Everything You Need to Know About Norco's New DH Bike

Apr 19, 2018
by Mike Levy  



Alright, it's not really a ''first look'' given that we spotted Norco's new downhill bike, or an iteration of it at least, back in October of 2016. At the time, Sam Blenkinsop and a handful of smart people from Norco were testing the design at a mostly deserted Whistler Bike Park; mostly deserted except for one eagle-eyed rider and his potato phone, that is. And after much pestering on my part, Norco finally let me into their North Vancouver HQ in February of last year to see the prototype and throw a bunch of questions at their engineers.

Now, a year and eight months after the radically different (for Norco), high-single pivot, idler-equipped carbon bike was first spotted, and with a full season of World Cup racing under it, Norco has finally released details, production spec, and geometry for what they're calling the Aurum HSP Carbon Downhill Series.

There's a lot to cover here, but the main points include that the Aurum HSP's 200mm-travel suspension design is radically different to anything Norco's done before, and also that riders who'll fit on the M/L and L/XL sizes can choose either 27.5'' or 29'' wheels - there's a unique frame for each. Norco says that this was done so that riders can ''further fine-tune handling characteristics based on their riding style.'' Sorry, Stubbs, but you'll be on the smaller wheels if you aren't tall enough for the M/L; 27.5'' wheels can be had on the entire XS/S to L/XL size range. All sizes will get that nifty offset headtube insert that lets you tinker with reach and wheelbase numbers, too.
Aurum HSP Details

• Intended use: downhill
• Wheel size: 27.5'' or 29''
• Rear wheel travel: 200mm
• Fork travel: 200mm
• Frame material: carbon fiber
• High single-pivot w/ idler
• Head angle: 62.5-degrees
• Adjustable front/center (+/-8mm)
• 'Gravity Tune' size-specific rear-center lengths
• Locking main pivot
• Full external cable routing
• Weight: TBA
• MSRP: $7,999 USD (HSP 1); $5,499 USD (HSP 2); $3,299 USD (frame)
www.norco.com


Norco Aurum HSP
Norco Aurum HSP
The high-end HSP 1 (left) gets a $7,999 USD price tag, while the HSP 2 (right) sells for $5,499 USD.


There are two complete bikes to choose from, with the BoXXer World Cup and X01 DH-equipped Aurum HSP 1 going for $7,999 USD, and the Aurum HSP 2 selling at $5,499 USD with its BoXXer RC and GX 7-speed drivetrain. But don't forget that each can be had on 27.5'' and 29'' wheels, too, so there are actually four complete models to choose from.

And if you want to build up your HSP with parts of your choosing, a frame kit (incl. shock, headtube insert, axle) costs $3,299 USD.


Norco Aurum
Two production Aurum HSP 1s at this weekend's World Cup DH race in Losinj, Croatia.
Ross Bell photo

Suspension Design

If you're not familiar with Norco's previous bikes, the Aurum HSP's 200mm-travel, high single-pivot and idler layout is their first radically different, non-Horst Link bike that they've designed since 1995 when the FTS-1 was released. That's twenty-two years of Horst Link'ing... and now this, which begs the question: why the drastic change?

According to the press release, ''The high-single pivot design provides a rearward axle path, lengthening the wheelbase when the suspension is engaged and thus carrying maximum speed through the rough without compromising on control,'' which kinda matches what we've been told about high-pivot bikes for ages. It's also a theory that others have put to good use, of course, from Sunn to, more recently, Commencal, and a bunch of others in between.


Norco Aurum HSP
The high single-pivot delivers 200mm of travel on both the 27.5'' and 29'' wheeled frames.


What makes the HSP different to those examples, according to Senior Design Engineer, Owen Pemberton (who has since left Norco), is its suspension geometry, and particularly its progressive nature: ''The kinematics are so different in a way, and the forces that they generate are really high,'' he said when I questioned him.

The HSP's linkage actually works the opposite way to the bike you're probably thinking of, Commencal's Supreme DH V4. So instead of compressing its shock from below as on the V4, the A.R.T pull-link tugs on a rocker that compresses the shock from above to deliver 200mm of get-out-of-trouble.

''This design allows us to be so creative with the actual feel of the suspension, just by changing the linkages,'' Pemberton said last year. ''We've been through, on the computer, probably close to a hundred different iterations now. What we've actually prototyped is a first suite of four with very differently shaped curves,'' which is essentially doing bracket testing of sorts but with the bike's linkage rather than just shock setup.

All of that would have been much, much more difficult had they stuck to a four-bar, Horst Link design as used on Aurum, simply because its suspension elements do far more than only suspension-type stuff.
Norco Aurum

The high main pivot would also cause a boatload of chain growth and pedal kickback if Norco didn't use an idler pulley to route the chain up and over the pivot, which is why most of these types of designs require exactly that. It likely also has something to do with that time Blenkinsop was spotted running an interesting looking idler pulley add-on setup on his Norco Aurum at a New Zealand National race back in January of 2016. Norco also says that ''tailored anti-rise makes the bike squat under heavy braking to counteract the forward rider inertia.''


Norco Aurum
A better look at the Aurum HSP's linkage.
Ross Bell photo


Frame Details

This bike's predecessor, which also goes by the Aurum name, looks downright conventional compared to the HSP's ultra-low slung, swoopy frame. I mean, could the top tube drop down any more than it already does? If it wasn't for the fin-like seat mast, you might mistake the thing for an adult-sized run-bike on 'roids. The frame went straight from computer to rideable carbon prototype, which is a first for Norco and not how it's usually done. No steel or aluminum test mules, or even a rapid-prototyped model, were created; it was all or nothing... No pressure, though.

''It was when we were going through the whole process, it was like, 'I think we're going to be handcuffed to just go straight to carbon,''' Pemberton said when I interviewed him back in 2017. He was largely referring to the 'wings' that extend down from the swingarm to where the pull-links are attached, a part of the frame that, according to Norco, proved to be virtually impossible to prototype out of metal. It's probably safe to assume that there was more than just a bit of suspense as the first HSP frame came out of the mold.


Norco Aurum
Norco Aurum
Guards galore. There's the usual bolt-on downtube protector, but the HSP also has a guard up higher for protection from truck tailgates.
Ross Bell photo

The carbon frame is made using the same 'Smoothcore' mandrel technique that's employed to make some of Norco's other high-end bikes. In short, rather than using bladders that can sometimes not provide enough compaction in complicated areas inside the frame while it's in the mold, a heat-sensitive mandrel is placed inside that's said to apply more evenly spread pressure to the layup. This technique should result in a smoother surface inside the frame, hence the Smoothcore name.


Norco Aurum
Norco Aurum
The idler mounts directly overtop the main pivot.
Ross Bell photo

Norco is far from being the only brand having their frames made using this method, of course, but they are doing something else that's pretty interesting... Rather than building all the frame sizes with the same carbon construction, each size gets a unique layup. In Norco's own words: ''Size-Scaled Tubing enables our engineers to calibrate frame stiffness to the weight of the prospective rider by increasing tube profile dimension in proportion with frame size.''

So, because the large-sized frame is obviously longer than a small, it'd require more material than the small to meet rigidity requirements and vice versa. They're also using a resin that they call 'ArmorLite' during the bonding process that, according to Norco, is especially resistant to impacts. There's a bolt-on guard on the lower end of the downtube, too.


n a
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See those small reliefs (left) around the outer bearing race on these prototype linkage plates? That should make it easier to get the bearings out when the time comes.


When I visited Norco's HQ last year to learn about the new Aurum, they were especially keen to point out a few mechanic-friendly features that the prototype was sporting, and those have also been carried over on the production version, too. The locking main pivot, which should refuse to come loose, is clever, and they went with externally routed housing front to back to have upkeep be headache-free. More interesting are the small reliefs machined into the inner face of the bores that will make it easy to get the old bearings out.



Two Wheel Sizes, Two Different Frames

When I read that Norco was going to offer the HSP with both 27.5'' and 29'' wheels, I assumed that the frame was the same for both and the deed was done by way of a geometry adjustment feature of some sort. That'd be the most cost-efficient method, I assume. Instead, each wheel size gets its own front and rear triangles but, because Norco can change the pivot locations between the two, they can use the same suspension linkage (in an ever so slightly altered layout) regardless of wheel diameter. This is arguably a more optimized approach, of course, but there won't be any swapping between wheel sizes on the same frame.


Norco Aurum
Can you spot the differences? Rather than using some sort of geometry adjustment, Norco is making different frames for 27.5'' and 29'' wheeled Aurum HSPs.


The HSP's suspension isn't adjustable as far as different shock mounting points go, but the bike's geometry can be tinkered with by way of an insert at the headtube that changes the reach number by 8mm. If you do decide to go longer, you'll also be dropping the bottom bracket by 1.3mm, increasing the stack by 1mm, and the wheelbase by 7mm.

Geometry is, as you'd expect, all about going warp speed down steep, fast terrain. There's a 62.5-degree head angle across the board, and a M/L frame sports a 445mm reach with 27.5'' wheels (the numbers vary slightly on the 29er). You can also add 8mm with the aforementioned offset headset cup. One number that might stand-out to you is the HSP's rear-center length that probably looks quite short; it's just 420mm on the M/L. It's not actually that tight, though, because that measurement is taken with the bike's rear suspension fully unweighted and extended, just as with any other bike. But with such a high main pivot, the rear-center length is going to grow as the bike goes into and through its 200mm of travel, so 420mm at top-out is actually shorter than it'll be at its sag point.


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And speaking of rear ends, Norco is also doing size-specific rear-center lengths, something they call 'Gravity Tune' that was also used on the previous version of the Aurum and other models. ''Traditional frame designs disregard rear-center lengths when changing size, forcing riders to compensate over the bike,'' they explain. ''Gravity Tune adapts the front-center/rear-center ratio across all frame sizes, effectively optimizing geometry and rider weight distribution regardless of rider height,'' so the small-sized HSP gets a tiny 400mm chainstay length (at top-out) and Norco adds 10mm to the back end of each frame size up to 430mm for the L/XL.


Norco Aurum HSP
The bike was first spotted back in 2016, and since then it's gone through an entire season of World Cup and National events.


I think there are a few notable things to buried in the Aurum HSP's debut, aside from the bike itself. Norco is still one of the few companies that vary rear-center length for each frame size with their Gravity Tune geometry, and the different carbon layups for each size is also worth mentioning again. Most important, though, is that rather than including some sort of geo-adjusting add-on, they've gone and manufactured different frames for 27.5'' and 29'' wheels while also tweaking the suspension on each to keep the feel consistent. Having not thrown a leg over the HSP yet, I don't have a clue as to how it performs, but you can't say that Norco didn't cover the details.

So, what do you make of the Aurum HSP and its high single-pivot suspension design?


137 Comments

  • + 123
 I've come to crave the suspension squish videos...
  • + 32
 Non drive side suspension action videos should be the new “standard”
  • + 4
 Is anyone else curious how the shock will not hit the down tube on bit hits? Or is that just me
  • + 8
 seriously. i cant figure out how this thing works without a video of it cycling thru its travel. its messing with my brain
  • + 2
 either I missed it or this article is seriously incomplete
  • + 3
 seems like the rearend is pulling the shock against the BB
  • + 8
 @whitebuffalo: because the shock gets pulled away from the downtube. As the rear moves thru it's travel it pulls on that arm connected to the shock link. The shock link is pulled back which compresses the shock.
  • + 3
 @sooner518: similar to delta link. Pushes shock too toward the seat tube with the pull links
  • + 1
 @sooner518: check it out at 1:42... youtu.be/97NRrqrc5ZM
  • + 6
 And here's the craved suspension video for a better visualization of how the new design works: Aurum HSP suspension articulation video.
Thanks for all your feedback everyone! We really appreciate your input.
  • + 1
 @norcobicycles: excellent. thanks so much.
  • + 46
 I can only commend Norco for being willing to pursue performance at the cost of higher production and development costs while still keeping prices in check. (well, they´re as reasonable as a 7000$ bike can be)
It´s obvious a lot of brain power and passion has gone into this bikes development.
  • + 18
 It actually is not a bad buy, carbon frame, insane fork, great build... Pro bike MSRP under $10k
  • + 14
 @focofox37:
Yeah, i´m just a bit concerned by the fact 10000$ bikes have become the norm as fast as they have. Like, 6 years ago a 5000$ bike would have been top of the line and perfectly rideable too. Now all manufacturers move to 7000$ plus. All just because of carbon fibre which in most cases doesn´t even offer any performance gains. Here you only get a mediocre fork on the 5000$ "entry level" bike. I´m just a bit worried about this trend continuing, that´s why on the one hand i commend them for making prices "reasonable" (compared to competitors offerings) but on the other hand i just can´t get myself to call a 7000$ bike a "great" deal Wink
  • - 15
flag mollow (Apr 19, 2018 at 8:47) (Below Threshold)
 Since when are Boxxers "insane" forks? Nowhere close to Fox or DVO or Manitou. Actually the last double crown fork I would buy aftermarket is a Boxxer
  • + 16
 @mollow:
Oh so you have spent some time on the new Boxxer?
Not saying the old ones were great, but hard to judge a fork that came out this week.
  • + 5
 @Loki87: I wouldn't say the $5k version is anything "entry" level. Both steeds are race ready out of the box. The comment about the fork being insane was the $1800 price, to deliver that build well under $10k could be a step away from the $10k bike norm. Seeing something this high-end that far under can only help...

Preaching to the choir on the industry and pricing... "Keep MTB blue-collar"
  • + 2
 @focofox37: 2000 dollar for a golf stick is more crazier than anything I could imagine in sport
  • + 4
 @cikudh: I don't golf. I imagine that demographic might explain the $180/day ski lift ticket that we now have to suffer with, If left unchecked, rich people can f*ck everything up
  • + 5
 I can't bring myself to commend any of these bike companies on their carbon these days... they keep claiming that they are using new tech when it comes to tooling and manufacturing but as far as I can tell most of these processes and tooling ideas have been around for a couple decades at this point! I'll be impressed once companies start moving away from using mostly or only unidirectional carbon and start integrating more complex layup schedules. They used a new resin for impact resistance? Cool story bro... what about woven carbon with a layer of kevlar?! I just can't understand how anyone can justify the added cost of carbon frames these days when the added tech really isn't there...
  • + 3
 @focofox37:
Preach it -.-
Ski resorts with f*ckin wifi and heated seats to justify 60€+ ski tickets.
It´s the best way to turn a sport into an elitist circlejerk. Meanwhile they started charging those who go out on their own with touring skis a fee to ride.

Around here, bikeparks have increased prices by ~10€ since the e-bike wave hit. They´ve all built "uphill flowtrails" (yeah, that´s a thing...) and shit like that and realized those guys on the e-bikes and (most) enduro guys will pay any prices because it doesn´t matter for those 2-3 days of bikepark riding per year they do. Those who suffer from it are us, who ride 2-3 days a week..
I died a little inside today as i remembered how a year ago i had a discussion on how it would be beneficial to bring more people into the sport...
Oh what a fool i´ve been :/
  • + 5
 @Loki87 : Poor thing, you have to "suffer" 2-3 park days a week...
  • + 2
 @Davichin:
What can i say, somebody´s got to do it, right?
  • + 1
 The only positive I see from change is... it creates opportunity. The big resorts just get crazier and more expensive, could pave the way for someone to open their own Indy resort with no-frills. The rumors circulating the Rockies could turn into traction and turn into action. Just like the more expensive bikes got the more the door opened for Canyon and YT. Or how resort bike parks got expensive in Colorado, so now the municipalities have all built really awesome public parks...
  • + 32
 As a Canadian, reading about a Canadian bike on a Canadian website, is it too much to ask for Canadian MSRP?
  • + 1
 just go on their website bruv
  • + 4
 It makes the prices seem less painful. As painless as a $5000 entry level bike can be.
  • - 20
flag Gasket-Jeff (Apr 19, 2018 at 9:39) (Below Threshold)
 Norco is not based in Que or Ont. Pinkbike is not based in Que or Ont. so neither the bike or the web page are canadain. Nothing west of que is Canada. we have no political say, we just pay the bills for Canada.
  • + 4
 @Gasket-Jeff: Live to Play Sports is based in both Toronto and Vancouver.
  • + 2
 @Gasket-Jeff: come pay my hydro bill in Ontario then assclown...
  • + 3
 @mhoshal: Its called transfer payments. I do. AB has donated dollar per dollar everything que has collected. I pay for their free daycare while paying out my ass for daycare here. west has 0 political power and all the money. its effed up. your hydro bill is kept high to keep transfer payments high
  • + 22
 It seems that along with Polygon, the more innovative the suspension, the less "session-like" the bike.
...so it's got that going for it.
  • + 14
 Good for them! Trying something new is risky. I would love to try it vs a traditional, low pivot design.
  • + 13
 Norco Aurum Halal Snack Pack?
  • + 4
 Does the bike come in an enormous Styrofoam container instead of a bike box?
  • + 3
 Legit came here just for this comment.
  • + 9
 What an amazing bike! Blown away by the innovation and engineering from Norco to create this bike. Top of my list to replace my current DH bike. Can't wait to find out how it rides!
  • + 11
 I'll have to give the 'looks like a ...' joke a break. That bike looks sweet and fairly distinguishable from the Commencal.
  • + 9
 Holy hell that looks good
  • + 4
 I really like what Norco's doing these days.
Riding a Canfield Jedi right now. Can't say the move to a high pivot (from a Demo) was a huge game changer but I did pick up 1.5% more speed on my home course but that could have also been the move from 26 to 27 wheels. I actually noticed the rear wheel path more on tech like Goat's Gully than I do at high speed in the chunk. Seems to stabilize the bike nicely negotiating through the rock channels and such. I am looking for a bit more reach though and 29" wheels on a DH bike definitely intrigue me.
  • + 1
 The biggest thing you’ll notice between this and the jedi is the super progressive lev ratio on the norco, so prob a bit more poppy and playful. But it also has about 30-40mm less travel
  • + 7
 Norco, please make a trail/enduro version with 29" wheels and ~140mm travel and I will buy one. Thanks.
  • + 9
 Well, their Sight is exactly that
  • + 1
 yes!
  • + 2
 @franxxy: the sight is a horst link, not an HSP
  • + 1
 @franxxy: sight is not high pivot.
  • + 8
 Needs more chain.
  • + 4
 dual chain ftw
  • + 8
 FINALLY !
  • + 2
 Sick looking bike, is it me or maybe the angle of the second last picture? but that 29 looks like a huge bike compared to the 27.5.
Bikes are changing so much from one year to another sometimes hard to keep up with them all. LOL
  • + 2
 Sick bike! Awesome to see several brands reviving the HPP concept for their gravity bikes. But I wonder why they forego the floating brake that was common with earlier incarnations to lower the anti-rise force. Any ideas?
  • + 3
 I´ve ridden one of those bikes with and without a floating brake setup (old Balfa BB7). The whole thing has been blown up way too much back in the day really with Specialized pushing their Horst Link agenda. While there was a small difference to it, it came at the cost of a rather failure prone brake mount construction that also added a good portion of weight and complexity and could introduce a whole lot of new problems. So i guess they just figured out how to limit the effects to a acceptable level and therefore be able to forego the whole floating brake issue.
  • + 1
 @Loki87: Thanks for the feedback! If you run the models with and without the floater, you get wildly different anti-rise numbers, but I wondered how noticeable it is on the track, or if there is even some benefit to a high anti-rise number. What problems did you have with your floater?
  • + 2
 @chUNdah-luVAh-69:
Wll no particular problem in general, it´s just another set of bearings, something that can get relatively easy broken in a crash, get caught on something or just come loose and rattle around. You´d need a really well braced system so it is stiff enough and doesn´t get annyoing, which would inevitably add a lot of weight.

As for the numbers, it´s been quite a few years since i´ve owned that bike. All i can remember is experimenting with the floater and constantly switching around. I just never quite got that moment where i was like "yeah, the floater is obviously superior!". It was more like that the characteristics of the bike did change, but it was nothing holding me back or pushing me to ride any better. You just had to utilize the different ride characteristics and deal with the drawbacks of each option.
And as i said, specialized FSR marketing was HUGE back then. People in all forums were indoctrinated by it, which was the main course for me,a young lad of around 17-18 years at the time, to constantly seek to improve that "shitty single pivot" because people on the forums said it desperately needed the floater, yet i always felt like it didn´t do too much Wink
  • + 2
 There's no "limiting the effects" without some kind of brake decoupling assembly (physics of squat and rise is the same now as it was 20 years ago): high singlepivots like this indeed end up with higher anti-rise numbers and thus they will squat deeper into the travel under brakes and end up harsher under brakes as a result. It's more noticeable on steep+rough tracks (than other types) because you're forced to hold the brake while hitting the rough sections.

Keep in mind that not everyone necessarily understood how to design a floater correctly, a floater can be designed even to *increase* anti-rise beyond the amount the bike would have otherwise had - something that was done on Barel's 2005 championship bike for example. So you definitely can't correlate what a floater did on one bike to another (since they could do completely opposite things, not just small variations), unless you mapped the AR curve of both bikes in question WITH their specified floater design.

However, there is one huge unrelated factor that does make this less of an issue now than in the distant past - and that's big wheels. 650b and 29 offer inherently better bump absorption / rollover, and I think coupled with the rearward path and presumably progressive leverage curve, it's probably something you can get over for the other benefits.

@chUNdah-luVAh-69 high single pivots always end up being heavy bikes because of the idler assembly and other complexities, even small things like the longer chain - it all adds up. I can't see a frame weight listed for this, suspect there's a reason for that. Back in the day this wasn't such a concern since DH bikes were all super heavy, but in the current era (where a V10CC large frame without shock weighs ~3000g, from memory), we're at a point where having a bike THAT much lighter could realistically provide a bigger overall performance advantage than the axle path - especially given the aforementioned improvements in bump absorption with big wheels anyway. Given this: the LAST thing you would want to do is add even more weight to the frame - floaters are heavy.

Don't get me wrong - I think this is the coolest DH bike out this season, and it's awesome to see Norco stepping outside the box + keeping the price fair. I also think carbon is really important for a high pivot bike (to offset the weight gain a little bit against modern lightweight competition), so to me this bike (potentially) does something Commencal doesn't too.

I don't think the braking will be a big deal, I feel norco made the right choice on that front. I think it would be more important to check the frame weight - if that is reasonable then I think it would be a sweet bike. Hope this answers your question.
  • + 1
 @Loki87: people don't ride their brakes as much anymore.
  • + 1
 @uuuu: Longest pinkbike comment ever ! Aahahaha
  • + 1
 @uuuu: Appreciate the input! I was thinking of the common floater set up used to reduce anti-rise which is to have the floater arm parallel the swingarm line and have the caliper path just behind the rear axle path. Commencal mounts the caliper right above the rear axle on where Norco mounts it forward of the axle. I think the caliper placement relative to the axle path does change the anti-rise number. I was kind of wondering how they arrived at different caliper placements. And yeah, it’d be interesting to know if it was in fact a weight issue or they simply felt the braking performance was fine without it.
  • + 1
 @chUNdah-luVAh-69: Caliper placement should make zero difference to anti-rise calculation on a frame with a single-pivot swingarm where the caliper's position is rotationally fixed relative to the rear axle as the suspension moves through its trajectory. How could it? In this case all that matters is the IC location, and on a singlepivot, the IC is at the main pivot. If you want to see a bike with a high pivot that can control anti-rise without using a brake linkage, check out the Dark Owl DH frame. In fact, in your situation, I'd be finding accurate frame weight numbers for both the Norco and Dark Owl (along with the Commencal, which is around 4.2kg without shock from memory) before making a decision.

As for "fine without it" I think it's just a matter of choosing what's a better compromise: in an objective comparison frames like this *should* be pitted against frames like the V10CC (strong and ridiculously light) since they are for the same purpose - so it certainly makes sense to not add even more weight to an inherently heavier design.

I see it that you lose a little performance under brakes (and add a little weight) which is potentially offset by a bike that absorbs bumps much better and holds traction better in general. I think if you want the rearward axle path *and* the best braking performance, it's potentially better (for weight optimisation) to forget about a floating brake and switch to a 4 bar linkage like D.O. did. But I also like the use of carbon with Norco as it potentially makes the weight more competitive, keen to see an actual number!
  • + 2
 way to push the envelope Norco. I have 2018 range A3 29, it's the most dialed bike I have ever put my ass on. You can feel norco's passion and knowledge of the sport built into the bike. great job.
  • + 1
 Is it possible for any of these bike posts to have a square on shot of the NDS of the links? It's fantastic to see the chain guide that hasn't changed fundamentally in ages, and a nifty pully wheel for the chain, but damnit I can't see the pivot arrangement clearly to see how creative the bike is and get an actual feel for what this bike really is doing. Looks sweet, I'm stoked for the progression, but for us tech nerds out there, some simple pics of square layout makes a huge difference.
  • + 4
 Since when is Norco HQ in North Van?
  • + 2
 This is the second time in as many days as I've seen this posted on PinkBike. Unless I'm missing something their head quarters are in Port Coquitlam. If this is done intentionally to try and make it seem like they are on the North Shore then it seems a bit poor for something so easily proved to be incorrect.
  • + 4
 This is the sickest bike I've ever seen!
  • + 4
 Great job Norco!!! Everything is on point!!
  • + 4
 If only Balfa could have kept the doors open
  • + 2
 Exactly what i was thinking looking at my BB7 !
  • + 1
 I have the high pivot Supreme at the moment and I love it, but oh my id trade it in for that matte black 29er. Next bike is decided.
  • + 3
 Show us the suspension clip!!!!
  • + 2
 bet 26" will fit in the xs/s too with my set of canfield 155mm cranks it wont be too low either Smile
  • - 1
 That bike looks killer, especially with the red Boxxers. Not sure about that suspension system, though. I'm not an engineer, so throw my next comment in the the WTF do I know category -- but it looks needlessly complex, doing something different for the sake of being different. Or maybe it's the greatest, most innovative linkage in the history of linkages, and everyone else is just that far off the mark -- this is what was needed all along. I suppose that's also a possibility.
  • + 2
 I'm gonna f*ckin c*m... Best looking bike I've ever seen, new boxxer ties it all together!
  • + 0
 Looks bad ass Drool but I still wish this was made by Evil. Looks similar to their delta-link. Evil needs to bring back a DH bike!!!!
  • + 1
 I do not care how it rides, it looks like PURE FIRE!
Gun shot (blanks of coarse) !
  • + 2
 I'd give me left nut for one of those.....
  • + 0
 also in my opinion its kinda lame too have 2 different frames for the wheel sizes ... would be nice just too swap forks /wheels and some linkage :/
  • + 2
 Dude, there are so many sick bikes comin' this season! Stoked!
  • + 1
 All I need to know about any new DH bik coming out is that it DOES NOT LOOK LIKE A FKNG SESSION!!! Thank you Norco...
  • + 2
 No bottle cage??
  • + 1
 1 ... 2 ... 3 ...

Where does the cage bottle go?
  • + 1
 (extremely mosquito-whine voice) looks like a Commencal
  • + 0
 Suspension Linkage:

Oh - now I understand - it is Scott Gambler - Downlayed...
but they just moved away from it---
  • + 1
 That's a weird looking water bottle.
  • + 1
 How is the 29er wheel base 5cm LESS that the 27.5 bike?
  • + 1
 The Frankenstein has two wheels
  • + 1
 I like it. I want to see more
  • + 1
 It's an uglier carbon version of the DH V4... I'll take 2, please.
  • + 2
 Sick!
  • + 1
 dat linkage... what the actual fuck
  • + 1
 Wonder what the hub spacing is? Only saw that the front is 110 boost.
  • + 1
 Yeah, considering the Old carbon Aurum is 142*12, I'd like to know if the new one is the same, or if its boost, or if it's 157, or 157 super boost, etc.
  • + 1
 It's 148mm (boost) according to their website @j-t-g:
  • + 1
 It's 142 for the 650B and 148 for the 29"
  • + 2
 @False I must acquire.
  • + 1
 you need to
  • - 2
 my only quam- keeo the rear end at 400mm for all sizes ! bikes are already so damn long with the new top tube lengths and big whels /slack headangles ... there isnt alot of riders who would want a longer rear end i bet !
  • + 2
 Balfa BB7 2.0 ....
  • + 1
 Looks quite like a moto trials bike.
  • + 0
 what is that chainstay, bikes are jokes now days
  • + 2
 did you not read the article? This is a rearward axle path so at 50% sag youre most likely looking at a 445 CS. Anyways its not the bike, it's the rider, and it's SUPER refreshing to see a race bike that can also just have fun in the park. Thats what biking izzz about
  • - 2
 Seems the weight of the shock and linkages themselves would provide some unwanted feedback as the rider hits bumps, and those things are flopping around.
  • + 2
 doesnt seem to affect blenki, he's on fire this season.
  • + 2
 @heyburn: It's possible they've orientated the last linkage so it's vertical when the rider and bike experience the most g's (a specific point in the travel). It's also possible the feedback is negligible and can be ignored.
  • + 2
 @spankthewan: also the average center of gravity of the bike is low and in the middle so it's not really an issue.
  • + 1
 why did he leave tho?
  • + 0
 When a Gambler and a Commencal had a few drinks...
  • + 0
 too much links, too much to understand the sistem
  • - 3
 How about an M/L size frame with 400mm chain stay length? That must be fun.
Can't understand why Norco designs larger frames with longer CS length, shorter CS length means smarter, does't it?
  • + 4
 Short chainstays are dead, bruh.
  • + 1
 want
  • + 0
 Looks like an....E bike
  • + 0
 461 for a XL reach?
  • + 5
 hpp bikes dont need a that long rech
  • + 3
 @jonaslp1:

Tall people do.
  • + 1
 @jonaslp1: Having owned Jedis from M to XL I couldn´t disagree more.
  • - 3
 I'm so sick of RockShox... 10 fucking grand CDN and you don't even get Fox
  • + 0
 thats because the new Boxxer wc is probably better than the 40
  • + 1
 @heyburn: when has the Boxxer ever been better? Not about to change
  • + 1
 @heyburn: besides its not even that new its the same old recycled shit
  • + 2
 @mollow: ya well pick your poison, personally I prefer the smaller chassis of the boxxer but I can see why a 40 is considered as a premium
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