Mavic Crossmax XL WTS - First Look

May 16, 2014
by Matt Wragg  
In the rugged mountains of the Maritime Alps, Mavic released their new adventure-focused wheelset this week - the Crossmax XL. It was the perfect terrain to launch the new wheels on as the steep-sided mountains test every aspect of a rider, both going up and down, and these new wheels are designed to cope with just those kind of demands. The idea behind this new wheelset is simple - to produce wheel and tires for riders looking to tackle long climbs and attack the descent too.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
  The Mavic Crossmax XL WTS

These are an important wheel for Mavic's mountain bike line, as it is the first time we have seen an all-new wheelset for all-mountain riding from them in a little while now. While the Crossmax Enduro wheelset they released last year have been undeniably popular, Mavic admit that they are very race-focused, especially the lightweight rear wheel, and are based very closely on the pre-existing Crossmax ST and SX wheelsets which have been around for a few years. This Crossmax XL wheel and tire set (WTS) has an entirely new rim construction and a new tire to match the style of riding they are designed for.

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Details:

• Purpose: Trail/all-mountain/enduro
• Material: Aluminium rim and spokes
• Diameters available: 26", 27.5" and 29"
• Axle options: 9/15/20mm (front); 9/12x135/142mm (rear)
• Internal width: 23mm
• Spokes: 24 Zicral spokes front and rear, with Isopulse lacing on rear
• Tubless: UST compatible
• Weight wheels only: 26", 1660g; 27.5", 1710g; 29", 1780g
• Weight wheels and tyres: 26", 3150g; 27.5", 3390g; 29", 3520g
• MSRP: $1,000 for complete wheel and tire system
• Availability: Mid-June (may be slightly later in the US due to shipping issues)


Not Carbon

While many companies are opting for carbon fiber as the material of choice for the flagship wheelsets, Mavic have made a conscious decision to shy away from the material. Manuel Berschandy, Product Line Manager for Mountain Bike Systems, is utterly clear on this, stating that, "We still don't think the benefits [of carbon wheelsets] match the price difference." When their wheelsets are already weighing in at $1,000 per set, which is not cheap, it is still around a third the cost of the top end carbon wheelsets. It's not just in their material they have remained conservative with either, and although the wheels do have a greater internal width than the 21mm (front wheel) and 19mm (rear wheel) dimensions of the Crossmax Enduro WTS, it's only a slight increase, and the new wheels have a 23mm internal width. At a time when people are starting to push internal widths up towards the 30mm mark, it is somewhat conspicuous. What Mavic has done instead, is take a wheel design that is fairly universally acknowledged to work very well, and incrementally improved almost every aspect of it.

bigquotesWe still don't think the benefits [of carbon wheelsets] match the price difference- Manuel Berschandy, Product Line Manager, Mountain Bike Systems, Mavic

Mavic Crossmax XL
Mavic Crossmax XL
  The hubs should look pretty familiar to most existing Mavic owners, except these have been incrementally improved and laid bare in this stunning, polished finish. If you look closely at the rear wheel, you should be able to make out the two spoke lacing patterns - the radial pattern on the drive side, and the cross pattern on the non-drive side. On the rim you should just be able to see where the material is machined away between the eyelets, to keep the rims strong where they most need to be, but with no excess material where they don't need it.

Mavic has reduced the weight by 10g per hub, which while not a lot on its own, is the kind of attention to detail throughout the wheelset that means that while they have upped the size and spoke count from the Crossmax Enduro, the weight has remained constant. The rim shape has been refined in every area, from the hook shape on the sidewal which has been moved 0.3mm to offer a smoother and more impact-resistant profile, to the milling on the face of the rim to remove excess material between the eyelets and the more symmetrical v-shaped profile of the rim.

There are a whole raft of features carried over from their previous wheels too. On the rear wheel Mavic uses what they call Isopulse lacing - which is radial lacing on the driveside of the wheel to help power transfer, and a standard cross-lacing on the non-driveside to increase strength. The freehub is their ITS-4 freehub design that uses two engagements at any one time to help power transfer. Unlike the Crossmax Enduro they have not used different designs for front and rear wheels, rather used the same 24-spoke, 23mm internal width layout for both as they feel away from racing, riders won't see the same benefits from having a burlier front wheel and a lighter rear wheel. One thing that is worth keeping in mind with Mavic wheels is that they are pre-sealed for tubeless use, whereas most other wheels need a rim strip to seal them for tubeless, something not typically included in most weight calculations. There is one other aspect we cannot overlook either - in this polished finish the hubs are a masterpiece of functional beauty; they are undoubtedly some of the best-looking hubs anywhere in mountain biking.

Quest Tires

Mavic have continued with their philosophy of developing their wheelsets in conjunction with tires so they form a complete system together. The approach with the Crossmax XL is quite different to the Charge and Roam tires for the Crossmax Enduro WTS, though. Most notably, both front and rear tires are the same here, a significant departure from the Enduro WTS. The aggressive front tire and fast rolling-rear tire of the Enduro WTS is something Mavic see as offering more benefits for advanced riders, but not something that will appeal to the wider majority of the market. The Quest tires are designed to be more user-friendly for riders of all levels, with a consistent overall profile across the entire tread, so riders should have similar traction wherever on the tire they are. They felt the marked differentiation between the centre and side tread on the Enduro WTS was not the best choice for the most people. Where both front and rear tires on the Enduro WTS are dual ply, here they are single ply, reinforced with Mavic's new Guard+ layer to help prevent punctures.

Mavic Crossmax XL
  These tyres are designed to be truly all-round - the aim is that they will work for most people, most of the time. As such, they have a fairly small, consistent tread pattern, durable single compound rubber and a lightweight carcass with some added puncture protection.

A single compound is also used here - 50A throughout, which is seen by Mavic as the best balance balance between grip and durability. This is at the harder end of things, with 60A, the hardest compound we commonly see in mountain bike tyres and 40 representing the super-sticky tyres designed with aggressive descending in mind. In testing, Mavic found that harder compound lasted 50% longer than the 40A compound used on the Charge tyre. Multiple compounds were considered, but in testing they found that, while they offer advantages for some riders, they detracted from the consistency of feel they were aiming for with these tyres. One of our favourite little details of these wheels is in the weights. The 26" tyre weighs 690g, the 27.5" 780g and the 29" 810g. What struck us is that the weight gap between the 27.5" and 29" is smaller than between 26" and 27.5", despite the fact that 26" and 27.5" are the two closest diameters. They achieved this by reducing the volume of the 29" from 2.4", down to 2.35". They felt that the extra volume was less crucial with the larger wheels, and it meant they could keep the weight down. The tyres will also be available aftermarket, retailing at $70 per piece - this is worth keeping in mind when you consider the overall value of the wheelset too. For your $1,000 you do get $140 of tyres, which puts them ahead of much of their direct competition on the value stakes.

www.mavic.com


103 Comments

  • + 35
 "internal diameters"? WTF are you talking about. It is internal "WIDTH".
  • + 44
 lately matt has developed a habit of drinking and writing.
  • + 7
 Its not the first "internal diameter" article on pinkbike. I'm pleased they have settled down on incorrectly using the word "utilize".
  • + 8
 What if the rim bed were to form a semi-circle, which, if continued would form a circle with a diameter of 22mm? Like ski radii. Reaching… faaaaaaar.
  • - 5
flag bikegreece (May 16, 2014 at 23:50) (Below Threshold)
 b1k35c13nt15t that is exactly why is refereed as diameter. The rim bed is considered as halved circle. Commonly used in Europe and in cycling circles.
  • + 4
 Every single rim manufacturer, Mavic included, refers to the rim width. Everywhere. Go to Mavic page specs and read "Internal width: xx mm". Calling it anything else, for any reason, is asinine.
  • + 2
 Nice looking wheels, oh and "tire system". Chromeish hubs and a hint of green on the rims??? Mavic is living dangerous this time.
  • + 5
 They manage to separate AM with Enduro kudos.
  • + 4
 @ Hint or green" That's not green, it's the chrome lettering reflecting the green background.
  • + 27
 Carbon, wide wheels, hype this, hype that. I like that Mavic is sticking to solid, proven results that get the job done with their wheel sets. You guys can sit here and bicker about the next fad all you want. I'm going to ride my bike.
  • - 16
flag jerrytek (May 16, 2014 at 17:59) (Below Threshold)
 If you like old stuff, great.

But don't you think that Mavic repackaging old technology, calling it "enduro", and asking you for a $1000 for it is a little silly?

You can get this exact same thing MUCH cheaper. In fact, if you've bought a decent bike in the last 2-3 years, you probably already have wheels that are very similar.
  • + 17
 I highly doubt that. They could only be similar if they were another pair of crossmaxes. Crossmax has so much tech and innovation in them that has yet to duplicated. How many wheels have a special aluminum alloy for spokes? Only Industry Nine. How many other wheels have a completely solid rim well for perfect tubeless setups WITHOUT a rim strip? What was the FIRST tubeless wheel-tire system? With Crossmax and UST, burping tires is a distant memory, and you don't even NEED sealant! If you think they are heavy, that is because you have not factored in the fact that they don't need a rim strip or sealant (that must be changed every other month). Yes it is a good idea to still use sealant, but you don't need nearly as much, just enough to plug up a puncture, and not to seal the tire's porous carcass. How about history, any other wheel brands been around for 125 years on top? I could go on...
  • - 3
 Re seal and rim strip every month for tubeless??? I haven't had to do squat to my getto electric tape, and cut out presta valve. Mine only get looked at when the tires wear out, Also my new crossmax enduro wheels are the worst wheel and tires set iv ever owned. Need a new rim and bearing in less than 50 miles and not even hammered them yet, that rim bead hook is a joke it's so thin.
I'm getting some hope pro 2 with light bike proper sized rims alot lighter and cost less to.
  • + 1
 Any suggestions on those rims? Quite like that idea but can't find any cheaper ones
  • + 2
 Crossmax enduro 650b set £650 of crc.
Light bicycle Web site delivered and built £560 .Think the rims set only came in at 350ish of the top of my head. Get great reviews as far as I can find. Also I think there on eBay as cn carbon I think but not sure bout that. I'd rather go direct.
  • + 12
 well i kinda like my hope pro 2's with sapim spokes/nipples and stans flow ex rims. what do these not provide that mavic do at twice the price?
  • + 1
 Sweet cheers
  • + 1
 Light Bicycle rims are well known for de-laminating at the spoke holes... I seriously considered them too, until I stumbled upon that issue. I was employed as an aircraft carbon laminator, and that is NOT a well made product. Apparently, they rely on consumer feedback for R&D and testing, NOT a recipe for a reliable product.
  • + 2
 Mavic rims are the best I've owned. Even the cheaper ones do the job and stay true. If you break a nipple or a spoke though, you will have a bad day.
  • + 3
 It would be cool if n carbon engineer could step in take what Light-Bicycle has accomplished and get some good engineering and QC behind it and deliver something for us at a reasonable price.
  • + 2
 " With Crossmax and UST, burping tires is a distant memory"

Having used Crossmax for several years, I can assure you that's not the case. Think I burped less on Stan's than Mavic - no surprise as tyres are generally a tighter fit on Stan's
  • + 24
 So you're saying for $1000 I can get two wheels including tires from a well known (and respected) company or I can get one rim from Enve... Easiest decision I'll ever make.
  • + 20
 "We still don't think the benefits [of carbon wheelsets] match the price difference-" Translation: We haven't figure out how to make them cheaply enough or without paying someone else a license fee.
  • + 4
 no way ,we must have typed at the same time ,there.
  • + 65
 When we post a review of a carbon wheelset people complain how expensive they are. Now people are complaining when a manufacturer doesn't?
  • - 1
 how about more brendog stuff haha
  • + 2
 Yes they want it cheap and they want it in house, which is a good thing. Or do you prefer to suck your money?
  • + 1
 Also not much more can do to improve this wheels now, so later can improve with carbon rims
It is not in big companies interest too give you exactly what you want right away or no room for improvement later?
Plus you can not just add a carbon rim too this wheel set as you can't screw nipples into carbon
  • + 5
 Better translation: ''Margin for profit selling cheap alu wheels for hi-tech price is much wider than one selling carbon made stuff.
  • + 2
 @bman33, did you forget that Mavic's high end road wheels are made of carbon ? I think they know their stuff...
  • + 15
 How does a radial lacing pattern on the drive side increase power transfer? I thought radial lacing is good for lateral stiffness but not appropriate for uses where there is rotational load (like the forces applied to the rear hub by the drivetrain or, more importantly, those produced with the use of disc brakes)!?!?
  • + 3
 Also means there are 2 different spoke lengths for one wheel
  • + 1
 mavic doing radial DS lacing is old news. if the hub shell is stiff enough the drive torque is transferred to the NDS side and the radial DS spokes only carry, well, radial loads.
  • + 4
 You guys forget, or are maybe too young to have known that a "race lace" rear wheel was 3x drive side, radial non drive.
  • + 1
 Maybe the radial/3x lace actually means they use the same length spokes, radial being shorter and therefore compensating for the added dish. My Kysirium ES road wheel use the same lacing and I haven't taken a spoke key to them in over 15,000 miles.
  • + 3
 Radial lacing doesn't help power transfer at all. However radially lacing the drive side on a rear wheel makes for MUCH more even spoke tensions. And more even spoke tensions does lead to better power transfer. Just pinkbike making a bit of a hash of the description.
  • - 2
 @mrpowerjd: The "race lace" works on rim-brake wheels, because the brake force applied doesn't wind up the spokes. Notice the radial is on the non drive side!
  • + 2
 You can argue the logic behind the lacing all day long, but get on a set of Ksyriums and virtually any other wheel in the same weight range and the Mavics accelerate noticeably faster. Couldn't tell you if it's due to lacing, or just overall stiffer wheels, as they also corner better than most, but I'm sold on the Mavic "system" wheels. My Crossmax XLs have been phenomenal, not the lightest wheels out there, but definitely not heavy, and they've outlasted every other component on my bike. Expensive for a boring alloy rimed wheel, but very much worth it.
  • + 2
 Radial lacing on the DS converts the torque into a tension which transfers to the NDS as a torque load. The benefit is that you utilize both sides for torsion and not just the single side. The lost power is negligible compared to tire flex; if you realize that both set of spokes rotate at the same rate, (the hub shell is one piece.)
  • + 1
 They can rotate at different rates though, just because it's one piece doesn't mean there is 0 flex. However I assume this is so minimal that it wouldn't affect what you feel.
  • - 2
 Mavic has to do way more to convince me of the benefit of this flashy lacing style if they want my business. Smells like marketing bullshit to me.
  • + 1
 the drive side spokes on most rear wheels isnt really a drive side at all. If you look at a wheel youll see that the drive side spokes are actually almost central on the hub, meaning you get more like a 80/20% split of drive torque across the wheel, both in braking and drive directions. what the radial lacing does is buttress the wheel laterally where the spokes have a much greater impact (i.e. Side to side).
  • + 1
 @ b1k35c13nt15t & lozzerbiker: Hub-shell flex will be pretty much non-existent so both sides of spokes should share the loads pretty evenly on a "normally" laced wheel. The radial drive side lacing on this wheel will however transfer next to no torque to the rim, leaving the non-drive doing all the accel/braking work. Normally this would be a bad thing, but the mis-matched lacing pattern does have a benefit, which is much more even tensions across the whole wheel, so lateral loads are shared and drive loads are looked after by spokes which are no longer ridiculously loose. In reality, offset rear ends are the ultimate solution to this problem, but that being something mavic have little control over, this lacing pattern is the next best thing.
  • + 1
 also @mrpowerjd
I have indeed seen these "race lace" wheels before, and must say they don't make sense to me. That's not to say they aren't a good idea, I just can't work out the reasoning myself. Do you know much about them, could you explain the idea to me? I am always keen to learn new (or in fact old but rare) ideas. Your views would be much appreciated.
  • + 12
 Full 26 through 29" offerings and keeping it real on cost-benefit. We need more like Mavic. This industry is turning into an emperor with no clothes.
  • + 1
 Now they can make 27.5" version of Crossmax SX (which I currently own in 26" size).
  • + 8
 Yawn.

This is not all that much different from my last pair of Crossmax XLs.....from 2004.

Their 'XL' wheels are a width that is now pretty normal. The weight is mediocre. The price is mediocre.

You can get a nice set of Hope/Stan's Flow wheels for about half the cost.

Or you could get a set of super wide carbon Ibis 741 wheels for $300 more.

Mavic used to make cool wheels. Thats not the case anymore.
  • + 1
 Stan's? are these with the rim tape??
and at least to my Xmax XLs these are a lot of different.
  • + 8
 "we still dont believe carbon has the benefits to match the price difference" i really thought one of the worlds biggest/longest running wheel manufacturers would of been all over the benefits of carbon rims regardless of cost..obviously not!!
  • - 4
flag kram (May 16, 2014 at 15:19) (Below Threshold)
 Carbon rims are by for the best non-mechanical upgrade I've ever made on my bike. These guys are out to lunch and are going to lose market share with that attitude.
  • + 57
 Basically what they're saying is that a $3000 carbon wheelset is not 3 times better than a $1000 aluminum one. I'm a believer of that theory. I'm sure carbon rims are great, but for a quarter the cost I could get something almost as good
  • + 12
 A week ago I would totally agree with you, then I cracked my rear haven rim. I'm not convinced carbon is the best material for rims other than race day. I was blown away with how well my carbon wheels performed, but I'm hard on wheels. I would much rather lace up a new alloy rear rim every so often verse a new carbon rim for 3x the price. Don't believe the bomb proof hype we hear about carbon rims. They aren't all they are cracked up to be. Pun intended.
  • + 0
 Noris, while they are saying it's not three times better, we know that performance vs cost can be exponential. The first grams are the easiest to lose, as they say. Why couldn't Mavic offer a wheel like this, while also offering a hyper high end carbon wheel? They'd be able to save face by knowing they have a very good alloy wheel, while people would still be able to get aboard their marketing. As it sits, I'm with D4, it sounds like a cop out. They know there are people out there that would buy them, so the cost of the final product is mostly irrelevant.
  • + 6
 and just for the record mavic uses carbon extensively in their road line, even in the hubs. cdn.media.cyclingnews.com/2012/01/18/2/katusha_menchov_aeroad_wheel_600.jpg
  • + 0
 Because they KNOW under harder riders, carbon wheels will break where alum won't. Know of a guy on an AM bike broke two sets of Enve carbon wheels. The end.
  • + 7
 And we all know of a guy who's broken alloy rims. Everything breaks. People are willing to foot the bill. The end.
  • + 2
 But cofattire, you could have gotten a free warranty replacement. I broke my Haven rim when I messed up a jump landing (front wheel sidewise on hard impact) and Easton sent me another front wheel free. No questions asked. So yeah, my carbon rim broke, but so have many of my aluminum rims. All things considered, I think my havens blow away every wheelset I've ever had
  • + 1
 VelkePivo: yes, easton's warranty is great. Do we know how much that has cost easton? Maybe Mavic doesn't want to deal with that? Like you said, alloy brakes too, but when carbon costs up to 10x as much, it makes sense why Mavic wants to leave it alone until either durability goes up, or price comes down.

My rim didn't crack from a crash, or coming up short on a big hit. Stuff like that can kill anything. It cracked riding the same lines my past alloy rims dealt with no problems other than dents. I weigh 155, and I'm not a hack.
  • + 0
 Exactly cofattire. That's what I was trying to say but you explained it much better. Thank you. I'm not talking about the rim making contact with objects because someone is running their air pressure too low. Anything would break under those conditions. While I'm definitely a fan of carbon when used properly in any application(wheels, handlebars, frames etc.), it's a lot stiffer making it more brittle than alloy thus more prone to cracking.
  • + 1
 Personally, I'm not worried about Mavic's profitability. It seems the debate here has shifted. You originally said, "I would much rather lace up a new alloy rear rim every so often verse a new carbon rim for 3x the price." My point is you don't pay for that every-so-often rim--you get a free replacement. As for myself, I weigh approx. 190 and I have zero finesse and ride in very rocky conditions. Sometime I take my havens to the bike park. Other than that one break that was replaced by Easton, the wheels have performed flawlessly; in fact, during the life span of my havens so far, I've destroyed a few aluminum rims on other bikes. Oh, and I paid $1500 for the wheelset almost 3 years ago. Maybe i'd feel differently if I had your experience.
  • + 8
 Mavic......you now have my attention!
  • + 6
 I'm actually disappointed they aren't yellow. I just want a wide version of the crossmax enduro. French's mustard yellow.
  • + 3
 I just let go my Crossmax ST on the bike that I just sold because the rims were too narrow. The 19mm internal width was limiting the tires' size to a maximum of 2.3 (depending on the tire brand) with a balloon profile. The Mavic hubs just works flawlessly and the wheels stayed trued whatever I threw at them for the 2 years that I own the wheelset. The Crossmax are light and if you climb as much as you descent, that makes a big difference. I will definitively consider the XL WTS for my next wheelset.
  • + 2
 Ive run the ST's on my Heckler for over 4 years with 2.4" Nobby Nics no worries. No issues what so ever and I ride them pretty hard in some harsh conditions. Best wheels I've ever owned, and I own some Enve AM's.
  • + 7
 Love my cross max st wheelset, lets hope these hold true.
  • + 4
 Love my Crossmax SX, and would consider these if I wasn't forced to pay for tyres that are of no use to me.
  • + 1
 These are an important wheel for Mavic's mountain bike line, as it is the first time we have seen an all-new wheelset for all-mountain riding from them in a little while now.

While the Crossmax Enduro wheelset they released last year have been undeniably popular....lol now about that Famed Mavic customer service ?
  • + 3
 Carbon rims aren't worth the price increase but R-sys carbon spokes were?!?!
  • + 2
 "We still don't think the benefits [of carbon wheelsets] match the price difference."

Well maybe you should make the price match the benefits...for all to benefit \o/ !!!
  • + 0
 Mavic need to sort out their hubs before anything. these come with a 135x12 rear (as do my Crossroc's) and require these dicky adapters to make them 142x12 or 135x9. Great to keep everyone happy but it's a f@#kin ghetto way around it
  • + 1
 Does anybody know which is the rim weight?
I don't know why Mavic do not put in the Crossmax XL spec (probably rims are not light!).
  • + 1
 I would love love to see a new edition of their Deetraks wheels. Best wheels I've ever had, so strong and still amazingly cheap.
  • + 2
 Very nice job Mavic! A solid set of wheels that is not made of carbon and is not yellow Wink .
  • + 3
 Why this and not flow exes for 600 a pop?
  • + 1
 yeah i'd agree with you for sure, but as we all know some people can easily afford upgrades, however marginal the benefit or large the cost. plus look at dem colors.
  • + 1
 I fancy those wheels, looking for a SX ............. really please with mu pair of ST, and another handbilt EN521 with HOPE hubs + DT spokes Wink
  • + 4
 look pretty sick
  • + 2
 I like how a few articles below theres one on enve.....but I guess now carbon is not the way to go Wink
  • + 4
 Still on crosslines Smile
  • - 1
 For price/quality I prefer the 'old' crossmax ST/SX wheels, all this new wheelsets declared specific for enduro are just a fashion and a good way to grab money from my pockets. Mavic, to charge me 1000U$S, please give me carbon.
  • + 2
 At least these ones aren't retina-searingly orange.
  • + 5
 Orange? They're always yellow!
  • + 33
 His retina is seared. So it seems like orange.
  • + 2
 I misspelled, tried to change and then my internet died, now I'm the ridicule of Pinkbike :'(
  • + 1
 I'm going to neg all posts I see from you from now on, for such a monumental cock up of miswording the most #enduro colour out there!
  • + 1
 The picture with "those tires" show the same tire side by side... where is the front tire?
  • - 1
 Most people, Most of the time. haha fuck off mavic, your products quality has wained in the past few years, and that tread look bad.
  • + 1
 To narrow... Jerome is killing it on 19mm
  • + 2
 Jerome would be faster than most of us on a f'n CX bike.
  • + 0
 Looks great but Industry Nine exists
  • + 2
 Yes. But Industry 9 are also a bit rubbish. Unless you enjoy replacing snapped spokes
  • + 2
 really? do other people think I9s are bad? I am considering a set, the 275 enduros
thought they were pretty solid
  • + 3
 Have you owned a set? Any wheel can have a failure. They seem to work for Mike Montgomery when he was sponsored www.pinkbike.com/photo/6114645, Neko (and he isn't even sponsored by them) www.pinkbike.com/photo/10679988, Mitch Chubey www.pinkbike.com/photo/10201859, The Shaw Brothers www.pinkbike.com/photo/10815603 , etc. My i9's are all good so far (knock on wood). A friend used to be sponsored by them about 8 years ago when I discovered them and now he sells them in his shop. I trust these wheels as I have never seen an issue in my experience and should be even more reliable with the Torch redesign. I'll do my best to break them this Summer and let you know if I do. I have the new i9 Torch Trail 27.5 24h wheelset on a Banshee Spitfire. Cheers
  • + 0
 Hooray, they aren't yellow Smile
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