Nordest Cycles Introduces a Titanium "Enduro" Hardtail With a Pinion Gearbox

Mar 19, 2018
by j g  
Nordest Lacrau M1 Kit

PRESS RELEASE: Nordest Cycles

We are proud to introduce the new Lacrau Ti, a hardtail enduro bike with a Pinion gearbox integrated into the titanium frame. Based on the proven Nordest Bardino’s geometry, the Lacrau Ti offers either the 9 or 12-speed Pinion gearbox, allowing you to use either a traditional chain or a non-lubricated belt drive. This sealed gearbox brings comfort and reliability to an already proven set.

Nordest Lacrau Ti

• 65° head-tube angle
• Designed for a 160mm fork (up to 170mm okay)
• 425mm / 445mm chainstays
• Compatible with 27.5+, 29er, or 29+ (29x2.6) wheels
• Price: €2,197.52 – €2,354.55 (shipping included within the EU)

The Lacrau is manufactured from titanium Ti3Al2.5V double butted tubing. This material is lightweight and has a great elasticity and resistance to corrosion. The Pinion gearbox and its low centre of gravity make this bike a tough machine that will satisfy the most demanding riders: fun, silent, fast, and very versatile. The geometry has been tested by riders from all over the world with excellent results in different conditions. This frame has adjustable chainstays 425/445 mm, and is compatible with 27.5″+, 29″ or 29″ or 29″+ 2.60 wheels.

Nordest Lacrau Ti

This frame can be purchased directly on the Nordest Cycles website, and has a delivery time of 8 weeks from order confirmation.

Nordest Lacrau Ti

More info: nordestcycles.com

Bicycles designed with love for maximum enjoyment with the minimum of complications. At Nordest Cycles we design and manufacture titanium and chromoly steel bicycles, increasingly demanded by those who seek simplicity, low maintenance, traditional materials, and advanced geometry. The spirit of our company is inspired by the Northeast of Portugal, the wild Trás-os-Montes, an isolated and mountainous area.


156 Comments

  • + 66
 i hope we gonna get upgraded gearboxes soon with electric shifter (cable or wireless) it would made it so much better
  • + 31
 I'm going to back you on this. I'm normally not a fan of electronics on my bike but that should definitely make putting on a paddle shifter easier for companies. I am sure as time goes by, gear boxes will be the next step. They surely will become smaller and lighter to become a more acceptable replacement to the current drive train. Obviously, they will go through the r&d growing pains just like most components and materials. We've come from steel frames to alloy, to suspension forks, to ultra bikes made of carbon and witchcraft. Putting a battery on a derailleur is really not that huge of an advancement in my humble opinion. Could you imagine a all mountain/enduro bike sporting 160-180mm of travel, and a gear box and still weighting in at 30 lbs or less?
  • + 15
 Honestly this would be a fantastic project for someone interested in electronics. you could probably hack a Di2 shifter to work with a servo motor fairly easily. the only difficulty would be adjusting to 12 or 18 speed.
  • + 12
 @JPostuk: You read my mind man!! I'd be all over it if I could get a pinion box and some di2 bits for less than one million dollarydoos!
  • + 7
 There is definitely potential for more upgrades within gearboxes, wireless shifting would be amazing, perhaps carbon crank arms and gearbox casings could also save a couple of 100g and go some way to offsetting that weight penalty
  • + 3
 @ProChargedZ28:
>I am sure as time goes by, gear boxes will be the next step.

i dont think that on low/mid range they gonna replace derailleurs but actually competitive (by price or features) gearbox design for sure gonna force derailleurs manufactures to improve their products which then slowly trickles down to cheaper groupsets. and even while personally im not interested in running one right now i really hope they start becoming decent alternative
  • + 4
 @JoeRSB: I doubt you can shave much more weight from C-series magnesium alloy bodies without integrating the gearing directly inside the frame i.e. sans box. As for electric shifting I don't understand why Pinion has not already integrated some servo motor at gearbox forgoing double cables going to gripshifter at handlebars, but I guess they are working on it.
  • + 2
 @jollyXroger:
>I don't understand why Pinion has not already integrated some servo motor at gearbox

most likely price, they have much better chance of selling cheaper product, making it perfect (gearbox itself) and then investing money in improved controls and selling at two different price points something that is already tested and well regarded
  • + 0
 @Asmodai: I don't think competing on the price point or weight against derailleur systems is their strategy in the first place.
  • + 2
 @jollyXroger: yeah but they cant just slap a huge price on a fresh product and expect it to sell well. they made more money selling cheaper gearbox with simple cable shiftier which now they can invest into electric one
  • - 1
 Product shot next to some terrible graffiti,,,, oh hell yes I'm in!
  • + 2
 @theky1e: Surely you're over thinking this by trying to reverse engineer Di2 though?

All the pinion needs is a motor that moves the gear selector back and forward in set increments, and then two buttons and a battery to make this happen?
  • + 2
 @JPostuk: You could probably keep the cable drive and just have the servo pull the cable. Problem is where to put the servo. Downtube area is vulnerable. Within the front triangle might be good if it's possible to route through cables there.
  • + 4
 Considering how often I break my drivetrain I’d reallly want a gearbox bike
  • + 1
 @JPostuk: look for archer components www.archercomponents.com their system is suposed to work with any derralieur, maybe with some configuration could work with pinion gearbox too. and it is wireless!
  • + 1
 @thelittle: Derailleur systems rely on the spring tension of the derailleur in order to shift up through gears, and then it relies on muscular force from the rider's thumb to counteract the spring in order to shift back down the gears.

The Pinion box does not use spring tension to shift gears, instead relying only on physical force from the rider's muscles to shift both up and down the gears. This is why Pinion currently use a gripshifter instead of a trigger shifter.

The Archer system would indeed be a step in the right direction for e-shifting, but would require some development before it could be used with a Pinion box.
  • + 0
 @jollyXroger: They seem very careful to release products that are thoroughly "finished", i.e. tested, vetted and improved until they work well. My theory is that they are a small company driving this currently niche market, so they don't want to make a bad decision, turn people off and then lose their business.
  • + 1
 @JPostuk: I'm interested in buying an Archer components electronic shifter to play with but $300 is a lot of money to spend on something that is likely not open source...
  • + 2
 @JPostuk: considering trying to do this to use my left road di2 shifter work for a dropper on my 1x gravel setup
  • + 2
 Im still confused as why they use grip shift? Effigear uses a sram trigger shift!! the only thing holding me back from gearbox is that stupid grip shift and effigear already proved they can do it with trigger shift! im ready for gearbox bikes bring on the FUTURE!!!!
  • + 0
 @excavator666: Effigear already use a trigger shift for their gearbox! Do you know why pinon is holding on to that stupid grip shift?
  • + 1
 I don't understand why they can't make a trigger shifter for these. I understand that the cable has to pull in both directions but a realively simple redesign could take care of that pretty easily. And at this point the gripshit is the main thing that's holding me back from them. Still not a fan of the electronic shifting idea even for these until the classic trigger shifter idea has been exhausted
  • + 1
 @rockchomper: It's a possibility that the gearbox has been modified instead of the trigger shifter. I'm not 100% sure. Either way, there has to be spring tension somewhere in order to use a conventional shifter.

I've been rooting for gearboxes ever since I heard about them years ago. The only thing really holding back Pinion at the minute is the stupid grip shifter.

In time, the weight of gearboxes will come down, but it doesn't matter how light they get, most people just won't want to use them if they have a grip shifter. You would think that they would realise this and sort it out.

The guys at Pinion and Effigear obviously know their stuff, so perhaps it's just more difficult to implement in the Pinion system.
  • + 3
 Effigear and Pinion apparently use different shifting mechanisms.

I think it was mentioned in a Pinion article here on Pinkbike that they test the gearboxes using a motor to drive the 'pedals' and a brake instead of a rear axle and use another motor for shifting. Which shifts just fine with no letting up on the 'pedal' power.

That's supposedly because the motor is strong enough to shift under power. It's not the mechanism that necessitates letting up while pedaling to shift on the Pinion, it's the rider's shifting strength. With electronic shifting, it might be possible to shift under load.

As for the mechanism, they use a large ring to which sables attach and then turn a central sprocket, attached to the shifting mechanism via a planetary gear system. Throw all of that away, put a large gear on the end of the mechanism and a stepper motor with a worm gear on it perpendicular to the pedal axis, connect it to some logic and two buttons et voila! Electronic shifting.

It should take an mechanical and electrical engineering duo, who know what to do (which is really not that hard for someone working in automotive firms making small actuators) about a week or two to bang out a rough prototype design. If given a full time project like this, functional prototypes could be on the bikes in about a month, given fast lead times for components (machining and/or printing some parts). It would be rough of course, the button pod would likely be ugly as hell, but it should work.

EDIT: as for integration, it doesn't make sense. It'd be a pain to service if anything went wrong. Given current design it's easy to take it off and send it off to have it serviced.

Maybe it'd be possible to do frame mounts where the plate wouldn't be needed, but i wonder if that would bring any weight savings at all.
  • + 1
 All you bitchers bitched about deraileurs. Cry’d and moaned for gear box bikes.
Now there’s lots of gear box bikes. Which I’m sure none of you bitchers are ever going to buy.
And now your bitching it should have electronic shifting?
Ha Pinkbike!
  • + 0
 @jflb: given Eagle, i doubt if i'd go for a gearbox. They are still very intriguing though.

As for many bikes, there was the Alutech that wasn't as expensive. Otherwise you have Geometrons, Zerodes, which are carbon, and not a Ti hardtail. All three options are jolly expensive.

But it makes sense, niche products on niche bikes. YT making a Gbox bike would probably not make any financial sense :/
  • + 1
 Oh, forgot to mention, i still think Pinion is THE MOST SENSIBLE platform to make an e-bike. All you need to do is mout a motor into an enlarged casing to the front of the gearbox (where you have space frame wise) and figure out where to mount the battery. But no, they are promoting e-hubs as their electric bike solution.
  • + 1
 @jflb: MTB gearbox tech is still in it's infancy. There are still elements which need to be developed before people will fully adopt it as a replacement for the derailleur.

@Primoz I love your hypothesis on how integrated e-shifting would be incorporated into a gearbox. In regards of servicing, you would hope that they could make the e-shifting mechanism modular so that the gearbox could be easily taken apart to work on it.

Even before e-shifting is properly developed for these, I envisioned installing something like a small stepper motor on top of the gear box, which was able to use the existing cables in order to rotate the large ring.
  • + 1
 @excavator666: integration wise I meant the gearbox to be mounted directly into a frame instead of to a special mounting plate. There were comments this would streamline the frames even more.

The shifting mechanism would of course make sense to be modular so you could easily exchange the current one and/or decide which you prefer or if you want to upgrade from one to the other while using the same gearbox.
  • + 1
 @excavator666: sadly can't edit my previous reply, anymore, but, regarding an add on box. I was thinking about one more along the lines of adapting an Eagle trigger to the dual cable nature of a pinion. Though given supposedly high shifting forces the return spring needed in the box and the forces in general might be too much for a standard Sram trigger. The differences in cable pull ratios would be easy to get around i supposes (i'm not sure if the pull length of all gears for the trigger is the same or if they have some variance through the gear range).
  • + 31
 Yes I think I just ejaculated.....
  • + 13
 You and me both. Ok...that's just weird. But that's one sexy bike, so think I can deal with it.
  • + 9
 @jlawie: Nothing wrong with cross-border tantric titanium sex. A new 6-nations event? Come on the Welsh, Irish and Italians, look at the thing. Let's get it on.
  • + 3
 @BenPea: May I join?
  • + 1
 @santoman: are you any good at rucking?
  • + 5
 @BenPea: I prefer pushing, TBO!
  • + 2
 P*rn on Monday morning.
  • + 7
 @MatsuMatsu: Monday porning
  • + 2
 Ok. Agree, the bike is hot!
But when will ew see the next generation of the gearbox that can change gears even under the load?

(Don't mind my flag. I'm a filthy immigrant. So this friendy fire is growing internationally)
  • + 12
 @jlawie: Only gay if the balls touch
  • + 5
 @jlawie: why don't you two exchange numbers and take each other off-line
  • + 5
 @enduroNZ: already have dude.
  • + 1
 @BenPea: Speaking of some dirty hardcore rucking and the six nations.... may I suggest youtu.be/aTpXymuwxNs
  • + 1
 If you push back @MrDiamondDave:
  • + 2
 @philrossnz: Thanks for the lolz. I'm waiting for GT's product manager to lodge a formal complaint.
  • + 20
 Do belt drive's still need a break in the frame? I'm not seeing one here.
  • + 37
 It's hidden well. You can see it here:

www.pinkbike.com/photo/15698238
  • + 30
 Oh wow... I'd never even considered this was a requirement before. Mind mildly blown.
  • + 2
 @haroman666: Same here. It makes sense when you put a little thought into it, but still how bizarre.
  • + 21
 In all honesty when we first made a gearbox proto I didn’t think about it till I had a sample and it was one of the most embarrassing moments @haroman666:
  • + 2
 Can anyone explain? Thanks.
  • + 11
 @pulDag: On most bikes, the chain is looped through the chainstay - so you have to break a link to take the chain off, and redo the link to put the chain back on. But with belt drives, it's not possible to break a link - so you have to have a cut in the chain stay or seat stay. Or use an elevated stay.

This bike does have an amazingly well hidden chain stay break.
  • + 2
 @pulDag: The way the drive train loops through the frame means you need the chain/belt to have a break in it. Chains are able to do this just by the way they are constructed.
However with a belt, you can't have a break in it as fixing two ends of a belt together is difficult to make work well. It's best to have a closed loop belt.
So in the instance of a belt: the break is put in the frame instead.

@sickbicycleco such is the design process! It's the little snags that get you.
  • + 8
 @jakevw: Took me a full 3 minutes to find the break. Not proud, but I'm impressed.
  • + 3
 This would be a nice match with my Zerode Taniwha Smile

Shut up and take my money !!! :$

So Cool !!
  • + 2
 @jakevw: Thx for the link. I didn't think of the need for that either, but cannot quite figure it out. Does it not have to have a second place for it to come apart (removing the dropout/axle adjust section) in order to open it up enough to get the belt in place? Enlighten me if you can.
  • + 2
 @bart882: No, typically there is enough 'spring' in the rear triangle to slip it through the gap.
  • + 16
 I’m just not psyched on these bikes. I mean it is beautiful. And no hate towards those of you that like this idea. But why? For XC rides, I ride the XC bike.. for trail rides or gnarly stuff I ride my trail or “enduro” bike... why this wierd grey area? I mean i get it its cool but I personally dont see the point.
  • + 16
 If you've figured out your trails and reached a plateau in terms of skills improvement, getting a shredder hardtail can help take your skills to the nwct level. High-speed stability and encourage railing trails, but with the rigid rear you have to refine your line and technique. 6 months later you're a better rider.
  • + 5
 @sambs827: Good point. One of the reasons I like riding my trail bike in the park. A less forgiving bike will force you to clean up your technique for sure. But with that being said a bike like this one shown is pretty damn expensive and there is a very select crowd that would use this bike as their primary weapon. 160mm travel hard tail? Maybe as a training tool like you mentioned. But not in this price point. Its a cool idea just not practical for me. Just my 2 cents...
  • + 4
 Not everyone needs to "get" every kind of bike. It's pretty unlikely you'll ever see me spend the $ for a Ti gearbox bike, but I appreciate people making stuff they are stoked on even if it's not really turning me on specifically.
  • + 2
 @vikb: Hey now I never said I didn't appreciate what these guys are doing. It is a beautiful machine. Just trying to wrap my mind around who a bike like this would fit best. I fix and sell bikes for a living. If I had one of these on my sales floor who would I sell this to? Its a very niche thing they have going on here...
  • + 2
 @Leo48333: my only bike is a 140mm hardcore hardtail purely because it best suits my local trails- soft woods trails, bit footy but hardly any rocks. I would love something like this but do agree that if you need a 160mm fork, then rear suspension would also be preferable.
  • + 1
 * rooty (not footy - damn autocorrect).
  • + 4
 It's good for those flow type trails that have cool jumps and features that are more fun to pump on a hardtail, but otherwise aren't super rough and rocky. I couldn't see myself preferring this over a full-suspension trail bike for something like the Whole Enchilada for example, but for Half-Nelson in Squamish, yes.
  • + 4
 @Leo48333: I second what sambs827 says. As far as hardtails go, I’ve had both a 150mm steel “enduro” hardtail and a 100mm XC hardtail. The two are worlds apart and can not be ridden in the same way at all. The longer travel is my go to trail bike for the winter due to easy maintenance and for polishing up on my riding. Going back to full suspension you feel much improved, faster and accurate. It’s also a good “day out with the family” bike. I think the Dad on a 7-9k SB6 is always gonna look like a dick.
  • + 1
 @tremeer023: but with the slacker head angle the verticle travel on the front will be less, so maybe feels more like a steeper hardtail with 140mm fork, you'd need to ride it I suppose to tell.
  • + 4
 longer travel hardtails are great fun for long adventure rides- cause you good peddling performance, while still being able to get rowdy on the downs
  • + 0
 @Scottybike36: Why can't Dad ride a SB6? Does this mean I have to get rid of my $9k SB6c if I have a child? I didn't know there were restrictions for people with families.
  • + 2
 @Leo48333: i've been riding hardcore hardtails for years. Don't think I was far behind people in downhill rides. Hardtails are not that much slower in fact... They are nevertheless very hard and on joints, qnd make you fatigue earlier, especially in long descents. But the experience is quite like driving a rally car compared to a short course track. Maybe the short course truck does better the gnarly staff, but the excess of travel eats the trail as you don't really notice much of it, so your experience is more limited. I can't describe how much fun it was to ride my steel, slack hardtail. The rougher the trail was, the better. Now i ride a short travel trail bike for downhill, with progressive geometry and burly components. It is the shit. That's why dude.
  • + 2
 @nickw686: You clearly haven’t met my Dad :-)
  • + 3
 With time every full-suspension looks outdated, hardtails like this become Classics, more so in Titanium.
  • + 3
 simplicity and fun. Take this bike on a trip and have a blast everywhere and only have to worry about your fork and brakes... no bearings, derailleurs, rear shock, etc. Get an extra set of wheels for it and boom, new bike with a quick swap.
  • + 4
 As a back and forthr’ I enjoy the hardtail allot. The nearest trails don’t have much elevation gain and the hardy is really fun there. Whistler weekends get a bit rough but the first 3 or 4 weeks last year were so smooth. Definitely makes you choose your lines better! DH bike and a longer travel slack hardtail is a pretty effective combo on a “budget”.
  • + 2
 I have a 160mm forked steel hard tail. Its almost as fast as my 170mm travel Enduro. It has nippier handling and there is more front end grip thanks to the lack of rear suspension compression. You feel it in your legs after 2km of descending and comfort is not high on the list but its great fun and really makes me appreciate my other bike.
  • + 8
 I'm going to get hate, but this seems like the worst of both worlds. Gearbox on a hardtail is just making it heavier and less efficient. Would be a sick bike with a traditional drivetrain, but this just seems confused.
  • + 15
 But a hardtail is a great mud/off season bike which a belt drive gearbox is perfect for. Seems like a win?
  • + 2
 Central mass.
  • + 8
 I like how small the pinion gear box is. It would be amazing if a big name company started to incorporate pinion’s into their frames
  • + 0
 It wouldn't make sense. You'd have to tear down the gearbox to do servicing on it or send the whole bike to have serviced if there was anything wrong with it. The current way makes it possible to take the box off and ship only that.
  • + 10
 Definitely a "bike for life".
  • + 2
 This is pretty cheap. I think the Portus Cycles Krowd Karl ED (first deliveries should be next month) went for the same kind of money. Also European production, but out of steel. 11ants would probably also be able to make you something like this (they make titanium mountainbikes with Rohloff or Pinion gearing) but for considerably more money.
  • + 3
 Gearbox? Is this a new standard that makes my current bike obsolete? Oh wait it's a gearbox, those are super cool never mind.
  • + 2
 Are belt drives using v-belts? I use a product called "link belt" for times when I don't have a replacement belt on hand. www.leevalley.com/us/Wood/page.aspx?p=30051&cat=1,240,41067&ap=1
  • + 2
 Pinkbike....cover a company that will.Give the people what they have been asking for forever.....So then they can shit on it...hahahahahahahaha...
  • + 3
 Compared to Portus Krowd Karl's €3500 Lacrau Ti's €2700 seems like a steel.
  • + 3
 value and hardtails is a weird one I realise they are boutique and for bike connoisseurs and small runs etc, and then the cheap bastard in me comes out and goes how is it that I just bought a brand new xt/slx full build with fox 36 front, fox dropper rear shock etc (WHEELS) handlebars etc all 2018 model for about 60 Euros more than they want to sell a few welded tubes and a gear box. Npt tp the same extreme but a lot of non-gearbox
steel builds are the same. I really want one but then. I look at tje price and it costs morr than an equivalent full sus bike. it is nuts
  • + 1
 @applepie: Cheap bastard here also fails to see how this costs the same as some boutique Handmade-in-Taiwan-with-Pride boutique full suspension frame (air can suspension included, also made in Taiwan). Or how those frames cost that much anyways, regardless these boutique hardtail comparisons in the first place. :S

Which bike btw?
  • + 1
 @jollyXroger: Were you talking about the frame. I thought for the Portus Krowd Karl the price for the first five frames was 2200 euro (including C1.12 gearbox) which went up to 2400 euro for those who pitched in later. Is it currently all the way up to 3500? Also, the Olsen bike including C1.12 gearbox goes for 2000GBP. Of course that is carbon but he can send the design to a welder to have it made out of steel for not much more. Not saying this Nordest isn't cheap for a Portugese titanium frame (it is) but I'm surprised to see you quote numbers that high for the steel alternative. The 11ants tarANTula is about 7000 euro for the bike so even though I don't think they have a quote online for just the frame, I expect it would exceed what Nordest asks for this one.
  • + 1
 @vinay: Here ( www.portus-cycles.de/order ) it says starting from €3500.
  • + 1
 @jollyXroger: Yeah, that is the price of built to order. But the actual Krowd Karl wasn't designed when he wrote that. Alex was producing frames with Pinion already. The concept of the Krowd Karl was to reduce the price by doing series production. After all much of the time is being spent setting up the jig for different sizes and geometries. So having a set of orders finished at a given time (I think it was last November) he could plan his production at once and work more efficiently. I think BTR works in a similar fashion nowadays. There is such a big build queue that they can pick all orders for the same size and wheelsize at once, set up the jig and weld them in kind of a small series. Much more efficient. This also shows why custom geometries require a surcharge. They require dedicated adjustments to the jig.
  • + 1
 @applepie: it's not nuts, it's welds as you say
  • + 2
 @jollyXroger: altitude 50. 2400 euro including 15% tax
  • + 2
 also compared to the Orange Ti9 (EUR 2500) or the Chromag Surface Ti (USD 3100) this Lacrau and its brother the Bardino Ti (EUR 1300) are amazingly priced!
  • + 1
 I’d be willing to to take the current weight penalty as long as the efficiency was on same or better level with current derailleur system. Unfortunately this is not going to happen any time soon I guess.
  • + 4
 Palms are sweaty!!
  • + 7
 Knees weak, arms are heavy
  • + 3
 @shawnca7: Vomit on his sweater already, moms spaghetti...
  • + 2
 @shawnca7:
That will be the drag from the gearbox and the extra weight getting it in and out the car
  • + 2
 dont understand the hate on gripshift.. its a precise and quick way to change the gear! Once i tried, i fell in love!
  • + 3
 $4300 CAD for the frame if anyone is wondering.
  • + 2
 It's so beautiful! Looks like a classic Ferrari that you'd have in your collection and never sell it.
  • + 1
 i would be awesome except the grip shift type shifting. it feels the worst!
  • + 1
 If I was wealthy enough to buy a "just for kicks" bike, it would be something along these lines. 100% reverse mullet.
  • + 1
 Gear range? Maintenance requirements? Availability of replacement parts? Energy loss through the drivetrain estimates?
  • + 0
 And slack, a bloody engagement slack in drivetrain. Also save your ''ordinary' bike cause if you got problems with that precious gearbox then nobody at LBS can help you, or probably they screw up even worse if they have will to help you. PS wait and see how we are downvoted
  • + 2
 600%, very little, absolutely none, quite a bit.
  • + 1
 I swear my pants were on a minute ago.
  • + 1
 One quest — how to replace broken or used drive belt?
  • + 9
 Open the frame, change the belt.
  • + 3
 All drive belt compatible bikes have a split drop out or seat stay. It a held together with a bolt that can be opened.
  • + 1
 @FlorentVN: this one is same
  • + 1
 @TobiBoy: "So what you're saying is when the bubble comes, turn the boot?"
  • + 1
 Looks like around $2800 USD for the frameset. I'm out haha.
  • + 1
 I just want a Bardino frame. Is there a US distributor? @jesusguerra
  • + 1
 @kwapik: H kwapik. No, we only sell online. Just write us to make you an offer: info@nordestcycles.com
  • + 2
 @kwapik: you can just have a Kingdom Vendetta...Nordest bluntly copied it anyway...and so did Sick...then they just added a Pinion to be all cool and trendy...and then Nordest thought...”oh, better jump on that boat too”!? But the very first original Titanium hardcore hardtail started with the best...Kingdom!
  • + 1
 @gbcarmona @kwapik: Nordest derives from our other brand, Jerónimo Cycles: have been making bikes like this for 8 years and we have designed more than 250 different frames. Kingdom makes nice bikes, but don't get confused and check the numbers, they're not as similar as they look.
  • + 1
 only ONE bottle rack .... no thank you ......
  • + 1
 Sweet...really low un-sprung weight with the gearbox... Nevermind,
  • + 2
 Another "new standard"
  • + 1
 I think if I owned this bike I'd almost be scared to ride it..
  • + 0
 POST THE WEIGHT, THIS IS USELESS.
  • + 1
 Oh yesss.....
  • + 1
 Wow..... what a bike.
  • + 1
 Thats a sik hardtial.
  • + 1
 Winter muddy season 100%
  • + 1
 Made in CHINA!
  • + 1
 No eight pins dropper??
  • + 1
 Clean and Sexy, check.
  • + 1
 ...
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