Mondraker Goes Aluminum Only on 2021 Summum Downhill Bike - Across the Pond Beaver

Sep 1, 2020
by James Smurthwaite  

Despite being sighted in multiple locations at various points in the past 12 months, details have been thin on the ground for the updated Summum downhill bike. That wait is finally over, though, and Mondraker has revealed the details of the bike we've been seen being tested under its team riders since Lenzerheide last year.

The Summum has plenty of race-winning pedigree, with Laurie Greenland taking its most recent victory at Val di Sole last year. As such, Mondraker didn't feel the need to overhaul the bike completely, but a number of key changes have been implemented.
Details

Frame material: Aluminum
INtended use: Downhill racing
Rear travel: 200mm
Wheelsize: 29" (27.5" and mullet builds also available)
Head angle: 63.5°
Price: From €4,199
More info: Mondraker.com

Mondraker DH prototype at Whistler Crankworx 2019
The bike in its prototype stage.

The looped seat stay mast is gone, replaced by a more conventional bottom bracket junction.

The biggest tweak is the frame material - all three specs of the Summum are now aluminum only with no carbon options available. While this does probably increase the weight of the bike, Mondraker claims it offers a "fast, active and natural riding experience". Apparently, Mondraker's World Cup riders found the aluminum bikes more responsive, and that's what pushed Mondraker towards using the material for the final construction. The tubes of the bike have also been slimmed down, bringing its silhouette more in line with the Foxy and SuperFoxy.

Welds are back for Mondraker's downhill bike.

A new upper suspension link has no window (the old link was an open triangle).

There has also been a big overhaul with wheelsize, and these frames have been predominantly designed around 29" wheels. All the full builds, apart from the S and M sizes of the base Summum, come with downhill's largest wheels and those two exceptions come with 27.5" front and rear. Both Brook MacDonald and Laurie Greenland were racing on mullet bikes towards the end of last year, and that's also an option for Summum riders, but they'll have to go via the frame only route.

There's no chainstay adjustment on this latest Summum model.

There have also been some geometry changes too. For starters, the bike is slightly steeper, with the head angle now sitting at 63.5°, up from 63° on previous models. The seat angle is also steeper to make room for a bigger rear wheel. The biggest change comes in the reach where the bike has grown by around 30mm per size. Mondraker's Forward Geometry was one of the big driving factors behind modern geometry so it's no surprise that the Spanish brand continues to stretch out its bikes in 2020.

Also on the geometry front, there's no longer any adjustment available for this bike. Previous Summums had the option to lengthen and shorten chainstays, but the new models have them set at 450mm, the size both Laurie and Brook were running last year. Suspension kinematics have also been given a small tweak and the bike's 200mm rear travel is now a bit more progressive for the biggest hits of high-speed World Cup racing. The full geometry is below:

Mondraker Summum

3 models of the bike will be available with the Summum 27.5 and 29 forming the base level and the Summum R and Summum RR above them. A frame only option is also available. Prices start at €4,199. More info, here.


Across the Pond Beaver 2020






136 Comments

  • 81 5
 anything that makes the rigs more affordable is a plus in my book - couldn't care less about frame material on a DH bike, if anything I'd probably opt for metal as any high speed shunt would (if not the bike) shatter my trust in it.
  • 37 1
 Cracking opinion
  • 61 2
 Mondraker more affordable LOL
  • 25 0
 @conoat: Meanwhile Kona sneaks in the 2020 carbon Operator w/ full converability to either mullet or full wheel size swap at a measly $5k decked out.

Granted, you can't get one right now, but it's on the site. Beer
It would be neat to have a head to head comparison chart of all the $5k DH bikes available currently with a check box next to "In stock" versus "SHIPS ON..."
  • 8 0
 Can I interest you in some steel sir
  • 1 0
 Are you sure that this aluminium is more affordable than the previous carbon one? If they keep the same price and then make a carbon frame for 1 or 2k more in 2 years it don't have made it more affordable...
  • 2 0
 @pasteque51: the top alloy version is around 1k less than 2020 carbon
  • 3 1
 @slimjimihendrix: actually steel bikes are usually more expensive because of their perceived exclusivity.
  • 3 1
 @jumunky: Is there good DH around Gothenburg? I go there to help Volvo and Polestar and one of their suppliers. Hopefully heading back in April/May. Last time I was there in early April and was planning to ride, a blizzard hit— so darn windy and so cold.
  • 7 0
 @excavator666: Aluminum is usually less expensive because its almost always built offshore at volume, which is realistically required to support the overhead & process (hydro-forming, etc). Steel is almost always more expensive because its rarely built at volume and almost always by hand and onshore.
  • 2 0
 Well, if you look closely you see that an aluminium bike today is almost the price of the equivalent carbon bike few years back
  • 1 0
 @HaggeredShins: fair point. Steel is more expensive becauser it actually is more exclusive.

Steel bikes are usually still more expensive though.
  • 3 0
 @jpnbrider: inflation is a hell of a drug
  • 3 0
 @excavator666: An Orange Alpine frame is more expensive than a Curtis XR650. Both frames are handmade in the UK, so I'd say aluminium is more expensive. I would also rank Nicolai among the more expensive brands, though I see no other comparable brand making similar products from a different material. All in all, I'd say there is much more to it than mere material choice.
  • 3 0
 @vinay: That's one example. Hard to make a comparison for full sus' steel frames because very few brands are making them, but you can easily get a cheaper hardtail alloy frame than a steel one.

I know because for ages I've been eyeing up a steel HT for my next bike.

PS. How have I never heard of Curtis. Dang!
  • 2 0
 @excavator666: Its not more exclusive at all though. Steel frames simply are the easiest to produce in a workshop tooling-wise and are more difficult (mostly time, somewhat material cost) to produce at high volume. In other words, its just as prohibitive for a shed builder to build with aluminum as it is for big companies to push the best margins with steel, regardless of which material is the desirable one for ride feel.

Sure, you can say something like a Colnago Master is "exclusive" but that's just because someone is willing to pay for it. Marino would probably build you nearly the same frame for 300 bucks.
  • 2 0
 @HaggeredShins: Let's get one thing straight here, I'm talking about "real" MTB's.

In that respect the exclusivity that I pertain to is by definition "shutting out all others from a part or share".

So if we take the total amount of "real" MTB's available, the steel part or share will be in the significant minority compared to the aluminum, which makes them more exclusive. What you're referring to is desirablility, not exclusivity.
  • 1 0
 @excavator666: sorry man I'm not following you. You can buy a steel frame easily whenever you want and there are tons of options out there at varying price points. On a steel squisher you could break the bank over 3k or spend under 600 bucks, one PayPal click away.

How many options there are compared to aluminum or plastic is apropos of nothing.
  • 2 0
 @excavator666: At the more affordable end of the steel hardtail market you have for instance On One. Their hardtail frame prices are on par with the cheaper aluminum offerings of others. Higher up you have Cotic whose hardtail frames are currently welded by a really good Taiwanese company and still I'd say these prices aren't far out compared to what an aluminum mass/series production frame would cost. Even higher up you're going the custom route which is never cheap. But even there, the company that may be able to offer you a custom aluminum frame that pops up in my head would be Nicolai. Their aluminum hardtail frames are about the same price as you'd currently pay for a BTR (which have been cheaper, but they can't continue to live on a shoestring). I could name a couple more examples, but I'd say when comparing apples to apples (as in where it is made, how "high end" it is etc) the difference may not even be that big. It is just that there are indeed really cheap aluminum hardtail frames available for the market where claiming something is "superlight aluminum" is a selling point and steel is viewed as "ancient". But as mentioned, On One continues to sell proper steel hardtails for those who consciously opt for steel but can't (or don't want to) afford the more expensive frames.

As for Curtis, they're quite the legends in the steel custom mtb and bmx market. I always thought their Racelite should be soo much fun, it is hard to resist Wink . I mentioned them as despite the different materials and production methods, I think their XR650 kind of resembles an Orange Alpine. And compared to other British builders (and especially considering their history), they're actually quite affordable!
  • 1 0
 @WRCDH: Actually living here at the moment. There are some fun trails but nothing in the immediate vicinity I would call a DH trail. And yes its basically always windy. You get used to the cold though
  • 1 0
 @WRCDH: if you're in Gothenburg rent a trail bike from mtbstore.se and go on one of their Wednesday after work trail rides. There's loads of trail riding in Anggården and Delsjön/kallebäck.

If you want uplift riding you need to go a bit out of town, I think Bollekollen is the closest decent one but I don't think you can rent bikes
  • 1 0
 @vinay: The XR650 is more than just 'similar' to the Orange Alpine, it's a direct copy. Many moons ago I sold a complete build Orange Alpine 160 2015 to someone heavily involved with Curtis.

A few months later the first XR650 turns up with all the parts off that Alpine 160, and I see that Orange frame is suddenly up for sale. It's the same bike, just choose alu or steel.

That's NOT a bad thing in my eyes. I loved that old Orange, and I love my current BTR. A bike that merges the 2 sounds amazing.
  • 1 0
 @conoat: Not all Bike manufacturers are Based in UK, thats the thing about world and global, #notjustMerica
  • 1 0
 @brit-100: Cool. It doesn't bother me at all as even if they wouldn't have had their hands on an Orange, they would have been able to make their own version of it if they wanted. And of course the 324 (or whatever it is called now) is quite different from the Curtis Thumpercross. What strikes me about the Curtis bikes though is that, judging by the pivot location, it appears like the Curtis bikes will have less anti-squat than the Orange bikes. I'm not enough of an armchair engineer to judge how it will ride just based on that. But I understand (current) Orange bikes are appreciated based on how much anti-squat they have. So if the Curtis bikes have less than the Orange bikes, I'm curious what people would think who have ridden both.

What BTR do you have? I've got a large Ranger for 26" wheels. Loved the process of having it tweaked to my preferences (geometry, colour, extras etc), absolutely love how it turned out. I currently don't feel like it is holding me back enough to justify getting a full susser. But obviously I'm always looking at what's around and the Curtis looks amazing. Considering what I can get away with on a hardtail, I see no use for 160mm rear travel. But if they could make something like a Five (evo) that should probably complement what I have and still be fun within what I see myself ride regularly.
  • 1 0
 @WRCDH: hey, for a trial bike there is plenty in town, ängårdensbergen and lackarebäck nature reserves. Just check trail forks out. The first is a big area with rolling hills, the second is steeper.

Nearest uplift is Bollekollen (near borås), then kesberget (vårgårda). Both cable pulley lifts. Nearest proper lift is vållasen (near helsingborg).

You can see all of them on my small YouTube channel (also are and järsvö) www.youtube.com/user/JohnJohn1327

Enjoy!
  • 43 0
 Crazy when one of the companies that started the long and slack trend isn’t even that long or slack when compared to everyone else? Does this mean everyone else has gone too far?
  • 62 1
 Yes
  • 5 1
 They only started the long part of long,low and slack trend...And no, most brands are not there yet either.
  • 6 2
 My medium Pole trail bike is longer than the Large Summum
  • 2 0
 Hold on man...hold on...
  • 8 0
 @maxwharin1: that’s what he said
  • 11 0
 It didn’t take off. Nobody wanted it, they didn’t want carbon ether. This is a good day for mountain biking.
  • 2 0
 Their target is nicolai lol
  • 3 1
 @maxwharin1:
Maybe in reach but doubtful in front center.
Often trail bikes are longer due to a steeper head angle.
  • 2 1
 @englertracing: I think you mean shorter
  • 8 0
 @flattire:
No the reach is usually longer on a trail bike.
With such a slack HA dh bike front center and wheel base gets out of hand quickly...... so top tube and reach numbers are usually slightly less than the same mfgs trail bikes.

Not to mention that on real downhills the rider is further rearward a large percent of the time which also makes the reach feel long
  • 1 0
 @englertracing: Everything except for effective top tube is longer on a size medium Pole machine
  • 2 0
 This is pretty long for DH. You can't compare reaches of DH bikes with those of enduro and trail bikes. More travel at the front automatically reduces the reach. What matters for bike fit is the handlebar/BB distance, which unlike reach, doesn't change with fork height.
  • 1 0
 So.. Are allunum bikes Aluminum, or just Summunum?
  • 38 0
 The prototype in RAW looks much better then the final version full of color ! Please offer a RAW option !
  • 5 0
 I've considered having frames sandblasted and clear coated, I dig raw metal.
  • 1 0
 aircraft paint remover and sandpaper.. works like charm
  • 39 10
 Those Alu Ethirteen wheels won't last you a week!
  • 13 4
 Looks like those are the LG1 DH Plus rims (welded 6069 alu). They are solid. So far lasted longer on my DH bike than the easily dented DT EX 511's I had on before
  • 8 1
 The LG1 DH Plus rims are rad, I ran them on my old DH sled and they lasted for ages. Only issue I've ever found legitimate with e*thirteen was their old mechanical dropper but their newly released one is apparently way better.
  • 14 1
 Mine have been great! Smashed so many rock-gardens with no issues. Like any alloy rim, you can push your low tire pressure limits and expect some possible dents, or you can run high pressures and avoid them. Most of the people I see complaining about e*13 alloy rims are taking their entry level trailbike rims into bike park situations with single ply tires....so yea....right tool for the right job.
  • 3 0
 @DubC: that would be me you're describing haha. although no complaints here! I've been running the trs trail Wheelset for about 3 years and ride bike park most weekends. they came on the trail bike I bought and after upgrading everything else including the frame (transition patrol) the wheels are still going strong. nothing but good things to say about Ethirteen wheels
  • 1 0
 Nothing wrong with E13 rims They can't make hubs, though.
  • 1 0
 @honourablegeorge: so true on both accounts
  • 23 0
 Step 1: Make frames carbon and raise prices
Step 2: Make frames aluminium and keep prices almost the same
Step 3: Profit

I´d bet we´ll see more AL with other manufacturers soon.
  • 10 0
 Step 3: Repeat
  • 1 0
 That's under the assumption that it's easier to build an aluminum frame than a carbon one. I'm pretty sure it's cheaper to build each additional carbon frame, the rest depends on how many frames are produced to offset the initial investment in moulds. Either way, a carbon frame can be sold for more, it's naturally more profitable.
  • 1 0
 @DavidGuerra: It's more labour intensive and the material costs more so it's normal that carbon fiber frames are more expensive. You need to go into some special alu stuff to get to simmilar prices (either lower volume like Nicolai or weird process like Pole). But it would be nice to see the percentege of frames that are discovered to be faulty on production floor of both carbon and alu, maybe alu is worse?
  • 24 2
 Looks like a Sunday
  • 22 0
 I dunno, looks an awful lot like a Tuesday to me.
  • 8 1
 @jackalope: looks like a MONDay to me, or possibly even a SUMMday
  • 5 1
 @jackalope: Wednesday over here.
  • 18 0
 I like aluminum. I especially like raw aluminum. I wish they'd offer it without the paint.
  • 14 2
 My thoughts, though surely unpopular, is a company the size of Mondraker wasn't seeing the investment of the carbon DH molds pay off since DH is a niche area of a niche sport. Therefore no more carbon DH where they can still sell enough XC, Trail and Enduro bikes at that level to make it feasible economically. I'll await my downvotes
  • 1 0
 Of course, why should this be an unpopular opinion? Carbon frame production needs high volumes to justify the higher initial investment.
  • 9 2
 How do they always manage to paint their beautiful frames (especially the foxy range) with such unbelievably hideous paint schemes?? (I know it's only an opinion, but i'd never even consider buying such a bike even though they do ride amazing, at least the one i tested...)
  • 8 0
 Aluminium with a threaded BB is the dream. I don't buy carbon or press fit bikes.
  • 10 6
 I’ve got a bb stuck in a frame I’d love to be able to simply knock out with a hammer but instead I’ve had to write it off all together. Press fit BB’s are so underrated.
  • 3 0
 @thenotoriousmic: when you install threaded BB always use a lot of grease on threads....
  • 2 5
 @Andrazzz: or just use a press fit BB and never have that issue? But yeah I did use grease but it was one of the first hope BB’s that lasted years and by the time it came to replace it had seized inside the frame.
  • 3 2
 @thenotoriousmic: it looks like you are one of few that likes creaking press fit BB standards Smile
I never had a problem with threaded (BSA)....if you use good tools you can unscrew really tight BBs....(tools like Pedro's External Bearing BB Socket + leverage).
  • 1 0
 @Andrazzz: said Harry Hindsight
  • 1 1
 @Andrazzz: I have more issues with creaking threaded bottom brackets than I do with press fit. I’ve got a three year old press fit bb still going strong where my threaded bb is creaking after a year. Threaded bottom brackets are not the one. There’s absolutely no benefit too them. You need to buy specific tools to fit it, aluminium threads are pretty sketchy at the best of times and then you have the possibility of your bb seizing inside your frame and writing it off. At least with a press fit all you need is a mallet and you can definitely remove your bb no matter how old is is.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I don't know what you do with your BBs....my Shimano threaded for 12 € works without creaking for 2 years - no problem (you need to adjust correct preload....). And belive me I ride a lot...normally I replace my BB because aluminium housing of BB is pressed by flying rock and then bearing wears out - because it is under tension.

And to teach you something new....instaling pressfit with hammer is not good practice...use correct press and adaptors (otherwise you can damage bearings and/or BB hole in frame).

I am happy that you like your press fit...but there is a reason why manufacturers go back to threaded BBs....and that is anoying creaking Smile
  • 1 0
 @Andrazzz: I said you can remove a press fit bb with a hammer no matter what. Though I have fit press fit bmx bottom brackets with a hammer and even a house brick I definitely wouldn’t go near my mountain bike with a hammer, use a press. I’m not bothered that my BB is creaking like you said they’re super cheap but I am bothered about them seizing inside my frame that cost thousands.
  • 12 9
 Aluminum makes the bike more responsive?

Personally I dont buy that as it does not make much sense to me. If anyone may have any idea as to why a bendable metal is more responsive than a stiff thin tubing of carbon, then Id like to hear it.
  • 8 2
 From what I understand it has to do with harmonics of the material. Carbon and aluminium will transmit vibrations from impacts and forces in the frame at different frequencies do to their molecular structure. Some riders have a frame material preference and sounds like Laurie and Brooke prefer the feel and response of aluminium.
  • 11 0
 The tube shaping, diameter, and wall thickness will affect the flex, stiffness, and springback as much as the material, if not more.

I'm guessing the carbon was too stiff (see www.facebook.com/watch/?v=1380399148727271). Its sooo much easier/cheaper to iterate on an aluminum frame and tune the flex than carbon. Carbon probably has a much wider range of tuning you can ultimately do, but how do you chug through ten prototypes with expensive carbon molds?
  • 3 0
 Carbon if laid up in certain ways can result in a more damped and dead feeling ride sensation compared to Aluminum.
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: I've been wondering how well Brage's bikes held up while he was riding mondrakers. They always seemed so thin and light under such a hefty dude like him looking at his recent shredits
  • 5 0
 Specialized was really smart with what they did here:

www.pinkbike.com/photo/17427775

They used carbon sheets to tune the flex/stiffness of their new demo (back in the day they developed their new Demo in secret, then dumped it on Brosnan and Gwin with no tuning or input from them, just surprise!. You can be 100% sure that Bruni had a lot more to say on what went into this new bike) until they got it right, then translated the extra carbon into aluminum. Additive manufacturing like this is so much cheaper/faster for prototyping.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the responses. Thats what I was assuming it was, personal preference. I knew there were differences between alu and carbon,(Ive ridden envys) but carbon always seemed more responsive. Maybe it was to me just a bad choice of word. That they favored the response of aluminum better with this model.

To me they just made it sound like "Aluminum was always the best. We dont want to R&D carbon this iteration." Or Im over thinking it.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Also I find this crazy cool. Thanks for sharing that. As someone who loves R&D creativity, this one makes me salivate.
  • 3 0
 They probably don't sell a lot of DH bikes/frames as more people ride enduro. Carbon molds are expensive and they make Alu frames (cheaper - more profit). They have to sell Aluminium frame as better than carbon - marketing Smile

But I would be just as happy with Alu frame as with carbon if frame doesn't brake too fast....
  • 2 0
 I agree it’s utter rubbish. You can lay carbon up to create any characteristic you want. I don’t mind if they don’t produce a carbon one but at least come up with a plausible reason
  • 2 1
 Bruni said he prefers aluminum over carbon
  • 2 0
 @markar: Specialized has the same problem as other manufacturers (want big profit and doesn't sell a lot of DH bikes) - so probably just marketing Smile
  • 1 0
 That just doesn't say much about their carbon bike. Probably needed some more carbon on it at certain spots.
  • 5 0
 Greater than the summum of all its parts.
  • 1 0
 Good on Mondraker for having the Stack Height and Seat Tube Length the same on all sizes. Allows a rider to pick a bike based on their preference rather than fitting a certain size range. But maybe it’s time to look at different Rear Centre or Chainstay lengths for the larger bikes?
  • 4 0
 Glad to see that the Iron Horse Sunday will still be racing World Cups!
  • 3 0
 Aluminum only makes sense for DH bikes. Not sure there are any advantages of a carbon frame for DH racing.
  • 2 0
 hell yeah alloy ftw, the "one crash" cracked/chipped carbon frame will never be for me as an amateur that wants zero down time during the season
  • 2 0
 There was never really a point in having a carbon DH bike anyways. Beyond a certain point, weight savings practically don't matter on a DH course.
  • 1 0
 If carbon was so wonderful and better than aluminum don't you think dirt bike frames would be carbon? Pro motocross and supercross riders case jumps and crash, fantastic plastic is gonna crack hahahaha.
  • 1 0
 All the factory MX bikes are on the minimum allowed weight already by using titanium all over the place. Also, MXGP is different, but AMA riders have to use production frames and engine cases. Even if say, Honda made a really good production frame from Carbon, people probably wouldn't buy it. So, you'll probably never see a carbon-framed MX bike from a big company, unless the sanctioning bodies go crazy and reduce the minimum weight by like 20 pounds.
  • 1 0
 @Glory831Guy: I'm saying if carbon was stronger than aluminum they would be using carbon instead, not for saving weight.
  • 1 0
 @markar:
Carbon IS stronger than aluminum gram per gram. Absolute strength isn't the only thing that makes a good dirtbike frame. The aluminum 1997 CR250 is probably the most bombproof MX frame of all time, but it's widely regarded as one of the worst because it's way too rigid and vibrates like crazy.

F1, Le Mans, crazy racing boats, $10k MTB's all use carbon frames. It's pretty obvious that Carbon is fantastic for making frames, when money is no object. Yamaha, Kawi ect. might not like their sales numbers if they make a carbon framed 450 and it costs twice as much as the competition.
  • 1 0
 @Glory831Guy: Carbon MTB frames keep cracking though, They are not using the same quality control and methods in Taiwan obviously compared to what they are doing for boats and F1, It seems to be more fragile than aluminum for a bike frame and it's a hassle to get a frame warrantied or repaired, I've never had an aluminum frame crack, Almost everyone i know had a couple carbon frames crack and forums reflect that, Same reason they won't use it for dirt bike frames, And aluminum is strong enough.
  • 1 0
 @markar:
Probably because carbon DH frames aren't overbuilt to the degree that Aluminum MX frames are. Compare any steel framed MXer with an aluminum framed one. The aluminum frames are like 2-3X as wide. Aluminum is more brittle, so they need to be overbuilt as a fail-safe

KTM's and Husqvarnas are lighter than the Japanese bikes nowadays, using steel frames, because they don't need so much extra material.

They could totally make a carbon MX frame with similar dimensions to an aluminum frame and it would be lighter and stronger than aluminum. BMW's most expensive/fastest motorcycle, the $80,000 HP4 Race does okay with a carbon frame. Various Ducati Superlegera models use carbon frames too.
  • 2 0
 No more investing in molds for bikes that don’t have mass appeal like trail or enduro or xc bikes.
  • 2 0
 IRONHORSE SUNDAY, nothing original here!
  • 1 0
 I just want that gorgeous raw proto as a finish option. When did raw aluminum finishes go away?
  • 1 0
 Nice to see Mondraker and KHS still using the same factory love these bikes had a 2016 prototype it was so fun to ride!!
  • 1 0
 I own a 2016 summum pro and its still thrashing under my 20st 6.3 build absolutely solid bikes
  • 1 0
 That paint job ruins a pretty nice looking frame, as evidenced by the raw prototype.
  • 2 0
 Looks like an Iron Horse Sunday. #lookslikeasunday
  • 1 0
 Low and raked out. Love it.
  • 2 0
 EPik bike
  • 1 0
 That’s a dream bike, aluminum all the way
  • 1 0
 Aluminium is the new carbon. I'm sure the prices will stay high though
  • 1 0
 Hot damn, that looks good!
  • 1 0
 Can I get the raw one with no decals?
  • 1 0
 hey, somebody... Turn the lights on,can't see shit
  • 2 1
 finally a real bike, not a plastic one
  • 1 0
 So... 58mm offset > 42-44mm offset?
  • 1 0
 77 degree seat tube, how bad does it pedal? 200mm enduro bike?
  • 1 0
 Ahh that's a nice looking bike, particularly with raw finish
  • 1 0
 I would have added a color or two. Seems a little too monochromatic
  • 2 2
 They dont sell much anyways, better for them to sell more
  • 5 0
 Agreed, unfortunately the cost of carbon molds for DH bikes can hardly be justified considering their sales nowadays
  • 3 2
 Looks like a KHS!
  • 5 0
 Yep, both branded Astro bikes
  • 1 0
 Nice bike
  • 1 0
 Alu FTW
  • 1 0
 WTF is that beaver?
  • 1 0
 Looks Like A gambler
  • 1 0
 But works like a giant
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Sunday
  • 1 0
 Aaaargh beat me to it.
  • 1 0
 Aluminisummum.
  • 1 0
 That's a great name actually!
  • 1 0
 Ironhorse re-born
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