Inside MRP

May 10, 2016
by Mike Kazimer  


The city of Grand Junction, Colorado, has a slightly gritty, distinctly Western feel to it, a place where Wranglers and cowboy boots are part of the dress code, and pickup trucks and semis rule the road. Sandwiched between I-70 to the north and Highway 50 to the south, many mountain bikers have only experienced the town via a pit stop at a convenience store on their way to Moab, Utah, 1.5 hours down the road. But there's much more to GJ than initially meets the eye, including miles and miles of top-notch singletrack within close proximity, everything from the buttery smooth trails found on Fruita's 18 Road, to the rocky, more technical offerings at the Lunch Loop area, situated on the border of the Colorado National Monument.

Grand Junction is also the home of Mountain Racing Products (MRP), a company that deserves a good portion of the credit for progressing chainguide technology to where it is today. MRP's story dates back to the mid-90s, when it operated under the name Mountain Speed in Portland, Oregon, selling spring upgrade kits for the early RockShox forks. Chainguides entered the mix in 1997, consisting of CNC'd aluminum plates with bright orange rollers that soon became the company's calling card.

In the early 2000s, MRP was sold to its current owner, Tim Fry, who left his job as a corporate litigation lawyer in Ohio and moved out to Colorado to begin his new career. Fifteen years later, Fry is still at the helm, overseeing multiple facets of the company. In addition to chainguides and chain rings, MRP's products include suspension forks (formerly produced under the White Brothers name), Kreitler Rollers, and even Power Grips, the pedal accessory that had its first heyday in the '90s, and then experienced a resurgence with the urban fixed gear crowd.


Inside MRP
The raw materials for making chainrings, chainguide back plates, and suspension fork internals are stacked and organized next to the station where they'll be trimmed down to the desired size.


Inside MRP
That cylinder of solid 7075 aluminum will be machined into chainrings before long.


Inside MRP

Inside MRP
MRP's manufacturing facility houses three lathes and three CNC milling machines.


Inside MRP
Remember when 85mm qualified as 'long travel?' There's a lot of history on MRP's walls.
Inside MRP
Cutting tools and guides fill the shelves at the edge of the shop.


Inside MRP
Most of the aluminum components for MRP's chainguides are machined in-house.


Inside MRP
The internal parts for MRP's suspension forks are manufactured here too, including top caps, axles, and adjustment knobs.


Inside MRP

Inside MRP
What started as a rectangle of aluminum is machined into a shiny new backplate for a chainguide.


Inside MRP
Scrap aluminum shavings are collected and then brought to a local company for recycling.


Inside MRP
Yerba mate seems to have replaced coffee as the day drink of choice for many of MRP's employees.


Inside MRP
MRP has three full-time engineers on staff whose tasks include everything from designing suspension fork dampers to making sure that a chainguide will be compatible with as many frames as possible.


Inside MRP

Inside MRP
There are no robots here - every chainguide order is picked and packaged by hand.


Inside MRP
Finished products stacked and ready to be shipped around the world.


Inside MRP
The lowers and stanchions for MRP's suspension forks are made overseas, and then assembled by hand in-house.
Inside MRP
With so many wheel size and travel options available, MRP builds their forks to order, rather than having boxes of pre-assembled forks lying around.


Inside MRP
Bins of tiny parts, many of them made in the adjoining room, are carefully organized and positioned within easy reach above each bench.
Inside MRP
Tools of the trade. Dental picks, tweezers, and tiny allen keys stand at attention, waiting for the next order to come in.


Inside MRP
Footnuts, rebound adjusters, and compression knobs are lined up in preparation for installation on MRP's Stage fork.


Inside MRP
Simple yet effective - this is where a fork's bushings get installed.


Inside MRP


Inside MRP
MRP also has a suspension service center to help out their customers, whether that's by taking care of a warranty issue or by performing a full rebuild on a neglected fork.


Inside MRP
Tucked away in a far corner and walled in on three sides, this is the torture chamber that's used for testing a fork's durability. The machine repeatedly cycles a fork through its travel for as long as necessary to complete the test.
Inside MRP
Production forks aren't subjected to the abusive testing that prototypes are, but they do all undergo dyno testing to ensure that the rebound and compression ranges fall within a certain set of parameters. Once a fork has been dyno tested, a process that takes around 10 minutes, a technician records the results and signs a card that will be included with the fork when it's sold.


Inside MRP
Is it 5 o'clock yet? Employee bikes and a new fleet of demo rigs hang out until it's time to ride.


Inside MRP
Remember these? Yes, Power Grips, which use a strap that runs diagonally from one side of the pedal to another to hold a rider's feet in place, still exist. These days most mountain bikers use either flats or clipless pedals, but fat bikers and the fixie crowd have helped keep Power Grips on the market.


Inside MRP
Rather than using only a narrow / wide pattern, the teeth of MRP's Wave Rings are also slightly offset in order to provide additional chain retention.


Inside MRP
Here the Wave Rings emerge from their laser etching session.


MRP
The history box. MRP's modern chainguides still perform the same task as these artifacts, but at a much lower weight, with fewer moving parts and a much easier installation process
MRP
Take the SXg for example - the carbon backplate helps shed weight, while the upper and lower guides now use co-molded thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) to muffle chain noise and to eliminate the need for a roller.

www.mrpbike.com


135 Comments

  • + 142
 I really like all this in house development and production. Make spending that little extra dollar really worth it, IMHO
  • + 37
 MRP products are well worth the price and their customer service is second to none. I've dealt with several companies that have very good customer service, but MRP is a true step above.
  • + 20
 That's really interesting. I bought an AMg a couple of years ago. I just assumed it was made in Taiwan, which I like, but could not find anywhere on the pack where it was made. Now I find out it was made in the USA. They should make more of that honestly. A lot of people would pay a premium I'd they knew. Me, I just bought it because I believed it was the best guide.
  • + 16
 @jaame: Similarly, I'm ashamed to admit that for years I thought Renthal was American, having seen their name all over Motocross and Supercross for years, until I bought a pair of Fatbars did some research and discovered they're made an based hour away from me in Manchester..!
  • + 3
 @nickkk: I always found it strange that they advertised on their grips all their AMA chamoionships etc, and their webshop was USA only, yet the company is British and a bit German!
  • + 4
 @nickkk: admit? that is more of a confession... your penance is a marathon climb with three chain rings and 8 cogs
  • + 1
 @nickkk: me too
  • + 0
 @nickkk: Renthal MTB bars are made in Taiwan. The 'final finishing' might be done in England, but there isn't the equipment anywhere in Europe to make a high end aluminium bar.
  • + 3
 @ninjatarian: Marzocchi back in the day were very helpful, especially if you take into consideration I'm in Canada, and I they were in Italy. Personally their support blew me away, they were (and hopefully still are) a real innovator in bike suspension.
  • + 3
 @brit-100: what equipment do you think you need to make a high end Ali bar? there are thousands of places with the required equipment in Europe its just more expensive to mass produce than going abroad and the quality is proven from Taiwan factories.
  • + 2
 @brit-100: FUUUUUUUUUUU... *tosses bar in the bin and spits on it Wink I'm not sure you're correct on the lack of European or British technology capable of producing a handlebar for a bicycle- I think that's a bit of a stretch putting it mildly, BUT I do see what you're getting at, to do it economically on a big scale domestically would be tough. Rolls Royce's aerospace division don't make handlebars but they do a pretty good job of engineering something a million times more complicated in the UK for starters..
  • + 1
 @nickkk: i think he's talking about the existence of that specific technology. It's not to say they couldn't do it in the UK, only that they don't. I've heard about renthal being made here and in tw. Carbon definitely tw, but ally i don't know.
  • + 1
 @jaame: aye I got where he was coming from, the forging equipment is presumably prohibitively expensive. Regardless, it is surprising that with companies like Hope tackling in house carbon production in the UK, that an aluminum bar is hasn't happened yet. Clearly the sums don't add up for them.
  • + 1
 @nickkk: my mate who works in a handlebar factory told me it's not just the tooling, rather the entire supply chain for aluminium manufacture. Taiwan is the world's hotbed, apparently. Couple that with wages in the £400-600 a month range and it doesn't make sense to form aluminium anywhere else.
  • + 2
 @jaame: right enough. I bet though the phrase 'my mate who works in a handlebar factory' isn't one you use often though!? Wink
  • + 104
 I rode with a guy in Moab recently who had a great story about MRP. Just the evening before he was having an issue with his Stage fork. So he called MRP and they told him if he could come to the factory they'd fix onsite, even after they closed. So he made the 1.5 hour drive and sure enough...they did. They pressed a new stanchion for him (yes, they can do that unlike Fox and RS who requires a new crown assembly at $300+) and gave him a factory tour. I'm all for getting the best deal for the dollar but there are few companies like that in our business.
  • + 27
 That is awesome. I almost want to buy a Stage now.
  • + 3
 If part of your product is the support you receive, then I'm not sure you can call their forks expensive. If it costs $300 to replace a stanchion, then "cheaper" forks are not your best deal for the dollar.
  • + 9
 I could totally believe that. My wife has an MRP Stage on her XC bike (don't ask), which she severely neglected. It finally started having issues beyond the scope of our local shop one week before a race. They sent it in to MRP who then serviced it and got it back in time for race day. I was super impressed with both the turnaround time and the quality of the service.
  • + 3
 both have a Loop TR 650b 2015 and 29" 2016 and I couldn't be happier. never have I ridden a fork so plush and well made. the product speaks for itself instead of a big and expensive marketing plan. I trust the fork when I descent through rockgardens and that for me is a big plus.
I'd have to say I run fairly higher pressure than the guide says in order to have a certain platform, otherwise I bottom it out too easy (with a good amount of ramp added).
  • + 3
 @jaame: I got one about a month ago. So composed, and so smooth. Outperforms 34 and Pike. No brake dive, no bouncing around, just controlled absorption of everything. I'm loving it. The proof is in all my times. PR's everywhere, even when I'm not trying.
  • + 35
 Looks like a pretty sweet but humble setup guys - respect for keeping it real Smile
  • + 26
 Thanks for the guide inside MRP's headquarters
  • + 8
 I was wondering when PB was going to Fork it over.
  • + 10
 I have to admit, this article really retained my attention
  • + 4
 Keep CRANKING out stories like this PB, they're SHOCKingly good. Please don't BASH my puns.
  • + 6
 We should get a inside tour of pinkbike hq!
  • + 3
 @NoahColorado: I wouldn't want to put a damper on your puns.
  • + 9
 @nickdaniel: you can if you want, I REBOUND quickly from negativity.
  • + 21
 Its great to be part of such an amazing team of co workers. One of those jobs where its always nice to come to work and 99% of the time on the same wavelength when it comes to work and play. Carry on being AWESOME.
  • + 24
 Nice article. This always beats silly click-bait polls.
  • + 15
 But I need to know if mountain biking is dead
  • + 2
 @bmoore34: how can it be dead when mtb fashion is so competitive
  • + 23
 *Googles 'Yerba'
  • + 2
 The mint flavor from Guayaki tastes great.
  • + 2
 It's like a green tea, but you use the spoon to mash it up and let it steep. The spoon is hollow and has a filter to drink the stuff in the cup through the handle of the spoon. When you want more, you just top it off with hot water. Some people drink it with milk. I've seen yerba mate cans popping up in my grocery store that are awesome as well, but they taste very little like actual mate. It's like a starbucks frap versus an americano
  • + 1
 @UtahBikeMike: do you actually drink mate? Yerba is available at the US? I was in L.A. 2 years ago but never would've expected to see Yerba there
  • + 2
 @juancho142: Yes, it's readily available in much of the US
  • + 1
 @juancho142:

The canned carbonated stuff is in grocery stores. The bagged stuff you have to use with the cup/spoon is usually only available in specialty south american stores, sometimes the mexican shops carry it as well.

I learned about it from some friends that lived in ecuador and i think brazil for a few years
  • + 1
 @juancho142: Josh Bender admited to drinking matte...every mtber in Utah follows suit(self included). It still hasnt given me the courage to huck off any apocalyptic drops though.
  • + 12
 MRP is great company. They are awesome to work with. I bought a groove 200 a couple of years ago from ebikestop.com that had the wrong internals in it. I think they sold me one that was actually made for an ebike... I emailed MRP about getting the right parts because it was super stiff and got a response really fast, they had me up and running quickly with my favorite dh fork I have ever ridden. It may be a little heavy but it is buttery smooth, ridiculously durable, has insanely long service intervals (I think they recommend like 100 hours or something), their customer service is unbeatable, and it is made locally so you are supporting high quality domestic manufacturing. I don't have a single bad thing to say about MRP. I would have the forks on both my bikes now but I can't afford them right now due to school and they are rare to come by used. I looked for a long time before I was forced to buy my current fork. I would think they are hard to come by used because everyone that has ridden one knows that it isn't something you get rid of... I hope the best for their company and want them to do well so when I graduate and get a job they will still be making the best suspension ever. Especially since they bought out Elkas mtb shocks. I had the groove 200 fork and a stage 5 shock on a supreme operator. It was amazing!
  • + 1
 Couldn't agree more! I had the exact same thing happen too me... Groove 200 with springs for an e-bike or something other than a DH bike. Absolutely rockin' fork.
  • + 9
 My Stage has been flawless mounted on my Guerrilla Gravity Megatrail. Super versatile fork from long 18,000 ft of descent kinda days to the bike park, free riding, whatever you throw at it. Have it set in 170mm and its the same axle to crown as a pike at 160mm. Their rep Nick is a rad dude too got to ride with him in Moab and he rips and is super chill and helpful too.
  • + 8
 Thanks Skye! We are stoked to have you rocking a Stage on your Megatrail. Very much looking forward to hitting up the big shuttle day with you later this summer in Oregon. Let's chat about me bringing you a coil to test on your Megatrail while I am up there.
  • + 2
 I've got a Stage on my MT and have a Raze on the way! Killer setup!
  • + 1
 @freetour: Awesome! That's a killer set up. If you have any shock tuning questions while dialing her in, give us a call
  • + 8
 Rad of MRP to rep Guayaki yerba mate! The gourd is from them and I see a sticker on the service station. I love coffee in the a.m. but love me some yerbs any other time of day. Their canned cold brew in Revel berry or Bluephoria FTW. So much better than the other "energy" drinks.
  • + 5
 Guayaki is the McDonalds of yerba mate; ultra mass-produced and overpriced gwag. Real talk. Get yourself some Selecta, Pajarito, or Colon if you want to fly!
  • + 8
 The Stage is the best air fork ive ever ridden. more supple than a Pike and Fit4 34 or 36 on the initial stroke and withe the ramp control feature, can be as progressive as you like AND theres an air bleed valve. Love that its made in GJ buy a great group of people!!!
  • + 4
 also, i would love to see a rear shock of the same caliber sometime soon...
  • + 7
 I just swapped out the Pike RCT3 on my Banshee Phantom with a Stage. I feel the Stage is a definite upgrade over the Pike which is also a great fork. The stage gives me the same level of mid travel and bottom out support that I liked the Pike for, at the same time the Stage is waayyyyy better at taking the little chatter at the beginning stroke. It just eats the small annoying energy robbing square hits. The Stage is also super easy to tune with all the adjustments being external, even changing the progressiveness of the spring is super easy with the ramp control. Bottom out tokens on the Pike are pretty easy to use, but it is way nicer to play with the ramp control while out on a ride to dial in the feel, or easily change it for different types of trails. I'm also rocking the SXG guide which is great. For the most part you just forget its on the bike because it is so smooth, quite, and just works. It has already saved my chainring at least once this season! Major MRP fan here!
  • + 5
 Almost 20 years ago I was building my first "dual salmon" bike, and they only option for chain guides where garbage or MRP. Being a broke high school kid spending $500 plus for a chain guide was too much, so I went for a cheaper one and it sucked. It dumped the chain and jammed up, total crap. Meanwhile the buddy that got a MRP (was the top middle one on the last row of pictures) beat the hell out it it and it never flinched or gave him an once of trouble..

Good to see all these years later, after everything that's happened to our sport, MRP is not only still around, but giving people jobs and still making a superior product.

Kudos MRP.
  • + 4
 Coming from someone who has a propensity to swap parts for the latest and greatest far more than necessary, the greatest compliment I can give is that I'm on my 3rd season on a Stage and can't imagine swapping to anything else. Fantastic range of adjustments and a super well thought out and great performing fork. Also running a G2SL and a couple original AMg guides and though I want to upgrade to the newer models, the old ones just keep doing their job despite a pretty constant barrage of abuse. Nothing but good things to say about their staff, I service everything myself and they've been happy to send me info or talk me through anything I've been unsure of. Top notch company and product!
  • + 6
 Dang, 3 engineers. I heard of bigger brands having only 1; the marketing/art team probably makes up a larger % of the size of these bigger brands.
  • + 20
 Actually I was expecting even more engineers, but a single engineer is no engineer imo. Everyone makes mistakes and/or overlooks something. You need someone to bounce off ideas and solutions and double check.
  • + 14
 Yeah, we have three full-time engineers, and they're constantly busy! I meet with them and those in manufacturing every morning to discuss ongoing R&D, current production, etc. With so much of the manufacturing done here in house, there are constant, hands-on QC steps. It's not uncommon to find the engineers themselves running production forks on the dyno, checking that every measurable performance characteristic is dead-on our targets. Things like that cause constant and consistent improvements in our production and products.

As for the marketing/art department, that's only me. Wink
  • + 4
 They really are an awesome company. I bought a stage fork that had a knob break off because the screw holding it on was alloy. They replaced it quickly with a steel screw and upgraded a bunch of internals and serviced the fork as well. So great to deal with a company directly and with people that actually care and you speak directly with the person working on your fork. Experience was very different than the one I had dealing with sram for my dropper post. It really is worth spending the extra money when customer service and the product is so great.
  • + 3
 Yerba Mate at mrp?!? Yerba outside Uruguay or Argentina?!? Now that's something I really wasn't expecting! Cool! Looks like a mate from my country too because of the big "cup" (called porongo) and thermos
Still have to wash today's mate btw
  • + 6
 The Stage fork betters any fork I've owned, and I've owned many. Worth every penny in performance.
  • + 4
 Great review of a home grown company. I rode in GJ and Fruita last year. I preferred it to Moab that I rode in 2014. It's good to see made in a America and the additional cost is worth the money.
  • + 4
 DAMMIT!!! I came here for pictures of Simciks hot self and I am DISAPPOINT!!!!!!!!!!!! MRP is rad and Simcik makes it even more rad! Keep up the great work all!!!
  • + 6
 I'm a simple engineer, i see CREO, I upvote! Smile
  • + 3
 This reminds me so much of how Raceface used to be. Back before the fellas left to form Oneup, and when they were still at the old Braid St location. It was more about cycling and less about bottom lines.
  • + 2
 Great to see the glowing customer service comments and the good reviews on the stage. I've run the chain guides exclusively since the start. Always been the best. I'm in the market for a fork but just curious if the stage has any updates I should be concerned about. I see new 2015's for sale. Are they unchanged 2014-2016? If so can they be upgraded?
  • + 4
 Hi, Nick from MRP here. Thank you for your long term use of our guides! I also have been running them forever, since 2004 actually.

The Stage: the 2016 version of the Stage features some updates to the compression, rebound, and the decals on the lowers. The fork can be upgraded though it would likely cost a bit more to buy a closeout with the previous internals and update than buying the newest model. That said, the 2014/2015 is still a fantastic fork with great performance and durability.

If you happen to make it over to Whistler the first weekend in June, we will be there with our demo fleet of Banshees for Outerbike. We would be stoked to get you out on one for a ride. The next weekend we will be at Duthie Hill for the Evergreen Bike demo event.
  • + 1
 @simcik: thanks Nick. Looks like it'll probably be a 16 then. Wicked combo banshee/mrp. Love my v2 rune. Maybe I'll make it to Whis . Should be EZ to tell what the fork is doing on the same bike I ride if I don't get one before. Continued success mrp/Nick
  • + 3
 @won-sean-animal-chin: Yeah, the Rune V2 is a wicked bike! I hope to see you in Whistler, if you come, snag me from the booth and let's go take a lap. If you get a Stage before then, we would be happy to help you get her operating to the max for you, although set up is pretty easy. Hope to see you in Whistler and thank you for considering MRP!
  • + 1
 @simcik: sick! ????????
  • + 2
 Really cool work from MRP, I would like the brand had better support or representation worldwide. For all that I have read have seen their division forks have a awesome high level performance.
  • + 2
 Kazzy san on the fork! They are great bunch of guys who are overly nice, and always up to help out customers and riders in general. Noah, Kyle, Kazzy, and the rest of the crew... top notch outfit.
  • + 5
 Great article, but no mention of ELKA shocks?
  • + 2
 I thought the same thing! They must be dropping them. It seems odd to talk about every other product and not their shocks.
  • + 1
 Are they made in the same factory?
  • + 1
 ELKA has discontinued their rear shock, at least that's what the Belgian dealer suspensionlab.be told me. I nearly bought one with a Morewood bike from Canada that mounted with it. Suspensionlab still has plenty of springs for those ELKA in stock.
  • + 1
 @zoobab2: Elka Sold their MTB suspension divison to MRP couple of years ago
  • + 1
 @faul: I didn't think so, I was sure everything elka is made in QC.
  • + 2
 @ePerron: you're right. I've been trying to get work done on an elka: Eric Prinster of MRP told me that the internals of the raze shock will retro fit post 2010 elka, but distribution in the UK at least - ISON - isn't joined up with the old service agent - Balfa - so right now no one can get their elka's sorted in the UK. Please have a look at this MRP people :-)
  • + 1
 I had my Stage 5 serviced by MRP last year, so yes, MRP will service Elka shocks (later models, probably). In fact, their Raze shock looks identical to mine (they even offered to replace the sticker to MRP but I declined... lol!)

www.mrpbike.com/raze
  • + 4
 @simeon10: We're currently working on making this happen in house to look after you guys. :-)
  • + 5
 @simeon10 We (MRP) purchased the bike division of Elka in fall of 2013 and began producing their Stage 5 shock in-house as the MRP Raze. We are working on getting all of our distributors, including @Ison-Distribution, on board and up to speed on service for the full product line. I believe in the near-term Ison will be able to provide you the service you need, but if you need something immediately, feel free to contact me directly. Thanks
  • + 1
 Elka is doing suspension for tanks and APVs these days as an OEM for Horstman, and aftermarket for various powersports.
  • + 0
 @microfiz: yeah, they told me they would service it if i sent it in... - to Canada..hope ISON can sort it soon
  • + 5
 Best fork I've ever owned!!!
  • + 5
 This is my next fork and articles like this solidifies it for me.
  • + 3
 I wanted a set of the MRP Bones cranks so bad. They're still super cool looking!
  • + 1
 If i ever leave the distribution side of things i would love to work for a company like MRP or another "smaller" company making neat things out of metal. Seems like a good gig, and i could move to Colorado Razz
  • + 3
 Love my MRP Stage fork and AMg guide. Also met them in person at sea otter. Bunch of nice guys Smile
  • + 4
 Mrp plastic guide quality is way better than e13!
  • + 2
 I attended whistler outer bike last year, I demoed a banshee spitfire with a stage fork. It was an awesome ride, great fork, great bike.
  • + 1
 Good folks and innovative minds. I remember putting mountain speed / eibach springs on every pro flex that rolled out of my shop. And their guides on every Balfa and intense M1.
  • + 4
 I love the smell of cnc'ed metal in the morning
  • + 2
 Nice article. Remember when that first guides was a dream. Today I am using a MRP Chain Guide on my 2016 Reign and never droped a chain.
  • + 0
 I have a stage and a mattoc. Both great forks. I've had some difficulty dialing in the stage. Right now I feel it moves through its travel a bit quickly. Maybe some low speed compression would help but I normally like to run my forks wide open because they just feel the most natural then.
  • + 3
 If you have some set up/tuning questions, give us a call at the office (970) 241-3518
  • + 2
 I have always used mrp chainguide..trying out a one up components on current build..probably will be back on mrp soon
  • + 2
 MRP need to make a new version of the old white bros Groove DH forks... Drool
  • + 2
 Wow, a corporate litigation attorney from Chicago moves to GJ and buys a bike part company? Talk about a major switch!
  • + 2
 I swear they used to call themselves MountainSPEED Racing Products. Cheers for the tour
  • + 1
 That's what I thought too! I remember back in '98 or so, picking up a chainguide from their Portland office willcall. It went on my SC Chameleon with a dual crown Marzocchi Jr. T. Savage ride!
  • + 2
 @pdxkid: Feel you on the Zocchis, i got a little collection going of their old stuff.
  • + 2
 They did - I still have the stars n stripes MountainSpeed stickers from the 90s on my rolling toolbox. I still have a bunch of their silver and orange stuff. I've re-used it in various forms for homemade chain tensioners on SS street bikes with vertical drops.
  • + 1
 Still have my mini me I bought in 2003 I still have a great set of their cro mo monster cranks which might get put to use soon!
  • + 2
 As a machinist, i love to see how things look around their shop, and all the shiny things.... Caaaaaw! Nerd porn hahaha
  • + 3
 I want some of those MRP cranks!
  • + 1
 good to see a factory tour where stuff actual gets made rather than the usual warehouse tour.
  • + 1
 Hey MRP can you bring the Cambers back without a gxp bottom bracket? They were great!!
  • + 2
 MRP user for years- great products!
  • + 2
 Yeaaaa My bike shop looks pretty much the same. I wish.
  • + 1
 big fan of MRP and the stage fork. i need 160mm of travel for my wreckoning though!!!! Gimme a 29er fork with 160+++
  • + 1
 Love the guys at MRP! It is cool to take a tour of the facility and see it all made. Nick and Noah rule Smile
  • + 1
 Just keep driving to Moab. Nothing to see in the grand valley. Definitely don't do the ribbon or lunch loops.
  • + 2
 MRP makes great products and they have excellent customer service!
  • + 1
 Their customer service really is excellent in every way. I do miss my old wc chainguide though! That thing was impossible to break, unlike my g3. I've already replaced every part of it once or twice!
  • + 2
 Nice to see they're using couple of Mazak turning centers.
  • + 1
 PB, glad to see stories of this type. Awesome. And MRP is a fantastic company.
  • + 1
 I've lived in Grand Junction all my life and I can honestly say I had absolutely no idea MRP was here, how sick!
  • + 1
 Yeah pretty low key. They are actually only a few blocks from me, off Patterson. Good to see them here they run a great shop!
  • + 6
 @cbisbee @SteveDekker give us a call sometime and we can arrange a tour. You know the places we ride to test our products, so you can see what they are designed to endure(o). Sorry, I couldn't help myself with all the puns floating around
  • + 1
 @simcik: Thanks! Will do.
  • + 3
 Made in Colorado, USA!
  • + 1
 Ha. I totally had those 99' Total Air Englund Air carts for the RS Judy. Interesting to see how far it's all come.
  • + 1
 yerba mate? colorado?
who drink yerba mate?

My dream was to have a kit mpr
  • + 2
 perfecto! bicipartes y unos ricos mates!
  • + 2
 I STILL USE A BONES CRANK ARM AS A PAPERWEIGHT.
  • + 1
 I have nothing intelligent to say so let's just make a stupid pun and see where it goes..... . . . . .
  • + 1
 Ribbon trail with a massive tailwind in a huge train of riders is still one of my fondest memories on a bike.
  • + 0
 Best quality chainring guides I've ever used and highest level of customer service. Great company.
  • + 1
 wow ! I wish i can get that job ! i love it
  • + 1
 the employees all have the same butt
  • + 1
 So your saying all forks are not made in China?
  • + 1
 One chainring.
  • + 1
 buy my STAGE!
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