Nordest Cycles Introduce New Bardino 2 Steel Enduro Hardtail

Dec 11, 2019
by Dan Roberts  
2020 2021 Hardtail Check Out

Nordest Cycles are a small brand based out of the Canary Islands, where you can ride all year long, and produce hardtails for almost all eventualities from gravel and bike-packing to enduro racing. The latter being proven in such enduro series as the Finnish Hardtail Enduro Cup, where it was the champion, with a rider on it of course.

They make their frames out of either titanium or chromoly steel and a few of their frames even include gearboxes. Experienced frame builder, Pedro Jerónimo, is one of the guys at the helm and his latest model is the Bardino 2 that builds on their original Bardino hardtail introduced 2 years ago. This was their best-selling frame, and has aggressive trail riding and enduro racing at its steel heart.

If Nordest's numbers are correct, then you should never be too far from one of their Bardino hardtails. With 600 sold to 46 different countries in 2 years it shows the popularity in the frame. Not big numbers in comparison to your more corporate brands, but mightily impressive given the size of Nordest.




2020 2021 Hardtail Check Out
2020 2021 Hardtail Check Out

Frame Details

Made from 4130 chromoly steel and using double-butted tubes, the Bardino 2 is designed around a 160mm fork, but allows anything from 140mm up to 170mm. There's space in the frame for up to 29 x 2.8" or 27.5 x 3" tyres depending on your preference.

There are neat replaceable thru axle dropouts (12 x 148mm spacing) and they've worked on a new CNC chain stay yoke as an improvement on the previous frame. The headtube is made for a TR44 headset, allowing tapered forks to be used in the straight 44mm tube.

Cable routing is all external aside from the dropper post which enters the frame via a small port at the bottom of the seat tube. Seat post diameter is 31.6mm. The frame includes 3 bottle cage mounts, 2 inside the mainframe and one on the underside of the down tube. So you'll be sorted for hydration or even spares with a bolt on strap. ISCG tabs are on there too. It's a sleek looking frame with the top tube and seat stay generating a single line from head tube to drop out which gives good standover.

If the standard colour isn't your pick then there's a custom paint option available for an upcharge but if you can't find a colour that you like in the suggested RAL colour chart then there might be no pleasing you.





Geometry
There's no hiding from bad geometry with a hardtail. But one notable point is that in comparison to a full suspension bike, the geometry will move in the opposite direction when going through the travel. Head and seat angles will steepen and reach will increase. Also important is that the Bardino's geometry is stated for when the bike is sagged (20% on a 160mm fork), this is much more useful than the static geometry as the changes on a hardtail when a rider hops on can be fairly significant.

Frames come in M, ML and L sizes with reach numbers ranging from 444mm to 485mm. Nordest offer a sizing guide ranging from 168cm to 193cm (5'6" to 6'4"). Head angle is generously slack at 64.5˚ and there's a 75˚ seat angle too.

425mm chain stays are, well, 425mm. You can make your own call on if that's on trend or not. But it should give relative ease in pulling some wild manoeuvres in the woods or manualing through puddles. Do they get puddles in the Canary Islands? BB drop is a plentyful 55mm and should result in around a 309mm BB height with 27.5 x 2.8" tyres and a 322mm BB height with 29 x 2.5" tyres.






Frame Kits & Price

The Bardino 2 is available as just the frame, including the seat post clamp and rear axle, or as a frame kit, including Cane Creek 40 headset and a choice of Fox 36 Factory or Marzocchi Z1 Bomber.

If you're in the EU then the prices include shipping. Custom painting is €150 extra.

• Frame Only – €599 (≈$664)
• Frame Kit with Fox 36 Factory – €1,578 (≈$1,749)
• Frame Kit with Marzocchi Z1 Bomber – €1,279 (≈$1,417)


More information at Nordest Cycles






115 Comments

  • 69 0
 Problem with aggro hardtails made from steel, they last too long. Have one now für 3 yrs and it wont fade...why buy another?
  • 60 0
 N+1 bro, N+1.
  • 14 3
 Geo changes. My modern 2013 hardtail looks like a museum piece compared to my modern 2019 hardtail. I kept the 2013 bike, set it up SS and use it to get around town for urban assault. The 2019 bike is so much more "aggressive" and so much more capable on the trail it's hard to want to ride the 2013 rig on dirt anymore.
  • 15 3
 Chromoly is bulletproof. Hard to justify buying anything else for me. Had 2 aluminum bikes, one broke in half, the other ovalized the headtube, and dented the chainstay (and the second one was NOT a cheap bike, and had EASTON tubing). Probably will never buy anything other than chromoly again. Additionally my first adult bike was a 550$ chromoly Norco that held up well, well beyond it's intended use. Complain about weight all you want, exotic materials all you want, but I honestly just would rather my bike didn't break.
  • 5 0
 My .243 from 2003 is still running
  • 4 0
 @vikb: absolutely agree about geo changing, this makes a huge difference. It will be interesting to see how much geo changes from where we are at now. I couldn't imagine future hardtail geos getting more aggressive, but who knows!
  • 3 0
 @vikb: SS is the best for old HTs as the seat tube angle makes no difference when you're stomping on the pedals up hill. As long as you have a 44HT you're good with an angleset.
  • 3 12
flag 62mphEbike (Dec 11, 2019 at 8:18) (Below Threshold)
 Most older bikes have outdated geometry that makes them essentially dangerous for aggressive riding. The lack of a progressive approach to geometry really held the sport back for years and now there are a million old hardtails out there that are basically scrap metal.
  • 4 1
 The industry rear axle update in 2021 to 13x149.725. LOL
  • 2 0
 @JDFF: I think we are now at the point where you can tweak geo with angle sets. The only change maybe that rears get longer.
  • 13 0
 @cxfahrer I thought the same thing until Sunday. Looks like I'm going to be shopping for a new frame soon...
www.pinkbike.com/photo/18072894
  • 4 0
 @piotrek21: ouch, thats one steep HTA
  • 3 1
 @fartymarty: I tried my hand at the 'on-the-fly' adjustable geometry trend that's in vogue now. I can say for sure that it's not for me.
  • 4 0
 @piotrek21: Did a tree help, or what happened?
  • 3 0
 The whole point of a good steel hardtail for me is to get one you really like and then be done with it. Just ride it, don't even think about how old it is or even care for what new is hot out there. If you like what you have now, what would make that you would no longer like it a couple of years from now? On my previous hardtail I always knew it was a compromise. I wanted my top tube low so accepted that I was riding a bike that was way too short. I've been riding that bike for ten years (and realize that some more stability could have saved me a good couple of nasty crashes). Now that I have that sorted, what else would I be looking for in a bike in the year 2030?
  • 3 0
 @JDFF: I would love to see someone test a modern aggro hardtail with a Motion E18 fork or Trust Shout or similar (are there any more out there?). These forks maintain the geo so much better through their travel it would make a new hardtail even more capable and fun to ride.
Anyone out there with this combo that can give us their experiences?
(Personally, a Ti hardtail with Pinion gearbox and Motion fork would light the forums and comments up! LOL)
  • 2 0
 @62mphEbike: use them for bikepacking, bar-bikes etc
  • 5 1
 @kiwikonadude: I admit having never ridden any of these forks mentioned but then again I have also never talked to a proper hardtail rider complaining that the geometry changes too much as the fork compresses. It is more as if it is something the "experts" would be telling those who actually ride their bikes. "Hey you're doing really well riding that bike but do you realize that your geometry steepens as the fork compresses? It is bad, you see." Then again I may not have talked to everyone out there (or well, pretty sure I haven't). But I view it like this. Usually you just keep your body in position and allow the bike to move underneath so as the bike pitches down doesn't necessarily imply the same goes for your own body. It may go for the passive seated rider but when you stand up it doesn't quite happen like that. And after all, the geometry of the full suspension bike is only preserved if both front and rear suspension compress the same amount. If they don't, geometry changes as well. I personally am very much not a full suspension bike rider and my experience (of obviously doing things wrong) is that as I shift my weight forwards to load the front for a corner doesn't just make the fork dive but also raises the rear end which I experience as much less comfortable than just the fork diving and the rear end staying where it is.

Obviously doesn't mean that a hardtail wouldn't benefit from one of those linkage forks. They might. My feeling (not experience) tells me it might feel odd having the front wheel move away from the bike centerline instead of towards it as the fork compresses with the wheel turned in one direction. For instance when riding steep switchback descends. Not sure whether it would be noticeable but it feels as if it would be counterintuitive. Still well worth a test.
  • 4 0
 @piotrek21: jeezus. You good after that?
  • 3 0
 @piotrek21: I did the same thing too a Voodoo bike once. Jumped over a small road and only noticed the stump in my landing spot when already in the air. Made the head angle proper steep. I mailed Joe Murray (the legend behind the brand) and he said geometry was no longer ideal but it should still be strong enough for riding. So I did. Was fun for a short while but it is true what they say, too steep head angles make your bike twitchy. It didn't snap off fair enough but then again obviously I wasn't really pushing my luck anymore with a head angle like that.
  • 3 0
 @nhtowa421: I'm mostly good. Collarbone is in a few pieces though, haha. I knew this bike would be bad luck. There is a graphic of a broken bone on the back of the sea tube!

@mmoon It was a case of touching down on the wrong side of a landing.
  • 2 0
 @artistformlyknowasdan: Mine as well, top tube a seems a little short now, but the rig is bombproof, and still killing it. Did my first 9' drop to flat on that beast way back when... STEEL IS THE REAL DEAL!
  • 2 0
 @kiwikonadude: one of my friends has a prototype Shand, 470ish reach and 64 HA I think, at 5 foot 10. Borrowed a Trust Message for about three months and loved it, apparently really interesting to ride. 27.5+ setup which helps keep the small bump grip the linkage forks can loose.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: agree. And its worth mentioning that an aggressive hardtail rider may tend to ride more nose heavy (intentionally) to utilize the fork a little more than a bike with front and rear suspension. Side note: I actually run my hardtail fork stiffer than the same fork on a FS, specifically because on a hardtail I'm relying on the fork more than on FS.
  • 2 0
 @JDFF: riding more `nose heavy`... I confirm, and that`s the key to really appreciate those machines.
When 3 years ago i passed from my Transtion TransAm 29er with a 68° HA to the 64,5° of my Stanton, that was weird, really weird, but once quickly adapted it`s such a great progress.... if you load more your fork :-)
  • 2 0
 @vinay: I ride a 160fs and a hardtail with a 120 fork. It definitely feels weird to me when the geo changes past about 100mm of travel on the hardtail, so I set it up stiff enough that I never use the last 20mm.

I suspect a lot of long travel hardtail owners do the same. For example "check out" the awesome "Czeck Style Hardtail" video posted to Pinkbike a couple of days ago. He takes massive hits, and it looks like he isn't using anymore than 2/3 of his travel.
  • 1 0
 @cxfahrer

Exactly; I have three of the damned things and still lust for more!!
  • 1 0
 @Kramz: So true.
  • 1 0
 @softsteel: yeah buddy! Glad to hear we have the same conclusion.
  • 1 0
 @softsteel: @JDFF: Ah yeah, that may imply what makes my riding style unsuitable for riding my full suspension bike. I really adopted a nose heavy riding style and it is perfectly fine for my hardtail but it just doesn't work on the fully. The rear end just keeps coming up when I really don't need that (steep switchbacks etc). Actually not just because of the fact that there is only suspension in the front but also because on my first hardtail, after half a year I got a better for and a hydraulic disc brake, but stuck with V-brake in the rear. Because the frame wouldn't take a disc brake and because I didn't want the reduced mud clearance the hydraulic rim brake would give me. So I just always relied on the front and let the rear go its own way. Previous hardtail frame was a DMR Switchback with about 375mm reach and 69deg head angle with a 130mm fork, current one is a BTR Ranger with 460mm reach and a 63deg head angle with a 120mm travel fork. Works really well for me. I can't see what future developments would trick me into replacing that one.
  • 1 0
 do you mean as long as the geometry trend that month or the
  • 1 0
 @dthomp325: you`re completely right. I`ve noticed the same detail on that video, and it was something I had to fight with at the beginning I had my Stanton
I ride a 160mm Suntour Auron RC2 on that Switchback... a good affordable and easily customable fork.
Initially I used it with 140mm travel, no token, and a firm set up. It was Ok but the nose dove too much in the steep, even with good HC/LC set ups. I added 1 then 2 tokens; was better but not optimum in the steep.
I changed to 150mm, with 2 tokens, and a smoother set up: it was better but I wanted something radical...
... so I finally went back to the 160mm initial travel, still 2 tokens, and a smooth-but-not-too-much set up, and I like it like that. I must have something like 25-28% sag, it works well negatively also because I changed the negative coil for a smoother - thank u Suntour ;-) and I use all my travel, minus the last centimeter.
The point is: I prefer to use more travel BUT with a subtle progressivity than using less travel and compensing the negative sagging effects with stiffer set ups. BUT!: it really depends on each rider`s style and terrain!!! Obviously: I ride a lot nose heavy, especially in the semi flat, and when I ride in the mountains, this set up gives so much confidence when attacking the steep Wink
  • 1 0
 @piotrek21: ride into a tree, or something??
  • 1 0
 @dagzin: That was my guess too. He replied above that "It was a case of touching down on the wrong side of a landing." Under his photo he also commented "Front wheel didn't make it as far as the landing on a longish jump. As far as I can tell from my garmin the take off speed was like 25km/h."
  • 1 0
 Yes, because Dominik has little more pressure in the fork. It is 140mm RST Rogue, but distance what you see is cca 155mm. 15mm is dead travel.
  • 20 0
 Sounds a lot like the Rootdown. I’ve got a Stylus, and I love it! I’d like to see Pinkbike review more of Chromag’s lineup.
  • 3 0
 Yeah, unless it’s a long and/or gnarly day the Stylus is my favorite after-work ride.
  • 1 0
 I was about to pull the trigger on a Rootdown, and now I'm very close to grabbing one of these instead.
  • 2 0
 @harryhood: don’t think you’ll be disappointed either way. Ride the hell out of it. Wink
  • 12 0
 I was going to make a snaky comment about overpriced steel hardtails, then I got to the bottom of the article and......the price is reasonable!!

This seems like an ideal candidate for a "I have a bike's worth of spare parts already" build.
  • 3 0
 Exactly what I did with my cotic bfe 26". So many nice parts finally ended up on a newish geometry hardtail. And it was only 350 quid as well.
  • 10 2
 Everyone seems to love aggressive steel hardtails. I guess I need to ride one and see what all the hype is about. On paper I just don't get it, so I must be missing something.
  • 11 2
 r u cereal?
  • 10 1
 Congrats on being open minded. Your experience will probably depend on the trails you ride and what type of experience you are looking for. It is also very important that you have a modern geo hardtail to ride. You cannot compare an old hardtail from 2012 to a 2019 6" suspension bike. Your geo needs to be apples to apples, if that makes sense. For what its worth hardtails will go anywhere, just slower in the high speed chunk. They will make you faster and save you $$$$ and give you serious trail cred.
  • 4 3
 And yes, steel (or ti) matters. Absolutely no carbon or aluminum for this sort of thing.
  • 4 0
 My friends were sceptical about my steelie, but everyone who's ridden it is positively surprised. That being said, they are not for everyone. Find someone who has one and ask for a short rip on it, you're gonna like it or not - you'll know after riding it.
  • 6 0
 You're missing an aggressive steel hardtail in your stable. DO IT.
  • 2 3
 It's about rider engagement I guess. If my Stumpy Evo is a Mitsubishi Evo X, my NS Eccentric is a Honda S2000.
  • 5 0
 A steel hardtail is my one bike for everything (Pipedream Moxie - quite similar to this frame). If your trails aren't rocky you will be surprised how comfortable a good steel HT can be.
  • 1 0
 @JDFF: I get your Aluminum(I have an AL hardtail, and am okay with it) critique. Does a carbon frame also give no flex/smoothing?
  • 4 0
 @joshroppo: I rode a carbon Transition Throttle awhile back. To me, it felt too springy with no dampening. Every bump wanted to pop the back end up. Chromoly is much better at controlling flex.
  • 2 0
 @BeKwik: Ahh interesting. So it takes, but then gives back just as harsh. Good considerations, thanks.
  • 3 0
 @joshroppo: for an aggressive hardtail, I have found carbon to be too stiff for frame (and wheels). Carbon frames I have ridden include the Vanquish and Honzo, didn't care for them, too harsh. FWIW, I notice a difference between different types of steel also, but a bad steel frame is still better than carbon IMO.
  • 1 0
 You must be missing a radical toy that will put a huge grin on your face Big Grin
  • 2 0
 I've had a bunch of bikes over the years. Sometimes I just want to try new bikes, sometimes I want to invest in the house I recently bought. So they come and go.
But the 1 bike I had and have ZERO desire to sell is a 2016 Kona Honzo Steel. 140mm fork, XT throughout and Flows. It's not worth much, nor does it get ridden nearly as much as my other bikes, but I can tell you this: when I ride it, even if it's just through town to run to the store, it feels like a big kids BMX bike. No other bike I ride makes me feel like I'm 15 again. It absolutely puts a smile on my face every time, even if those times are infrequent. It's the 1 bike I'll never sell.
  • 1 1
 @JDFF: I have owned both of those bikes/frames also. I agree they felt super stiff. I will say I have owned many other trail hardtails over the years also.
However I have now owned 2 of the current generation Nukeproof Scout Alum hardtails which I love. I am a firm believer it is the longer 440 ish stays that make the Nukeproof Scout stable, smooth and so good. 425-430 are too short for an "enduro" hardtail. It makes them harsh in rough conditions and twitchy and less stable at high speed. It is a trend that I hope ends soon.
  • 5 0
 I got a Ti hard tail a few months ago, the thing was too beautiful not to. Started out on HT and moved to full squish and never thought I would go back...and I haven't, I just added an aggressive HT into the mix with the same head angle as my 170 Enduro. I jokingly call it my winter bike but it does serve that purpose really well, less maintenance head aches etc and when you point it down the same trails it livens up the previously dull ones and makes a riot of the tougher ones. Line choice is a real and present concern, every ride is re-learning experience.

Yes its harder and yes it beats you up more over the miles but it climbs better (not amazingly) and....I dont know what it is exactly, its just great.
  • 1 0
 Lots of replies to my post which is neato. I would venture to guess I am not one of those folks that would enjoy a steel hardtail too much. One of my frequent riding pals has an aluminum 27.5+ hardtail and LOVES it, sometimes leaves his full squish 29er at home just to ride it. For me, I hate it. So I might just be intolerant to lack of rear suspension. To each their own. If i had a chance to ride a steel hardtail though without shelling out $$ to buy one up front, I'd definitely give it a shot.
  • 1 0
 @yupstate: suffer on the hardtail, improve bike handling, get faster on your full squish. Repeat.
  • 5 0
 "If the standard colour isn't your pick then there's a custom paint option available for an upcharge but if you can't find a colour that you like in the suggested RAL colour chart then there might be no pleasing you."

My partner and I here at the powder coating shop just had a chuckle over that line. That might have been true in the 80s but these days most customers don't choose an RAL. RAL powders are all full gloss and solid tone. People want different gloss levels, metallics, texture, other colors, etc and most suppliers offer a wide range of powders outside of the RAL.

My TransAm which shares some design elements with this frame is Tractor Green for example, not an RAL unfortunately because its a nice green!
  • 13 8
 It just makes me SICK looking at all these small companies aggressive steel hardtails
  • 6 0
 I C WOT U DID THERE
  • 5 1
 The delivery on this joke was SICK...
  • 2 0
 It makes us sick reading such bullshits
  • 1 0
 ???????????? #companyfailurebanter
  • 1 0
 Was it not Marino bikes who made the SICK frames though?
  • 3 0
 As an owner of the original Bardino, I can attest that these bikes are freaking amazing. Do yourself a favor and pick one up, they're gorgeous to look at, a blast to ride, and rare to boot.
  • 2 0
 Proud owner (and tester) of this frame for already 7 month (almost 2k km) and can´t be happier, what a beat. Had the opportunity to try the previous (and first) iteration of this frame www.pinkbike.com/u/elyari/blog/nordest-bardino-steel-hardtail-review.html">Nordes Bardino 1.0 and the difference is huge for the good ofc.
  • 1 0
 What are the biggest differences you've noticed? @elyari
  • 2 0
 @phazedplasma: main difference is related to the head angle (64.5 on the new one), almost 20mm more on the wheelbase for the L size and +10mm on the reach, in general I feel it more stable on harsh terrain, on fast rocky trails is a misil. My current setup is with 29 wheels and is crazy how I can get it on any tight switchback, the limitations are on my skills, this bike can handle everything. I was 1 week in Madeira back in September (look on my profile, there is an article published about the event I was in) and the bike handled everything. With a light setup you can have a pretty decent trail hardtail, throw a Lyrik (mine is new Debon Air 160mm), wide handlebars, good brakes and wheels and can shred any trail.
  • 5 1
 Still sleepy eyed I thought for a moment this was the advent give away. Darn it
  • 6 1
 where is waki and his rage against aggro hard tails?
  • 15 0
 "I hate when people do stuff I don't do and don't see the value in insert 5 minutes of incoherent rambling>"

Did I do it right?
  • 4 0
 was wondering the same thing but to a degree he is right. either you or the trails you ride have to be pretty special to make an aggro hardtail the perfect ride. even in my area with trails beeing not too gnarly my enduro with supergravity tires is faster up and down compared to my aggrohardtail as a bonus i get tired faster on it too.my 160mm fork is set up to travel 130mm max and on the dirtspot the kids say its a "Downhillbike not a Hardtail". sofar it also has not helped to hone my DH/enduroskills on the big bike. still love it and will not ever sell it.
  • 3 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: It probably won't be faster, but it'll put a bigger grin on your face.
  • 2 0
 He`s secretly buying one ;-)
  • 2 0
 and in case you want to own it FOREVER, they make a frameset with basically the same geometry in Ti, but call it the Lacrau

nordestcycles.com/en/product/lacrau-ti-frame
  • 2 0
 The lacrau has a pinion box too...
  • 2 0
 @rynee: there's also a TI version of the Bardino.
  • 1 0
 @Muckal: yep, and they all look very tasty Smile
unfortunately (or luckily) I currently have no need/room/excuse for another bike Wink
  • 1 0
 Serious question, maybe a dumb one, but, I don’t understand how reach would increase as a hard tail moves through its travel. Looking at the diagram, G is reach, wouldn’t that number stay the same regardless of how much form the bike has? I totally get that the HA and ST numbers change, but reach not so much. Can some bike nerd please explain.
  • 2 0
 *fork, not form. Looking at it closer, is it because the vertical line (on G on the diagram) remains vertical even if the fork is fully compressed, resulting in a 90 degree angle as shown in diagram? If that makes any sense.
  • 3 0
 That right angle has to stay perpendicular to the ground, so as the fork compresses and the whole frame is effectively rotating clockwise around the rear axle, that angle is not rotating with it.

So for reach (G), the vertical line would get shorter, and the horizontal line would get longer to keep the right angle between the BB and headset connected (since it can't rotate).
  • 1 0
 @brussell: gotcha. Quick reply. Nice work
  • 2 0
 Reach is the horizontal distance between the center of the bottom bracket and the center of the top of the headtube.

Basically imagine a line going directly up from the bottom bracket and directly horizontal from the center of the headtube. As a fork compresses, the reach increases because frame pivots from the rear axel and brings those points into a more horizontal relationship with one another.

Think of a clock. The bottom bracket is the center point. At 5 past the hour, our "reach" is the distance between a line up to 12 o'clock and the top of the minute hand. At 10 past, that distance is much greater. It's basically the same with a bike as the fork compresses (though it's not pivoting on the BB.
  • 1 0
 When the fork travel changes the whole bike basically pivots around the rear axle. The BB is below the rear axle so it will move backwards on the horizontal plane in relation to the rear axle. The top of the head tube is above the rear axle so it will move forward in relation to the rear axle. Viola the reach gets longer.
  • 1 0
 I have a Bardino with a 160mm fork. This bike rocks! I dont see much different though for V2.0 aside from the new drop out and maybe a bigger tire allowance as I think mine is pretty tight in the back with a 29x2.6. Regardless it's an awesome bike and I highly recommend!
  • 2 1
 Would be great to learn more about the warranty. Its hard for small brands to offer a lifetime warranty like the big boys, but I couldn't find any info on warranty at all. Translating their terms/conditions page to english provides a bunch of info on government-mandated "contracts", but its still unclear to me if that's a warranty or not.

Being chromoly, it should be a-ok but you never know! If I'm ordering something with $200 shipping, I'd like to know I'm covered for manufacturers defects for at least a year.
  • 4 1
 Funny how €599 equates to $664, but the new Mac pro of $5999 equates to €6499 ???
  • 2 0
 FX witchery!
  • 2 0
 I got the original Version of this frame. It makes a great bike, good fun, good quality. It's way more fun than a full sus on my mellow trails around here.
  • 4 0
 I've seen a lot of Nords in my time but this is the Nordest
  • 3 0
 Looks A LOT like a On-One DeeDar frame...
  • 2 1
 Almost an exact replica! Probably made at the same factory too.
  • 4 0
 Actually it looks a lot like any other HT with a diamond style frame. So? Not like a Session, though.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, as @muckal said, the resemblance to the deedar is limited to the triple triangle style. The deedar is quite outdated in terms of geometry. The large has shorter reach than the medium bardino.
  • 2 0
 love my meta cromo 2018 - only bike i can not imagine selling one day.
  • 2 0
 Weird thing that pinkbike has not yet reviewed the Pipedream Moxie MKII
  • 2 0
 Would love one, but my ankles going off drops wouldn't thank me!!
  • 2 1
 Certainly not getting a break on the fork price ordering the kit.
  • 1 0
 I like that frame. I will certainly consider buying that.
  • 1 0
 Love the colours, this is going to be an adventure...
  • 1 0
 I love that color. Wish it was on more bikes.
  • 1 1
 Looks neat, there need to be more agressive hardtails made from steel!
  • 1 0
 *fork not form
  • 1 0
 Love the color scheme!
  • 1 0
 Too many bike brands!!
  • 1 0
 Nørdest?
  • 1 0
 Looks like a blast!
  • 2 4
 Too bad no 26" option! Cash$$ on hand!





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