MRP's New Ribbon Fork and Ramp Control Cartridge - Eurobike 2016

Sep 1, 2016
by Mike Levy  
Eurobike 2016


MRP's trail and all-mountain focused Ribbon fork is entirely new from the ground up, including its odd looking lowers that employ a fork arch that is in the usual place but that also appears to be turned around backwards. The new Ribbon, which takes its name from a well-known trail in MRP's hometown of Grand Junction, Colorado, will be an addition to their catalog rather than a replacement for their proven Stage fork.

Ribbon Details

• Intended use: trail / all-mountain / enduro
• Travel: 140-170mm (27.5), 120-150mm (29)
• 35mm stanchions
• Internally adjustable travel in 5 and 10mm increments
• Air-sprung
• Ramp Control system
• Twin tube damper
• External LSC, LSR adjustment
• Availability: late November
• Weight: 4.1lbs (w/ QR axle)
• MSRP: $989 USD

The 27.5 Ribbon can be run with up to 170mm of stroke or down to as little as 140mm, while the 29er version can be set with up to 150mm of travel or down to 120mm. This is adjusted internally on both models by either 5mm or 10mm increments via a spacer system that is said to be simple to understand, and MRP includes everything that's needed with the fork.
MRP s New Ribbon Fork and Ramp Control Cartridge

There are two separate chassis - one for 27.5'' wheels and another for 29'' wheels - and the former can fit a tire up to 2.6'' wide, while the latter can take a 2.6'' wide 29er tire or a 3.0'' wide 27.5 plus-sized wheel and tire combo.


Eurobike 2016
MRP s New Ribbon Fork and Ramp Control Cartridge
Forwards but also backwards. The odd looking arch is designed to be mud proof.


And what about that funky looking arch that appears to be designed backwards but put on forwards? MRP says that the idea is to simply move the lattice work to the front of the arch to keep mud and crud from building up within it, something that their UK clientele has repeatedly requested. Also, with everyone and their friend selling an all-black fork with different decals on it, the funky arch design of the Ribbon certainly sets it apart from the crowd.

MRP has also included a set of nifty air-bleed valve buttons on each fork leg; simply push them to expel any pressure that's built up from use or elevation change.

The Ribbon employs a twin-tube damper just like the Stage fork, but it's an updated design that has moved to an internal floating piston rather than the expanding bladder compensator found in the Stage. Why the change? MRP says that the IFP is a more reliable, easier to manufacture design, and also that it makes it much easier for a rider to perform a damper bleed. That said, one of the main reasons that many fork dampers employ expanding bladders is because it's an essentially frictionless system, which is important when talking about the 1:1 suspension ratio of a fork but less of an issue when the leverage of a bike's rear suspension can easily overcome the friction of a shock with an IFP in it. MRP's Noah Sears says that this isn't an issue with their IFP-based design, however, because of the low air pressure behind the floating piston.


Eurobike 2016
Eurobike 2016
The Ribbon is home to a new twin-tube damper.


A crown-mounted dial is used to adjust the Ribbon's low-speed compression, with eight clicks that take the fork from wide open to nearly locked out. Rebound is tuned at the bottom of the same leg, and there's a decal on the casting that shows the total number of clicks for LSC, LSR, and the Ramp Control air spring feature.

MRP has also gone with a different air spring in the Ribbon compared to what's used in the Stage, with the new fork featuring separate air valves for the positive (at the top) and negative (at the bottom) air chambers. This is instead of the self-adjusting negative air spring found in the Stage, and like any fork with a two-way adjustable air spring, it lets the rider tune how active the fork is by varying pressure in the negative chamber.

One thing that does get carried over from the Stage is MRP's clever Ramp Control system that, as you probably guessed, adjusts how the fork ramps up in its travel without needing to add or subtract tokens. Instead, you simply turn a crown-mounted dial that opens or closes a very small port; the smaller the port, the harder it is for the air to pass through and vice versa. Think of it as damping, but to control the fork's air spring ramp-up.
Eurobike 2016
The Ramp Control assembly sits at the top of the spring-side fork leg.



Eurobike 2016
Eurobike 2016
Tired of token tinkering? MRP's Ramp Control cartridge replaces the top cap and token assembly of certain RockShox forks, and it allows you to tune ramp-up by turning a dial.


Would you like a quicker, tool-free way to adjust the ramp-up of your Pike, Yari, Lyirk, or BoXXer instead of adding or subtracting tokens? MRP has decided to offer their Ramp Control system in a drop-in, cartridge-based setup for the aforementioned RockShox forks. The $150 USD Ramp Control cartridge replaces the top cap and token assembly of your RockShox fork, allowing you to adjust its bottom-out control by simply turning a crown-mounted dial. This dial opens and closes a very small port at the bottom of the cartridge; the smaller the port, the harder it is for the air to pass through and vice versa.

MRP says that installing the Ramp Control system and leaving it wide open is about on par with adding one token to your RockShox fork simply because of the volume it takes up, but that it also gives you a much easier way to tinker with your spring rate.


132 Comments

  • + 168
 They may have made the arch "mud proof" but they've only gone and left a big rectangular hole in the stanchion there which is going to fill up in no time. They must be kicking themselves for that oversight.
  • + 52
 doh! We'll fix that hole for production, for sure!

As for the arch, mud mitagation was part of goal, for sure, but we make no secret about it also being there to achieve a unique look. The aim was blend form and function - keeping the weight reliefs in the traditional spot (back of the arch) and then throwing non-functional material elsewhere to achieve an interesting "look" seemed a little silly when we could go this route.

Cheers!
  • + 18
 I mounted an MRP Stage on the front of my Nomad and ended up loving it so much that I installed an MRP Loop on my 29r. MRP makes solid products backed by astounding customer service. I have zero doubts that this new fork will impress people to no end. Keep up the great work, MRP!
  • + 7
 @NoahColorado: any chance of releasing a coil spring assembly to replace the airspring? There is a serious lack of coil forks on the market lately.
  • + 6
 @NoahColorado: have you guys considered a clean mounting fender, to do away with all the zip ties normally used? Not sure why that is not more common.
  • + 4
 @NoahColorado: the lattice on the front is genius. How about including mounting points for a mudguard? It would simultaneously keep mud out of the lattice and provide a clean solution to keep mud from splattering up.
  • + 1
 Big Tim, you've made my day!
  • + 11
 mud proof yes, the real question... can you get that arch to whistle a tune when you get up to speed?!
  • + 32
 Ramp control is awesome. Another one of those "why didn't we think of that" gadgets.
Not $150 awesome though.
  • - 2
 The description makes it sound like it affects compression damping rather than spring rate though
  • + 4
 agreed...fairly certain this will be a "must-have" feature at my next fork purchase. It's great to be able to tune the volume with spacers but in reality, once I get to something that seems "pretty good," I just don't take the time to keep messing with it, let alone fine tune for different ride destinations or trails.
  • + 4
 @surfhard987: technically it would do some small amt of compression damping, but since it's working with a compressible fluid (air) it would behave totally different from a normal fork damper which needs incompressible fluid (oil) to work right. If you've ever gotten cavitation or air entrainment in your damper you know that it immeditately stops acting like a damper once some gas gets involved, which is why we have pressurized and bladder-based systems.

For a given amt of fork movement, a normal damper forces *fixed volume* of oil through the damper. With this thing, it takes time for air to flow through the tiny orifice and equalize the pressure - instead of forcing a fixed volume (oil) you're ramping up the pressure outside the chamber and allowing some leakage into it. If you held the fork deep in its travel at this point, eventually the pressures inside and outside the chamber would equalize and you'd lose the progressiveness, but realistically a normal bottom-out type of situation wouldn't involve the fork sitting low for long enough to make that happen. Adjusting the orifice opening would basically change how quickly this equalizes, which would feel more or less like adding/subtracting tokens.

Seems like a really clever system. I'd love to try it. The only thing I'm wondering about is if you'd lose progressiveness after successive big hits because the chamber wouldn't be able to release its air fast enough. Or if slower bottoming events like G-outs wouldn't act as progressive as fast ones.

@NoahColorado am I understanding this correctly?
  • + 5
 I think it's awesome when the little guy (MRP) out engineers the big guy (SRAM). $150 is expensive but that's the price of R+D for a product that will give you the ability to tune your existing fork.

Also, if you are interested in this type of technology check out the Manitou IRT and IRC. Both are custom ramp control. I have the Mattoc with an IRT and it's cool because you can adjust the ramp-up using a shock pump.
  • + 2
 Been done already, it's called a manitou fork...
  • + 7
 BTW, the Ramp Control upgrade is retailing for $139.95 - I guess I over-quoted the MSRP. My bad, yo.
  • + 1
 @bkm303:Very astute observation... I was thinking this same exact thing, just figuring out how to put it into words. Thanks for allowing me to be intellectually lazy :-)
  • + 3
 @thisguyalex: Yup. The old spv forks did it well over a decade ago.
  • + 1
 @Bkm303: is there an equal and opposite effect on the rebound as a result of air now being trapped in the wrong chamber?
  • + 1
 @twebeast: I don't think any rebound effect would be noticeable, because while the compression event happens really fast, you already have a rebound damper and rider weight limiting how fast the fork will return to its extended/sagged position. This would probably give the two chambers a little time to equalize. There might be some difference (rebound stroke ever so slightly more linear/slow) but I'm guessing it would be tough to notice, and you could compensate by running less rebound damping if needed.

FWIW, adding and removing tokens usually involves some amount of damper fiddling as well. I expect this probably would too, just maybe with less rebound than you'd use on a fork with actual tokens.
  • + 1
 @DirtGuru2: glad I could help! ????
  • + 1
 How will it work if your Lyrik has the dual position?
  • + 2
 @twebeast: no, the return flow path is quite free, so no rebound effect
  • + 0
 @NoahColorado: where is it availible? i just checked your website and couldnt see it
  • + 20
 reversing the ribbing will increase my drag coefficient resulting in a .0003% reduction in top speed not to mention the negative impact on my acceleration! Like the ramp control, but the added weight will likely slow me down even more! I might as well sit on the couch watch the WC and have a breakfast pint.
  • + 11
 Breakfast pints rule! I'm convinced this is what coffee stout was invented for.
  • + 3
 The weight of the mud stuck in the ribbing was slowing you down more before.
  • + 2
 Check your calls man. Aero is all about the trailing edge.
  • + 1
 Breakfast, pre ride, lunch, post ride, dinner pints and the night is still young!
  • + 19
 Love my Stage but needed 160mm for my wrecker so I got a Lyrik. Was really hoping this would say 160mm 29er...come on MRP!!!!
  • + 1
 agree; don't know why ur downvoted
  • + 2
 Agreed, missing the boat on my long travel 29er also
  • + 31
 Please stay tuned. We may RAMP up max travel and make a 160mm model. Try to CONTROL your excitement.
  • - 9
flag araines1 (Sep 1, 2016 at 8:20) (Below Threshold)
 @NoahColorado: prove it.
  • + 6
 @NoahColorado:
common MRP - please make a 170mm 29 Version. This would be a dream comming true for our alpine trails...
  • + 6
 I've definitely gotten to new trails and wish I had a little more ramp on my air spring. WIthout a shock pump or the ability to add tokens on the fly, you're out of luck. Having the ability to firm it up on the fly sounds perfect.

Hey MRP: Make the Ramp Control cartridge for Rockshox 32mm forks like the SID/Reba and I'll buy 3.
  • + 4
 Still no fender mounts on the arch? Eventually manufacturers will figure out that zip-tieing stuff onto a carbon super bike is just dumb. Put a couple threaded holes on that arch and you'll jump ahead of fox and rockshox. They'll be adding the mounts sometime soon too. Why? Because front fenders are already standard equipment in many parts of the world.
  • + 4
 If it's muddy in Grand Junction you pray you're not out on your bike. It's like riding in paste.
  • + 3
 @dfiler Fox has the threaded holes but no fender - baffling.
  • + 7
 Cheers @davidcoleman . Thanks for the comment.

Real talk, we had threaded bosses on the back of the Stage fork with genuine plans to make a fender, but we couldn't make one that didn't cost an arm and a leg to produce. We found the garden variety Mucky Nutz and Marsh Guard jobs to work without fault for relative pennies, so a proprietary unit never came to be. We made sure those worked as well on this casting and called it good.

I agree that zip-ties aren't the cleanest, but Home Depot, and the like, have thin Velcro straps that work just as well and can be reused easily.
  • + 0
 So we won't buy a fender that costs 'an arm and leg' but we'll pay $3200+ for a carbon frame? Funny. Very funny.

And velcro straps are cleaner than zip ties... Meh.
  • + 2
 I hear you noah, a proper fender isn't as cheap as a flexible sheet of plastic that is zip-tied on. I use velcro as you mentioned. Still though, most bikes around here cost thousands of dollars. A front fender is critical in many climates and I predict they'll be as popular as dropper posts. All you have to do is ride with one to realize it completely eliminates mud and debris being flung into your face. I used to wear goggles for DH and enduro. Now I just run a front fender much of the time. For a company selling forks though, certainly you have to play to the masses. The only question is which year will be the year that the masses finally take notice. They will, it's only a question of when. Being someone who already uses a front fender, I just hope that companies such as MRP lead the market rather than trail it. Front fenders could be a massive selling point over the competition if supported with a legit media campaign. Bikers aren't dumb, they'll realize the benefit when shown and experienced.
  • + 3
 @dfiler: but from a business standpoint, what benefit is there to offer a proprietary bolt-on fender that adds cost to the fork casting, when a customer could go get a generic product for less money that does the same thing? Just don't think there's any value in it from MRP's standpoint - their market share is already tiny, and nobody with a non-MRP fork could use it. You don't stay competitive by adding features that most people won't buy.

I don't really get the ziptie/velcro hate, regardless of how nice the bike is. If you use a black one you can barely see it.
  • + 1
 It's true you can get by with zip ties or velcro. But for those spending thousands on a new bike, there is another solution that matches the cost/benefit ratio they're obviously willing to pay for.

Take for example, internal cable routing. That adds way more to the cost of a frame than threaded holes to the back of a fork arch.

Also, frames with custom, built-in bumpers for double crown forks. Money is spent on those even though a ring of rubber around a stanchion is cheaper and not custom to every frame.

Or perhaps the best example: Remember when fork brake lines were zip tied to fork lowers? Now we expect forks to include a threaded mounting hole and custom cable clamp. Fenders need exactly the same improvement.

Certainly i'm not claiming it to be a profitable feature right now. But it will be eventually. My hope is that a company or two adds fender mounts and the others all have to follow suit or be left behind.
  • + 2
 @NoahColorado

The Stage 29" fits some 29x3" tire & rim combos (even though they're not officially supported). Does the 29" Ribbon have more or less actual clearance than the Stage?

Also, does the Ribbon use boost spacing?
  • + 2
 I really don't understand the point of Ramp Control.

It SEEMS cool, but once you adjust the spring rate, doesn't that mean you need to then readjust your compression and rebound settings as well, since those will be thrown out of wack for the new spring rate?

If you're doing that at home and taking your time with it, sure, that's fine, i guess, but then spacers offer the same benefits with less complicated parts. And if you're doing it at the trailhead, you're holding up your buddies having to readjust everything.
  • + 0
 I think it's amazing you can have that much adjustability over a fork. Old forks used to just bang like a hammer on cement when you reached the travel limit.
  • + 0
 Also it's not like you have to be a dork about it, and readjust it every time you're about to hit a bump, although that might make a good comedy bit.
  • + 1
 This is actually a really good point. I'd be curious to see what, and how much it effects sag, rebound, etc...I suppose the only alternative would be to spend a considerable amount of time by yourself recording different settings/pressures and recording them on your phone. That's worth an email to MRP.
  • + 1
 @Kramz: that's a bit of a straw man- i'm not talking about changing it several times a ride, i'm talking about changing it depending on the trail you use, which would require retuning everything, not just the ramp control. seems like more trouble than it's worth if you're going to do it right, and like you're going to end up with a badly tuned fork if you do it wrong.
  • + 2
 @xeren, I just got this email back from MRP: "The RAMP cartridge does not affect the spring rate as you are controlling the flow of air through a valve and not changing the volume like the tokens did. The cartridge will allow you to run a similar pressure to where you are at now and not sacrifice the performance of the spring when you add additional clicks of RAMP to your fork."

Makes sense now. It should't effect any settings as you're not changing volume, but rather changing the flow of air. I'll be picking one up when they release it on their site.
  • - 1
 @crazyXCsquirrel: so this is basically just a damping adjustment. i'm even less impressed with this than ever!
  • + 3
 @NoahColorado
How will the ribbon feel compared to my Stage? I have a 29er 150 stage and love it, but wouldn't mind replacing my Pike on my 27.5
  • + 1
 I would like to know this as well. Just ordered a bike with a Stage and now I'm worried it's already outdated. Based on the article I don't really see why they would keep both forks in the lineup.
  • + 1
 I scrolled to find this exact question. @NoahColorado should I be ditching my stage and buying a ribbon at this point? I've had pretty good luck with it but if this is better I'd give that a go.
  • + 6
 As with any new product introduction, the goal is to make it better than the last. Compared to the current Stage, with the Ribbon you're getting more adjustability to air spring - able to tune the positive and negative pressures independently vs. having them only be equal. The Ribbon also benefits from lower-drag seals that reduce stiction by up to 28% compared. The Stage is pretty well know to be very supple and plush in that respect, so that's saying something!

The new damper and air spring designs are also going into the MY17 Stage and Loop models - both of which remain in the lineup.

Thanks for the questions.
  • + 1
 @NoahColorado: Thanks for the reply!
Two more questions, will the stage also be getting lower drag seals moving forward?
Are the damper and air spring available as aftermarket drop-in upgrades? I imagine the air spring would be easy enough to change but the damper requires a weird socket correct?
  • + 1
 @NoahColorado: is it quiet? I demo'd a bike with a Stages fork and it was loud...performed well, considering not exactly dialed for me, but it was distracting.
  • + 1
 I bought an MRP Groove 27.5 which some label the heaviest fork for its travel in the current market, however, for the price $1000 and its functionality as well as how it rides and the fact that you can mount fat tires on your 20mm hubs without going boost, makes it a killer value. Ride wise, great fork. No regrets. MRP is solid!
  • + 2
 curious what stanchion diameter is...or did I just miss it?

Also, can someone explain why low speed damper adjustability (compression and rebound) would be prioritized over any high speed damper adjustability?
  • + 1
 35mm
  • + 1
 My guess would be that the vast majority of suspension movement is damped by the low-speed circuits and that makes adjustment of low-speed a higher priority.
  • + 3
 Actually, the majority of bumps, roots and trail obstacle impacts are handled by HS compression circuits. That's why LS compression can be used to tune out any bob when pedalling out of the saddle and stop the fork diving through it's travel under braking, without making the fork less reactive over rough stuff.

I'm not 100% sure why LS is prioritised over HS, but I reckon it's just because it's cheaper for the companies and less confusing for riders to have just a few external adjustments. I think removing that pedal bob and brake dive is seen as a priority and is also difficult to tune out over a range of rider weights and styles with a fixed factory setup, so those adjustments get priority.
  • + 1
 @Smevan: Thanks for that explanation! Makes total sense!
  • + 1
 @Smevan & @Facingtraffic -- Thanks for the comments...I figured it must be some kind of compromise of else maybe @NoahColorado might have provided his input in the first place. I have found that I adjust HSC much more then LCS so it looked like a deficiency. LSC damping must be responsible for that "mid-stroke support" that everyone is so picky, and maybe they found their stock HSC damping is good enough for most that it was worth the tradeoff in terms of cost. Without having really paid attention to how dampers function, I've always wondered what shaft speeds are covered by LSC damping and at what point HSC damping takes over...
  • + 3
 Have a Stage on my Nomad3 also and love it. The Ribbon will be my next upgrade. 35mm stanchions, bleed valve, and upgraded damper for easier service has me drooling.
  • + 2
 I gotta say it's pretty neat that we are able to chat to the manufacturers and nitpick their products with the hope that they might make them even better. Pretty cheap market research too.
  • + 4
 I always put abit of eletrical tape over the holes in the back of my arch to stop them getting full of mud
  • + 1
 Big stickers work well also. Discreet way of adding something interesting.
  • + 3
 @dirtnapped: Yeah had a YT one that said "sh*t bumper" seemed fitting
  • + 1
 So the Ramp Control is a non-linear token, interesting. I hope that the price is reasonable and that it's as easy to install as it is to take the top cap off a Pike, which is very easy and you only need to use a socket or wrench.
  • + 2
 It's not really a non-linear token, just a more finely adjustable token that you don't have to open the fork to adjust. Tokens/ramp control do make the spring curve of the fork more nonlinear as you add ramp up.
  • + 2
 It looks exactly as easy to install, just as you described. Price will still be well above a handful of molded plastic, but the feature is being able to adjust on the fly.
  • + 2
 Interesting, i'm sure what they've said about the IFP is the exact opposite of what Fox and Rockshox say about their bladders, ie reliable and easier to make/maintain
  • + 2
 I have a Stage on my Nomad, as well as some other MRP goodies. Awesome products all around, and I'm sure the Ribbon will be great.
  • + 1
 I just cover the gaps with a sticker and tape, which gets mucked quickly. So who has come out with snap-on cover for each fork brand?
  • + 2
 i just fill mine with silicone caulk. mud and grime slide right off. ill keep my forward arch.
  • + 15
 I just fill mine with mud and grime.
  • + 11
 "i just fill mine with silicone caulk"

must resist...
  • + 1
 @WayneParsons: that's the funniest thing, now that I think about it. How the hell did I not see that?
  • + 1
 you know your sh*t is good when you get this many comments on pinkbike with customers praising your products..sorry, coudl not resist. MRP is solid.
  • + 1
 Love the attention to detail. The label on the leg near the rebound, priceless. I'll take the ramp control for my Pike and my Boxxer.
  • + 1
 now that is simple creative thinking and problem solving. I dont know anything about MRP forks, but i like what they have done .
  • + 2
 Sounds interesting, hopefully we will get a long term review in due course

35mm Stanchions?
  • + 5
 Yes, 35mm stanchions. We'll definitely have a Ribbon fork over to Pinkbine when they reach production later this year. A Ramp Control review will be coming soon!
  • + 4
 @NoahColorado: "When they reach production"?? But then how are you supposed to blame anything breaking on it being pre-production? Haven't you learned anything from Yeti?
  • + 2
 Very excited to see this fork. Huge upgrade over boost options from RS/Fox last year.
  • + 1
 @NoahColorado how similar is the MRP Ramp Control to what Diaz Suspension is doing with his Pike insert?

Really like the bleed valves. Much better than the zip tie trick.
  • + 2
 Although they are expensive, MRP makes quality products and backs them up with excellent customer service!
  • + 1
 I like the idea of reversed arch but it looks ugly. They should cover the surface with something to make it look smooth.
  • + 1
 @EnduroriderPL What a stupid thing to say.
  • + 1
 @CaptainVonAwesome: Come on, you can do better than just repeating others people comments.
  • + 2
 Fork, meet mud... mud, meet fork. You guys will be attached forever!!!
  • + 2
 Or ride to close behind people.
  • + 1
 Bolt in axle? I like that the travel adjust can be accomplished without buying extra bits.
  • + 1
 yes, bolt-in axle and QR axle options available.
  • + 2
 Dam! I want me one of those 'Ramp Controls'!!!
  • + 1
 The front fork on my next bike is going to have to be an MRP. Gotta support my home state companies!
  • + 2
 What about the axle options - there's QR and bolt-on versions.
  • + 1
 also, will the bolt-on be available on the current stage? Been looking for this option since the QR lever needs regular attention to keep from rattling.
  • + 1
 i bet some people are gonna mount it the other way around lol
  • + 1
 Will the ramp control fit in older lyric solo air?
  • + 1
 @EnduroriderPL Have fun with your Q-tip!
  • + 1
 Mud proof arch? Or did they really want the stupidest looking fork ever?
  • + 1
 pinkbike,could you review MRP's Ramp Control cartridge????????????
  • + 1
 did i miss the stanchion diameter or did they not mention it?
  • + 1
 35mm. Cheers
  • + 1
 i like the older design.....cool spot for mud now
  • + 1
 I really dig this fork can't wait to get my hands on it for a test.
  • + 1
 These products are really cool to see! Nice going Mister P!
  • + 1
 Could you not just create an arch that is smooth both sides?
  • + 1
 Put a sticker over the arch to keep dirt out.
  • - 3
 That honeycomb on the front is hideous, it's bad enough on the back.

I like Suntour's arches because they don't have that. May be marginally heavier, but not too bad. (talking about higher end ones, Auron, Durolux, not cheapie stuff)
  • + 1
 So clean! Has that vintage crown look from the 90's!
  • - 1
 I have never had an issue with mud in my fox or rockshox fork arches, in the PNW... does this actually happen to people?
  • + 6
 Yes it does.
  • + 3
 Genuine problem
  • + 3
 your mud must be *too wet* so as not to be so thick and sticky? But there's pretty much no possible way you can ride a fender-less bike without whatever the tires pick up getting spun off into the fork arch. Whether it sticks or not depends on what it is, but the stuff around here packs in and then dries hard as rock.

I wouldn't call it a "problem," per se, but this certainly is a functional improvement. Aesthetics are personal.
  • + 4
 Yeah, everything packs with mud around here. Smooth designs are easier to clean.

Though the real solution is to put real fender mounts on the arch and have the fender cover those holes. DVO has it figured out. Hopefully the other manufactures will soon as well. Example: http://brimages.bikeboardmedia.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/DVO-Diamond-suspension-fork-for-enduro-mountain-bikes02.jpg
  • + 2
 @Jagertom: Bet these lucky b*astards don't even have to tape over the welding holes in there frame stays to keep the water out!
  • + 0
 @dfiler: that is slick.
  • + 2
 Survey says: yes.

Possible solution: added weight for all the times you're not riding in wet, sticky conditions by way of a fender you'll have to add on top of the cost of a new fork.

Not taking the piss, just saying the unconventional "outcast" arch design keeps the muck from accumulating in adverse conditions without ANY downsides when it's sunny and delightful.
  • + 0
 Only up to 150mm for 29? A bit of a miss IMHO.
  • + 1
 That's why they have the Stage.
  • + 0
 MRP: mud repository pockets.

Can't wait to read the reviews on this.
  • - 3
 Imagine how hard it'll be to keep that arch clean.
  • + 5
 Not any harder than a normal one?
  • + 2
 Not hard at all?

Edit @Tehuprising beat me to it
  • + 10
 Probably pretty easy unless you like to ride backwards.
  • + 1
 @CaptainVonAwesome what a stupid thing to say.

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