think it was right before Madeira when Maes got his newly decorated helmet
  • + 2
 When first saw the Headline tought straight away he was the 3rd rider who was positive at the same time with Rude and Graves and we never known anything yet... Poor Maes, this is not fair at all!
  • + 1
 Strange there aren't many comments regarding the doctors. There is two days between the first treatment and second treatment so I'm sure there would be cell coverage. I'm a journeyman carpenter and I have to know code when I build a house. I just can't tell the building inspector I didn't know that was wrong. I'm responsible. I don't know who these doctors are but to have some responsibilities during a race where there are dispensing drugs and there are also banned drugs, it is the responsibility of the doctors to know that they are prescribing something that is banned. Could they have gotten an exemption at that time? Certainly more possible than backdating one a couple of weeks after failed drug test.
  • + 5
 This is so jacked, Maes you did the right thing.
  • + 1
 So in hindsight, sound like Maes should have pulled out of the race after he got that cut in his leg. That way it would have healed, he wouldn't have needed to take those meds or at least get the appropriate exemptions to take those meds, and he would have his results taken away or have to serve a ban.
  • + 4
 he did, it was at the NZ Enduro and it was covered here on PB. The NZ Enduro is NOT an EWS event.
  • + 1
 I mean, you could look at it as the meds being performance enhancing, as they allowed him to continue the race.
  • + 4
 @flipfantasia: So the timeline is confusing me. He competes in and gets hurt in the NZ endure, then leg gets infected so he's given the meds, and then races the Rotorua and Tasmania EWS still recovering from the infection? At what point did GT submit for an exemption I wonder. I'm surprised that a team like GT doesn't have a doc on staff that knows he can/can't give professional athletes right off the top of his/her head. Seems like that would be a crucial part of the job.
  • + 2
 @skelldify: they didn't though, as he dropped out.
  • + 2
 @matadorCE: yeah GT definitely failed in reviewing the drugs/applying for TUE in a timely manner. I have no comment about that, other than they messed up there.
  • + 1
 @flipfantasia: Just re-read the press releases and it was a volunteer doctor along with another volunteer doctor advising? Seems like this is a huge miss by the EWS as their should be a race doctor/medical center. In motorsports racing, there is a mobile clinic which checks out all riders/drivers and hence you can not only ensure everyone has access to healthcare but also that these 'accidental ingestion' situations are completely avoided.
  • + 2
 @matadorCE: how could it be a huge miss by the EWS since the NZ Enduro ISN'T an EWS event?
  • + 1
 If this isn't proof that this type of incidence should be handled on a case by case basis I don't know what is. This "black & white", guilty before proven innocent stance makes no since & just makes the UCI look like morons. Seems more like the UCI is trying to save face more than just doing the right thing .... Amazing!
  • + 3
 How does this ruling make the sport more fair, or safer for riders?

This decision makes the UCI appears foolish rather than a competent governing body.
  • + 1
 If there was an explicit conversation regarding whether it was a banned substance or not, would you not have checked that right away. As soon as you got cell reception? If this story is right and all true he could have protected himself with a legit TUE. But he didn't check when he got cell reception. All a bit fishy. I have watched happen for years in the road scene. Always a good reason. I hope this is legit.
  • + 1
 Regardless of the truth, it is way better communication from that Rude and Graves (with a bonus for Graves for giving a genuine statement in the comments).
We are only missing UCI statement to make it perfect. Pinkbike title could be a bit more favorable (more focused on the leg injury). It would also be nice to get more info about probenicid and why it's a masking agent. With all the side of the story, I'm more likely to believe.
This case also outlines how terrible is Richie Rude PR effort! Why in his case, it was so slow and there are no genuine statement from every parties..
Anyway, it's all very sad because it really damages the sport and the trust fans have for the athletes.
  • + 3
 So, you’ve all read one side of the story and have reached the conclusion that the UCI is to blame, even though none of you have all of the facts.

JP
  • + 1
 "Maes apparently took the drug on the advice of doctors to help him recover from a cut he sustained on his leg"

Hmm...as a former ER and trauma nurse, don't think we've ever given anyone an oral medication for a leg cut....unless it was antibiotics. Not to mention a small laceration has minimal effect on performance. That "excuse" in and of itself is ridiculous.
  • + 2
 Really unfortunate but if in something we characterize lovers of this sport is that if we fall strong, stronger we get up. Best wishes for a quick recovery for Martin.
  • + 5
 Bullshit decision.
  • + 5
 FREE MAES!!!!!
  • + 1
 Collect 4 tokens from your Probenecid box and send to GT Factory Racing. (allow 90 days for delivery)
  • + 1
 Every racer should be issued a formal list of drugs that UCI tests and the list should be with the racer 24/7 and posted clearly at each race.

The UCI ruling seems heartless too me.
  • + 1
 www.wada-ama.org/sites/default/files/wada_2019_english_prohibited_list.pdf

Save to your phone and if you are prescribed anything, before you pop the pill or say ok Dr just so a search. If it’s on the list “say anything else I can take instead, I can’t take this when I’m racing, banned”.

How hard is that?

Don’t need a phone signal either.
  • + 3
 That's really lame. After reading the doctor's reasoning, how the hell could they not give him the TUE?
  • + 2
 Masking agent? Not saying he used any PED's but does that mean if you take that drug that it would hide any PED's from showing up on a test?
  • + 1
 "Any" PED, no. But it can be used to mask some types of PEDs.
  • + 2
 Awwww this sucks. Probenicid is regularly given with antibiotics. He took it for that reason, and not as a masking agent! Super lame
  • + 1
 The denial of the backdated TUE was a correct decision. There's no way of knowing if the rider was using it as a masking agent before the race and then attempting to use the prescription to explain the positive test.
  • + 1
 Sooo....

"As of January 1st, 2020, water will now be a banned substance on the WADA list." - UCI

Being properly hydrated with H20 has have a greater effect on one's performance than Probenecid. Ban water.
  • + 0
 It's wild to me that there aren't SAT phones for the medical personnel to use to double check a situation like this. This is a huge international race and I'd hope they'd have the infrastructure to determine the best course for treatment. This all around just sucks for not only Martin but the doctor who made the decision as well as all the other racers who risk injury while on site for an event. Maybe I don't understand event logistics, but this seems like a case where it could have been prevented had someone actually been on call to advise in this situation.
  • + 4
 WOW,such a bummer!

*changes the fantasy team*
  • + 3
 then it was the doctor, with the water bottle, in the conservatory.. fooled me, I was sure it would be Colonel Mustard.
  • + 0
 After reading the above, I kinda feel like the Dr. should get the 90 day "unintentional suspension."I don't think the Dr. had any malice and it sounds like he made a sound medical decision- just not one aligned with UCI doping rules. As a Dr. administering drugs on their behalf it should be his responsibility to know and their responsibility to tell him which drugs are allowed and which aren't. It's like a police handing out drugs for a judge, you asking if they are illegal and them saying no, and then them busting you for them. BS. There was a mistake made but it wasn't Martin's. Also- the drug is a masking agent- so hides stuff that actually does effect performance. There is no reason why he should loose his wins if the drug did nothing to assist in them. Sounds like Martin is on the wrong end end of other peoples mistakes here and acted professionally throughout. That sucks for him.
  • + 2
 Gutted for Martin, the UCI once again shown that they're decisions aren't logical IMO.

On a different note @brianpark what will happen with the fantasy team results?
  • + 2
 I am fervently against this ruling! I rarely side with the athlete in these matters, give me a break about a water bottle was laced with crap, AND this isn't that!
  • + 1
 Armstrong was defended fervently by his fans before his confessional... It's naive to believe that drugs aren't happening at the highest levels of enduro just as they are in every other sport
  • + 4
 Well at least he didn't just use some random guy's antibiotics!
  • + 3
 Let's book a full plane of Belgian supporters to Mont Saint Anne for the DH world cup (31st aug - 1st sep)!
  • + 3
 What a joke. Let our guys race. The UCI needs to back the hell of and hopefully the EWS has Maes back.
  • + 5
 Ban the UCI!
  • + 0
 I remember when all the roadie's got done for doping years back, they all had similar reasons / excuses about it not being their fault with sponsors and doctors playing along with the same bullshit excuses, sometimes your heroes aren't who you think they are. Not saying that's the case for Mae's but all seems the follow the same blueprint.
  • + 0
 ridiculous comparison.
  • + 1
 @ksilvey10: Why? It's not a comparison with the drugs or the level of organised drug taking that was happening in the epo years in road racing. Just that for years everyone blindly believed what the riders and teams used to say. No team or rider is straight away going to put their hands up and say 'yeah we did it, didn't think we would get caught, sorry'. Like I said not saying that is the case here, sounds like a stupid mistake and prob to harsher rules. It was more a general comment, to think that performance drugs aren't in all sports at some level is naive, and to think that it isn't covered up is also naive.
  • + 4
 Fk Off UCI, FIS and IOC too
  • + 0
 Fu$k the UCI. Some people will read this headline and assume Maes is guilty of doping without actually reading that his doctor was just trying to save his infected leg. If this banned medicine is non-performance enhancing then why the hell is it banned? So the UCI can have a job, that’s why! I think it was a huge mistake to get them involved in Enduro.
  • + 1
 "we host our first anti-doping rider and team educational seminar alongside the UCI Legal Anti-Doping Services"

Well that's a relief, lucky everyone knows about this halfway through the season...
  • + 3
 The UCI needs to go. A bad idea from the start. The path to hell is paved with good intentions.
  • + 3
 This is awful. Maes gets stripped of his results and banned 3mo. for taking medication to heal an infection. Cruel UCI.
  • + 1
 Anyone know if this was a uci sanctioned event, if so where was the uci delegate? If not why are the uci getting involved
Cynical me thinks the uci denied the tue to make mtb and enduro look bad. But that's just me
  • + 3
 Well this is a bit mad on the UCI's part. Has anyone blamed Wiggo or Brailsford yet?
  • + 5
 This is dumb.
  • + 0
 Hate to say it, but ‘ignorance’ isn’t an excuse, unfortunately. ‘I didn’t know officer’ never works.

That said, why isn’t there an app, or email, or something with an exhaustive list provided to every racer and Dr. before the series starts up?!?
  • + 0
 All these accidental ingestions be it of supplements or anti-biotics by EWS riders who are (Dominating Races) is not strange or odd.........lol....hmmmmmmmmm

Why would a trained EWS / UCI or whatever kind of doctor he was be carrying a banned substance?

Anything is possible and i am not accusing / blaming anyone or anyside, but sometimes the proof is right in the pudding and remember that there is always 3 sides to a story!!!
  • + 1
 This is really rubbish - this season EWS men's competition is now ruined for all participating and following IMHO. Such a shame a bit of common sense couldn't be applied here.
  • + 2
 Complelty gutted for Maes, I would have thought that a 90 day ban is more then enough punishment, but they still have to strip him of 2 titles
  • + 1
 Drugs is drugs. If needing to take banned drugs for medical reasons they do need to stay away from competition but NOT be fined! Should be given 30 days to flush out of system, this sounds fair!?
  • + 0
 EWS - If you are going to adopt new organizations rules then you best make sure there are personnel on site to answer questions in a situation at an event. Cell service or not.

UCI - Same as above. Why wasn't there a paper list present for doctors to review? Most races are in remote locations. Depending on a cell signal is shameful. Representatives need to be on site to make real time decisions.

GT / Maes - EWS and UCI take no responsibility for their rules only enforcing them as they see fit. Demand personnel be on site. A TUE should have been granted on site.

Shameful... When UCI decides the result of a series and changes the results in a situation like this the sport is lost... Maybe UCI should just focus on banning paying card holding riders from participating in E Bike races...
  • + 3
 Perhaps rather than a ban a period of enhanced testing would have been better?
  • + 1
 What the hell uci..all the conditions of this are perfectly normal! Why the hell would you ban him and strip him of prefious titles???? This is stupid!!
  • + 1
 No way! This is utterly preposterous. I hope these decisions are reversed for the sake of common sense and our beloved sport. Incredibly unfair.
  • + 2
 Martin was clearly wronged. The real issue is the WADA list, you can’t take beta blockers while competing in Billiards?
  • + 3
 Does anyone know if this bans Martin from DH events as well?
  • + 2
 Crazy. You don't cheat and lie and you get a 90 day suspension. You cheat and lie and face a reduced punishment
  • + 2
 That's ridiculus frim the uci. Ews should never have mated with them. So gutted for Martin...
  • + 3
 Guess this is what you get when you make a deal with the UCI devil.
  • + 3
 This is getting to be ri-goddamn-diculous
  • + 1
 If it doesn't help him gain a performance advantage and prevents him from potentially loosing a leg (worst case scenario) then I dont really see a problem
  • + 1
 Sadly cooler heads did not prevail in this case. The UCI wants to ban Whoop Ass (canned), in order to bring the sport of MTB more in line with it’s (the UCI) roadie roots.
  • + 3
 I guess it was Martin's waterbottle...
  • + 3
 Bye Enduro, its been real.
  • + 3
 Wonder what would happen if every rider refused to ride this weekend.
  • + 3
 UCI go home, you're drunk!
  • + 3
 From the list events of this one, looks like chicken sh*t call by the UCI.
  • - 2
 I'm a licensed medical provider, there is a simple fix: Provide all medical providers who work or volunteer at a sanctioned event with a list of banned medications.

Summary: He was treated on site, the treatment was ineffective. If it really was a risk of limb, they would have shipped him out of the area for a higher level of care, so I'm calling BS.

My opinion: They knew it was banned, they took a chance, and they lost.
  • + 4
 Your opinion is just that - the facts are completely different. I was at the event in question as a volunteer marshal as were a large number of EWS racers who also saw first-hand what happened. Dr Tom is a legend locally, and an experience ED doctor. Your inference is outright appalling to me - with him and his crew of volunteer doctors many of our local events would struggle to take place. Yes, Martin could have gone to a local hospital and got intravenous antibiotics, but as everyone believed there was no issue with prescribed treatment, why bother sitting in a waiting room and a night in hospital when you can be treated on site? Read the press releases, they are accurate.
  • + 1
 This is garbage. These bans have already ruined seasons for the sports best riders for unintentional ingestion.
  • + 2
 Holy sh*t Eek this is awful. Can’t believe this happened Frown
  • + 1
 Pedro Delgado was popped for the same substance
late 80’s. He received no sanction.
  • + 2
 This season is intoxicated with bad news.
  • + 1
 UCI be like "It is better publicity for the sport if you lose a leg or die competing." F em. Go Maes
  • + 1
 But what are the ramifications to our fantasy points? Gonna need to adjust my team now...
  • + 3
 fuck uci
  • - 1
 Not sure why the doctor would prescribe a known banned substance with having approval first. Was it essential Martin took the drug at that moment rather than a few hours later once the outcome oc the Tue application known?
  • + 3
 The list changes every year, without notice, and contains some 400 substances. A lot of which are used therapeutically, and /or have little to no performance nuancing effects. WADA likes to stay in business.
  • + 2
 Dr: "You have an infection that could cause you to lose your leg or possibly your life."
Me: " Gimme whatever you got in that bag of drugs, Doc, and make it snappy!"
  • + 0
 BTW, did you read they couldn't check the banned list because they didn't have internet access?
  • - 1
 @iamamodel: hes the race doctor at a uci sanctioned event. He should know or have an offline list of what's banned
  • + 2
 @drew12341: I know how it works. I used to be subject to wada anti doping in the past as an athlete
  • + 2
 I have no idea how the exemption process works but in the case of a large wound that has already developed an infection a few hours does matter.
  • + 3
 @CM999: It was not a UCI sanctioned event....
  • + 1
 Sounds like EWS need to get some doctors who know what's banned and what's not.
  • + 3
 This occurred at the Trans NZ enduro, 2 weeks prior to the first EWS round in Rotorua.
  • + 1
 @sarahmoore: indeed. I corrected myself later. Still, this doctor should not have administered a banned substance the day after the accident, without first obtaining a TUE or checking the substance was banned.
  • + 2
 What does this mean for my fantasy league????‍♂️????
  • + 1
 So does this mean fantasy now has two icons for no shows? Medical symbol and a needle?
  • + 0
 All EWS riders should submit a TUE for the use of Probenecid in case they crash and get an infectious injury that threatens them.
  • + 2
 God....this is ALL so inconsistent. Feel for Martin in this case though
  • + 2
 This sucks, they steal his wins over his leg
  • + 2
 ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ well..... shit. Frown
  • + 2
 Is a simple list with all banned substances on it too difficult?
  • + 1
 It is simple. Doctor should have known. Doping is strict liability. If you ingest/inject it, you're liable.
  • + 3
 it's like 300 substances. good luck remembering or trying to figure it out when a dude has a gash in his leg you're trying to deal with
  • + 3
 @ksilvey10: It was 24 hours after the initial treatment that the drug was administered - not like the guy was bleeding to death. Yes, if you're a race doctor, you should have a bang up to date banned list so that you know you're not administering something that will bring up a positive test.
  • + 2
 @HartsCyclery: Indeed.

Why everyone seems to think it’s hard to know what’s banned or not when anyone can download this pdf to their phone to do a search to check is beyond me.

www.wada-ama.org/sites/default/files/wada_2019_english_prohibited_list.pdf

It’s the sort of thing I’d expect any pro sports person to have in their personal phone and get a new copy of before each race, it’s what 10 seconds of effort to save all the bullshit ?
  • + 2
 @StevieJB: On the EWS, at least in this specific situation, hind sight is 20:20 - apparently.
I'm sure all parties involved (and anyone observing not practicing it already) will follow that (or something similar) protocol moving forward.
  • + 2
 @ksilvey10: I didn't say anyone needed to remember all banned substances. A race physician should be able to look at a simple list to see if a drug is on the banned list. It would appear that such a list is easy to download to one's phone or just print it out if you wanna go all retro.
  • + 1
 Sux so much....
does it mean that kegan and nicolai take the wins instead ?
  • + 2
 Ridiculous. This should change. Free doping for all! That'll solve it.
  • + 1
 I think I'm bummed now that Richie won't be racing Martin. I was excited to see that match up. Now we have to wait.
  • - 1
 So Maes gets popped for a PED, but EWS says it wouldn't have offered any performance advantage. Rules are rules, I get it, but sometimes there's gotta be a little wiggle room.
  • + 2
 Conor Fearon 2nd in Tasmania.
  • + 2
 Nothing new with the poxy UCI. Really luv the EWS but this is crap news.
  • + 1
 What a joke. There needs to be some common sense injected into the application of these policies.
  • + 1
 He wouldn't be suspended if he was riding a 29er.
  • + 1
 Does this mean pinkbike will do a recount on fantasy points?
  • + 1
 His performance was enhanced by not having his leg amputated....
  • + 1
 Got to feel sorry for who wins the EWS overall now.
  • + 1
 ALl about $$$$....ruining the sports one champion at a time.
  • + 1
 This is ridiculous. Fuck UCI, srsly.
  • + 2
 Fuck the UCI
  • + 1
 If it doesn't affect his performance why is he being stripped of his wins!
  • + 0
 And that gentlemen is why it's called the 'Pot Belge' (aka the Belgium's Pot …)
  • + 1
 there has sure been a lot of accidental doping in EWS recently...
  • + 1
 Fuck the UCI. They do nothing for our sport.
  • + 1
 Article title change? Must be getting pressure fro UCI.
  • + 1
 sounds like the EWS/UCI are fixing results.
  • + 2
 So sorry for you Martin
  • - 3
 I get the whole personal responsibility aspect of this drug policies, but what gets me especially in this case is the medicine was prescribed the race doctors. It wasn’t a case of him going to some shady doctor to try and get an exemption. These were the official doctors brought in by the EWS who gave him this, and now he’s stripped of his wins and suspended for 90 days? Seems ridiculous to me.
  • + 6
 The drugs were not administered at an EWS race
  • + 11
 @EnduroWorldSeries: You guys have some pull and you're looking quite foolish right now.

I'm sure you're gonna say no, we don't have any pull, its all up to the UCI, because that's the formal, party line agreement. Nonsense. You all know each other and can talk about this, and this situation stinks like a rotten fish.
  • + 0
 @Speeder01: right on!
  • + 7
 @Speeder01: does it though? I'm not saying that Mae's actually did something wrong, but we know from other cycling disciplines that even with rigid doping guidelines, entire teams were able to subvert the system and become champions and the highest earners in the sport, Thus, even more strict rules were put into place until we are at where we are today. Why would any EWS athlete not carry the doping rules in their phone (or anyone working on their team for that matter) to share with medical professionals they may see as they travel the world? It could be that Maes' only crime was being dumb.Live and learn. But cheaters who work so hard to cheat, also have excuses ready to lessen the penalty if they are caught.
  • + 2
 @EnduroWorldSeries: Right, I am mistaken. I misread the article.
  • - 3
 @EnduroWorldSeries: so f*ckin what!?! They saved him from loosing a limb or worse.. this isn't even funny or about EWS racing... It's about power and control which the UCI has NONE of but pretends this is somehow important enough to try and take his titles.. f*ck that!
  • + 4
 Did you read the article? The injury happened (and the drug administered) at a local level NZ enduro race, not an EWS race.
  • + 3
 @ThinkTank45: maybe you should read all the comments. Particularly the one where someone already pointed this out, then the one after it where I acknowledged that I misread the original article.
  • + 3
 @Rubberelli: I stand by my comment. If he showed up with a random positive for a masking agent, of course, suspend him. Considering the evidence in this case, however, this suspension is a mistake.

He had a serious, life and limb threatening wound infection in his leg as a result of an accident. He sought medical attention from a well known and well respected volunteer physician not affiliated with his team. He failed first line antibiotics. The wound got worse and he became septic. They increased the narrow spectrum antibiotics and enhanced the effectiveness of the medicine with probenecid. Someone failed to look up the info. He failed the test.

As MM himself has said, hopefully we can all learn from the mistakes made here on all sides. But I think the penalty is unfair and the EWS knows it and has rolled over.
  • + 1
 @Speeder01: and I stand by mine. Maes got off incredibly light for a violation that carries the punishment of never racing a UCI event ever again. What was EWS supposed to do, just slap him on the wrist? It's not like doctors have never been in on doping schemes and UCI can't travel back in time to see if what the doctor said is true. But think about this: 3 top EWS racers have so far tested positive (all from supposed dumb mistakes). When was the last time you remember that happening in WC DH?
  • + 1
 Fuck the UCI Elitist swine
  • + 1
 I guess you go full DH for this season now
  • + 1
 Rude's series for the taking now!
  • + 1
 it's like the US military, you're only allowed to take Motrin
  • + 2
 Not cool, that
  • + 1
 Tag team between Richie and Martin?
  • + 1
 Just appeal should be overturned without much drana
  • + 2
 wada is known for being extremely slow with decisions, difficult to work with and never overturning anything
  • + 3
 on what basis would it be over-turned?
  • + 0
 Wonder will this affect my fantasy team results ???? lads mightn't like Richie but will be swapping him in like mad
  • + 3
 ha, i was thinking the same thing
  • - 1
 Maybe the EWS should publish a 3 year study on banned substances, then distribute it to their volunteers administering prescription drugs to riders...
  • + 6
 The drugs were not administered at an EWS race
  • + 11
 @EnduroWorldSeries: Sprit of the law vs. letter of the law? Does it really matter if the drugs were literally administered at the race or at a follow-up appointment after the race by the same EWS vetted medical staffer if time was first necessary to monitor for infection? I mean, if the sprit of the law here is, in fact, keeping a level competition field for everyone? The 90 day ban is arguably a consequence within the spirit of the law for not having filed a TUE immediately after administering the Probenecid, but vacating two wins over a non performance enhancing (but very medically necessary) drug looses sight of giving everyone a fair chance to compete on a level field.
  • + 3
 @boonecycles: it was not on a EWS race, and not from a EWS medic, it was before the season had begun
  • + 4
 @EnduroWorldSeries: yes, sorry. I thought this and obviously not. He was popped at an EWS race test. Therefore had a chance to gain TUE after treatment and before competing in EWS. Another reason why he has received this sanciton.
  • + 0
 @EnduroWorldSeries: would you accept a petition to get out of the UCI? I understand one of the main reason to join UCI this year was the doping tests. There is also this aggressiveness of UCI to monopolize cycling competitions, for example with the letter UCI sent to FMB over eBike enduro competitions. UCI does not invest in our disciplines, why should we invest in UCI?
  • + 1
 Welcome to the world of road cycling
  • + 2
 WADA is stupid as fuck
  • + 1
 Appeal this appalling mess!
  • + 1
 This is some BS. If ever there was a place for a TUE, this is it!
  • + 1
 F-ing ridiculous. It's a disgrace
  • + 2
 #bantheUCI
  • + 1
 So, most importantly will the fantasy league be updated?
  • + 0
 But then nothings said about a guy chopping his balls off then entering the womens cat?

Madness.
  • + 2
 I was curious about this and there's actually quite a bit of information about gender transitioning and policy surrounding it in competitive cycling. The UCI has officially adopted the IOC's guidelines which are quite measured (circulating hormone levels, timelines, etc.)... That being said, I'm not at all trying to start an argument, but at least there is actual policy for transgendered athletes competing at an international level in cycling/the olympics, whereas Maes's situation seems like it should be somewhat straightforward and that TUE seems like it should have been granted yet... it wasn't... which is puzzling Frown
  • + 1
 @cragus-t A few facts easily Googled: 1. you don't have to "chop your balls off". You only have to have a certain lower level of testosterone achieved by hormone blockers. This was Martina Navratilova's point that players could compete as women, and later father children (in reality not going to happen). 2. In Australia the vast majority of trensgender women have not had gender-reassignment surgery. I expect this is similar for other countries like ours.
  • - 2
 Why did the race doc carry medicinces without knowing which were and were not acceptable?
Surely if prescribed by the race doc then the liability is with him.
  • + 21
 Thre last thing a doc should be worried about is UCI rules when helping people.
  • + 6
 I'm pretty sure he got the injury at the NZ Enduro, which is a local, volunteer-run race.
  • + 6
 Doctors have enough stuff to worry about. The UCI and their BS is not one of them.
  • + 1
 Then whats it masking?
  • + 1
 The use of diuretics is typically to clear out any synthetic EPO used that might still be lingering in his blood stream.
  • + 1
 surprise surprise...
  • - 1
 First mistake was closing a contaminated wound. Should have just irrigated, antibiotics and dressing to let it drain.
  • + 1
 Endurabro
  • + 0
 Dame .......will have to put him back in my fantasy team now !
  • + 1
 Doh, he’s out again !
  • + 0
 Doc...whats in that pill? I dont know, just take it.... For the win!
  • + 0
 If you ain't cheatin, you ain't tryin
  • + 1
 Fuck me not again
  • + 0
 We need cedric ravanel to drop some bombshells on this like he did rude!
  • + 1
 That is bullshit.
  • + 0
 f*ck the EWS and f*ck "enduro"
  • + 1
 why.....
  • + 1
 Probably because we need more "Endurando". Enjoy the track at your speed without someone on your back, replay the interesting bits at your pace, no time pressure, just for the fun of it. I don't give a shit about the chrono, I just want to do the track and finish in one piece at the bottom. And have beers with friends at the end!
  • - 3
 Can’t find out if your drug is illegal??? Have no signal on your phone??? TAKE IT ANYWAY AND EXCEPT THE RISKS OF GETTING BANNED FROM RACING FOR DOPING......
  • + 0
 Pretty weak sauce.
  • - 2
 Junkie
  • - 2
 Serious
  • - 3
 This is why I was laughing when everyone got so angry at me about suggestions he is doping. Now I'm laughing more.
  • + 1
 What do you think he is doing? He is obviously an amazing biker (winning the world cup DH last year), but I would think EPO would help huge with Enduro which is basically an endurance event. It would help for staying fresh clmbing and also on flat out descents. @Batipapo suggested above that the Probenicid, if it was used as a masking agent, could have been masking EPO. Thoughts?
  • - 2
 Another ROID RIDER gets busted! Nice!
  • - 2
 "masking substance"

where the judging wave of haters?
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