#N1NO, The Hunt For Glory: Hittin' the Gym Part Two - Video

Mar 21, 2016
by SCOTT Sports  
Views: 16,668    Faves: 245    Comments: 5

The workouts of the pros are normally out of reach for everyday riders. Whether they are too intense, too time-consuming, or both. In part two of “Hitting the Gym with Nino Schurter”, the World Champion lets us in on some unique exercises he uses to develop the coordination and balance required to compete at the highest level. Nino and his coach have fine-tuned these exercises to meet the demanding needs of mountain bike racers. They combine power, coordination and regeneration exercises, replicating a race environment. Get a look at some never before seen cycling workouts that could very well change the way you ride a bike.

N1NO The Hunt for Glory
Nino talks us through the importance of a well-rounded workout:

Why do mountain bike riders need good coordination?

Mountain biking is a very demanding sport. Not only in terms of endurance, but also with regards to power and coordination. As a rider, you always need power and coordination at the same time - whether going downhill, accelerating or simply when managing tricky trail situations. That`s why I try to combine power and coordination exercises in my workouts.

N1NO The Hunt for Glory

N1NO The Hunt for Glory

What does your indoor workout look like?

My coach Nicolas Siegenthaler built up a 30 min indoor circuit with nine different exercises, each requiring a high level of coordination and balance. My goal with this workout is to keep up a very intense level to simulate situations which are very close to race situations. All of the exercises are physically very demanding.

N1NO The Hunt for Glory

N1NO The Hunt for Glory

What is special about this workout?

The exercises are specifically developed to simulate a cross-country race. Even the regeneration exercises simulate real situations in races - like downhills. After two power exercises I do one regeneration exercise but here I do not fully relax – like descending on a long section of a trail, I try to balance and activate the same muscle groups. I try to even close my eyes when doing these exercises to teach my body to feel what's going on.

N1NO The Hunt for Glory

N1NO The Hunt for Glory

N1NO The Hunt for Glory

#HUNTFORGLORY
#NOSHORTCUTS
For more episodes, click HERE.
Check out part one here.


MENTIONS: @SCOTT-Sports



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102 Comments

  • 98 5
 More articles like this would be fantastic - showing functional training instead of just lifting heavy weights.
  • 20 163
flag boulderbasher69 (Mar 21, 2016 at 8:07) (Below Threshold)
 This is not functional training, i dont recall doing any of these things while mountain biking. There are much more effective ways to elicit a greater training response in the areas they are trying to improve. Sitting on balance balls and skateboards does not define functional training. The dude is just working out how he wants, nothing wrong with that - CSCS
  • 13 127
flag boulderbasher69 (Mar 21, 2016 at 8:15) (Below Threshold)
 there is no better functional training for a sport than the sport itself, go ride!
  • 358 4
 You probably don't recall winning several World Championships on a mountain bike, either.
  • 54 0
 ^^^ oh snap!
  • 23 4
 @SCOTT-Sports you beat me to it hahaha
  • 28 0
 Strength training using non sport specific resistance training is very normal in literally every sport. You won't win a single professional title in any sport, across the board, if all you do is the sport itself. This can be verified by paying attention to the training programs for athletes. Every one involves heavy lifting like deadlifts and squats, along with movement drills and various other things like balance specific workouts like we see here.
  • 16 11
 Every PT is gonna flock to this comment section imparting all of the wisdom they learned on their weekend training course, But the simple truth is that no matter what sport you do, there are more effective sport specific movements than"squats n deadlifts brah".
  • 18 2
 And you're just proving you have no idea what you are talking about, "Brah". Find me one professional cyclist that doesn't perform those two, basic, foundation building exercises and you will find a person who hasn't won anything. Sport specific movements mean jack shite if you are weak. This is fundamental to any sport and is reflected by the fact that it's everywhere and done by every single athlete training program from lacrosse to football to cycling to even F1. Get a clue, Brah. Broooo. Brah. brooooo.
  • 14 2
 @SCOTT-Sports Would love if you guys released a training plan. Especially a tiered version for people with varying degrees of time.
  • 10 9
 @atrokz, read the comment again, I said "more effective", never said unessential. Remember, training is important, but reading is importanter.
  • 1 3
 Your comment eschewed what I wrote about various training methods, and made a remark to make fun of ‘squats and deadlifts’ which exposed your ignorance of the topic. I would also argue it’s less ‘effective’ if you can’t perform compound movements without any strength behind it. You build on the foundation, which is the basic methodology for all training programs. Everyone benefits from doing these basic compound strength movements hence why they are included in every good training program in the world. Wink I can't think of a sport specific movement related to cycling that would have a bigger impact that doing those two compound movements.
  • 9 0
 HA! importanter, made my day
  • 3 1
 My comment wasn't aimed at yours, it was aimed at the bro science i saw on comments of the last vid of nino training. I dont disagree that the compound lifts are important, but i think the attitude of "you have to do squats and deadlifts" is a little dated. Look at the way Gary Roberts trains NHLers, can you imagine going into a gym and doing a bench press with uneven weight on each end of the bar? no, but when you're training specific to sports and thats your only focus then why would you stick to exercises aimed at people gaining foundation strength. if you want to be a mountainbiker, you train to do the movements required during mountainbiking, and while i agree that squats and deadlifts do this, i think there are excercises that do this better.
  • 2 1
 Like what? What exercises activates as much and builds as much power in your legs, core, back, and shoulders, as the deadlift or squat? I'd argue that the paradigm shift has changed towards these old school compound movements than away from it. I remember training for rugby doing a bunch of silly 'sport specific' movements back in the 90s. Nowadays training programs always include them as fundamentals. We aren't talking about body builder workouts, we're talking about two very important movements that are more beneficial to strength in your movement than any other. And fair enough, just hard to grasp your point correctly if it's directly under mine...... Wink

and speaking of Gary Roberts... garyrobertshpt.tumblr.com/post/66380079426/strength-maintenance-part-1
  • 2 1
 God I love Gary Roberts.
But wouldn't you say that routine reiterates my point? I understand there's a deadlift in there but that is a workout based around unconventional none bodybuilding excecises. Even the deadlier wasn't conventional strictly speaking, although I know I'm being pedantic there
  • 1 1
 caged deadlifts are pretty damn good. They are part of the routine workout for SOF guys as well, since it mimics movement whilst wearing 100+lbs of kit. I'm just saying it's a substantial foundation that you build all the sport specific and movement drills on top of. All those movements become easier when you build that base. That's all.
  • 2 2
 ^^^^^@bluumax and @atrokz how about you are both right or your both wrong, and call it a day. However I do enjoy squats and deadlifts every monday (since 1985) and I still cant ride for shit, but I can understand the generalized elitist comment of the Brah/ Bro as I am assuming it implies the gym culture.
  • 1 0
 @Bird-Man we are slowly coming to an agreement, as such is the way with Canada-British relations! haha
  • 1 0
 Honestly, I think we are both on the same page, for example there is a specific reason you would reccomend caged dl over conventional. Just like there's a reason Roberts reccomends split squats instead of conventional.
  • 10 4
 I can't believe all the hate on for @boulderbasher69 because he and @atrokz are correct. Most top olympic calibre trainers have "experimented" with these types of balance exercises before with, guess what, NONE to MINIMAL transfer to the athletes respective sports. Guess what showed the biggest transfer? Thats right, the big compound movements, deadlifts, squats, pull-ups, etc. Strength to weight ratio, we develop that by lifting heavy, not by doing balance tricks. The stronger I am per given bodyweight, the "easier" time I'm going to have on the bike and the faster I'll be able to go, pretty simple. Many studies and experience have proven these concepts time and time again.

At least in this video, Nino points out that he's doing a lot of those balance movements as "Active Recovery", not the sole focus, so for some muscle (namely core) "activation" and "proprioception".

Now I don't know what exactly Gary Roberts is into, but in the example of "caged" (trap bar) deadlifts they teach a beginner with reduced flexibility and technique to "hip hinge" and allow the experienced athlete to lift heavier and safer than the conventional deadlift, both have their place.
  • 17 2
 @Robnow, there is not a tiniest mention in any of the videos that such training is Ninos main or even second meal on the gym. The term "Active Recovery" pops out all the time. It doesn't take a genius to realize that these are complementary routines for someone who surely rides 500+ km a week and hits the gym with some serious weights 3+ times a week. In such situation you welcome "creative" exercises. Suggesting that he, multiple world champ, one of the most allround riders out there SHOULD focus on something more efficient is so arrogant that it blends with shear stupidity. It's like saying that Josh Bryceland wastes time by doing wheelies instead of cornering drills. Assuming that there are people here who can take this video and put such exercises as their main routine is also purely arrogant. And even if someone were so short sighted then well, he surely suffers from his stupidity in other areas of his life. This video shows some cool ways to mix up. And yes, boulderbashers comment shows clearly how little clue he has on what he talks about, but well everyone starts as a noob. Nothing bad about it, but he's still wrong. No you can't get any strong at MTB by just riding your bike
  • 5 0
 I agree with Scott, I think Nino and his team know exactly what they are doing. Look at his results and look at the fact he is recognized as one of the most capable bike riders. Having a nice bike helps too!
  • 5 0
 I'm really not sure what your argument is @Wakidesigns. Aside from @boulderbash69 comments, this video focuses mostly on some of Nino's "creative/core" exercises with some shoulder and hamstring endurance thrown in. I'm inferring from this and the first video, "Active Recovery" is referring to doing some core work in between working sets of actual work.

My point is that I think Nino and @Scott-sports in these videos should be showing, so people understand, some of the real work that Nino does in the gym, which is probably those compounds movements like squats (exhibited in first video), deadlifts, chins, etc. along with plyos and mobility which would have a much bigger net effect than these "fluff" exercises. Off course I exaggerate when I say "fluff" but thats really all (except for a few) they are is creative core and muscular activation exercises.

I did my practicum in University working with the National Ski and Speedskating teams, along with some of the varsity teams. In the very early 2000s they experimented with many of these "balance" type exercises. Entertaining and impressive looking stuff for sure but TOO LITTLE BANG FOR BUCK and little crossover, plus too much time+resources taken away from the more effective exercises.
  • 4 2
 I have no clue, many pros do them from what I've seen in such videos. But aren't they just fun, to keep motivation going? I cannot even imagine how burned out one has to be after 15 years of volume, intervals squats and deadlifts. I love doing goblet squats on pilates ball.
  • 3 1
 @robnow Exactly. People hate because they haven't won a single thing other than a participation ribbon....
  • 4 2
 A lot of these exercises are mobility and stabilization exercises. You have strength training exercises like, squats, lunges, etc. that strengthen the larger muscles, but you have to somehow connect the larger muscle groups in the body with each other so they communicate with each other properly hence mobility and stabilization exercises. Stabilizer muscles are usually ignored in traditional training and strengthening the stabilizer muscles requires unique training exercises like seen in the video, these muscles are very important to mountain biking. If you only do one thing, such as ride your bike and only that, then you are prone to actually lose mobility as time goes on because your body becomes unbalanced. Ever wonder why old school traditional body builders move like stiff boards when walking, their mobility is very limited because they never incorporated mobility and stabilization exercises in their routines.
  • 1 0
 it's worth reading this if you think deadlifts aren't strengthening stabilizer muscles or think athletes who use this walk like stiff boards:

www.musclemagfitness.com/bodybuilding/exercises/the-deadlift.html

"Stabilizers Worked When Performing Deadlifts
Erector Spinae
Trapezius, Middle
Rhomboids
Trapezius, Upper
Levator Scapulae

Antagonist Stabilizers Worked When Performing Deadlifts
Rectus Abdominis
Obliques

Dynamic Stabilizers Worked When Performing Deadlifts
Hamstrings
Gastrocnemius"
  • 2 1
 I don't know @atrokz, have you ever tried to push a body builder or power lifter over? Just a little tap of your finger and they collapse to the groundWink
  • 2 1
 lol. Especially those olympic power lifters!
  • 3 1
 You two are funny. Nearly every top MTB, BMX and MX rider shows balance exercises in their promos but you come here with philosophy coming from steroid buffed guys attending beauty contests to debunk myths and save us all from ourselves. I don't know what it's all about I admit it, I just blindly follow James Wilsond training program. Some of that is surely to make it look cool on the video, some about balance equiplment makers hype (war against bodybuilding and nutrition hype, those small underfinanced industries, yoga is killing them) but still... No smoke without fire. I was advised to incorporate that aside of strength training program by functional movement specialist. But what can she know with her PhD, she's into gymnastics and yoga, while the zit covered headcase behind the counter at my gym is the true enlightened one. Olympic weight lifters fk. They must be amazing in street fights , lifting a bench above the head and throwing at attacking person. They Knock down three guys in one bench throw. Olympic skiers are great too, in case they stand in a queue under very low ceiling, their ability to hold position with bent knees will get thrm to the counter. Functional btchs
  • 2 3
 You assume wrong @WAKIdesigns . I come at it from the side following successful strength training coaches that work with Olympic medallists in sports like T & F, judo, alpine skiing, speed skating, olympic lifters, etc.

Which athletes have amongst the greatest flexibility? Gymnasts yes, but also……………………………Olympic lifters, OMG, say it isn't so!!
Which athletes are amongst the most badass? Pole vaulters and skiers because they combine big balls, power, lower and upper body strength, time and spatial awareness, blah, blah, blah. In other words, functional bitchesSmile
  • 2 1
 Waki litterally has no idea what hes talking about. We are just stating that these movements are the foundation. The ice cream in your sunday. The shit youre talking about are the sprinkles on top. There isnt a bmx racer in existance that isnt encorporating these compound movements weekly. Your analogy that divides it between yoga or roid rager shows you dont understand.
  • 2 1
 Do what you want but just think about this, in your LIMITED time spent in the gym do you want to work on what has been proven time and time again over many years in every sport to be successful? Or do you want to take away some of that valuable time on this pseudo-science and spend it gathering and setting up equipment so you can learn some fancy looking circus tricks (which again, studies and experience have shown show very little to no payoff, i.e. you get good at doing that particular circus trick and nothing else).

Remember, strength doesn't just mean you're able to lift heavy things, it also means you're able to do other things easier, not to mention structural balance in your body, preventing injuries, etc, etc.
  • 1 1
 @atrokz Where did I say that athletes that do dead lifts all walk like stiff boards? I said "old school traditional body builders" and hell yea most of them walk like stiff boards. I know a crap load of old school traditional body builders that can dead lift a freaking car but can't even do one "pistol squat" without falling over. They come to my mma school and get their ass kicked because they have zero functional strength, zero mobility and zero balance!

In my opinion the strongest overall athletes that have amazing strength, mobility and balance are all around gymnasts. By body weight they are the strongest f*ckers of any other sports and their workouts are almost 100% bodyweight training! But as an all around gymnast their body goes through a complete range of motion that no sport ever even comes close to and again in my opinion I think its probably an awesome type of training for mountain bikers as well.

Check out "Convict Conditioning: The Forgotten Art of Bodyweight Training", which a gymnasts basically wrote. I will put money down that no power lifters, not even Olympic power lifters, have the strength, balance or mobility to do half the stuff these guys can do.
  • 2 0
 I agree. most MMA fighters and Gymnasts also perform squats and dead lifts.... Wink

We are just saying it's important to build on a foundation, one that's based around strength.

I'll take you on that last bet, have you see what the lower weight power lifters can do?
  • 1 0
 Bear in mind lifting doesnt nessesarily mean at max. It can be done light just to build those stabilizers. Nino does it. Is he huge and natty or setting records? No. Hes using it as a tool. Thats what we are saying. Not understanding this is silly. Look at what GSP was deadlifting.
  • 1 0
 MMA fighters yes, but they also incorporate a hell of a lot more than just squats and deadlifts, they incorporate a lot of non-traditional training techniques. Just rolling on the mat with an opponents is an all around workout itself, sorry if that sounded a bit gay Smile However, "most" gymnasts rarely workout with weights. I was one all through high school and college and never used weights because the bodyweight training alone, especially on the apparatuses, was pretty insane and neither of my coaches ever allowed it.

I agree, the lower weight power lifters have overall strength and much better stability, but they have no reason to train to do for example a one handed handstand pushup, or a hand stand from a back arch position or to pull off an inverted iron cross on the rings. So you may loose money on that bet Wink But, not that they can't train to learn how to do that, its just not in their ability because they're strength training does not incorporate the level of stabilization needed to pull off moves like that. Not many athletes have that kind of mobility and stabilization because they only concentrate on the "strength" aspect of training and I agree that building a foundation is important but how you build it is the million dollar question and there are so many opinions on that. I personally think that it must be incorporated with mobility and stabilization in mind and the majority of traditional bodybuilding is lacking in that category.
  • 3 1
 I said it in the first comment: "those wobbly exercises are a side dish" you two simply walk in to say how important are deadlifts and squats which anyone interested at least a bit inthe subjects, knows damn fricking well. As if people were now going to do just what Nino did in the video and you want to get them off the wrong path. Video hasn't mentioned that he is not doing fundamental exercises for 90% of his time on the gym. It just shows him doing weird sht. Neither video, nor me has said anything in the lines of: fk deadlifts train like Nino and you'll be great". I have no clue what your case here is about other than "we know how to squat and why exactly is that good for you - please acknowledge our expertise, appreciate us".
  • 2 1
 @Dirtyrig - the only thing that body building is really lacking is admitting that guys doing it try to look tough and at the same time pretty, to other guys.
  • 1 1
 You just make up peoples arguments for them. Strawman argument is the term. Boy you sure beat up that straw man! Lol.
  • 2 1
 And dont forget to pick up your participation ribbon from your PHd yoga instructor.
  • 1 0
 Dirtyrig makes good points and is part of the conversation. Nobody is even replying to you Waki.
  • 1 2
 Wow that got crazy LOL, Just saying, I never said what Nino did was'nt good, or that it would not transfer to cycling, I was simple making a comment toward the hot topic of "functional training", EXERCISE, has been around for hundreds of years, now everyone want to put a label on things and sell it as a certification. The exercise modality you choose is up to you based on your current goal, obviously we all have different responses we are trying to elicit from our training, that's why different people do different exercises Smile
  • 3 2
 This has got to be the most pathetic comment section battle ever...
Chill the f*** out and ride your bike.
  • 1 0
 That gym looks awesome! Totally wide open and empty. Probably free, too.
  • 45 0
 I just wanted to post to say a huge thanks to Nino for producing these videos. They seem to be produced for the genuine benefit of other riders. They're not plastered with sponsor logos and product integration. So from the cycling community, I say thanks.
  • 9 8
 Just a thought - I'd love to see these sorts of videos directed toward us roadies. I know the road world is hugely over-saturated, but us downhillers and BMXers who also commute and ride road, Pinkbike is my chosen source for info.
  • 22 1
 Since we all are already lying to our girlfriends/wives about the cost of that latest carbon mountain bike (not to mention the perpetual discussion on "i-dont-understand-why-you-need-that-many-bikes?") good luck convincing them about keeping all those torture devices (let alone just a single one) in the house.

In fact I can already hear the angry voice: "i don't care if the effing world champion is using an effing handlebar attached to a skateboard while balancing on a wobble-board GET THAT SHIT OUT OF HERE and WHAT!!!? HOW much did that thing cost are effing kidding me??
  • 9 0
 That's odd, I didn't know you lived in my house, heh. It's cool though, a roomie that bikes is fine by me!
  • 10 0
 why don't all you guys coach him I wonder?
  • 8 0
 Too busy typing. Priorities man!
  • 4 0
 @boulderbash69

While I understand your sentiment as a fellow lifter, the word "functional" has become so widely used in the fitness industry that it can mean many things.

When I think of functional exercises I usually think of squats, DL, OHP and maybe the olympic lifts. These are lifts that can make a person stronger in every day life, picking up heavy things and putting them down efficiently. Without injury.

However, in the context of this article, "functional" is referring to excercises that will specifically help mountain biking. This can include a lot of excercises that you may not normally consider. Is skateboarding a normal functional exercise? Of course not. But it will absolutely improve your mountain biking balance, self awareness and cahones. It's why a friend and I split the cost of a mini-ramp.

I don't want this to be ranty so I'll end here. The word functional has a lot of ambiguity when it comes to fitness. Squats and DL's are traditional functional exercises. But other non-traditional exercises can be extremely functional when applied to specific sports.
  • 2 1
 I hear people describe the Olympic lifts as "functional" all the time. I have to ask,what exactly is functional about them? Squats, DLs, OHP etc are all great exercises, but Olympic lifts (Clean/Jerk & Snatch) don't seem to have any "functional" attributes at all. When would you ever use anything close to those techniques for anything in everyday life?

I mean look at the snatch. Its a super wide gripped, straight armed, locked out lift of the weight above the head, into a full squat, with the weight still over the head. There is absolutely no way something like that is "functional" for a normal person. The only reason to ever do such a lift is to practice doing that lift for a competition.
  • 3 0
 Olympics lifts are functional because they produce power in the hip hinge. This transfers to a sport like mountain biking or any other sport for that matter in that you can get more drive to your pedal (lower body).
  • 1 0
 @robnow - I get that there can be some benefit to doing an olympic lift, but using that logic you can say that any exercise is functional simply because it helps produce power somewhere in the body. My point is that there does not seem to be any benefit for the average person or athlete to performing and exercise like the snatch. No where in the real world does anyone throw an object above their head, wide grip, elbows locked, while squatting. There are much more efficient exercises one can do to build that power.
  • 1 0
 Strength yes, power no. There's a difference. Remember, Olympic lifts are meant to be explosive/quick while driving a large amount of weight. And they tie in the upper body and lower body together well.

But yes, only if you have a lot of training experience and a coach are they beneficial. Otherwise time is better spent doing the compound lifts.
  • 1 0
 @sino428 C&J and snatch have a very different hip extending movement to them that's simply not the same as the deadlift or squat. The overall positioning of a power snatch or clean is useful for most sports that involve running, multidirectional movement, etc. The exact motion of something in the "real world" doesn't have to be duplicated exactly in the gym to get strength benefits, so yes, many exercises only have small carryover to average life. And there definitely aren't more efficient exercises you can use to build a powerful hip extension, the oly lifts by virtue of their design are performed by using the most efficient possible way to catch the bar at the end of the lift, or else you're going to suck at them.
  • 1 1
 Y'all reminded me of a story: I was working in a gym in Manly in the early 1990s. Lindford Christie (Olympic gold in 100m) came in one day and squatted so much he bent our bar. Unbelievable.
  • 1 1
 Can someone explain me why are squats any good for mtb? Why not do single legged squats? As for power, single legged boc jumps with catch drops.
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns - because as someone pointed out above, its not about mimicking the movement of a particular sport (in this case mtb), its about simply strengthening the muscles used in the sport. A regular (2 leg) squat allows you to focus much more on the main large muscles of the leg, without bringing into it all the other stabilizer muscles needed to do one leg squats. You are going to be able to do much more weight with both feet, thus getting the most out of the exercise.

Now that is not to say that one leg squats aren't also a good thing. They are, because working out those aforementioned stabilizer muscles is also good. So really what I'm saying is its not really one or the other, but doing both is likely the best bet.
  • 2 0
 Thank you for explaining me Big Grin makes sense in such condensed post
  • 4 0
 Looks really effective for improving balance and core. Strength training should be priority as well. Squats, deadlift, benchpress seriously improves power out on the trail. A little extra mass makes you a little more durable when you crash too.
  • 5 0
 I too have a skateboard, which is the closest thing I'll come to doing this workout
  • 5 0
 That's what it takes to be the best. Which is why I'm nowhere near it. But my fridge has lots of good beer in it.
  • 2 0
 Has anyone actually tried some of these exercises? Jesus some of them are hard. I figured how hard could it be to balance on a board and do the pedal replication drill. The answer is very, and I'd considered myself to have a decent core and pedalling technique yet I was struggling to pull back 5kg plates. I'd be interested to know what his 1RM is for squat etc, given that he's probably barely 70kg soaking wet. Looks like hes got 140KG on the bar in the still so I'd imagine its more.
Big props for showing this vid, more of these please!
  • 2 0
 I balanced my skateboard deck on a foam roller last night and tried to do some of those plank/one armed row type exercises and found it extremely difficult. The first set I could only do about 6 with a weight that I was doing 12 - 16 with my feet spread on the ground. By the third set, I had become a bit more stable, but it was very taxing on my core. I felt like a fool trying to get setup though. The board was twisting and sliding all over the place and I could hardly get my feet on the deck in the right position with the roller centered. The 3rd or 4th set I used the skate board without the roller. It presented a little bit of added difficulty, but was much easier to get set up.
  • 1 0
 Does anyone know what the balance device he is using with the handlebar attached to a rounded square balancing on a ball ? I can see some letters on the back end of it.. Toot, or Tool ? any help here would be appreciated.... I want one, or would like to build one
I have been searching online for one with no luck Help suggestions ? cheers in advance
  • 2 0
 Thanks a heap mate.... ask and ye shall receive here on PB Cheers !
  • 1 0
 SUPER pricey too.. made in Germany. I already use an Endo-board left over from my snowboarding career, but these things look sweet ! definitely a great device to ad to the toolbox...
  • 1 0
 Ridiculously overpriced!! Dunno how they get away with it. Bet you could build it for less than $40, less if you've got wood scraps or a ball already.
  • 2 0
 wouldn't just doing some basic trials training be way more effective? I don't know.... trackstands, backwheel hopping, things like that. I mean, it's one of the few things you can do indoors with a real bike.
  • 4 0
 Nino is a beast! Nothing less. Much RESPECT for the commitment that he has for the sport and the pursuit of his goals.
  • 1 0
 I would buy a copy of his workout routines throughout the year....hint hint. I am transitioning to more body weight workouts to have lean functional muscle, instead of going for the beefcake physique. I used to lift weight a LOT, think gym rat. 5'7" 205#. I am down to 180# now, looking to get down to about 170#.
  • 3 0
 Wow. Were you lean at 205? Not trying to be a dick, just interested. I'm 5'10" and 160# and still carrying more muscle than most of my fellow xc whippets. They beat me up... the hills.
  • 3 0
 No offense taken at all man. I was around 21% bodyfat at 205. That was also before I started mountain biking and was riding motocross. Once I realized I have to be the engine, I decided it is time for a change. I am down to 15% body fat now. My goal is 170# 10% body fat. I lifted heavy for nearly 20 years, so it is going to take a while for the excess muscle to lean down. Plus I have to fight the urge to lift because I love the rush from it. I have moved onto TRX (body weight) and yoga, with heart-rate focused cardio to drop fat (yes I use a personal trainer to help me define a program to match my goals).
  • 1 0
 Lots of great movements in there.

I was a little surprised for how fit that guy is, that his push-up techniques was so poor. He clearly has ripped triceps. Has he forgotten to work on his pecs!?

I am inspired to build my own balance board out of an old skateboard deck, and use that for doing pushups and the various dynamic movements that he showed (including juggling and hula hooping!)
  • 1 0
 This video is fun to watch, and watching Nino do the exercises is quite impressive. The only problem is that there is no context to the exercises in terms of where they fit in a training program. I don't think you would just go from nothing to doing a lot of these exercises. You would have to build up to them by learning proper range of motion;learning proper technique in simpler, more basic body weight exercises and basic lifts; and so on. A lot of this stuff is for the big boys, people who have a proper strength and conditioning base. This is running -- you gotta crawl before you walk, and walk before you run. It is cool stuff though, and seems effective for Nino. I can't even juggle on flat ground, never mind on a balance board.
  • 1 0
 the racing videos shown on the little screen give an idea of what sort of help that training is going to do, you don't have to do them exactly like Nino does. He gives these recommendations considering that you know yourself and understand what you lack of, for example if I am terrible at rock gardens I will practice a variance of most of the balance board exercises and stay away from the exercises that will improve my uphill performance. I you want to learn to juggle start with 2, throw one ball right after you throw the first one, do this for 5 minutes for the next 7 days. Try incorporating the 3rd ball on the 8th day, you wont have a problem. Do it in front of a bed, so when a ball falls it doesn't bounce off and it wont discourage you.
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 There are some really interesting core exercises that could be added to a fairly heavy kettlebell routine / KB with lighter double weights on bosun to keep the core active and focus on the range of movement. Gym is a boring aspect of training but when it helps hop up your racing ability as your professional job you have to keep it fun and interesting. That guys like a piece of rope, totally nothing wasted there. I'd love to give these a go, but collecting all the wood gear would take away from riding time so I'll stick within my non professional ability and push the boundaries where I can with what I can afford / have time to do. I really enjoyed the creativity of what you can do and will be trying some of it out at home. Great work guys! More videos like this please.

After all, it's great to see the pro's in action, but it's even better to understand the work that goes into becoming one.
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 I've been studying a lot related to the neurological benefits of exercise. The secondary exercises that require maintaining balance and coordination at the same time can help us in terms of better reactions and responses on the trail. I've been doing a lot of these exercises this off-season and have noticed that specifically with my snowboarding and mtb. I believe in Part One he mentioned doing things like the balance board with juggling after entering an exhausted state to prepare us to maintain skills during physical exhaustion. At least theoretically, this is one of the best things I've heard in a long time. To push that skill threshold in a way that doesn't involve crashing is at least worth trying in my book. Not that I know, but it's worth testing out systematically and then checking results.
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 I appreciate Scott Sports for demystifying a lot of the training and what goes into being a professional athlete. Its awesome that they don't see it as an elitist training program, but just as an opportunity to share what works for Nino with the mountain bike community.
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 More people should invest time, energy and money into strength training and less into carbon. I purchased a training program this past fall to try during the off season, I'm now feeling stronger and faster than ever.
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 Very impressive indeed. BUT 99% should not do this until they get their basic strength in order. And 99% do not have the basic strength in check.
  • 3 0
 I'm exhausted watching. Great series.
  • 2 0
 it bothers me that he trains with a cap on, being indoors, still...lots of respect for this guy.
  • 2 0
 Lots of fun-looking ideas! Thank you for sharing.
  • 1 0
 Where can I find those "pedalo" things? I tried searching them on google but nothing useful comes up...
  • 2 0
 I believe it's the pedalo station trainer
  • 1 0
 German shops mostly. For example: www.sport-thieme.de/Pedalo-System
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 This is unbelievable!! Really love Nino's videos...awesome stuff. Hope he's gonna win Rio
  • 1 0
 Thank you N1no! I've incorporated your work out and I've already seen improvements.
  • 1 0
 This video is really humbling.
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 Very impressive... Thanks for sharing. Off to the gym now Smile
  • 1 0
 got tired just looking at the video. nino number 1.
  • 1 0
 Nino is the most legit athlete riding mountain bikes in any discipline.
  • 1 0
 Very creative. Thanks for sharing.
  • 1 3
 Kind of impressed!!
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