New Rotors and Materials from Galfer - Pond Beaver 2021

Apr 8, 2021
by Henry Quinney  

Galfer, a Spanish braking components manufacturer, will no doubt be known to some of our readers who also follow MotoGP. They've been creating mountain bike brake rotors and pads for several years now and have chalked up World Cup wins, podiums and even the overall under Tracey Hannah in 2019. This year they've brought out some new rotors which were the product of feedback from their World Cup riders and athletes. All Galfer parts are made in their factory near Barcelona, which incidentally sits right next to the Circuit de Catalunya racetrack.

So, what's new?

The DB004W2 is the new 2.0mm width variant of the 203mm rotor and costs €39.90.
Rotors
Galfer's main line of rotors, their Disc Wave series, is now available in sizes from 160mm all the way to 223mm. There is also now the new option of 2.0mm width, whereas previously only 1.8mm had been available. This is something that is a direct result of rider and racer feedback. The idea being that simply put, more material to simply dissipate the heat is always going to be a good thing. In a previous life as a race mechanic, I used to lust after the prototype 2.0mm thickness.

I've been riding with 203 Disc Wave rotors for a couple of months in the 2.0mm option front and back. I combined these large rotors with the new G1652 Purple pads and the results were excellent while being used in conjunction with SRAM Code RSCs.

The standard 203mm rotor (DB004W) weighs 140g, whereas the new 2.0mm option (DB004W2) comes in 40g heavier. Relative to the weight of the disc, this is not an inconsiderable difference. However, in the context of our bikes, this seems like a very efficient trade-off and to increase your bike's performance, should you need it, for merely 40g seems like a very good deal indeed.

All that being said, if you don't find yourself putting large amounts of heat through your brakes, for whatever reason, then the performance gained will be lessened. If you live in the mountains though, I think this small compromise could really be worth your consideration.

They have now also introduced rotors as small as 140mm for road and gravel bikes. The DB101W, pictured, comes in at just 64g and costs under €28.
The DB101W rotor is for road and gravel
Brake Pads
Galfer also now offer six different variants of pad materials for cycling. Excluding the entry level and trials specific pad, it boils down to four main options, including options for e-bikes and road and gravel bikes.

G1851 ADVANCED These red pads are meant for mixed conditions. They're made with basaltic fibres and a specific coating that help absorb moisture to keep braking power and performance consistent in a wet environment.

G1554T PRO As the name suggests, these green pads are used by racers. It sacrifices a small amount of longevity to deliver the best blend of power and consistency.

The G1652 E-BIKES purple pads are specifically meant for e-bikes. This translates to a combination of durability, power and the ability to cope with higher temperatures. It's slightly different to the Pro
green pad, in that it isn't quite as powerful. However, in my months using these pads front and rear I've found them to be very consistent and have both bite and feel in ample supply.

The G1455 ROAD blue pads were developed to be powerful, efficient and hard-wearing brake pads for road bikes. Although it might not seem like much, road bikes do tend to have different operating demands due to smaller rotors and often longer braking distances. This can lead to a huge amount of heat buildup within the system. They are also available for some two pot mountain bike calipers.

The pricing options for these four performance compounds start at €16 and tops out at around €22 for the range-topping G1554T Pro green pads.

Galfer EU / Galfer USA







128 Comments

  • 33 0
 I run the 223mm rotor on the front of my DH bike with Saints (normal pads) and it performs great, but DON'T ORDER THIS INTO CANADA from them because I had to pay 50 bucks 'brokerage fee' to UPS, in addition to the cost of the rotor, adapter, and shipping to Vancouver which was $96 USD. The adapter which was specifically for my saint caliper had to be shimmed like crazy to get it working (on a standard modern Boxxer). I hadn't asked for UPS shipping, it was just done.

I'd probably not do it again despite the good performance.
  • 14 0
 Sad but typical of small companies... UPS/DHL/Fedex make it very easy for the shipper, they come to them to pickup for free... but pass the costs on to the receiver. With regular post you need to go to the post office, which isn't worth it for some. Buyer beware.
  • 12 0
 @GVArider: The biggest cost using UPS/DHL/Fedex is what they charge for customs clearance, up to 30% of your item.
USPS all the way, but I don't order from Europe.
  • 15 0
 @GVArider: As a prior small business owner, I always asked the customer what preferred method of shipping they wanted. It was always USPS for canada. Small businesses today should be doing the same. Scratch that. ANY business should be doing the same. Too many companies lose focus on customer service.
  • 32 1
 We recently started selling Galfer rotors and pads in Canada. Our shop is in Calgary and we offer free shipping nationwide on orders over $200.
  • 5 23
flag DizzyNinja (Apr 8, 2021 at 6:02) (Below Threshold)
 @TheInsideLine: so I need to buy $200 worth of pads and rotors for free shipping?
  • 19 1
 @DizzyNinja: I believe that’s what he wrote. Maybe the question you should have asked is what is the domestic shipping rate for small parts under $200...?
  • 8 0
 @ChrisNJ: UPS is the devil's arsehole. USPS is great for shipping to Canada.
  • 1 0
 @TheInsideLine: What is the shop called i live in edmonton and come down to calgary all the time.
  • 1 0
 @TheInsideLine: Can I pick up? I'm local and was about to order online from Galfer until I saw the shipping cost.
  • 1 1
 @stingmered: For some reason my full comment didn’t upload.. the rest of it said “The Bike Shop, Bow Cycle, Calgary Cycle, and Ridley’s all have free shipping at $99 nationally out of the same city”. Competition and all that
  • 2 0
 @NorcoRida244: the store name is the same name, The Inside Line
  • 2 1
 @DizzyNinja: @DizzyNinja: The shop I work at does free shipping anywhere in Canada. No minimum purchase amount:

fullcycle.ca
  • 5 0
 UPS is a crooked dishonest operation that steals from consumers. I specifically directed them to leave my order at customs so that I could clear it myself and not pay brokerage. I requested this in advance of shipping. They took it through Customs themselves anyway, and tried to hold my package hostage for $140 of additional fees. Fortunately their point-of-purchase machine didn't work that day, and the opted to send me the bill. I later sent them a cheque for the (legitimate) GST tax fees. When I cited my clear request and decline of their service, they started harassing me with phone calls. Thieves, crooks, liars, scammers, and incompetent at what they do. Only the delivery people are nice. The guy that drives through my area is polite and waves at everyone.
  • 5 0
 You can self-broker a package and save the outrageous fees. When ups or whoever tells you your item is being held until the fees are paid you can tell them you want to self broker it and have them email you a copy of the commercial invoice. They can not refuse this although they may try. Just mention reporting them to the CBSA and it'll clear that up quick.
Then you need to take or email 2 copies of the commercial invoice and 1 copy of your original invoice to a CBSA office that offers Inland Services (usually located at or near airports including many smaller airports). They will process it and you will still have to pay any owing duty (sometimes they will even give you a break on that) but no brokerage fee. They will stamp the invoice and give it back to you and then you send it back to ups and you stuff will come with nothing more owing. I've saved as much as $110 once as they didn't charge me duty too.
  • 1 0
 Yes. I was looking at Galfer prices yesterday and about to order pads when I saw shipping was far too high. Something like $45. Then you’d get duty and taxes and a ludicrous brokerage fee.
  • 1 0
 @h82crash: Yes, and I followed this process. Yet UPS ignored my directions, and attempted direct delivery anyway and attempted to coerce payment. My package was duty-free with international tariff code clearly indicated. UPS cannot be trusted. At least DHL keeps their brokerage fees to a flat rate. USPS (via Canada post) only charges $10. Unfortunately, trusting DHL and USPS often results in PST (BC) being applied to items that are PST-exempt (i.e. bike lights, brakes), and the Gov't will not accept a refund request if the claim is under $30. THus, they seem to charge inapplicable PST to most small orders, knowing they can suck up the extra taxes and deny you an opportunity to recoup the loss. So less is either ensure you can clear it yourself at Customs, or keep your orders large enough so that any improperly charged taxes can be recouped..... or of course buy local whenever possible.
  • 4 0
 For all you Canadians who hate these couriers, the following is how you can avoid brokerage fees and customs and duties with courier services:

1) I know for a fact that all goods coming into Canada that is bike related can only be charged GST when the item charged is above $30 value. Most of the time, a CBS officer will let things go even at $100. No additional duties are applied for bicycle related items. The only caveat is fully built wheels/wheels or a fully assembled bike for which another 18% can be applied. This is because the fully assembly of these required the services of a person assembling it before coming into the country. You can comb through the customs and duties schedule from the CBSA website.

2) Before you order, email the web store and ask which courier service they use to deliver the goods. If the courier warehouse and office is located in your city/town, you're good and things will be A-OK. If the courier service is not located in your city or close to where you live, you're SOL. I had to deal with Skynet which is either based out of Toronto or Vancouver. Each of these offices are like about 1000+km away. No way I can get to those offices from where I live. CRC and Wiggles use Skynet for delivery. So, if you deal with CRC/Wiggles and you don't live or near the two cities I mentioned, you're SOL. So, if your courier service and CBSA is close by, go to #3 - else, you're SOL and have to pay the ransom.

3) With all the major courier services such as DHL, UPS, Fedex, IntelCom, Skynet, etc,,,, you can get them to send you the cargo manifest after the package has arrived or in transit in Canada. This is the document that CBSA requires. You can also wait until the courier service arrives at your door and shoves the credit card machine in your face and demands a payment for the package. Just tell the courier you'll not pay them at the door and tell them to put the package at the warehouse/office where you'll pick it up at a later time. Wait overnight to go down to the main office of the courier service to get your cargo manifest (if you haven't received the manifest via email or fax - a lot of these courier companies actually don't want you to get the manifest and they withhold that information so that you cannot self clear - they make it hard). Make sure you tell them you want to self clear and you need the manifest to pay the GST at the CBSA office. They'll provide you a copy, no questions asked.

4) Go to the CBSA office. It's usually nearby one of the major courier companies near the airport. Submit your manifest to the CBSA officer and declare what is ordered. Most times, if it's under $150, they'll just stamp the manifest and you don't have to pay the GST. Anything over $150, you'll likely have to pay the GST. Make sure you declare all items order that is bike related as bike parts and accessories, even clothing (other clothing can have customs and duties applied). Pay your GST as necessary and get the stamp of approval.

5) Go back to the courier company that supplied you with the manifest. When they see the stamp on the manifest, they have to surrender your package without any further payment. They will take your only copy of the stamped manifest. Make sure you keep the receipt from the CBSA and make the courier service give you a photocopy of the stamped manifest. Otherwise, the courier service may lose their copy and come back to haunt you for payment and you'll have a nightmare on your hands.

- I know how all we all feel when we (Canadians) have to pay for high shipping costs to these courier services and then have to pay even more when it arrives in Canada. But if you follow what I just outlined, the only cost you'll pay is the original shipping and maybe GST on top of that. That's it. If you're the type that don't want the hassle and don't care about saving $25+, then ignore all this and just pay the damn delivery person and give him a tip. I'd save that money and buy my family and friends beer or wine with money I don't have to pay out.
  • 2 0
 I went the other way and just ordered from Inside Line. Going to pick it up soon enough. In this case, way cheaper, faster, and more convenient to support a real person in my community!
  • 1 0
 @husstler: Good bike shop, friendly customer service there at the Inside Line. I didn't even know they existed near the Chinook area until one day I needed to get some stuff for my wheels. Yeah, LBS can be good if the service is good and you need to get something quick that's available in-store without the wait.
  • 1 0
 @cerealkilla: Yeah always the best bet out of the US is USPS which then goes to Canada Post here because they must do their own brokerage. Also international orders that then get handed off to Canada Post is usually the best outcome. That $10 fee is a customs handling charge.

@CSharp: CBSA officer also told me that duty varies depending on different items with clothing being hit the hardest. I had an order come to a broker that was a mix of clothing and parts and the broker put the max duty on everything. When I went to the CBSA they broke down the invoice item by item and charged accordingly so it came out to quite a bit less.
  • 1 0
 Huh. I paid $111 CAD for mine, shipped from dirthut on ebay, from the UK. No crazy brokerage fees that I recall, but I could be forgetting. Expensive, but sweet rotors. I was able to use a standard PM 160 to PM 203 adapter on my MRP Ribbon that has PM 180 mounts, and it works perfectly without shimming.
  • 1 0
 @h82crash: All brokers at every port of call will try to collect their fees. So, if you self declare and take the manifest to the CBSA and declare everything up front as truthfully and politely as possible, chances are you'll only pay the GST. Some agents will check out the prices online to make sure that what you say and what the prices are on the manifest match. I had a set up tires ordered from CRC for like dirt cheap. Turns out the CBSA officer also rides on local trails. He couldn't belief how cheap the tires were. So, since we're on the same page, he was nice and said GST can be exempt and nothing to fret over. Sometimes, if you don't get the right officer, you'll pay the full GST. But you definitely won't be paying all that brokerage and duties that couriers collect.

For clothing, if it is related to biking, it can be classified as biking accessories or sporting goods, which in itself is not a fashion garment, but is considered as biking accessories. Most CBSA officers will classify these items this way if the order is complete bike related. As I mentioned before, clothing in itself can be classified in a totally different area where they can tax you heavily.

Also note for any Albertans shopping on JensonUSA. They collect a 13% tax for Alberta residence on checkout. I asked them about it since there is no sales tax like with other provinces. Yet, they will collect the extra 8% because their system (as I was told) does this for all provinces. Yet, if I check out as a BC residence or an Ontario residence, that tax rate is correct for either (as they are different for those provinces). So, any discount is offset by both currency conversion and a hidden 8% fee! So, Albertans are getting screwed left, right, and down below!
  • 1 0
 I didn't pay any brokerage fee with bikeinn. I had 2 203x2.0mm rotors and 3 pad kits but ordered it in 2 different packages to stay under 100$ and hope I wouldn't have to pay extra dollars... NRG is the distributor in Canada and rotors are about the same price as Jensonusa (like 3$ more so no way I would have buy it online instead of my LBS!!) but they didn't have anything available when I wanted it so had to buy it online.
  • 2 0
 @Timo82 & @Kyle201 - It's not about where you ordered stuff from but about who they use for shipping, especially at the Canadian end. I've had packages over $100 shown up with nothing owing and others that had GST, duty and brokerage fees owing. Talking to a guy I know that works for Canada customs, he told me it's a bit of a crapshoot because it really comes down to which officer it goes through and what kind of mood they are in that day. He said it's not as standardized as you would think. Also mention that in the earlier days of covid that since it was so backed up, they were basically letting anything under about $1500 go with no duty.
  • 1 0
 @h82crash: Anyone getting tax free for orders above $150 is lucky. Getting $1500 go by without checks would be crazy! But regardless of which courier service is used, if they're close by and within driving distance to a CBSA office in your area, you can do a self claim and pay any necessary GST. It's better than paying both Customs/duties and GST.
  • 1 0
 @CSharp: Yeah, I posted some basic info about self clearing a bit further up in this thread and it's good to see you and anyone else bringing this up so people know and don't keep feeding the broker vultures.
  • 1 0
 @DizzyNinja: Yea. It's the Calgary Bike Brake Pad and Rotor store, they don't have anything else for sale.
  • 9 0
 Been running TRPs 2.3mm thick 220 dia rotors for about six months on my Specialized Enduro that weighs about 37lbs. They are very consistent and almost always quiet except in rare situations that last a few seconds til the water & grime is cleared.

No brainer for DH bikes, but they are definitely heavier. If you are an enduro rider who prioritizes going fast on mostly downhill segments... I think the thicker rotors are definitely the way to go. The larger diameter rotor on the other hand is probably more personal preference and dependent on things like rider weight, bike weight, wheel size, outer wheel/tire/insert weight, physical intensity, and and maybe most importantly... commitment to taking the time to adjust to something new and not sticking with what you know. If you ride mostly XC trails and/or don't find yourself on the edge of grip constantly during DH segments, it probably wont be worth the change.

For reference I'm 180lbs and I do notice a small amount of reduced modulation going to DHR Evos /220mm front and rear coming from Code RSCs /200 front & rear. Mostly I have adapted my finger pressure to this change, but I still over brake occasionally when the front is unweighted or going through an off camber turn mid way through a long/physical decent.

Last added benefit is they seem to stay true when the rotor bumps trail obstacles that would require adjustment on the thinner 1.8mm rotors. Of course if you hit something hard enough or crash, they will still bend and might even be harder to get straight after more serious deformation.

Hope this anecdotal feedback helps anyone on the fence..
  • 2 0
 No issues fitting the Trp rotor in code calipers?
  • 1 0
 @travitiger: I think he meant the TRP rotors are on TRP brakes (DHR Evo).
  • 1 0
 @travitiger

@bigtuna00 is correct... I'm running 2.3mm thick TRP rotors with the TRP DHR Evo calipers/brakes
  • 8 0
 This is the first thing I’ve seen in a long time to actually get me thinking.
  • 5 0
 The rotor and pad combo is also really quiet in the wet. I've used the 2mm rotors and pads (red front, purple back) for a while now and find them a big improvement over the standard Formula pads and rotors (Cura). Definitely recommend.
  • 3 0
 If you can get them, I recommend the trickstuff red power pads for the cura. Definitely the most powerful set of pads I have used. Not sure how the Galfer pads compare mind you. Would be keen to try their rotors!
  • 1 0
 @nickism: Formula pads are made by Galfer AFAIK, so you could well end up with the same pad depending on your colour.
  • 4 0
 No rubbing issues with the 2mm rotors? I love my Cura4 modulation and power, however they have the typical tight Formula rotor-pad tolerance even with stock 1.8mm rotors.
  • 1 0
 @malaya: I just make sure the pistons are fully pushed back and it seems to be OK, though it is tight.
  • 1 0
 I ordered formula cura brakes recently. They will be arriving in a few weeks. Is there anything I need to know about setting them up? Do you think it's necessary to order only Formula's mineral oil? (I've only used Shimano and Sram in the past.)
  • 6 0
 @11six: mineral oil has no industry standard as to viscosity, boiling point, freezing point, etc etc. each company is free to make their own.. Formula..
  • 3 0
 @11six: Yeah, no, any mineral oil will be fine. I have recently bled one brake with formula, the other with an aftermarket mineral oil and there is no difference. They are great brakes as standard, some new pads as outlined above make them into excellent brakes!
  • 3 0
 I use Galfer's pads and rotors with my codes, the rotors are amazing and the same goes for the pads. I was using the green ones but they last nothing, they are really powerful and you get a lot of modulation but they seem to be made out of butter. I've switched to the purple ones...and I can't be happier, they have a slightly different feel but they last twice as much as the green ones. I was used to the metallic SRAM pads, which I love, but I'm not going back.
  • 2 0
 What is the longevity like on the purple pads compared to the metallic SRAM pads? I like the metallic pads too but I was interested in something a little longer lasting.
  • 2 1
 @sjma: The purple Galfer pads last a little less than the metallic SRAM pads, my guess is that they last about 20% less or so, but is my guess. That's no problem for as Galfer pads are cheaper and easier to find here in Spain, I don't know if that's the case elsewhere.
  • 1 0
 The disc wave rotors are light, quiet and perform good, but I'm not especially impressed with the power of the green pads. Not bad, but there are plenty of just as good or better options around.
  • 1 0
 @DavidGuerra: I find the green ones pretty much on par with the metallic SRAM pads, the purple ones might be a little less powerful but with very good modulation and frankly, with the SRAM code that I use I don't need more power and I'm not small by any means.
  • 1 0
 @juanmallorca: I always ran the BBB DiscStop BBS-371S (sintered metal), they are really satisfactory, they offer instant and lasting power and don't have the drawbacks of metallic pads. Then I tried the Galfer green ones because I heard good things about them but wasn't really impressed. The power seems "soft" and it's not instant like on the BBB's. Then I gave another try to organic pads with these cheap THPC ones and they aren't worse than the Galfers, I'm actually pretty satisfied with them and not thinking of switching. I'm running a MT7 lever/MT5 caliper combo with which admittedly, not many pads will offer a bad performance though.

www.bikeinn.com/ciclismo/tfhpc-brake-pads-for-magura-mt5-mt7/137205194/p
  • 1 0
 @juanmallorca: So the two other pads I mentioned cost around 15€, the Galfer ones are 25€ or more, the increase in price isn't reflected in the performance at all.
  • 2 1
 Look on the back of your Hope pads...and what does it read? ;-)

I use them with MT7s, red back for winter/wet, black for summer. The reds are good but the blacks arent quite as good as Magura OEM pads for feel and longevity but they are cheaper at RRP
  • 1 0
 Why are MTB rotors drilled and scalloped/waved?

The article mentions in the bump from 1.8mm to 2mm thickness that the reasoning is for more rotor material to improve thermal dissipation. Wouldn't having a solid rotor surface be more effective as it would greatly increase the surface area for heat dissipation as well as contact area with pads.
  • 1 0
 @haen the holes and the wave shape create a self cleaning action as well as increase surface area. When implemented correctly, the holes and waves will pull moisture and debris outward expelling it from the system. More surface area will allow the rotor to shed heat faster when off the brakes (the thicker rotors utilize more mass to allow the rotor to absorb more energy when braking before the rotor experiences heat-related problems).
  • 3 0
 Metal cools best at the edges. Think of like a heatsink or a radiator, they are finned. It also increases airflow through the rotor. Think of motorcycle brakes or brakes on a performance/race car. They are drilled or slotted for the same reason.
There are also gases that release off the pads as they heat up/wear down. Same principle applies to water in the wet. It's not a huge amount but it needs to go somewhere. On solid rotors those games can actually form a small barrier between the pads and rotors
  • 2 0
 Sorry hit submit before I was done. Having holes/slots/waves in the rotors gives those gases a place to escape.
  • 2 0
 @grldm3: A heat sink or radiator isn't finned just to add more edges, it's to add surface area, because more _surface area_ equals more heat transfer.

"Metal cools best at the edges" could be considered true only because at a corner there is more _surface area_ relative to the amount of thermal mass nearby.

Sharp edges that concentrate the heat could actually be bad if it gets hot enough. It can be an issue in cars that aren't driven often, when the pads leave a slight rust ridge from sitting against the rotor and then that rust line gets heated up more than the surrounding rotor, and that heat hardens the ridge, so it heats up even more under braking, and hardens, rinse repeat. EBC or somebody mentions this in their website's tech section.
  • 2 1
 @mechaNICK It looks like a ridiculous amount of surface area is lost with this design! I guess it's all a tradeoff.

@grldm3: My initial post was inspired by a pretty length video on braking systems by PFC which provides the brakes for Porsche's cup cars: youtu.be/Q8eCcPVSeVc

Almost all of your points are refuted by the video. Granted, MTBs are not the same as cars. I'll summarize the video for you since it's almost an hour-long:

Off-gassing is not an issue with modern pad compounds.

Drilled rotors remain popular merely for aesthetic purposes as off-gassing is no longer a thing. Drilled rotors are actually weaker than solid rotors as cracks can form at the holes as the metal expands and contracts.

Slotted rotors are designed to clear the surface of the brake pad (analogy in the video is to think of the slots as a cheese grater that slices off a very thin layer of the pad). Any modern race car that uses iron rotors has a slotted disk design, not drilled.

Regarding cooling at the edges, I think @justinfoil has that one covered.
  • 2 0
 @haen: sorry been busy with work. You're right, but you're also missing a couple things. PFC (great brand of brakes) is correct in everything they said, but it's not a direct crossover.
I specifically mentioned drilling because I mentioned motorcycle brakes. On a vented car rotor drilling is more of a liability, but look at race motorcycles and you will see drilling or cutouts. Because they are solid rotors (as are mountain bikes). I said cooling at it's edges and not surface area because surface area by itself is not the only equation to effect cooling. Brakes are air cooled. Look at anything air cooled and a large flat surface is a very inefficient design for cooling. Air flow matters just as much as surface area and anytime you can get air flowing through something you will be better off than just having air blow across the face of something. Thats why motorcycles still use drilled or cutouts in their rotors. On a vented rotor, which these aren't, it's unnecessary.
Off gassing is very much still an issue with off the shelf compounds designed to operate at ambient temperature. On race pads that will go to 1000+ degrees sometimes it's not an issue, but mountain bike pads don't fall into that category.
The other thing is surface area by itself makes little difference if you have to increase the mass of the product to increase surface area. Larger mass takes longer to cool down. So (random numbers but the point still applies) if galfer decreased decreased mass of the product by 40% and decreased surface area by 25% with these large cut outs, then they will cool better.
Not disagreeing with anything PFC said, I've ran their pads on my track car and they really know their stuff. But little of it applies when talking solid rotors vs vented and pads designed to run at ambient temperature as opposed to race pads that need to be brought up to temp.
Look at motorcycle brakes for a closer comparison and Galfer happens to be one of the top manufacturers in that category.
  • 1 0
 @grldm3: Cool! Thanks for the detailed response.
  • 1 0
 I'm interested in the 2.0 thick rotors for a number of reasons but have been a diehard Shimano Ice-Tech rotor user for a while. Since my rides do contain heavy braking and heat shedding is important, I wonder how even thicker rotors able to absorb more heat will compare to the Ice-Techs?
  • 1 0
 The thicker, (more mass to heat up) rotors should be better able to handle more braking heat in a single instance, ie: slamming on the brakes hard after a drop to make a sudden turn, where the ice-techs could stay cooler in prolonged braking situations where they have more time to handle the heat input and also keep getting air flowing over the fins,
  • 1 0
 Good news for Team Canada on Galfer accessibility issues and cost to buy on-line. NRG Enterprises has them available for Canadian Dealers as I type! Also their floating Rotors and "Standard" Pads which should have a better handle as they are great value for their actual performance!
  • 8 4
 Hope vented rotor: Hold my beer and watch this.
  • 5 0
 Even the standard hope V2/V4 non vented rotors are 2.3mm thick lol
  • 1 0
 @McMeta666: not true - 1.85mm with a wear limit of 1,6mm
  • 2 0
 Never used the rotors, but the pads (red ones) are amazing! Magura mt5 and the lever bite is consistent and always predictable.
  • 1 0
 Good to know. I'm running MT5 calipers on a couple of my bikes and haven't been thrilled with the Magura pads. I swapped in Kool Stop pads, which work well, but more options is always better.
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: I'm running shigura (Fabio Wibmer calipers and XTR 9120 levers) and the stock 8P performance pads were decent at best. I've heard the race pads are great but that'sjust an insane price they charge for them. Galfer ebike or mtx braking gold have been amazing in them though.
  • 2 2
 @grldm3: Yeah I have MT5s mixed with XT levers and have tried three different Magura pads and was always disappointed. I had one set that didn't even last an entire muddy ride. I put them on that morning, went out and rode in some pretty bad slop and by time I was about 3/4 through my ride I had no friction material left on my rear and only a sliver on the fronts. FWIW the Kool Stops work really well and seem to last. They're a little abrupt on initial pull, but if you know that's coming, it's easy to work around.
  • 1 0
 I've had good luck with this company in the U.S. Purchased 3 different Sram replacement pads over the last year, resonable $ with quick shipping, in stock, worked as advertised. Seems pretty good for 2020-21.
  • 1 0
 In stock and doesn't immediately fail is better than a lot of companies in the bike industry are doing right now.
  • 3 1
 Good thing NRG picked them up. Canadians can keep supporting their LBS, ride a Spanish made product, all while riding a superior product.
  • 2 0
 "Galfer, who are Spanish braking components manufacturer..."

Henry is saving up to buy an indefinite article. Brian hoards them all in a locked safe.
  • 4 0
 Bloody hell, on the very first line as well. No excuses for that one! Haha.
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney: He's got Levy stashed in there too. Locked up with nothing but a bunch of down county bikes and a word processor.
  • 1 0
 I run Galfer rotors in my Zees with normal metallic pads (H03C). Will any of the Galfer pads fit the Saint/Zee calipers? Guessing they won't but would love to try them.
  • 2 0
 Read the very first comment, I think he might be able to help.
  • 2 0
 Yes. Any of the 4 piston shimano pads from them will fit.
  • 2 0
 Green pro pads are literally the fastest wearing pads I’ve ever used. Shot in one weekend.
  • 1 0
 Can confirm. But they are great pads while they last!
  • 2 0
 @bocomtb: same. Green are kind of like that bear that overdosed on cocaine. Didn't last long but they were wild while it lasted. I used to run galfer road (galfer were the ones who recommended them) because they trade some of the heat capacity for a really long life while having a lot of power. Only time I noticed any fade was on a single fire road descent. Other than that they did great in the bike park. Now I run mtx braking gold or galfer ebike.
  • 1 0
 I gotbsome MTX pads for my gravel bike, and they seem great, but cost much more than these. I was thinking of upgrading my mtb with those, but i wonder how these compare.
  • 1 0
 Rotors have been flawless and haven’t warped a bit. The pads crumbled and fell apart the first time I put serious heat through them (code rsc fitment).
  • 2 0
 Galfer rotors and the cheapest black pads on Saints, just great
  • 2 4
 uber race matrix pads for as long as they are available nothing comes close! and i dont get that thicker metal cools faster heat some 10x10x1mm steel sheet till glowing red and after ten minutes of cooling it will be at room temp heat a block of 10x10x10 inch steel till glowing red and go pick it up after ten i bet you wont hold it for long?
  • 9 0
 You're approaching it the wrong way. The energy that you need to glow the 10x10x10 is much higher than that of the 10x10x1, so there's more energy to dissipate.
Now think, If you heated both pieces with the same amount of energy ¿Which would be hotter after a while? The one with the biggest area in contact with air will be able to dissipate heat faster. That's why usually engines or CPU computers have fins surrounding them, to increase the outer area and help with heat dissipation.

Hope that helped!
  • 2 0
 True, but it will take tons of time to get it that hot, and that's the point.
  • 3 0
 It's all about thermal mass.
  • 3 0
 The thin piece will both heat up and cool down faster than the thick piece. With rotors, this means that the thin rotor is more easily overheated than the thick one.
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: yes, but that's not what the article said. They only said more material to dissipate heat, which implies more surface area, which an extra 0.2 mm of thickness does provide, but not much. That extra 40 grams of mass that needs to be heated along with the rest is certainly a big part as well.
  • 1 0
 @flon: yea i get that but why then did the saint rotors with cooling fins not work? i melted the aluminium out of the centre of mine coming down super morzine and for some reson they seemed to work better after probably due to the fact the braking surface was ruined and blue? simple fact is once heated more mass will take longer to cool? take motorcycles for instance in the seventies they had front rotors that were big and really thick if it was an advantage why do they run such thin discs these days?
  • 1 0
 @markbe: No idea about the Saint rotors, never used them, but the fact that they didn't work doesn't mean fins don't work when properly designed and executed.

Regarding your melted rotors working better afterwards, no idea about what happened there either, assuming you didn't lose any mass, maybe it had to do with the braking surface rather than heat dissipation, but again this is all just hypotheses.

"simple fact is once heated more mass will take longer to cool?" Not really, more mass heated to the same temperature than less mass of the same material will take longer to cool because the amount of energy required to heat it is bigger. Think of boiling a 5" diameter pot of water in a fireplace, and then think of trying to boil one of 500" diameter in the same fireplace. The bigger one will need much more energy (e.g. Much more lumber to keep the fire going for a longer time) in order to boil it. After 5 minutes of boiling the small one you couldn't put your finger inside of the water without hurting yourself but you could do it on the bigger one, so more mass receiving the same amount of heat will be cooler than less mass.

About the motorcycles, that's due to overall improvement of the whole braking systems: Better materials on the rotors that dissipate faster, more powerful braking circuits that need less surface, etc. Every technology improves with time and then has to find a balance. Think of the first cellphone ever, super bulky and heavy, inconvenient. Cellphones are much slimmer now, but, the thinnest the better? You'd come to a time where you wouldn't want a phone so thin that it would compromise its stiffness to much and could bend just be simply wearing it inside your pockets, you need to find a balance between thickness and rigidity, which is what I think happens with motorcycle brakes.

In the end, I think is good that some companies try to defy the stablished assumptions and try to improve the standards.
  • 1 0
 SRAM centerline 200mm at 207g with 1.8mm thickness, so better at heat management than galfer 2mm it seems
  • 6 7
 E-bike specific brake pads? Either complete marketing bullshit, or further evidence that e-bikes are very different than regular bikes and should be treated as motorized vehicles.
  • 1 0
 as an FYI, Magura rotors are both floating and 2.0mm. so there are options out there.
  • 1 0
 160, 180, 203, 223. One of these things is not like the others.
  • 3 1
 Actually they are all different.
  • 1 0
 @hmstuna: look again. the differences are the same for 3 of them, but there is a different difference for one, and that's silly.
  • 1 0
 Nice, another option for us Magura guys.
  • 1 0
 How many IPA's do I have to give up for 40g of rotational mass?
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