MRP Ribbon Fork - Review

Sep 27, 2017
by Mike Levy  
You probably know about MRP's chain guides, but did you know they also offer a range of suspension forks? Sure, this isn't news to a lot of people, but if there was ever an underdog in the suspension world, it has to be this relatively small company based out of Grand Junction, Colorado. After all, their trail/enduro fork, the Ribbon, has to go up against the likes of RockShox, Fox, and Manitou, and let's not forget the new Cane Creek Helm or Öhlins' RXF lineup.

MRP has a few tricks up their sleeve to set the $989 USD Ribbon apart from some of their more well-known competitors, including the clever Ramp Control Cartridge that provides speed-sensitive bottom-out control. There's also a twin-tube damper inside, and external adjustments include low-speed compression and rebound, while travel can be tweaked in 5mm and 10mm increments from 170mm to 140mm on the 27.5'' fork and from 160mm all the way down to 120mm on the 29er version, which is how I set up my test fork.

MRP Ribbon Details

• Intended use: trail / all-mountain / enduro
• Travel: 140-170mm (27.5''), 120-160mm (29'')
• 35mm stanchions
• Internally adjustable travel in 5mm and 10mm
• Ramp Control Cartridge
• FullFill air spring system
• Twin-tube damper
• Adjustments: low-speed compression, rebound
• QR15 or bolt-on axle options
• 7'' disc post mount
• Nine decal color choices
• Weight: 4.12lb (1.869kg) (120mm, 29'')
• MSRP: $989 USD
www.mrpbike.com
Staff Rides - Mike Levy s Rocky Mountain Element



Inside the Ribbon

Twin-Tube Damper - Twin-tube dampers have a reputation for being more advanced than a common mono-tube system like what's found in most other forks, but that doesn't automatically mean that they perform better - they're more complicated, more difficult to package, and some might argue more difficult to work on as well. But there's a reason that you'll see the twin-tube layout used on many high-end suspension units in the motorized world: a twin-tube damper is said to offer lower internal pressures compared to a more commonly used mono-tube system, and lower pressures can mean more control over forces and less stress on seals.


MRP Ribbon twin-tube damper
This is the Ribbon's twin-tube damper. The black seal head at the bottom of the cartridge creates the second chamber between the stanchion tube and the cartridge body, which is where the twin-tube name comes from.


A twin-tube system is pretty self-explanatory; the damper is a tube-in-a-tube design that sees both filled with oil and the piston working inside of the inner tube. In the simplest of terms, it's constantly recirculating the oil between the two. Unlike the Stage fork's twin-tube damper that made use of an expanding bladder for compensation, the Ribbon's damper gets a spring-backed internal floating piston. MRP says that the IFP is a more reliable, easier to manufacture design, and also easier for a rider to perform a damper bleed.


Air Spring - MRP's previous fork, the Stage, is also air-sprung, but the Ribbon features an entirely different system than its predecessor. Rather than a single Schrader valve and self-adjusting negative chamber as found on the Stage, the Ribbon uses two valves and manual negative spring setup, a system that MRP calls FullFill. These separate valves for the positive spring (at the top) and negative spring (at the bottom) air chambers allows the rider to tune how active the fork is by varying pressure in the negative chamber, much in the same way as on the recently reviewed Cane Creek Helm.

No surprise, MRP has put their clever Ramp Control Cartridge system to use on the Ribbon as well; it adjusts how the fork ramps up in its travel without needing to add or subtract tokens. Instead, you simply turn a crown-mounted dial that opens or closes a very small port. The smaller the port, the harder it is for the air to pass through and vice versa. Think of it as damping, but to control the fork's air spring ramp-up, and it differs from changing the air volume with tokens because it offers speed-sensitive ending-stroke control with adjustable bottom-out, whereas tokens are position sensitive.
Eurobike 2016
The Ramp Control Cartridge pictured inside of a Pike. In their own forks, the unit is integrated into the leg and sealed against the ID of the stanchion, so it's not a separate cartridge.


Ribbon Chassis

We should probably talk about that funky looking arch, shouldn't we? When questioned at last year's Eurobike show as to why it looks so, er, backward, MRP's Noah Sears said that the idea is to simply move the lattice work to the front of the arch to keep mud and crud from building up inside of it, something that their UK clientele have repeatedly requested. Makes sense, I guess, but let's not forget that it also gives the Ribbon a very distinctive appearance, one that sets it apart from a sea of black suspension forks that all look pretty similar. You may not like the exposed lattice at the front of the arch, but there's no denying that the fork stands out...


Staff Rides - Mike Levy s Rocky Mountain Element
The Ribbon won't be mistaken for anything else.


The rest of the Ribbon's chassis is pretty straightforward; there are black, 35mm stanchions that make sense given the fork's intentions, and a 15mm thru-axle that can be had in either a QR15 setup or the bolt-on version that I prefer.

There are also a set of buttons on each leg, just below the seals, that are there to relieve any pressure that may have built up from use or elevation change. No more burping your fork by sliding a zip-tie down through the seals.


Staff Rides - Mike Levy s Rocky Mountain Element
Staff Rides - Mike Levy s Rocky Mountain Element
Those small buttons (left) on the lowers can be pushed to release any built up pressure inside the fork. I prefer a simple bolt-on axle (right), but you can also get the Ribbon with a QR15 setup.



Riding the Ribbon

Air Spring - Besides a suggested pressure for your weight, MRP also provides a range of pressures for the negative spring that will change how the stroke reacts, especially at the top of the travel. It works in reverse to the positive spring, with higher pressures in the negative chamber helping to push the fork into its travel, and MRP strongly recommends keeping this pressure within 95 - 110% of what you use in the positive chamber. For a 160lb guy, they say that 80psi is a good place to start, and between 76 and 86psi for the negative spring.

Those numbers worked decently well, but I did find myself looking for a bit firmer feel overall, so I bumped it up to 90psi and had the Ramp Control dial backed mostly out. In the end, however, 85psi in the positive with the orange party dial turned in twelve clicks did the trick, and that's where it's still at today. I'm also running 90psi in the negative chamber to help the Ribbon into its stroke; it doesn't feel mind-blowingly active, but it's as slippery as anything else on the market. The Ribbon's advantage here is that you can easily make it feel however you'd like by tinkering with the positive and negative pressures, and how the Ramp Control dial's speed-sensitive bottom-out control both works in a very different way than tokens and can also be tweaked during a ride. All that makes the Ribbon far more tuneable than its major competition, which is a bonus if you're into that sort of thing,
MRP Ribbon
MRP includes this nifty setup card that not only provides a place to start for both positive and negative air pressures but also explains what the damper adjustments do and what to look for on the trail.


Chassis Performance - With its open-front arch, the Ribbon might look a bit different, but its 35mm stanchions, sturdy looking lowers, and 15mm thru-axle add up to a package that feels comparable as far as torsional and front-to-back rigidity. I'd be nice if I could tell you that it was even stiffer, or less stiff, but the Ribbon feels on par with a Pike on this front.

I will concede that, at under 160lb, I'm not exactly Richie Rude in the heft or skills departments, and I have no problem saying that all of these forks - Ribbon, Pike, 34, et al. - feel more than torsionally rigid enough for the very large majority of riders. Would a 36, Lyrik, or Mattoc be even stiffer? Yeah, probably, but I'm not too big time to admit that I don't need more stiffness from this 120mm-travel package.


Staff Rides - Mike Levy s Rocky Mountain Element
  The 120mm-travel Ribbon lived on the front of my Element, and it saw everything from bike park laps to shuttle runs to cross-country racing over the last six months.


I asked for my test fork to come with the standard, 15mm thru-axle rather than their QR15 setup, but only because I don't see any reason to need to get the fork's axle off in seconds, and I always have a multi-tool on me anyway. Then again, I don't race enduro or even cross-country that often, so I'm happy with the simplified setup and having to bust out a 6mm hex key. Riders who are in more of a rush to fix their flat tire than I am can opt for the tool-free QR15 setup, and you can even swap between the two if you feel the need.

As for those air bleed buttons that look like nipples, they're cool looking, but I never heard a single puff of air, or noticed a difference in performance, even when going from sea level to three-quarters of the way to the top of Whistler or Blackcomb. But hey, push 'em if you want.


Damper Performance - I've said it before and I'll say it again: the Charger, TPC, and FIT4 dampers are all top notch and leave essentially nothing for the average rider to wish for, just so long as you're not André the Giant or a fourth grader. The status quo works pretty damn well for nearly everyone but there's always room for something that does the job differently, and the Ribbon's twin-tube damper certainly feels different.

There's a decent amount of compression support, even when the eight-position knob is turned all the way to the left, and that only increases as you dial on more low-speed as required - I usually had the knob set five or six clicks out from fully in or backed completely out if it was wet or loose. The twin-tube damper offers a good amount of composure, but the impressive bit is how it doesn't sacrifice small bump compliance, and therefore traction, in the name of being able to stay up in its stroke. Here are some comparisons because I know that's what you want to read: the new Helm has even more support than the Ribbon, but it's also a tad harsh and less comfortable if you're not in a big hurry, while the Pike and 34 are more forgiving than the Helm but also won't stand up in their travel as the Cane Creek fork manages to do.
Staff Rides - Mike Levy s Rocky Mountain Element
MRP's Ribbon has a great deal of low-speed compression control, but without the fork feeling harsh and unresponsive. I usually had this dial turned five or six clicks out from fully in.

And the Ribbon? It's like MRP rode all three of those options, took the best of each, and then put those traits inside an odd-looking chassis that I have no problem looking past because this thing works so damn well.

The MRP fork is as supple and active as a new Pike or 34, but with the same ultra-composed stroke that the Helm can brag about. There just doesn't seem to be that compromise between support and the fork's ability to let the front wheel get up and out of the way of even the smallest root or rock, which is an especially nice thing when you only have 120mm as my test fork does.

At the other end of the range, the Ribbon's high-speed damping never felt too heavy or spikey, but it also did well at taking in those 'oh shit' moments when you see the landing fly by beneath you. That's a good thing as there's no external high-speed compression adjustment which, as a chronic knob fiddler, I wanted before I rode the Ribbon at ten-tenths... I was wrong: it's not needed, at least not by me.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesA lot of us only think of two or maybe three brands when looking for a new suspension fork, and that's understandable given how much these things cost. Most riders aren't likely to spend a grand on something that's not a well-known performer, but it turns out that the Ribbon is one underdog that can not only hang with the big boys but even outperform them. MRP's awesome twin-tube damper and Ramp Control air spring come together to make their fork not just a viable option, but also a front-runner. Mike Levy







141 Comments

  • + 61
 I just put this on my Nomad V4 and it is completely amazing. Also not mentioned is the awesome customer service from MRP. Call them up and actually get a factory tec on the phone. Also, they quoted me only $90 for a factory rebuild. Supporting a local Colorado company with great customer service goes a long way with me. This customer service combined with an amazing feeling fork is a total win-win for me. I highly recommend trying this fork you will not regret it!!
  • + 5
 would you say its worth waiting for the coil version?
  • + 1
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: according to recent reports the coil and air spring are interchangeable. I would call MRP and confirm. I use my nomad primarily for park riding so I am also curious if I can interchange the spring with the air.
  • + 14
 @motostingray: you can convert to coil very simply, but going back to air is a no-go. Contact between the spring and stanchion will possibly score the surface and make sealingl unreliable.
  • + 12
 In a world of overpriced servicing, $90 for a factory service is refreshing.
  • + 1
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: hell yes
  • + 1
 I lived in Grand Junction in 2015/16, amazing riding of course and the guys at MRP are legit. Not surprising to see a fully equipped MRP or DT Swiss (also based in GJ) bike rolling around the Grand Junction & Fruit trails. Keep up the great work MRP....but maybe also give us the option to order the lowers with a standard arch!
  • + 3
 @E-ROG: Just get the Stage fork instead
  • + 8
 Been on the 29 version the past couple weeks and I’d go as far to say its the best single crown I’ve ridden. I’m pretty picky with my setup and usually have to have suspension custom tuned at 250lbs, and I’m blown away at how good this fork feels. I wasn’t unhappy with my 34 but the Ribbon is both more plush off the top and more supportive in the midstroke. Arm pump all but gone. And the service intervals are longer than most, I believe its 50 hrs for lower oil, 100 for wiper seals and 200 for damper service. So glad to not have to give my dough to companies that essentially tell you to shove it with their lack of support and value- looking at you Fox and RS. Keep up the good work MRP.
  • + 1
 @dtm1: that's awesome
  • + 1
 @dtm1: What was the travel you ran? I am considering a 160 mm 29er to replace a Yari. Is that a worthwhile upgrade?
  • + 1
 I been riding my Stage fork for two season and it's the bees knees. Amazing damping and adjustability, with only a lower leg oil change done, and not a single problem! Great work from MRP!
  • + 1
 Curious as to what travel Ribbon you installed on your Nomad 4, was it the 170mm?
  • + 32
 Fork me. That's a good review right there...
  • + 14
 Buttery smooth review.
  • + 14
 It ramped up perfectly
  • + 13
 A Pinkbike article with a pun thread in the comments, there's a shocker.
  • + 2
 Started out a bit soft, but really ramped up towards the end.
  • + 1
 @NoahColorado: Way to ruin the flow...
  • + 5
 Yes, we need to help this pun chain rebound
  • + 14
 @cky78: Perhaps I can rebound?
  • + 8
 Not impressed by the small-minded comment sensitivity.
  • + 2
 @unconvinced: this gets me so excited that i might shoot a pre-load in ma shorts
  • + 2
 @NoahColorado: Nope, you blew the seal.
  • + 2
 @NoahColorado: My bad ... you said shocker.."shock"er...Sorry for putting a few clicks too many on the fun dampening....lol MY BAD
  • + 3
 We really outta put a fork in these pun threads......its done. If this were high school we would all be suspended for it
  • + 22
 One thing I want to point out (in case the quality of customer service wasn't apparent from the 5 people above raving about it), MRP has people answering almost every question in this thread. SRAM drops a new product and no one from that massive company takes the time to go in and answer questions or respond to comments. Way to go MRP.

Ribbon coil is probably my christmas present to me. Can't wait.
  • + 9
 That's a huge compliment to the gang here, thanks!
  • + 13
 go glad to see other forks out there for sale i hope these are reliable and as good as this ad says they are
  • + 8
 Loved my old White Bros loop, love my current Ramp Controlled Pike. Excellent review with legitimate comparisons to the competition. Deciding the build on my next bike just got a little easier.
  • + 5
 I have 2000 miles on my Stage now, and it's awesome. I just got it back from finally having them do a service on it, and immediately set a KOM with it. It feels so freaking good.
  • + 3
 @TucsonDon: that's so awesome to hear! I've always heard these guys ment serious business. Glad to see they back it up. I'm looking forward to getting to try one
  • + 13
 mine gets here tomorrrow. going on a Chromag rootdown. stoked!
  • + 1
 Wow sick
  • + 4
 Awesome! Let us know if you have any set up or tuning questions when you get it installed.
  • + 3
 @simcik: y'all are great over there. I've been rocking mine for a month or so and now got my buddy ^^ getting one as well. I had a rootdown with a stage and now we gonna have a rootdown BA with a ribbon!
  • + 3
 @elliotkelley: Thanks man! We are stoked you are digging the suspension on your Chromags. We are seeing more and more Chromags with MRP suspension on them.

Give us a ring if you ever have questions
  • + 10
 I called MRP a few weeks ago, got a tech, and talked to the guy for about an hour- I'm saving my pennies, and there is no way I'm buying anything but a ribbon. Nice to see this review as well, enjoyed the read
  • + 8
 I've been riding my Ribbon for few months now and am really impressed. The chassis is rigid, especially compared to my 100mm Fox 32 on my CV rig. I'm about 220 on the bike, so rigidity was really important. Fine tuning the fork has been a bit time consuming, I still don't have my pressures completely dialed, and unless I'm on the roughest of rough, I'm not using the entire 150mm of travel I'm set to. The Ramp Control has been a life saver. I rode some fast flowy stuff locally and was able to open it most the way up to get deeper into the travel, without changing pressure, I took the fork to Pisgah and added several clicks of ramp control and had all the end stroke support I needed on the steeper/hairier terrain, the next day I rode some Knoxville Urban Wilderness, and backed it off a couple clicks to free up the end stroke. Perfect, no pump required.
Frankly, I think the arch looks good, and like the exposed lattice. I've gotten comments from several riding buddies and some gawkers at the trailhead. Mostly it's a positive reaction, occasionally, I get a neutral comment.
Love the fork, love the customer support. Great Job MRP.
  • + 7
 So glad MRP is getting the recognition it deserves. I had the Stage on my last bike and was upset to see it overshadowed by the Pike and 34, because it was every bit as good, if not better.
  • + 2
 And I bet is doesn't creak like Pike or 34!
  • + 6
 Hey @NoahColorado, can you guys make a fender that clips into some of those forward facing slots? Seems like an easy clip-in accessory. That, or a whistle, so I sound like a missile coming down the hill.
  • + 3
 you would have to be going fast enough... Wink
  • + 4
 If everyone buys everything on line for lower than shop cost eventually there will not be that local ripper working in the bike for you to chase down on the weekends. Our society wants most things for manufacturing costs and use the terms "its expensive" or I wanted a "really good deal" These are statements that will have you driving long distances to shops in other communities and for basic service if you are not handy. My experience is most folks think they are handier than they actually are. Online is "killing" your local retailers and its you who are not supporting the little guy that is putting the nail in their coffins!

I've used the Ribbon and have owned the Stage forks from MRP and they are everything they claim to be. I'd recommend spending your hard earned $$$$. If you "cant afford" something new you can wait and save your dollars, If you want a "good deal" go ahead and ride something that is a couple of years old. I have put my money on MRP and will do it again.
  • + 5
 The ribbon is £899 here in the UK online, the CC Helm is £950. I paid £450 for my mattoc pro with IRT.
  • + 32
 I do agree online sales are killing bike shops, but I dont entirely feel its their fault. Years ago someone could walk into our bike shop and ask for a rear wheel for their mtb. All we had to ask was if it was thru axle or qr, and we always had various qualities and quantities on hand. Now we have to ask thru axle, qr, boost, 26, 275, 29, sram, or shimano. Its impossible to stock all types and sizes with a variety of each to choose from, then when we tell them the cost since we can't put in an order of 5 or more to get a discount they'll have to pay close to msrp and that it will be 2-3 days before it comes in, they just go online, and I am 100% ok with that. I would do the same thing. Is the bike shop a dying industry, no. Is it a changing industry, yes. We make way more money on servicing bikes then selling merchandise these days, and we do charge an extra fee to install parts you bought inline. Why the heck should a customer have to pay more just because we're a bike shop? We need to evolve as the customer evolves, you really think just because 1 person out of 20 refuses to buy online is going to make a difference in whether a shop goes under or not?
  • + 5
 doesn't help that most bikes roll off the shop floor with un-optimised spec: crap rims, crap suspension, crap brakes, crap tires, but up-spec'd derailleurs. Tiered pricing of components that may not reflect increased manufacturing costs, but instead priced at what they can sell it for. And not much indication of quality or durability so we shop for the lowest price.
  • - 7
flag Poulsbojohnny (Sep 27, 2017 at 12:19) (Below Threshold)
 Online is "killing" your local retailers and its you who are not supporting the little guy that is putting the nail in their coffins!

Blah blah blah. Price competitively and it won't be an issue. Want people to come into your shop and buy stuff? Keep the prices close to online to draw them in. Make your money elsewhere, service, whole bikes, etc. You aren't making money off of someone who shops online anyway, so what is the difference? At least if you price similarly you might up sell on something else.
  • + 4
 @Poulsbojohnny: You should add to stop hiring people how knows close to nothing about bikes.
  • + 3
 @Poulsbojohnny: do you know what you're talking about??
  • + 7
 @Poulsbojohnny: Price similarly? Many shops literally cannot get merchandise from their distributors at the prices that online retailers are selling them to the public. I see what you are saying, but it is unrealistic to expect online prices from most brick and mortar shops.
  • + 2
 @poah: That also depends on your LBS. I bought the stage about 18 months ago and my LBS as usual took care of me with the cost coming well under RRP. Ill be getting a coil ribbon from them as soon as i can get my grubby mitts on one along with their hope boost adapters.
  • - 1
 it would have to be 1/2 the cost of rrp.
  • + 3
 I've got about four months on my Ribbon - mounted to my SB6 - and it's awesome. I've never had a fork with so much support and/or suppleness; the front wheel stays glued to the ground while never diving or wallowing in its travel, regardless of how steep the trail is or how hard I stuff myself into a corner. Killer fork guys, I'm stoked!
  • + 3
 Always wanted a white brothers DH3 back in the day. MRP is seriously taking force faster than I can imagine. I wrote them off at first as another X-fusion kinda manufacturer (which makes decent forks for the price mind you, but still far from top range). However, these new MRP forks seem to be setting a new tone and I am eager to try one out.
  • + 7
 The X Fusion Metric HLR is top-notch in my opinion. It performs as well as not better than most 180mm forks and is also pretty cheap (got mine for 440€ new).
  • + 3
 Went out on a limb and put a Ribbon my Banshee Phantom build. Love the thing so far. Props to the MRP crew for building a quality product in the USA. Keep up the great work guys.
  • + 6
 "chronic knob fiddler"... and... begin!
  • + 1
 I believe Levy also fiddles with the chronic...
  • + 2
 @NoahColorado

Hey Noah,

Are you able to comment on the torsional and fore-aft stiffness of the Ribbon chassis beyond what Mike has said in the review? I weigh 200 and would be looking at using the 160mm 29er Ribbon Coil as replacement for a MY18 Lyrik. Prior to that I spent 6 years on a 36, and have always appreciated the directness of a slightly burlier fork.

Thanks in advance.
  • + 4
 Rode one last week while borrowing a mates Transition smuggler ~ felt really really good , had no issues whatsoever with performance

Thumbs up
  • + 3
 Just going to drop an unapproving look at the lack of 26” here, hop back in my Model T and putter back to the past. Looks like an awesome fork.
  • + 4
 I love my stage, so adjustable and smooth. Not so happy with '17 fox 36 fit4
  • + 2
 That's interesting to hear. Why are you unhappy? I'm pretty pleased with my 2018 fox 34 GRIP, which has the evol upgrade but am curious about your complaints.
  • + 1
 @neologisticzand: I weight 190 with gear and to get proper sag or suppleness I am running 45psi fully open r/c. It wallows a fair amount but doesn't bottom that much, and orange and blue spacer at 180mm.
  • + 4
 I like their flipped arch. Form follows function! I hate this mud catcher on every other fork just for the better look
  • + 5
 This should be the new standard for all product reviews
  • + 7
 ugh, no more new standards!
  • + 1
 I love the Stage and its bladder design, I have no issues whatsoever bleeding it (it is very easy to service at home with the right tools and instructions) but I understand the manufacturing cost argument.
Q for @NoahColorado - will we ever see a coil upgrade for the Stage in the MRPs web store? TIA!
  • + 1
 Based upon the springs being used for the Ribbon Coil, they will not fit into the internals of a Stage unfortunately. I do not believe we are working on a Coil coversion for the Stage. Sorry!
  • + 5
 Thumbs up just for the set up card for people like me.
  • + 2
 @Noah or @Simcik is the rebuild process on the ribbon easy for the home mechanic? Any special tools outside the norm for the rebuild? I prefer to do all of that myself for the $ and time savings. Thanks
  • + 2
 There are a few tools that make service easier. I think there is a tool or two for the damper service that are recommended. Lowers service and travel changes can be done with basic tools. We are also happy to send over the instructions on how to do it. Plus, Noah has put together some great videos on travel change and such. Let me know if I can help with anything further!
  • + 2
 @simcik: Thanks a ton for the quick reply. I will be ordering one shortly. Just gotta decide on air or coil now
  • + 1
 I wonder if it's as user friendly for full servicing as the RockShox products that I love so much. This is a huge deciding factor for me, personally, because I love to do it all myself. That aside, really looks like a kick booty fork option!
  • + 4
 I have these in the 160mm 29er variant and I love them, don't think I'll ever go back to any of the big names again.
  • + 4
 ive had a Stage for a couple of years and its better than any of its competition. Really want the ribbon coil.
  • + 2
 How much of a learning curve is there to figure out the negative air chamber settings? I've never had a fork that wasn't just one air valve and self-adjusting...
  • + 3
 It is pretty straight forward. Just follow our fill instructions and recommendations. From there, you can tweak with it and fully understand it in no time. If any questions arise, we are more than happy to help www.mrpbike.com 970-241-3518
  • + 5
 It's basically no different than adding air to any other fork. I started out equal to positive pressure, tried it again with 10psi more in negative, and got a very quick sense of how this translated out on the trail. From there it's a simple matter to dial it in one way or another for more or less initial suppleness. Very easy & intuitive in other words.

Can't say enough about how much I love this feature... and this fork!!
  • + 3
 @budgie-1: Thank you for explaining that much better than I could Smile

Stoked you are loving the Ribbon!
  • + 2
 "I don't need more stiffness from this 120mm-travel package."
Mike, it takes a real man to admit things like this. Bravo!
  • - 1
 I love how Rockshox, Marzocchi, Manitou, and Fox have been doing this for 20+ years, and he comes to this conclusion: "not just a viable option, but also a front-runner."...........That must feel really good like, "what have we been doing this for 20+ years?"
  • + 1
 Why has no fork company come out with a thin plastic cover that bolts on with a simple 2mm allen bolt to cover the voids?!....
  • + 3
 Offset? Since that's a thing now...
  • + 1
 44 mm on the 650b, 51 mm on the 29er/plus version; think there is a 46 mm option on the plus/29er too. Love my 29er Ribbon, reverse arch works brilliantly here in Wales UK!
  • + 3
 The details in the arch facing forward is brilliant for cleaning.
  • + 2
 Just got the tools to rebuild this guy at the shop and it was pretty easy. Good looking internals too.
  • + 1
 If you begrudgingly compare forks, why not compare it with the only other twin tube damper on the market -the Öhlins RXF?
  • + 2
 It's not as widely available as other options.
  • + 1
 Are other colors available for the decals? I think a stealth theme would look sick.
  • + 3
 We have a pretty stealthy one, it's got two metallic gray tones and black. No additional colors except on the tuning decal. Aside from that, there are 7-8 other options.
  • + 2
 @NoahColorado: you guys still doing colorado sticker kits? i seem to recall seeing that?
  • + 1
 Is it just me, or does it look a bit like a Manitou mounted backwards?
  • + 1
 Hey Levy, hows the reliability? How often does it need to be rebuilt?
  • + 1
 Put...on...a...front...fender
  • + 1
 Does anyone know where to get these serviced in Vancouver?
  • + 1
 Suspension Werx
  • + 1
 Are those DP Brake discs???
  • - 2
 I don't really get why I'd want "support" from my fork. It's a suspension fork, I want it to compress with a slight progressive curve.
  • + 7
 Because you don't want it to dive in response to weight shifts, braking, down steep sections, etc.
  • + 0
 @dthomp325 Go ride a RS fork on something really steep and then brake and then tell me you don't get why you'd want support.
  • + 3
 @kwl1: Instructions unclear : Shoved my face into the ground.
  • + 2
 @kwl1: I ride Rockshox forks down steep stuff all the time. If it dives, then you've either got the compression setting or sag setting wrong. What I don't want is the compression to stop mid-stroke, I want a nice progressive compression that gets stiffer the later in the travel I get.
  • + 1
 @dthomp325: Played around with sag, I run 20%. I find that I can add slow speed compression to dial back the dive somewhat but then that necessitates me stopping before steeper trails to change my compression. Not a big deal but not something I ever had to do with my Marz 350. It still doesn't eliminate it completely, especially on steep technical terrain where speeds are slower.
  • - 1
 Or I can buy a 2017 40% off Fox Shox online.....
  • + 3
 don't worry , you'll be able to get these on sale eventually (I'm counting on it)
  • + 0
 @DGWW: way smaller production numbers, so probably way less on sale.


Skimming the ad I didn't notice if these are made in USA or Asia? (and yes, too lazy to go re read)
  • + 5
 The real truth, most of us end up buying what is on sale and being happy with it. Given a choice, it is Manitou or DVO for me because they are easy to work on with great support. That said, Noah from MRP is really active at responding to questions and issues on MTBR and MRP has a great reputation for taking care of their customers.
  • + 22
 @onemind123: Every fork is built to order here in our Grand Junction facility.
  • + 1
 @simcik: cool, so all parts are manufactured in USA
  • + 27
 @onemind123: We source some of the parts from Taiwan, parts that you frankly cannot get made domestically to our standards (magnesium castings, stanchions, etc.). But most of the spring and damper parts, knobs, axles, etc. are produced right behind me in the machine shop. Turning all the various parts into forks happens right here too. Design, testing, sales, marketing, and production are all under the same roof.
  • + 11
 @onemind123: We do have to have some of the chassis parts manufactured in Taiwan. Magnesium casting is not really possible here. All internals, knobs, rods, axles... are machined in house. All forks are 100% assembled in house, dyno tested/verified
  • - 27
flag mountain-life (Sep 27, 2017 at 10:46) (Below Threshold)
 @onemind123: They should say assembled in USA. Parts come from Asia, just like other brands. Lots of companies like MRP use words like "built" to mislead consumers into thinking the a product is made in the USA.
  • + 11
 @mountain-life: Does it really matter that much? It's not like they're outright lying about it, in fact you have two MRP employees here telling you straight up where stuff is from and why. Not all manufacturing is feasible within North America anyway, and it's not solely a cost thing either - there's a reason why there's only a couple of factories in the whole world making thin walled cast magnesium fork lowers. If you want it done right, you go to those factories.
  • + 5
 @mountain-life: Go to Grand Junction, ride some bitchin trails and then stop in and see the guys. They will show you how they build them in the states. And after, demo the fork on said bitchin trails!!
  • + 5
 @NoahColorado: Noah, great to hear you guys are making them here. Got mine a few weeks ago for my Enduro 29er. And boy, does this thing rock! I'm pushing 215 lbs and this things stays nice and level. But when it gets to the rough stuff...it's sooooo smooth!
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