Mountain Bike Spine Injuries - Some Statistics

Jun 14, 2010
by aa aa  
This is a medical paper that was just published and it is a thirteen year study on spine injuries due to mountain biking. It is a good idea to stay informed on how easy it is to get a serious injury mountain biking.

Here is a summary of the study and you can find the link to the entire file below.

Spinal Column and Spinal Cord Injuries in Mountain Bikers: A 13-Year Review

Background: Multiple studies have described in general the injuries associated with mountain biking, and detailed accounts of spine injuries sustained in hockey, gymnastics, skiing, snowboarding, rugby, and paragliding have previously been published. However, no large-scale detailed assessment of mountain biking associated spinal fractures and spinal cord injuries has previously been published.

Purpose: This study was undertaken to describe the patient demographics, injuries, mechanisms, treatments, outcomes, and resource requirements associated with spine injuries sustained while mountain biking.

Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4.

Methods: Patients who were injured while mountain biking, and who were seen at a provincial spine referral center between 1995 and 2007 inclusive, with spinal cord injuries and/or spine fracture were included. A chart review was performed to obtain demographic data, and details of the injury, treatment, outcome, and resource requirements.

Results: A total of 102 men and 5 women were identified for inclusion. The mean age at injury was 32.7 years (95% confidence interval 30.6, 35.0). Seventy-nine patients (73.8%) sustained cervical injuries, while the remainder sustained thoracic or lumbar injuries. Forty-three patients (40.2%) sustained a spinal cord injury. Of those with cord injuries, 18 (41.9%) were American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) A, 5 (11.6%) were ASIA B, 10 (23.3%) ASIA C, and 10 (23.3%) ASIA D. Sixty-seven patients (62.6%) required surgical treatment. The mean length of stay in an acute hospital bed was 16.9 days (95% confidence interval 13.1, 30.0). Thirty-three patients (30.8%) required intensive care unit attention, and 31 patients (29.0%) required inpatient rehabilitation. Of the 43 patients (40.2%) seen with spinal cord injuries, 14 (32.5%) improved by 1 ASIA category, and 1 (2.3%) improved by 2 ASIA categories. Two patients remained ventilator-dependent at discharge.

Conclusion: Spine fractures and spinal cord injuries caused by mountain biking accidents typically affect young, male, recreational riders. The medical, personal, and societal costs of these injuries are high. Injury prevention should remain a primary goal, and further research is necessary to explore the utility of educational programs, and the effect of helmets and other protective gear on spine injuries sustained while mountain biking.


Read the entire file here.




Stay Safe
A


184 Comments

  • 23 4
 I think if all we thought about were injury statistics, then we wouldn't ever leave our padded rooms....... Of course it sucks to hear that so many people suffered spinal injuries but the percentage of riders who suffer those those injuries is way below 1 percent. But just to keep the statistics going..... between 1997 and 2006 437 people were killed by lightning in the U.S. thats four times more than the people who suffered spinal cord injuries. Make up your own mind about the risk of riding, but I'm sure as hell not gonna stop.
  • 8 2
 I don't think the aim is to make people stop, it's to educate them about the risks and the necessary precautions...
  • 17 1
 You're dead right. What we do is dangerous. Heck! It's the thrill of the danger and excitement that makes most of us do it. Not amount of statistics is going to change my mind. You ride within your ability and you take full responsibility for what happens to you. The same should apply to the whole world. Little Johnny hurts himself on a swing and the parents sue the park. A swing is a potentially dangerous method of enjoyment, and hence it's not the swings fault that he got hurt. This whole world is becoming padded in cotton wool. Everything has to be faultless.
  • 9 0
 To say that you're 4x more likely to be killed by lightning is ridiculous. Here's a few things to think about.

This study is in British Columbia. You are comparing the entire country of the United States to one province in Canada. So let's compare these things fairly - lightning strike deaths in BC to spinal cord injuries due to mountain biking in BC.

According to weatheroffice.gc.ca (the Canadian Government weather site) 9-10 people die per year in Canada being struck by lightning. A figure significantly different than the 437 in the states. Now, British Columbia has 13.49% of Canada's population. So, if you do the math there, it's 1 British Columbian dying from lightning per year.

This study includes people who were injured over 13 years in BC. So multiply the 1 person per year in BC who is killed by lightning by 13 and we get....oh...13 people!

So in reality you're actually 800% more likely to suffer a spinal cord injury mountain biking in BC than to be killed by lightning.


Now let's put this into perspective. In BC, an average of 12 people die per year from cycling related injuries. Half of which are from head injuries. So if 6 people die per year in BC from head injuries then approximately 78 people have died in the 13 years that this study covers (keep in mind this is all forms of cycling, so in reality the number is far lower for mountain biking only. But I'll give you the benefit of the doubt on this one). So according to those number you're 130% more likely to get a spinal cord injury from mountain biking than to die from a head injury while riding.

Do you wear a helmet when you ride your bike? I think you probably see where I'm going with this...

No matter how likely or unlikely you are to get a spinal cord injury, they happen and it isn't something you want.
  • 1 0
 my bad, I didn't know that the area this study applied to was limited to one area in Canada
  • 4 1
 Now that is a complete, well thought out response larock. Good statistics, and an even better point.
  • 1 0
 so there!
  • 14 0
 i just had a crash on my bike, ( video in my videos) and i smacked my head so hard i shattered my helmet. I didnt know about this till the next time i went up to ride and found all the broken bits inside the helmet casing. If i hadnt been wearing a full face, i would most definitly have a broken jaw, major scarring and likely brain injury. WEAR UR HELMET.
  • 4 6
 Yeah I have broken 2 Fullface Helmets so far (like using my head I guess lol)... Don't need a Leatt Brace though. I mean it's my personal opinion that neck braces are not nessecary in our sport. Of course it's more save with them (besides they cost more than a high end fullface) but used to play American Football and Rugby without neck protection and so many MX riders don't wear them although the forces are much bigger than in mountain biking.
Anyways Injuries happen and I think there is no way to stop them... just look at Barel, Hill or other Pros
  • 2 0
 thats why i wear my moto helmet, they're more capable of taking harder hits. unlike the guy in the pic above who probably lost his face =P
  • 7 2
 hoshi it is your own preference to wear it or not, as it is not always compulsory protective gear. What you actualy do, sets the bar whether you need one or not, but you as yourself can never be certain of that. So don't go around telling it's questionable because your comment might convince someone hesitating whether to buy one or not, to make a decision costing him a spinal injury. If someone doing seriously dangerous riding in terms of skills vs. risk level, can afford one, it's better if he buys it and wears it, especialy that as far as I heard, Leatt Brace is a pretty comfortable thing. Moto Helmet vs bicycle dedicated helmet is the same thing. You feel you need it: buy it, wear it.

As some lame song says: it's ok to be wrong, ain't ok to pass it along...

Never too much safety. as long as you don't ride AM in full body armour and moto helmet.
  • 2 0
 exactly many AMA SX/MX riders dont wear armor at all.. just a roost gaurd their helmet, boots and pants/jersey ...... go ahead and neg prop me, many riders dont, they've even said so in interviews...
  • 3 1
 many people use hairdryer while bathing in the bathtub
  • 2 0
 haha yeah,

I never said people shouldn't buy a Neck Brace, I'm just saying that I don't need one (well maybe after a neck injury). Just saying people have been riding DH without for a few Years now. I mean of course everybody has to decide wether the money is worth it or not... Not blaming people who love their lives and want to stay healthy Wink
  • 14 0
 Right, as someone who can actually access the .pdf file of the full article, I think I should comment because there is a lot of nonsense in this discussion. The study is conducted by doctors at the University of British Colombia, and the statistics are solely from the records of people being admitted to their spinal trauma unit. They say that they are the primary referral centre for spinal injuries in the British Colombia area, so this isn't an international study. They give their injury rates of MTB associated injuries as a percentage of the total number of spinal cord injuries they saw over the 13 year study period, which comes in at 3.7%. They also express it as a percentage relative to the total number of British Colombia residents. The reason they can't give figures for total amount of people riding versus people who sustain injuries is because it is impossible to know how many people went for a ride in a 13 year period. Think about it, do you register on some database every time you take your bike down the woods? It is impossible for them to know this.

As for people asking for absoloute statements like 'Does a neck brace help?', this is not how research works. They present data, interpret it to the best of their knowledge and it is then published so it can be up for discussion by other experts in the area. Don't go thinking this has been published for a bunch of kids on a bike forum, this is supposed to be reference material for doctors working on similar cases. That is all.
  • 3 0
 well spoken mark99.
  • 2 2
 if thats the case then why has it been posted here? plus he offered a conclusion, most of us expect a conclusion to be conclusive, although Im quite aware this isnt always the case in medical science
  • 13 3
 was this necessary? now i am just scared lol
  • 3 1
 Yes, most of those injuries were cervical (in your neck) and would probably be preventable or reduced in seriousness with a neck brace as well as reducing injuries to the rest of your spine by compression. if it scares you in to wearing one it has served an important purpose.
  • 4 5
 leatt brace FTW
  • 3 1
 well ya i took a pretty bad crash a couple weeks ago... enough to crack my helmet then slid down 30ft of rock garden on my back so this did scare me a bit and if i could afford a leatt brace i would wear one but at this point i dont have the money to wear one
  • 2 8
flag ncrider5 (Jun 14, 2010 at 10:37) (Below Threshold)
 yeah and I'm not sure if anyone else picked up on it or not, but the conclusion was nowhere near conclusive, this article said nothing an average person wouldn't have already known.
  • 8 0
 Serious shit there. There's a good reason why I own spine protection and that's pretty much it.
  • 2 1
 That doesnt always work. I broke my neck and I was wearing a helmet. I hit my forehead on the ground and that snaped my head back which is what broke my neck so sometimes no amount of pading can prevent serious injuries.
  • 3 0
 soccerdorf123..this is why neckbrace exist...an helmet is no protection for neck/spine...
  • 1 0
 A full face probably increases the rish of a broken neck as it fits lower than a normal helmet. If you dont want a broken neck then buy a neck brace.
  • 2 1
 A full face also adds top heavy weight and leverage, further increasing the chance of a neck / upper spinal injury.

700$ doesn't seem like too much for a ultra light DOT helmet and brace.
  • 1 0
 full face helmets ahve come down in price as more people are buying them, the same with happen with neck braces. go to some MX shops and search around, there are other braces that do the same thing....


@Markusr15 yea sure Ricky Carmichael isnt sold on them, big deal, hes been around MX since the late 80s, shit evolves, he who is afraid to move forward is he who is too hung up on the past..... think about it, we have super strict regulations on chemicals that used to be house hold norms.... the more we can protect our selves the better, the human body isn't a fortress...
  • 5 0
 I always go by the theory of "Suffering is optional" If wearing safety equipment can save you some suffering, where is the question on whether or not to pay for it. There is no question. As far as moaning about the cost, instead of blaming a company for what their equipment costs, ask yourself how a few less nights out, beers after rides, or whatever your "fix" is, it would take to buy a piece of safety equipment. We always justify new bars, or a different frame by sacrificing something else. I'd justify a brace by sacrificing a few nights out. I doubt beer tastes good through a tube.
  • 4 0
 The text posted above is an "abstract" it should give only a very short overview of the research. In most journals it is limited to a few hundred words. That's why all the interesting details are not in the abstract.

The actual research is presented in greater detail in the main article, which, unfortunately, you have to pay for. Luckily my computer is hooked up to a university network and I can read the article. Concerning neck braces, I have found the following statements very interesting:

"One of the most striking findings in this study was that
the vast majority of riders injured were recreational,
with only 2 patients being professional mountain bikers.
A particularly devastating aspect of the injuries sustained
by these mountain bikers is the high number of cervical
injuries (79 [73.8%]), and the high proportion of complete
paralysis among those suffering spinal cord trauma (18
ASIA A [41.9%]). Historically, the high-risk sports for spinal
cord injury have been football, ice hockey, wrestling,
diving, skiing, snowboarding, rugby, cheerleading, and
baseball. The results of this study suggest that mountain
biking should certainly be added to this list."

and

"The most common mechanism is an ‘‘over the bars’’
mechanism with direct impact to the head and resultant
cervical spine injury."

In layman's terms: Most spine injuries occur in the neck region (cervical). A lot of injuries end in paralysis. They happen to recreational riders and mostly in relatively unspectacular "over the bars" crashes and not only to professionals that ride at motocross-like speeds and fall trying to do a double backflip.

After reading all that, I am seriously considering buying a neck brace.
  • 1 2
 how do you break your spine playing football and baseball? must be pretty special
  • 4 0
 So, basically, that stats say to me is that:
a) if you hurt your spine, 73% chance it will be your neck
b) if you hurt your spine, 40% chance there will be spinal cord damage
c) if you do incure spinal cord damage, 42% chance there will be complete loss of motor and sensory function
d) if you do injure back while riding, overall 17% chance that your become wheelchair-bound

I think what I read out of this is that neck braces actually are more important than spinal protection, since most spinal injuries are neck injuries.
  • 1 0
 hence why they make fun of spine armour calling it ninja turtle outfits
  • 3 0
 People shouldn't knock the body jackets though. The shoulder, chest, and kidney protection offered by most of those jackets is also nice to have.
  • 1 0
 i dont think they intended to knock the body jacket. They were just making a pun about the false sense of security man get from wearing it.
  • 4 0
 I think the study presented in the article is actually a good thing, because it reminds everyone that mountainbiking is a dangerous sport. The article sets a good example for the kids to always wear a lid when riding a bike. I hope that soon leat-brace will become more affordable to most of us, such advancements in protecion sholudn't be that expensive. The price is way to high, it should be decresed to the price of an average, quite decent full face helmet.
  • 7 0
 wow adam this is pretty serious!
  • 23 1
 Its true enough, but surely its common sense just to pad up when you go for a ride? And just in my opinion, did we need all that research to tell us that young males hurt their spines the most? Young males just crash the most full stop! It is good that someone is taking it pretty seriously though. I suppose without people doing the re-search etc like this we wouldn't have such good armour etc and be nearly as safe!!
  • 13 11
 theres a lot going on in that there conclusion... its always 'further research' this, 'further research' that, weve known that for ages... why dont you go and do the further research rather than tell us that somebody else needs to do it? we dont want to know what the freaking demographic of who breaks their backs is we want to know is a neckbrace really worth it for mountain biking, where the impacts are much smaller than in motocross? should my backplate cover more of my lower back or upper back? will a d3o or other foam backplate suffice for trail and cross country riding?
  • 19 3
 well DanB25 that is the nature of any research, it is never finished. The text written here is an abstract paper of full research. Nothing too personal but think how the world works before you demand more from someone that already done something for you. Ask yourself further what do you bring to the world to post such demands, blaaaaaaa!
  • 23 4
 The article is pretty lame IMO. Where are the rates of spine injury versus other sports? What are the rates of spine injuries versus other mountain biking injuries???

AND, the conclusion is straight up retarded. Spinal injuries occur to young males. DUH.
  • 13 3
 Hey DanB25, well actually we do need to know the demographic of those most prone or at risk of a spine injury. How are you to effectively develop awareness programs and safety equipment for the right people..
And yes, its good to see your expectations of the author are so high...(Sarcasm)
And maybe your riding level does not warrant the need for a neck brace... but ALL riders can be impacted with a spinal injury just from an awkward fall... I have seen it.
I encourage you to read the full text and the scope of the study before you so blindly criticise someones work. Oh and, why don't you get off your pessimistic ass and contribute to this society in a more positive manner....
  • 37 3
 Yeah, lol............"After thorough analysis we have concluded that mountain biking is
in fact dangerous." LOL LOL
  • 5 4
 well that was depressing
  • 3 5
 HAhahahaahahahaha you got owned danny Razz
  • 15 2
 If you read the whole study it states that the likelyhood of suffering a SCI while moutain biking is about the same if you are playing football. Still, we need to have a standard for some sort of neck brace, just like we have standards for helmets. Leatt makes me sick, charging kids and their families $400 for something that may or may not work.
  • 4 4
 konafarker, come down of your horse if its not too high. He is right, this study does not demonstrate anything that every mountain biker didn't know already. It is dangerous but I simply cannot afford a neck brace or leatt when it is so unlikely to actually happen. It does happen, but not often enough to scare me into spending that much money. Dont scare yourself out of your sport, go have fun within your ability.
  • 16 2
 umm shasta, I don't know about you, but 400$ is a very small price to pay if it lessens your chances of spine injury by even a slight amount. my neck is worth much more then 400$ even on a bad day
  • 4 0
 well said Atrak. this is good because now there is no reason to not wear at least a helmet
  • 11 3
 You can get an approved helmet for under $50. A leatt takes no more manufacturing than a nice helmet...and where are the scientific studies that show that leatts work?
  • 2 1
 Yo guys let's be realistic here, we know how dangerous our sport can be, and what we have to do to make it the safest, so why argue?
  • 6 11
flag WAKIdesigns (Jun 14, 2010 at 11:31) (Below Threshold)
 Shasta@ a scientist invented it. Stop sharing crap ok? Nobody forces you to buy it. The fact that I don't use Moto fullface helmet does not mean I am going to go around forums telling people it's overkill. You feel better in it: have it, it's probably better for you.

rbeach: an aim of many studies is to confirm what other believe is true, that's what science is about. At the same time Shasta wants scientific proofs, like it is not clear what FF helmer and leatt do together. Well it is quite simple: if you fall on your head (what happened I guess to nearly everyone in here) or at least hit a tree with it, your flexible neck is the only part of your body between the rigid head and the rest of pretty rigid body. All force of impact is being channeled through the neck. The Leatt Brace works as a base for FFH during impact channeling the forces from the FFH to your shoulders, taking them awayfrom your neck. Plus it limits the unnnatural head movememnt, as the neck has limited flexibility. This is sort of: mechanics in physics if you need science Smile distribution and channeling of forces in physical bodies
  • 7 0
 A lot of people are complaining that the conclusion isn't helpful but that is because this was written for hospitals and health systems, rather than riders. I put this up merely to remind people that the chances of getting a bad spine injury are very real. Ask anyone who has had one, I can assure you that they suggest you do all you can to avoid spine injuries. If all this does is make you think before you try that new drop or whatever or wear some extra armour if you can, it has served it's purpose.
  • 5 1
 On a serious note, It is helpful. This artical actually comes 24 hours after I had a fairly serious crash, or what could have been anyways. Over the bars into a tree at a decent clip. If I hit my head and not my hip (my hip is black and blue) I might not be here, thats the truth. I mean really think about that..........If you ride agressive, wear as much safety gear as you can. Thats the bottom line. What we do is dangerous, and I think alot of us dont take that seriously enough.
  • 1 0
 dude that must of killed, did you brake anything, or scratch up you face? :S
  • 1 0
 Bad scrapes on forearm, bruising/scraping of hip, abdoman. I was lucky honestly, I hit so hard I was freakin' out at first- I was sure something had to be broken.
  • 9 1
 Leatt braces are medically untested and don't conform to any safety standards, they also cost about £2.50 to make.

L33t cardboardtanium braces are the real deal though, download yours today for just $699 plus P+P !
  • 2 1
 I just ffractured my T4 and T5 vertibra and compressed my spine,unfourtantly a LEATT braces wouldn't have don't shit all!
  • 4 0
 true..i broke the T5 2 months ago, while using back protector..just because i landed on my ass...im not saying that u shouldnt use the protector, im just saying that shit happens..
  • 2 1
 @konafarker do you work for a local council? please dont tell me we need demographics for 'awareness programs', dont you think protection companies marketing is enough to spread the word? if you need to tell someone about backplates or neckbraces they probably dont need it. and dont tell me about 'contributing to society' (what the f*ck that has to do with anything?) I worked in a charity shop for over a year until my exams recently have meant Ive not had the time. oh and you dont need to tell me when youre using sarcasm, Im british...

@darkstar63 if you only bruised your hip (albeit badly) the same impact probably wouldnt have caused any severe damage to your head and neck, people seem to forget how strong they actually are, after all you CNS is all in there
  • 2 2
 Haha... Shasta is the most demanding person I have seen to date on this site. Here is an idea... why dont YOU go out and do the survey, and study on the leatt, instead of bitch to others to do it. Want everyone to wipe your ass as well?


If it doesn't work for you... go out and design something yourself... and get it produced, and shipped for less. If your worried about lack of "scientific" study on the leatt, you could always flip yourself over the bars a dozen times and note the injuries. you will then have your study and we.. pinkbike will have our info. Smile Ride on!
  • 1 0
 BTW shasta... you may want to do a bit more research before you talk...

www.amazon.com/LEATT-ADVENTURE-NECK-BRACE-MD/dp/B002FDPP3M

looks like they finally got themselves an injection molder. See how things work. New products are expenive... but when they make money, they invest it in machinery to make stuff easier, and cheaper, and increase profit, thus allowing for more R&D on other products... thus further progressing things. Ahhh... simple business and economics.
  • 3 4
 Meh, I got one of those and ended up returning it. It's not designed for MTB, where you ride in a standing position, it was designed for MX where you're mostly sitting down, so when I got it all set up I couldn't even lift my head up to look straight ahead. It would have been flat dangerous on a rock garden or anything tech. I'm all in favor of neck braces, it's just that they should be 1) scientifically shown to do what they're supposed to do, and 2) be designed for MTB if MTBers are going to ride them. You only need a little bit of support, not a table around your neck. Just enough to stop your neck going past where it already can...
  • 2 0
 Glad to see so many comments - if nothing else at least people are thinking about it. Some good points:
1. We need research to prove the obvious - without it then it's only an opinion/personal observation. This cost money - how many researchers researching MTB do you know/know that have big funding. Be happy anyone is even looking our way. Have you done anything helpful?
2. This is only in BC - it is not representative of the entire worldwide MTB community - read the article.
3. Personal reports are that neck braces offer support - nothing you wear is a 100% guarantee that you won't get hurt - if you ride hard the neck brace is a good option - if you choose not to it's your own damn fault. It will be a good thing when prices come down.
  • 2 2
 Ricky Carmicheal AKA G.O.A.T. isnt even sold on the neck braces going to show they are questionable.
  • 2 1
 I got a LEATT after i was in my local Moto shop, last year and they told me about a guy they sold a leatt too. He ice races his ATV and was in a race in 5th gear when he missed a righthand corner and crashed. He BROKE his callorbone and crushed his LEATT. His doctor told him to thank the people who sold him his brace BECAUSE IT SAVED HIS LIFE! I won't ride with out my LEATT. I don't even notice it anymore. I'm not telling you what you should or shouldn't do, Everbody has to make choices...
  • 1 0
 I have to say, I'm going to save up and pick up the Leatt sport. 500$... but the neck padding looks a whole lot more comfy than the rubber of the cheaper models.

EVS makes a brace to compete with the leatt for about 150$. There are also foam ones from protec, 661 etc that will offer more protection than without. The 661 and protec are basically what car racing used to use before they went with strapped in helmet restraints.
  • 2 5
 All I can say here is:
1. Nobody forces anyone to buy a Leatt Brace
2. By arguing on public forum that some protection gear is unnecessary, you are counter-productive. This kind of behaviour is common for corporate lobbying.


YOUR STUPID COMMENT MAY CONVINCE SOMEONE HESITATING, NOT TO BUY A PROTECTIVE GEAR THAT MIGHT SAFE HIS LIFE.

BY DOING THIS STUPID COMMENT YOU ARE CO-RESPONSIBLE FOR THAT PERSONs INJURY you selfish twits!
  • 3 1
 Its perfectly sensible for people to suggest caution, when deciding to wear something that may change the forces in your neck during a crash. It is also perfectly reasonable to hesitate in supporting products like the leatt brace before they have been properly tested. Stop gettin' all crazy.
  • 1 1
 I hate to say it man, but I'll listen to a doctor over your ass any day.

And yea... there have been tests. Called real world tests. Look at some of the comments of people that have actually had them save their tail. Then again... that's not good enuf. Sure as hell are more protected than without it... doesn't take a genius to figure that one out... so why bash on a good thing. U don't wanna support em... go buy a cheap 30$ foam one. Don't want something around your neck... then don't bitch when you break your neck. You won't have any right to. there is a method to our craziness...
  • 1 2
 What exactly do you want to get Matt-W? Scientific proof how much does L-brace actualy help? Some numbers, crash tests? How difficult is it to manipulate that? Yes science is one thing but you also need to use your own logical thinking. Isn't it really logicaly clear that products like Leatt Brace do help? do make riding safer? Choosing to buy them increases your safety, damn it, it's just plain simple. So what, to use it you want to know, how much does it help? just think for a short while how it works.

We do are getting crazy here. We are getting close to a case of seat belts. Some here get closer and closer to the thinking process going on in heads of idiots putting reasoning behind not using seat belts. Or those who don't believe in air bags!

One thing is to not use safety gear and well just screw it, I don't use that. Worst you do then, is you give a bad example for those who watch you. Another is to put reasoning behind it cause that's a bloody crime against humanity!
  • 3 1
 Is it really that wrong to ask for proof that they will actually protect me in mountain bike crashes rather than harm me before I spend £300 on one? Of course not.

Don't compare them to seatbelts, which went through many years of testing and killed a lot of people before they got to the design we use today, because they simply aren't the same.

Neckbraces are fashionable, but the safety side of them isn't as clear cut as you might think.
  • 3 1
 You really can't compare Leatts to seatbelts.

The problem I have with Leatt braces is that the only piece of research you can see that they, the people trying to sell it have done seems to be some force/torque sensors in a dummy, and then some very idealised scenarios.

None of it has been published in a journal, so we just have their word that what they've done effectively models real world scenarios and takes into account other risks. If Dr Leatt actually felt like writing a research paper then perhaps I would take him a little more seriously.
  • 2 0
 www.leatt-brace.com/gpx_testing.html

They have in no way shown that in a real world accident the brace helps. If you look at the graphs, the force from compression isn't even all that different with a brace on, which is the injury where you're most likely to damage your spinal cord. A concern i've heard raised with it a number of times is that the brace stops your head from being able to roll out the way of the ground; you kind of end up as a rigid body which digs in, increasing compressional forces. I don't see any testing by Leatt which would disprove that. My point is that in the real world it's messy; you land on uneven surfaces, the ground has give in it so things can dig in, you can hit trees, etc. After you've had an impact which could shift the position of the brace, what happens if you have a second impact? What's the increase in force on your upper back where the brace sits after having your helmet contact with the back of the collar?

I'm not saying it doesn't work, it might well do, but I really hate the way that Leatt has marketed it, as if somehow they've shown that it does actually protect athlete's necks, and trying to sell it based on the fear of an injury, particularly to parents for their kids. They even link to this video;

www.vitalmx.com/videos/features/A-Message-From-David-Bailey,196/GuyB,64

It's been out for a while, have they tried to do a study on its use in MX? There are enough spinal injuries in motocross to be able to produce something statistically significant after a number of years, surely?
  • 1 2
 Matt-W: you don't believe it: don't buy it, as simple as that.

InColour dude: if that video with David Bailey is not speaking to you, well... I don't know who and what can. What Leatt shows is that it decreases the risk in most cases at least for 25%. You talk like you expect it to be the golden remedy for all neck injuries. Stop troubleshooting, look for a moment at the whole picture. Listen to the guy on the vid.

If you are so picky about Lbrace, do you apply the same approach to helmets, knee guards? Which knee pad producer shows any eveidence that it helps. Probably none, but it doesn't take a genius to figure that out that it does help.

You don't like it, fine, but don't take people away from buying it! Because you take their 25% of chance for decreased injury! Sorry for stereotyping, for putting people in boxes but one question:

are you so sceptical because you can't deal with the pressure of community? because that makes you feel like you need to buy it? and you don't like that pressure. Be smart then and don't buy it! But also be smart enough to stop putting people off buying that thing, or any safety gear. Because it does help! even if 25%, it does help! And there is no conspiracy theory, dr Leatt is not a Wallmart with awful marketing strategies : it's logical think before you say something: he's business is small, he can't afford such action! if it puts you off, don't buy it!
  • 2 0
 No, they don't show they decrease the risk by 25%. They show that in that specific test with that specific force the compressional on the neck of a dummy is reduced by about 25%. We have no idea what happens when it isn't a dummy swung like a pendulum with a completely clean hit. We have no idea what the force on the upper back where the brace rests is in a hard impact. We have no idea if it puts your neck at extra risk of compression in situations where your head can't roll out of the way because of it. We just don't know. That's the value of peer reviewed research, of which there is none for this. That way you at least have some assurances that their claims are substantiated.

And I really do have a problem with Leatt trying to use videos like that to promote their product. With all due to respect to the guy, as awful as that situation is, he isn't an authority on the subject and he can't say whether or not it would have prevented anything.
  • 3 1
 Leatt have very good marketing when you think about it, people buy their products without any proof that they actually work.

If there was a 25% less chance of injurt in a leatt brace i would buy one, simple as, but there just isn't; because there hasn't been any scientific testing done by an independant research team.

Questioning something like this isn't harming others, especially if 5 years down the line the leatt design turns to be flawed and we find it has been putting riders at risk of serious injury.
  • 1 0
 And no, i'm sceptical because scepticism of it is the best stance to take before something has proper evidence in its favour, which Leatt doesn't.

You can't compare them to helmets/padding either. Helmets HAVE been extensively tested, it's been shown that statistically you're less likely to injure yourself when wearing one, and there are safety standards that they much reach, which have been decided by independent organisations. With helmets and padding it's simply a simple case of putting something between you and what you're about to hit, spreading the load over a larger area and increasing the impact time. It's something that's been done for thousands of years in loads of different applications.

Neck braces like this are completely new and unproven, and what they do is no where near as simple. You're actually attempting to transfer the force to somewhere completely different on the body. It still has to go somewhere. You also have to think about what your neck does in an accident; it can fold to the left or right as you impact so it's moved out of they way. There's so many more variables and the spine is so complex that it can't be compared to normal armour.
  • 1 2
 ok this is not taking us anywhere...my point of view is: neck brace is good. In the way I understand the way physics work, how applied forces are being transferred and distributed through physical bodies regardless if it's steel or flesh, neck brace does transfer them around your neck to some extent (naturally when used with a FF helmet) The fact that it limits the head movement, and therefore extreme bends of neck is just clear to me as the fact that pigs can't play a banjo. I personaly don't need scientific proofs that it does it's job.

However I understand that others might need these proofs as a base for the decision whether to buy or not.

The ultimate reason for my somewhat aggressive arguing is that some strongly reasoned hesitations like these may put off someone from buying it while it might be vital to use it. maaah... I'm going riding XC now...
  • 2 0
 ^you are 100% right with that!Im deffiantly considering buying one now that I F-ed up by back really bad.Even if it wouldn't have done anything when I did F-up my back,it could save me from doing it all over again in a different situation!
  • 4 1
 I broke my c7 in a crash last year. I was seen by the spinal clinic in Vancouver, who handles all serious spinal injuries in bc. What they told me, and this is astonishing!, is that in the last ten years they haven't had one recorded c spine injury of someone who was wearing a leatt brace!!! Not exactly scientific study, but worth listening to!!! Wear a leatt!!!!
  • 1 0
 that's pretty amazing, and good to hear that the braces are worth the money. I don't think the leatt was invented at the time that I bit the dust. these things are way more important than elbow pads and shin guards - landing hard on your arms and knees will hurt, sure, maybe even bleed for a few weeks, but that's mellow compared to paralysis or even missing 1/2 a year in rehabilitation. accidents are called accidents, folks, because nobody plans them.
  • 3 0
 My best friend broke his back in 3 places about three years ago. He went ass over tea kettle. his seat pegged him in the back and gave him a fracture where the rails are located(two high ones to the left and right of his spine and one low one on his spine) There was no protective gear avlable at the time that could have prevented or reduced the seriousness of his injuries nor is there anything today (not even a pressure suit due to the location of his injuries and how they occurred.) I still believe the bast way to prevent injuries (especially to the spine)when riding a mountain bike is to ride with serious caution and to know your limit.
  • 3 0
 I BROKE my SPINE riding DH in 2007 @ NorthStar in Tahoe at 26 years old. I was wearing a 661 pressure suit and a fullface. I scorpioned myself due to over shooting the landing of a jump on Livewire and plowing into the ground face first. I punctured a lung, cracked some ribs and destroyed T10 in my spine. How I crashed and the level of destruction were kind of just a fluke. If I had been on flats instead of clips I probably would have been fine. If I was wearing a Leatt I probably still would have broken my spine because of how far down the vertebrae that broke is located relative to what the Leatt is supposed to protect.

Bottom Line: Back on the bike in 3.5 months after having a spinal fusion and staying 2 weeks in the hospital. Bikes are my life. I still DH and race, am headed to N* next weekend, and still don't have a Leatt...though I am interested in getting one. I won't stop riding MTB unless it kills me.

This SCI research needs to give more feedback about body armor, pressure suits, and Leatt braces and whether or not they work to help prevent SCI

Live 2 Ride; Ride 2 Live!!!!!!!!
  • 1 0
 Metal mike,

I broke my T8 snowboarding a month ago had surgery a day after injury to fuse T6 - T10 with rods.
How are you know and how were you able to get back on a bike after only 3.5 months!? Any advice on length of rehab etc!?

All the best Mark
  • 5 3
 I always ride Downhill with a Leatt brace and full face helmet nowdays. I fractured my L1 vertebrae in a crash from landing on my head in 2008, I may have been lucky it was not a vertebrae in my neck. I had cuts in my shoulders from the edges of my helmet, when my neck compressed. It made me think twice about not bothering to buy and wear a leatt brace.
  • 3 0
 I broke my t6 and compressed t4 and t5 about 9 weeks ago. thats what you get for landing on your head off a DJ haha!

it always happens when your messing around in a piss pot! Smile
  • 3 1
 cheers mark, for once a proper response on this forum. and thanks for not ripping into me, though i probably deserved it. i believe you are right in everything you say, butI have no real knowledge of how such a report is conducted. hence my laymans reply. it just annoys me when given half information coz i am "too thick" to understand it or use it, which only results in the replies this thread has spawned..

cheers again hopefully your reply should put pay to alot of pointless replies

ps i would just like to apologise for saying over 160% relating to cord injuries, this is infact wrong and the figures do tally up, i read the way the information was being conveyed wrongly. my bad!!
  • 3 1
 funny thing is that most pro riders are not even wearing shin guards and/or elbow guardsin the races and in those extreme DH biking films. Perhaps the races organisers should mandate all rideers to wear full armors in order to promote a good sense of safe DH riding just like what the pro skaters(skateboard and inline skate)have done more than 10 years ago.
  • 3 1
 i bet that will happen in the years to come
  • 3 0
 As someone who has had a spinal injury from MTB (broken neck in 3 places) I think this is a really important subject. LEATT braces are just as important as helmets in my opinion. Expensive, but a used one can go a long way.
  • 2 0
 Ironic to see this article this morning after being surprised this past weekend, at the NWcup Port Angeles race, of the number of cat 1 (men 19-29) riders racing pad-less in t-shirts. That would be consistent with the demographic this report summarizes. I believe Estes said "absolute insanity there folks!", which I think was just an appropriate euphemism instead of flat out saying "dumbass".

I just want to mention that you never see the top riders taking this risk because they are serious about competing in this sport. To get any amount of longevity from this sport, the gear is simply a requirement. Fact is, you *will* crash. If you don't crash, you're not pushing your limits.
  • 2 0
 so why if these neck braces are so important for our own health and saftey and enjoyment of our chosen sport/pastime/lifestyle why the hell are they so bloody expensive ? i mean you could buy all the armour from head to toe and a good helmet for the same price as one of these braces? doesnt make sense for a lot of people £400 is a large payout especially for a fancy toilet seat to hang around your neck
  • 2 0
 I was out the other day and a guy came off on a very small table, he was ok and wouldn't sit still. We insisted on the ambulance, he got airlifted to hospital and kept in for a week, he was operated on after 4 days and it turned out he had broken 2 vertabraes between his shoulders. He hAd landed on his head and compressed his back. Someone once said to me it's not if but when. Sadly probably true but riding is such good fun.
  • 1 0
 hey, same thing here, i crashed at us open at diablo park, flipped forward and flat landed with my back straight to rocky and stony spot, fortunately i had my spine protection and it saved me, not even scratch, and i know how lucky i am right now.
  • 2 0
 spineboards save lives, good job for wearing one.
  • 1 0
 but i wonder how effective the protection people where is...... they should do more research on that cause it might make more people willing to where protection if they can see some figure to prove that they will really make a big differance
  • 2 1
 waki, you talk some pish, every post i see of yours makes me angry for some reason, usually because its in my face, quick short negative outbursts to a poster. sometimes its well justified sometimes its not. in this case its not first off i can't read the full manuscript as i am not a member of the AJSM and i would imagine the majority of posters here arent, so we can only comment on what the reseach says in the abstract given. so how many riders were included in the research group 107 is this the max total of spinal injuries in the world or north america or US or just some backwater in texas. also what protection were these riders wearing, that lack of information alone discredits everything written.
  • 1 0
 yeah i hate that waki guy too, some people just like to hear them selves talk
  • 1 0
 Forcing people to do something is always delicate, even if it's for their own good. At least helmets are mandatory pretty much everywhere and neck braces are currently quite fashionable. But most people wearing a neck brace now will probably stop wearing them as soon as they become cheaper.
  • 1 0
 true, in the SDA races here the younger riders have to wear leg, arm, chest and back protection as well as full face helmet to race, although for the seniors it is only helmet protection.... not sure if leg protection is mandatory too. there is one small problem though. to kit one person out with full body head and neck protection things start to come very expensive. yeah but what price do you put on the rest of your mobile life!!!! i hear you all shout. if price is not an issue, and the jury has decided on full protection is a must then we wouldnt be having this debate. unfortunately it is a debate, because price is an issue, and the jury is still out on whether its worth it or not.

i for one, dont wear upper body armour just leg pads and helmet. for me it is because i find upper armour very uncomfortable and it does 2 things to me 1. makes me think i can do whatever uncontrollable speed i like and 2. makes me so hot i suffer from heat stress (most our tracks are push up) resulting in bad judgment and crashes. in other words i ride safer without upper armour. touch wood i wont ever have a bad crash, but even though i crash alot i feel i have learned to crash properly (this is not as stupid as it sounds) i very rarely come off with more than bruised pride and believe you me. i have had some whopping crashes. the final say for me is if you think you can look at what you are doing, weigh up the outcome and what your bail out points are and come to the conclusion you may crash and break your neck then dont do it or get the necessary protection other wise ride within your limits. either way, buy and use what you think you need coz doing otherwise would be just plain stupid. and Waki this includes wearing full protection for riding AM who are you to imply that riding lesser trails requires less protection. no it doesnt its down to personal choice and what you feel you are at risk to.
  • 1 0
 @ stever:
I don't know how you calculated those 17% of becoming wheelchair bound, and of course we have to take into account that a lot of minor injuries where probably never counted, because they went to a smaller hospital or no hospital at all.
Also, we have to take into account that back protectors have been around for most of those 13 years and there was a time when they were used a lot more than today, so that may be one the reasons for the low percentage of injuries below the neck.

But all in all the numbers do show that the neck is at risk and there is a high chance of paralysis, and therefore a neck brace seems to be at least as important as a back protector.
I believe that this is really the first study of this kind and the first that proves that the neck is indeed the primary area of spine injury in mountain bike accidents.

Good news for Leatt ;-)
  • 1 0
 My math is as follows:

40% of injuring spinal chord (ie. when involved in a spinal injury) multiplied by 42% chance of your spinal chord injury being class A (paralysis) = 17% of paralysis if you sustain a spinal injury.
  • 1 0
 As mark99 pointed out this report is for doctors - not MTBers specifically. As such I think it presents good info - if I show up at an ER I want them to know where the most likely injuries may be so nothing is overlooked. As a rider I know it's dangerous. I wear an EVS RC3 which is a slightly better verison of a neck nut, but have been OTB with it and it did do a good job of preventing whiplash type motion (I modified it by adding additional padding). A Leatt, Alpinstar or EVS RC EVO would be even better IMO, and am currently looking into getting one for my son. As a rider and a parent this is the beginning of a good discussion. What I would like to know better is the correlation of these injuries to specific activities. I've had some neck injuries from DH, landing an air in the trees. Had another friend break his neck on a small 4' drop JRA - so where does the crap usually hit the fan? This is important to me because DH I always wear full gear and I make my son do likewise - but trail riding with small drops no. I know the kids on dirt jumps rarely wear armor heck some don't seem to wear helmets. If dirt jumps are producing the more serious injuries I think it would be good to know. Any changes towards better safety - in equipment, education, etc. can only be good for the sport.
  • 1 0
 I can agree about the "over the bars" conclusion.
But I landed straight on my head and broke Th11, every doctor I met in the rehab was like - wtf? How can that be?!?!

But we came to conclusion that it was because 2 months before the crash I fell off the second floor while building a house, and my back hurt a bit, but the pain went away in a few minutes. I didn't care, but the muscles were probably damaged and in the crash they could not hold the pressure to keep the spine straight.

So - get exercises as often as possible!
  • 1 0
 I suppose the Leatts etc are so expensive because of the R&D costs. I feel good about the RC3 - I read on a motocross site about a guy crashing at over 100 MPH with an RC3 with neck intact (the rest of him got wrecked though). I figure except in a true freak I'm not going moto speed, or crashing with a 200 lb bike on me so the RC3 or RC Evo should cover 99%. It's under $200 so that's a pretty small price to pay...
  • 1 0
 thats me, 14 years old, dirt jumping scorpioned myself and fractured t11 had major surgery to install metal rods to hold my back and im now going in for more surgery to get them removed, i have already been out biking and faster than ever, and i will never stop.
  • 1 0
 I understand that this article is kind of strange and out of the norm of all the kick-ass articles we usually read about events, products, trails and other things that keep us loving the sport so much. But in reality, I believe everyone commenting on this forum either pushes the envelope when they ride and should be aware of the unknown risks that is good knowledge. Especially the riders that feel that freeriding is riding free of the protective gear out there. As a mountain biker for over two decades, I can remember riding with a bandana on my head, no shirt, shades, full finger gloves, shorts with no shammie and spd's. As one advances and pushes the envelope, its foolish to think of backcountry ridin in this typical way. I believe the article gives a hidden message to wear the appropriate gear and avoid such injuries. Ride on, ride hard, and ride till you die beoootch!!!
  • 1 0
 Shasta you are a retard if you think moto riders ride sitting down. I am up 80 percent of the time. Leatt has saved me and my best friend from breaking our necks. Wear one, it save lives. Would have kept my dad out of his halo for three months,
  • 1 0
 13 years is a lot of time to collect data regarding the injuries. However, "mountain biking" has evolved dramatically in those 13 years.

My problem with the study is that all "mountain bikers" are lumped in to one category. It might as well be "cyclists" in general. Looks like otb accidents are mentioned, but in what context? How many of those injuries occurred when riding aggressively vs. how many occurred when just riding along? What were the experience levels of the riders that were injured? I think that plays nearly as large a part as wearing protective gear. I see a lot riders out here that are riding over their heads - and I don't mean hitting kickers or drops or riding steeps. I mean just "average" mountain bikers that cannot control themselves on anything but a flat trail (and even then accidents find a way to happen).

While I would not argue against the use of protective gear (I own and use helmets, pads, pressure suit) I would like to see a study that focuses more on "extreme" or aggressive riders like ourselves, in the context of the falls and accidents we sustain as a group. Something that would include data about full face helmet usage, with and without a neck brace, impact studies, and some scientific data about leatt braces in general (is there any at all?) There's a lot "this is good idea to wear this brace" and "a full face with no brace is likely to break ones' neck" - but I don't see data (other than anecdotal) to back up such claims.

to be continued...
  • 1 0
 You should have that dude from further up in the thread e-mail you the article.

It does in fact distinguish between "trail" and "park" riders. Also, it mentions the use of helmets and "other protective gear".

This is a retrospective study. They can obviously only work with the injuries that occurred in the last years in BC.

I guess that for a study focusing on "extreme" riding and the use of neck braces, there is not yet enough data.
If you want to examine that, you would have to conduct a study with crash test dummies or cadavers, which is what the companies like Leatt or Alpinestars most likely did. They would not publish their research however, because they paid for it and want to be the only ones to profit from it.
  • 1 0
 continued:

My anecdotal submission to this thread is: I have friend who works in an ER, she sees far more spinal injuries from tire irons and boots/feet than from mountain bikes. In fact, she rarely sees head or spinal injuries from cyclists - mostly wrists, knees, shoulders and clavicles...

My conclusion: Safety gear is always a great idea. But this study does not address "us" - as in skilled aggressive riders, but only cyclists in general (just because one rides a mountain bike, does not mean they are particularly skilled at all), then applies its evidence and conclusions across the board. A keen effort, but... I dunno.
  • 1 0
 Stab- if you adressed your preaching to me it was pointless,because i'm aware of it all as I'm not a new to the sport and actually been around for years.Next time before you start to type "7-11" thing do some research in my album. What I wanted to say in my previous post, is that the article will make kids who start riding more aware of the risk involved and always wear protection gear.
  • 1 0
 I ALWAYS ride with helmet and protective gear; always have my Dainese Evolution Armour on while Freeride/Downhill/4X. Thinking about a neck brace too since the gaps and tables keep getting bigger and bigger.

I also replace the helmet after a big crash! Even when it's not showing any stressed area's. Better save then sorry Smile


And 4 the costs?

If you are willing to spend 3k or more on a bike, what's the problem with going the extra mile and buy proper protective gear and a descent helmet? If you can't afford the top notch brands just go with a cheaper brand, but don't ride without Wink
  • 3 3
 tbh it was only 107 people who sustained an injury in this study and there are millions of people who ride so the chance of having a spinal injury is still quite small, also if you wear a back protector or even a neck brack it is unlikely you will get badly injured.
  • 1 1
 Either way, there is still a chance. and i has nothing to do with the figures. all it takes is one small rock to put your off, once your past the point where your going OTB there is pretty much nothing you can do to change where you land. that's why i wear a neck brace and back protection.
  • 5 0
 alexmcb, its 107 people out of the sample size, not out of the millions of riders in the world.
  • 4 4
 To whoever posted this, this is a pretty pathetic copy and paste effort to make a point that is baseless in regards to the "study" posted.

Sample group size? This study is meaningless without knowing how many people were involved in the study. Simply telling us the percentages of different types of injuries does not prove anything.

Without being told otherwise, were left to assume that this study includes every single person who has ever ridden a mountain bike in the past 13 years. 107 sustained injuries out of the hundreds of thousands (if not millions) over that period of time probably equates to a smaller risk percentage regarding back injuries than say, taking a shower.
  • 1 0
 its a number based on the number of people who MTB in the area that hospital would serve in the event of spinal injury. Kinda hard to determine that sample size
  • 1 1
 of those with cord injuries the percentage total is over 160%... not knowledagble about statistics but how can a group of people amount to more than 100%. i'm sure the article is far more complicated and specific than the abstract shown here, but i think people are fairly justified to query the information they have been given (due to its lack of substantation). i would just like to say that we have a simlar project happening in the uk. call me cynical but i feel this is probably from the government trying to figure out what sports cost the NHS the most money, next step is to charge extreme athletes money for hospital rehabilitation due to reckless activity in order to save the Govt money. next step is to ban mountain biking in foresty commission areas or charge innordinate sums of money to ride in these places next step is to make certain extreme sports illegal, first one being base jumping. yes a conspiracy theory but perfectly plausible. before things go further i would like to see the detailed report in its enterity before making anymore judgement (but i cant because i am not a member of the AJSM). so unless you have seen and can show us the full report Waki, wind your neck in for once and be a bit more constructive in your arguments riddled with cool soundbites.
  • 1 0
 I'll repeat my previous comment for those that don't read all the comments:

I am more than happy to email a pdf of the article to anyone who wishes to read it in its entirety. PM me with your email if you're curious.
  • 1 1
 IMO its just another slant against riding bikes..... personally I'll take my chances on a bike......stuff like this just gets the gullible people all uptight and scared..... Now, lets talk about car crash statistics and what happens to those people who get mamed, burned, loose limbs....and die. again, personally I'll take my chances on a bike and have fun doing so.
  • 3 1
 I didn't get that at all. Like advorak mentioned, "this was written for hospitals and health systems". The message I got from it is to wear protective gear, that's all.

oh, instead of car crashes, I think a better comparison would involve your mom :-)
  • 2 0
 stop whining, if you dont like the article dont read it, I thought the article was informative and appropriate for pinkbike.
  • 1 0
 did you happen to see the version of this that ran on the tv news channels last night?
  • 3 0
 LEAT BRACES it is not made off carbon or titanium nothing fancy , pretty simple design .... WHY SO EXPENSIVE ?????????
  • 1 1
 Renio if you didn't think mountainbiking is a dangerous sport you must just be riding your bike to the local 7-11. A nice fully is going to run you a couple g's so putting a few hundy into a nice full face isnt to much to ask. Here's the best tip, do not hit lip jumps or drops until you are fully ready. I've seen so many ppl get worked because they think that having suspension and pads on means they automatically have bike skills. Start small get comfortable then step it up to bigger features. If you didn't already know what i just said you are not smart enough for a high risk sport.
  • 1 0
 In a perfect world everyone would wear a fullface and neck brace. It's not a perfect world. I have had alot of minor neck injurys on my bike, and i wear a neck roll even when dirt jumping,.
  • 1 0
 I'm sorry right but I know MTB is dangerous - thats why we do it and we know the risks..... I wear a helmet to even ride to the shops and wear fully body armour when DH'ing..... if it wasn't dangerous we wouldn't do it.....
  • 4 0
 Lesson 1: dont ride clipless
Lesson 2: dont ride clipless
  • 2 1
 why not?
  • 4 0
 I like to be able to eject unrestricted.
  • 4 1
 Wear your protective gear and learn how to crash.
  • 2 0
 agreed! theres a fair few people who dont know or understand 'how to crash'
  • 4 5
 so over 12 years, only 107 people were identified as having spinal injuries directly related to Mtb-ing. hardly a lot is it? its a study saying "Yep, you can get injured whilst doing this sport" big wow. we know that.
we all know there is a risk, thats why its a buzz. just enjoy it.
  • 1 0
 *sigh* Patients who were injured while mountain biking, and who were seen at a provincial spine referral center between 1995 and 2007. Provincial means in BC.
  • 2 0
 Good to see some scientificaly proven numbers. Good article even if it just reminds people how frigile is their back.
  • 3 3
 What a load of sh1t. this report has told me that some people have sustained a back related injury from mountain biking, and that it can be costly.... thank you captain obvious!!!
  • 3 4
 I broke my neck mtb'ing back in 2001, broken C-5/6/7. Luckily that was the extent of the injuries, no organ damage and just a few other scratches. I finished my first dh race yesterday, and firmly believe that a leatt brace or similar would have reduced the severity of the injuries, as it was caused by an extreme flexion at the neck. "falling properly" is hard when its 70 feet down...
  • 1 0
 I compression fractured six of my vertebraes at silverstar in grade 7, had to relern how to walk, and im still riding, harder than ever. Get Some!
  • 1 0
 I cannot complain about this model: www.xsportsprotective.com/evs-rc-evolution-race-collar.html . Not a bad price when compared to other brands.
  • 1 0
 i am sure its not bad, but it looks like you are wearing a car seat on your neck.
  • 1 0
 "The mean age at injury was 32.7 years (95% confidence interval 30.6, 35.0)"

I am 32.6 years old, uh oh. I am amazed the 95% CI is so tight, do 20 somethings not crash?
  • 2 0
 haha nope I'm 25 and I crash like I'm getting paid for it.
  • 1 0
 i thought this was a bizarre statistical figure. so they are 95% sure that their mean age at injury was 32.7 years? so we're 5% sure someone lied about their age? Wink
  • 1 0
 Oh, right. They mean that they are 95% confident that the mean age in the entire population (rather than the sample) is in that range.
  • 3 1
 So, does it better to have a leatt brace?
  • 3 5
 stops you compressing your spine if you land on your head
  • 3 0
 leatt are designed primarily to stop hyperflexion, alpinestars are designed primarily to stop compression
  • 2 0
 So which is more likely? I would imagine landing on the top of your head is more likely in fmx/motox? Which would make sense why AS make that one.
  • 3 0
 Normally, when you fall on your head (even straight down) it tries to roll out of the way, so I'd go for hyperflexion myself.
  • 4 2
 Alpinestars are tested and proven to work, they're the only neck brace out there with certification standards which are tested on human cadavers! Alpinestars don't mess around! Leatt doesn't do this. Alpinestars FTW.
  • 1 0
 Yeah but the AS one seems to be for something that is much less likely in dh(?)
  • 1 0
 lol, i had a spine injury last year and was out for six months. i spose a back brace would have stoped it from happening.
  • 3 0
 I think you mean back pad. A back brace is what you need after a spine injury Wink
  • 1 0
 I am more than happy to email a pdf of the article to anyone who wishes to read it in its entirety. PM me with your email.
  • 2 0
 basicly, wear a neck brace + spine board
  • 2 0
 Whatever they say, it will NEVER stop me riding!!!! WOOP WOOP!!!
  • 1 0
 whats the injury rate of mountain buiking as compared to other ball sports? ive always wondered that?
  • 1 0
 You would have to divide all accidents by the total number of hours ridden, respectively divided by the number of hours of ball play. It may be possible to count the number of accidents, but no one can count how many hours people actually ride and how many hours they spend playing ball.
  • 1 0
 We could argue about our spines, or we can go out and ride? seems pretty simple to me
  • 1 0
 Sure MeanMike so do I, always have helmet whether be it downhill race, training or mere road riding
  • 1 0
 ok lets stop ridin. Nah dont think so
  • 1 0
 not evan a full face helmet
  • 1 0
 holy tits people should get out and ride their bike
  • 1 0
 chance getting parralized or have a mizerable life ill take my chances
  • 1 0
 Are we stuck in a cave, cause all i see are trolls around here
  • 1 0
 thats a nasty crach
  • 1 2
 107 injuries in 13 years? Less then 10 per year? Seems like good odds to me.
  • 2 3
 what a waste of time making such a correlation.. do something productive
  • 1 4
 Why is this in pinkbike? I understand our sport is dangerous but do i really need to be told how many people suffer spinal injuries?
  • 1 4
 My thoughts exactly. It's by doctors for doctors to reach consensus and educate each other about their patients. It is Not designed to educate the general public. Now i have bunch of numbers i personally can do nothing with. Risk analysis maybe? Great I already do that every time I ride.

The chances are infinitely smaller for these injuries if you don't mtb. But that is not happening, and neither will I totally sacrifice my comfort for a freaking number on a sheet of paper.
  • 1 2
 HAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! P.O.D, P.O.D
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