More Randoms: Flat Pedal Shoes, Less Expensive Brakes, Camera Packs, Sunglasses - Pond Beaver 2020

Apr 10, 2020
by Mike Kazimer  
Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020
Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020

SRAM G2 RS and R Brakes

SRAM recently announced two new lower-priced versions of their G2 brakes. The $155 RS brakes have a tool-free reach adjust and use SRAM's Swinglink cam inside the lever body, while the R models still get the tool-free reach adjust but no Swinglink for $135 USD. Both models come with 'Power' organic pads.


Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020
Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020

Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020
Shimano recently updated their GR9 flat pedal shoes with a new Michelin rubber compound for increased grip. The speed lace system remains, as does the protective toe cap and asymmetric ankle cuff. MRSP: $160


Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020

Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020
Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020

EVOC Stage Capture 16L

It used to be a badge of honor to lug around a massive backpack when you were out shooting photos. A big pack meant there was a big camera inside, and everyone knows that the bigger the camera and the longer the lens the better the photographer... That's changed in recent years, and the advent of mirrorless cameras with interchangeable lens means that pro-level cameras and optics take up much less room than before.

EVOC's Stage Capture 16L has enough room for a camera and multiple lenses in the padded lower compartment, with a size zipper that allows for easy access. There's also a separate compartment with a sleeve for a hydration bladder, a rain cover that zips into a pocket on the bottom of the pack, and straps to attach a tripod to the side. A wide, elastic waist belt and a sternum buckle keeps the pack securely in place even on rough trails. MSRP: $190 USD.



Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020

Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020
Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020

EVOC Hip Pack Capture 7L

Want to take the minimalist route to trail-side photography while still using a proper camera? The Hip Pack Capture has a padded main compartment with enough room for a smaller camera with one lens, and an outer pocket for stashing spare batteries and memory cards. There's also a pocket for a water bottle, and straps on the underside for carrying a smaller tripod. MSRP: $100 USD.


Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020
The Topeak Shuttle Gauge G2 is a tiny analog gauge that measures up to 160 psi. I like the size, but it'd be nice to see a more mountain bike oriented version of this that would allow for more accurate readings. As it is, it lets you know if you're in the ballpark more than anything else. MSRP: $39.95



Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020

Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020

Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020


Topeak Joe Blow Digital

Just like the name says, Topeak's Joe Blow Digital pump has a digital gauge that displays pressures in .5 psi increments. The amount of air it puts out might not be quite enough to seat a stubborn tubeless tire, but it could be handy for those pre-ride top-ups when you don't want to keep switching between one pump and different gauge. MSRP: $124.95


Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020
POC's new Define sunglasses ($180) are available in eight different frame colors, and are a lightweight, unobtrusive option with excellent optics that work just as well for mountain biking as they do for wandering around town.


Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020
Fox's Dropframe Pro helmet isn't totally new, but it did recently earn a spot at the top of Virginia Tech's helmet safety rankings. The MIPS-equipped helmet is available in four different colors, and retails for $199.95. The fit seems to run a little small, so as always it's best to try before you buy.





Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020






130 Comments

  • 164 2
 Topeak really ought to bring out a high end Joe Blow pump. Call it the Joe Exotic.
  • 43 0
 That’s a very topeakal joke.
  • 6 0
 Next will be Joe Blacked?
  • 6 0
 I guess Joe Dirt was taken already...
  • 7 0
 It would pump and suck, right?
  • 11 0
 Baskin Blower
  • 4 0
 @leifgren:your pun is pardoned
  • 45 2
 Sweet Baby Jesus!! SRAM is like the GM of bike parts. How many versions of brakes can they possibly come up with. Sram....stop at the Codes, and please, discontinue everything else.
  • 3 5
 Levels are great for lighter riders and probably the most reliable of the lot as they’re only two piston with a better master cylinder to calliper displacement ratio.
  • 3 1
 They should certainly bin the non swing link versions, and stick with RS and RSC.
  • 3 0
 As someone who could care less about contact adjust, but really likes the reach and swing-link combo, I love seeing the RS versions come out. Shedding the "C" saves you ~$100. That said, I do agree that they could drop the non-swinglink version all together.
  • 5 1
 Have you tried an G2s? Very similar feel to the Codes at a lower price point. I have no complaints about mine.
  • 3 2
 At first they should finally use mineral oil ... this is still the worst part
  • 1 0
 Lol definitely a valid point. If they dropped everything but RS and RSC that would be nice. I also don't really understand the point of having both G2 and Codes in the lineup as well. Keeping level makes sense as they are much lighter and two piston instead of four. I don't know if I've ever met anyone that has said, you know what these Codes have too much power, I'm going to go with the G2.
  • 16 0
 What are people's thoughts on the GR9 vs. 510 on grip? I know this is kinda like asking if I'd rather have a Minion or a Kenda look-a-like that's $10 less - but worth asking.
  • 19 1
 The newest GR9 and GR7 shoes are the only shoe I've ever ridden that is as grippy as a good pair of 5.10. The durability is much better, and the shank in the sole provides more support than other flat shoes I've ridden in. My current pair of GR901 have been through the ringer for almost a year and they are still going. You will wear out the rubber on grippy shoe, but it looks like I'll get two full seasons, vs warrantying shoes a couple times a year.
  • 5 24
flag JonathanJTB (Apr 10, 2020 at 15:10) (Below Threshold)
 I would say (and will always say "if it ain't dh go clipless") but....if you're attached to flats and it isn't dh I never felt a difference (when I used flats).
  • 18 3
 @JonathanJTB: I always say that if it's DH go clipless
  • 3 0
 @willygfresh: Right on, yeah I'm used to my 510's only lasting about a season and that's kinda the tradeoff with the grip. Just thinkin' bout switchin' and trust reliability of Shimano gear.
  • 1 0
 I'm also super curious about this. For some reason the clicking of lace ends knocking against my shoe with every pedal stroke really annoys me but fancy lacing and lace securing systems only ever come in clipless shoes.
  • 6 0
 My grey GR9s have way less grip than the 510s previously. Especially in the wet.
  • 5 0
 Had a pair of Shimano GR7 (GR701) for 1,5 years. Ultra comfy and durable, their are still in impeccable conditions, and this was while being used 3x a week.

Now have a pair of Five Ten Impact Sam Hills. Compared to the GR7s the grip is really a level above, you can really relax much more.
GR7's grip is more than enough for general trail riding, messing around with the bike and bikepacking, but for serious DH action the Impacts are in
  • 20 1
 @JonathanJTB: It's true that clipless pedals have made amazing strides over the past few decades and many still believe that someday an EWS champion will ride them!
  • 1 0
 I've had a pair of GR9's for the last year.I think they offer pretty excellent grip. I had a pair of 510 Freerider Pros for about a week (returned for fitment reasons). I think, to my feet, the grip between the two is pretty much the same.
  • 3 0
 @Mtmw: decades... so you're saying they're better than when they were introduced?
  • 1 1
 Better tread pattern, but the rubber is as sticky, I don't consider thst a bad thing though.
  • 2 0
 @mbikes1: Mtmw was talking about clipless, not flats.
  • 3 1
 @JonathanJTB: I am confused by this comment. Are u basically saying- if it’s gravity oriented, then go flats, all else go clipless? If so, I understand.
  • 1 0
 @willygfresh: How's the fit? Pretty spot on or does it run big/small. How about toe box width?
  • 5 0
 I recently replaced my old Impacts with the GR9. In terms of rubber, the GR9 is a bit firmer feeling, especially OFF the bike. However, I don't feel any difference in pedal engagement, if anything the GR9 might grip the pins on my Bladerunners better because of the pattern. Grip being similar, they are WAY lighter, dry much faster and are faster to take on and off. Big fan so far.
  • 1 1
 @kittenjuice: That is like a ten year old talking about "the good old days".
  • 1 0
 @willygfresh: ya I second this. But just a notch less grippy I have the gr7.

They are very durable mine have been thru the washer numerous times. They also dry really fast if your feet get wet on the trail.
The toe protection is nice and saved me a few times though they could probably extend it a little bit.

Funniest thing when they came in the mail is that shimano box. It's that same blue and silver you get when you buy brake pads or something.
  • 1 0
 I'm curious what they did with the michelin rubber with this new shoe, I have the old ones and they are fantastic, but never as grippy as my 5 10's. It's close, the grip is adequate, but is still not stealth rubber. The shimano's are much more durable, and the speed lace is well worth the compromise imo,... just use grippier pedals, higher pins, etc.
  • 1 0
 I've been pretty stoked on my GR7's so far and they aren't really broken in yet. Maybe a little less grippy than my previous Impacts but definitely lighter and still plenty of grip. I'd be hard pressed to go back to 5.10 with their durability issues at this point.
  • 2 0
 @cpobanz: if they ever get on the same level as 510 grip wise it's game over.
  • 2 0
 @Mntneer: yeah the only time I clip in is for dh or Enduro racing.
  • 2 0
 I ride the Freerider Pro and the previous version of the GR-9. Hands down winner in terms of grip Freerider. Like, to the point that riding the GR-9 when it was even remotely wet had me riding very tentatively, pedal slips all the time. Pedals are Chesters with 16mm screws, so they stick out a little more than twice as far as the stock pins. Oh yeah, adding that I have another bike with Chesters and stock pins- if anything the GR-9s are less grippy on those (thought it was maybe the longer pins not being able to bite the harder rubber, nope, short pins in exactly the same spots feels extremely similar.)

Durability and weight certainly go to the GR-9s, but I couldn't give less of an ess because they're so much less grippy it's scary. You'll eat through the Freerider soles real fast but the difference in longevity isn't worth the shocking lack of grip by going to the GR-9s.

Your mileage may vary based on your pedals, for me it's all 5.10 Freerider Pros all the time, unless I was going for some ungodly pedally ride that had very limited downhill and needed to prioritize weight over everything (says me on a 35 lb Evolink....)
  • 1 0
 @JonathanJTB: it's totally unclear to me what you've tried to express
  • 1 1
 @bschleenbaker: tuck the lace ends under the front lacing of your shoes.
  • 2 0
 It's small diameter pins that kills the 5.10 soles. I used to go through at least two pairs a year but switching pedals to Vaults with bigger diameter pins last spring made my Freerider contacts last the whole year and they're still going strong without the usual hole pattern from the pins. There's a minor trade-off in absolute grip but it's worth it.
  • 1 0
 I'm hoping they're similar. I've got a pair of GR7s waiting to get used, they've got the same sole. They're incredibly stiff, hopefully not too stiff to get a good feel of the pedal. My impacts are almost dead, so I'll save them for special occasions.
  • 3 0
 I have used the 510 impact since they exist. Last Fall, I bought the GR9, hopping to have something nice for the Winter. Shoes are quite smaller than the 510 impact, ankle protection is quite limited (compared to 510 Karver, it's not existent).
I rode my hard-tail with the GR9 up until last week, then switched to the old impact (like 5 year old ones). The GR9 have far less grip. I had so much less control in the fast root section that I'd slipped out of the pedals more than once, while I still can pedal in the roots with the 510s.
  • 4 0
 My wife had Impacts. She switched to GRs. In thirty seconds of singletrack she decided to sell the GRs and get another pair of Impacts.
  • 2 0
 @Mtmw: I think Clementz, Graves, Rude, Courderier, Ravanel and Moseley all went clipless...
  • 2 0
 @Mtmw: winning at comments there!
  • 1 0
 @fielonator: every ride is a special occasion! I want my wife to go back to 5.10s for the increased safety alone. We are all one unlucky accident away from injury, it's not worth compromising control with inferior shoes.
  • 3 3
 I have a set from last year, I call them my “slippers”, super comfy, super flexy, super shitty for biking. They reside on the floor next to a spin bike.

The speed lace started slipping after a month, replaced it with thin laces that work like laces should work. The instep cover is nice. Sole is not that grippy, no way as good as five ten, not as good as RC.

I had a set of the originals when they were using Vibram brand rubber, talk about a shitty shoe, torr chunks outta those soles in the first week.

So yeah, Shimano should stick to clipless shoes cuz they have no idea how to make a decent flat pedal shoe.
  • 20 13
 “We will call it G2 and people will forget what utter trash the Guides were.”
  • 12 2
 I think it's telling when their trail brakes keep getting renamed. It's not like they rename the DH brakes.

Elixir/Code
Guide/Code
G2/Code

If they didn't continually earn a bad reputation then they'd probably still be called Elixirs.
  • 24 14
 Dude stop. Guides were good brakes. And still are. WC factory teams were running guides less than 4 years ago when (the current) saints were also being used. If you’re smart enough to bleed them, which isn’t that hard.
  • 5 5
 @nskerb: unlike WC riders, I use my brakes too much most of the time. I’m also free to use whatever brakes I want unlike those sponsored team riders. Codes are damn good, Cura 4 is borderline amazing, Quadiem G-Spec are ok (requires more lever pull than I’m used to), Hope is pretty good and Saint is nice too. Guides are absolute crap in comparison, only modern brake I’ve liked less is the current generation SLX (previous gen was fine).
  • 5 3
 @nskerb: maybe I am nuts...I do not want to be "smart enough" to bleed my brakes....while I am, smart enough, I have XTR and dont worry about it.
  • 2 0
 @AgrAde: Juicy. I was a happy chap the day I replaced my Juicy 5s.
  • 1 0
 @DHhack: Whats wrong with current gen SLX? I've got some MT520s and they're great so i'd assume that new SLX brakes would be nicer.
  • 3 0
 @Johnsterfer: the set I bought have been very inconsistent with the lever feel (sometimes mushy and sometimes perfect - in the same ride) and down on power.
  • 1 0
 I tend to find the limit of bike parts (much more to do with being heavy than skilled), and yet the two sets of Elixer’s and the set of Guides I owned were flawless. It’s too bad they have a history of making two generations of brakes that were either excellent or terrible depending on the set you happen to grab off the shelf. If they could dial in the manufacturing consistency they would perform at the top of the market.
  • 5 2
 The g2 are a really good brake. Very similar feel to codes, just a little less powerful. Definitely less grabby. Perfect for a trail bike imo.
  • 4 2
 Once upon a time, I was using ``things``called Juicy 7, Elixir 9, Code R.... and since I know the Shim XT 8000 and 8200, it strange: I don`t feel like having any Sram brakes on my bikes. Guess why...
  • 2 0
 @Velocipedestrian: The Codes were never concurrent to the Juicys though were they?

@nskerb: No they weren't. They were underpowered and unreliable. I'll never forget dropping anchor with a well bled, bedded in pair of guides with 203 rotors front and rear, and feeling like I was still accelerating down the hill.
  • 6 1
 I still have the Guide RSC on my trail bike. Best brakes I ever had. Very powerfull and great feel. And no cracking pistons like from the other big S brand.
  • 1 1
 @AgrAde: well, they renamed the whole brand to start with, that's saying something.
  • 6 0
 @OneTrustMan: I’ve got a three year old set of rsc’s that I’ve flat out abused that replaced my codes. They’re by far the best brakes I’ve ever owned but you need to bleed them and align them properly to get the best out of them once you’ve done that your good for ages. I’ve not bled mine in over a year just gave the rear calliper a quick little alignment yesterday and they’re back to feeling like new. Most people don’t bleed them correctly and then just pull the lever and tighten up the bolts and then wonder why their brakes aren’t working properly.
  • 2 6
flag Adamrideshisbike (Apr 11, 2020 at 4:56) (Below Threshold)
 I had some Guide Rs and decided to give them a chance before I replaced them. I should have just replaced them right away. No power and I could never get them to stop rubbing.
  • 5 0
 @Adamrideshisbike: you need to make sure the calliper is directly centred over the rotor and that all four pistons are pushing evenly and as long as your rotor is straight and you hadn’t over filled it that would have sorted it assuming you was using centre line rotors.
  • 7 0
 I had Guides on the old bike and Guide RE on the new one, and they've basically been flawless. I only bleed then when I feel I ought to out of mechanical sympathy, rather than feel. If I'm really complaining, I'd say they honk a bit in the rain if they don't warm up. I'll admit, I don't live in the Alps, and I'm only 75kg, but I ride and race fairly hard. Based on the reviews of how ever many Shimano equipped bikes with inconsistent lever feel there are, I'll stick with what I've got. But, like wheel size, pick a brake brand and be a dick about it...
  • 5 0
 For everyone on a forum complaining about Guides, there are probably 5,000 users who had zero issues. Why is it that when I go to multiple LBS, so many of the staff/techs seem perfectly happy using SRAM brakes on their own gear? Meanwhile, professional reviewers the world over cannot stop discussing how utter garbage XT and XTR brakes are, with their wandering bite point issue that hasn't been fixed in years.
  • 5 0
 @KJP1230:
Well you are right.
I am not commenting much on PB articles, because the comment selection here seem to be like one of those biased internet bubbles that you can found normally on Twitter.
The real world doesen't care.
  • 1 7
flag nurseben (Apr 11, 2020 at 20:01) (Below Threshold)
 @KJP1230: I wish I could agree, but sadly you are mistaken. Guides suck, I had to warranty a bunch of them over years. I continue to hear about Guide failures, sadly they were OEM on far to many bikes.

Meanwhile Shimano brakes just keep on ticking, recently pulled one off a muni to use for a trials bike, this brake hadn’t been used in seven or eight years. A quick bleed and it’s like new.

If this ^ had been a Guide, it would have been junk.
  • 4 0
 @nurseben: Again - purely your own experience. I simply see hundreds if not thousands of handlebars rocking SRAM brakes on local trails in Colorado, and I have yet to have a riding buddy tell me about these brake issues. I'll grant that SRAM brakes make the turkey sounds when the rotors are hot - but I will take the consistency, modulation and power over the on/off and wandering bite point of a shimano XT/XTR build on my bike any day. Why is it that no reviewers take the time to point out SRAM brake issues?
  • 2 3
 @KJP1230: you’ve got to have your head in a deep dark hole to not hear all the Guide brakes stories.
  • 4 0
 @nurseben: Maybe you're too fat and old. SRAM brakes work well for me.
  • 2 0
 @DHhack: you need to take into account how many people are riding guides. Sram sell more brakes than pretty much every other brake manufacture combined, course you’re going to hear issues especially since they’re not the easiest to bleed and set up for a novice rider who’s just got a set of guide r’s and doesn’t really know what they’re doing. I’ve had a set of m7000 and two sets m8000 that I’ve had to replace over the last 18 months while my three year old guides have been faultless and so has everyone’s else’s that I ride with.
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230: Nailed it. SRAM brakes are on so many bikes from the past 5 or so years since they clearly overtook shimano in the OEM drivetrain game with Eagle. Yes, they had issues initially, if I recall correctly it was only about the first year they were produced, all of which were replaced quickly and easily under warranty, but they are absolutely great brakes.

I too will take consistency, modulation, and power over other brands any day.
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: Hmmmmmm...... as a roadie new to mountain biking. And as somebody who won from tektro to XTR recently... That is a very intriguing statement for me.
  • 8 0
 Smith from the 90s called asking for their sunglasses back
  • 9 2
 Insane, isn‘t it?
I always wonder what compels people to shell out 180 bucks for a pair of plastic sunglasses?! Even more than the bike part, the eyewear companies have brainwashed mankind to swallow the thought that a piece of plastic costing about 3€ in manufacturing could possibly be worth 180 dollars - with a design that screams „deja vu“ to boot...
  • 2 0
 The Guide RS is 155$ but here in Europe (at least with Swedish Sales tax) they are 219 eur. That is 239$
Is the 155$ with no tax at all? And even with an added 25% sales tax that is 193$. 193 vs 239. Why the European price punishment?
  • 1 0
 Aren't you comparing Canadian dollars to euros? Aside from tax, there'd be an exchange rate too.
  • 3 2
 Brakes. Glad there are some cheaper options, but I'd take mid level shimanos for budget any day. I rode M675s for 3 seasons and I liked them.

I saved up some coin and upgraded to Magura Mt5s w/ Mt7 pads and nothing I've ridden compared to them. They modulate well and mesh with my ride style. To each their own of course.
  • 3 1
 I’m not too convinced of the new 5-10/adidas stuff and I’m looking for an alternative... but let me tell you those Shimanos are fugly. Is it really that difficult to design a visually pleasant flat pedal shoe?
  • 2 1
 SOME nice items , some ugly , but who buys this stuff .
Seriously , not your average recreational slo mo rider like me and not the pros , cause they don’t carry ANYTHING with them
Does anybody check their tire pressure on the trail ? I’ve been off road riding since the late fifties and still just inflate ,
squeeze the side of the tire and take off .
  • 1 0
 I've been super interested in the Shimano GR9, but the one issue I have is my foot width. I have a pretty wide foot and high instep so shoes are always tight on the sides and on the top.

Anyone with similar issues try these and like them? Unfortunately "trying them on" isn't possible since not a single bike shop (3 locally) carry Shimano flat pedal shoes in stock.
  • 1 0
 I also have wide foot and tall instep and arch I wear a size 47 and bought a 48 fit nicely
  • 1 0
 I have the shimano gr9's, multiple 510's, I ran Teva's for the longest, and I'm now riding Oneal shoes.

While the weight/rigidity/lace system was AMAZING, the Michelin soles simply were not. For DH style riding pedal kickback was causing me to constantly lose foot position. I sold them after my second try as I considered them almost dangerous.

Loving my Oneals, and they are price friendly but I am not sure on durability; we all know the only good thing about 510's durability is the Warranty.
  • 6 3
 Why have one version of a brake that won't slow you down when you can have 3?
  • 2 0
 Ath this price point there are more better and powerful brakes available, hip pack also looks ridiu comparing to other brands
  • 3 0
 I’m curious to know some of the other camera hip packs? Honestly, I’ve been in the market for one.
  • 1 0
 surprised by those POC sunglasses, I read that some guides won't even let people wear open bottomed glasses like that because they can cut your face in a crash, POC is missing the safety mark.
  • 1 0
 There is an inconsistent sizing between different helmet models offered by Fox: some mediums are perfect for my head whereas others are impossible to put on.
  • 2 0
 Shimano missed a marketing opportunity with the GR9. Just subtract 1 already...Ibis too with the DV9.
  • 1 0
 So do brake manufactures spec out of the box brakes with organic pads because they know most people think they're sheit and will buy new pads too or is that just me?
  • 1 1
 Organic are quieter and work better when cold, so most riders will like them better. But, they wear fast when hot.
  • 1 0
 Can't seem to find that pump anywhere for sale. Have had non digital version for a LONG time and wouldn't mind upgrading.
  • 1 0
 Is there a floor pump on the market with both a digital gauge and an air can for mounting tubeless tires?
  • 1 0
 If you're willing to give Crankbrothers 229$ for a pump, yes, they will sell you a Digital pu,p with burst tank. Otherwise, hard to find afaik,
  • 2 0
 @Floho: HELL no
but thanks for the info.
  • 1 0
 @toli-ibz: The only annoying thing is that the digital gauge doesn't shut off by itself, it drains the battery.
  • 1 0
 @toli-ibz: oh didn't know that, it looks quite promising, and even a bit cheaper. Plus lezyne lasts longer in my experience
  • 4 0
 @Floho: Geesh, for $229 you can buy a small compressor and pump your tires in about two to five seconds .
  • 1 0
 @toli-ibz: Good to know! I might get the Lezyne pump.
  • 2 0
 @Sirios: A nice thing about pumps is that you can toss them in your car and use them while at the trailhead. They're more portable than generators and don't require external power. Plus the workout is probably good for me because I'm disinterested in lifting weights.
  • 1 0
 Why do you need air can for tubeless set up? I never had an issue without (maxxis tires) even on fat
  • 2 1
 @nickmalysh: Inexperienced, you are. Yes, hmmm.
  • 1 0
 @sam2222: Blackburn does make nice products, but I think that 160 is a very premium price. The lezyne with digital gauge costs the same. If digital isn't a requirement, Topeak is a bit cheaper than blackburn, and some inhouse brands like Lifeline from Wiggle/CRC is almost half the price.
  • 1 4
 Camera Hip Pack!? What’s next? Strapping cameras directly on my frame? Evoc you are mad.
  • 2 0
 They've been selling it for a while now, not a completely new concept. I would guess people are happy with it, otherwise they wouldn't keep selling it.
  • 2 0
 Out of everything people are strapping to their frames these days, I think a camera makes most sense to me. It is a bulky item to crash on. Ideally they just make the lenses bottle size so that people can jam the camera in the bottle cage. Or more up to date, make a Fidlock adapter for cameras.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: Yeah to be fair it's not a bad idea at all (depending on the camera). But actually the front triangle is a pretty safe place compared to the lower hips.

I'm a bit surprised by the downvotes, i guess next time i should add a bold "/s".

@Floho: This is actually a new concept for me, i never saw any photo-hip pack before. It brings back not-so-fond memories of hip lenses pouches that were so cumbersome to use and always sliding. I guess it makes sense for a small compact cameras, but those cameras are rarer than hen teeth lately with the mobiles phones.
  • 1 0
 @evocsports can you built us a prototype frame mounted camera bag? I'm even willing to test it. Wink
  • 3 5
 LOL... SRAM cheaper brakes? What does it mean? They are one-use only?
  • 1 1
 Aiming for the Walmart/Target OEM market.
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