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North Shore Billet Announces New Canadian-Made Talon Cranks

Jun 1, 2023
by North Shore Billet  
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The NSBillet Talon Cranks are available in four lengths, including the short 155mm here.

PRESS RELEASE: North Shore Billet

Introducing the North Shore Billet Talon Cranks. We’ve dedicated two years to perfecting this product after it came to life as a personal project on a few of our machinist’s park, enduro, and DJ bikes. After catching the attention of our friends, team riders, and customers in Whistler and beyond, we proudly offer them to you.

To create the best product possible, we worked closely with our team of riders, including Yoann Barelli, Max Langille, Ben Wallace, and Milton McConville. Together, we refined the design to improve durability and usability while maintaining the sleek machined finish of the original cranks. After extensive real-world testing, we sent the cranks to EFBE Pruftechnik in Germany for further lab testing. They passed with flying colours, meeting and exceeding their comprehensive EFBE TRI-TEST Gravity standards.

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Yoann Barelli has been riding the cranks for more than 12 months and has played a key role in their development.
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Yoann has tested the Talon cranks all over the world on his enduro/freeride bikes.
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Into The Gnar athletes have also been part of our testing pool. Nate Spitz getting low.
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Team rider Milton McConville has been valuable during real-world testing, providing great feedback while testing the cranks on his trail bike, DH bike and DJ.

We’re excited to release the Talon cranks to riders everywhere and offer them in various sizes, including new shorter lengths for modern mountain bikes. Precision machined from 7075 T6 aluminum in our Whistler machine shop; the cranks are available in anodized black, clear anodized silver, and our anodized pewter colour.

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The cranks use an aluminum pre-loader and feature a reasonably-sized bolt head to increase durability.
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An 8-lobe interface secures the crank arms to the spindle.

Features:
• Built for Enduro and DH/Freeride and Dirt Jump bike applications
• Three-piece design
• 30mm crank spindle diameter
• Aluminum pre-loader
• Cinch chainring mount
• Four lengths currently available: 155mm, 160mm, 165mm, and 170mm
• Available for 68/73mm and 83mm bottom brackets
• Machined from billet 7075 T6 aluminum in Whistler
• Weight: 670g (170mm w/ 73mm spindle)
• Price: $420 USD

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A threaded bottom bracket to fit our cranks. Available in 68/73mm and 83mm widths.
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The NSB bottom bracket tool fits anything the Park Tool BBT-79 does and secures chainrings to our Talon crank.

As we produced our Talon cranks, we created a threaded bottom bracket and a tool for installation. This tool can also secure the direct mount chainring and follows Park Tool BBT-79 specifications, making it compatible with various bottom brackets such as SRAM DUB and Race Face.

The North Shore Billet Talon cranks, bottom bracket and tool are now available on our website; several distributors also have stock ready to roll. Head to the site for more information on this exciting new addition to our range.

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The Talon crank is 99% made in Whistler, BC, with only the bolt for the pre-loader not coming from our machines.

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About North Shore Billet

Since 2003, NSB has been making high-quality Canadian-made bicycle components. First located in North Vancouver, we were drawn to Whistler for its diverse riding and small mountain town atmosphere. While being a small company in Whistler has allowed us to stay close to the roots of mountain biking, we strive to keep up with the latest manufacturing technologies and remain globally competitive.

Author Info:
nsbillet avatar

Member since Jan 28, 2002
13 articles

281 Comments
  • 211 40
 I hope one day mtb riders will stop salivating over expensive, pretty anodized parts machined from billet and realize how inferior they are to less expensive but better-performing forged parts. Machining from billet is an incredibly wasteful manufacturing process that produces an inferior product at an elevated price point for consumers. It does nothing to make your bike look unique anymore since everyone seems to have their anodized bling these days, so what is the point in spending all that money?
  • 75 4
 If I'm spending $400+ on cranks they better save me a lot of weight. If I'm not mistaken, these cranks are a little heavier than my slx cranks that i paid $100 for $130 w/ chainring.
  • 9 8
 Here here. CNC’ing is just too cheap and easy.
  • 48 2
 $420
Nice
  • 58 6
 As someone who spent time machining parts for medical machines/devices I can’t the life of me can’t see how these or DEV 5 are worth the money. Not as strong as forged nor as light as carbon but twice as much $. Seems to be a good business strategy tho since dudes love CNC.
  • 49 2
 This trend happened in the 90's with billet, along with the anodizing. It's that time again, I guess. One trend that should have died a horrible death is mom jeans. The person who brought those back should be slapped.
  • 24 1
 I 100% agree with you general sentiment but forging is not "cheap" unless there are huge economies of scale associated with it. I'm sure the majority of forging, in say Taiwan, is done by a handful of manuf. that produce 10's of thousands of copies....small manuf. like this just don't have the means to effectively do that when they can machine a handful of sets on relatively cheap CNC machine and do it all in house or at worst up the street.

I do pick forged parts over machined parts 10/10 times if I had the option....
  • 6 0
 They are beautiful, but mostly jewelry for your bike. About the same weight as an NX crankset that comes with a durable steel chainring. Even cheap cranks have gotten so good and stiff, it’s really hard to justify the cost, unless it’s just for looks and you accept that.
  • 27 0
 Shimano SLX and Race Face Aeffect are both $300 cheaper and a good 100g lighter. What is the point of these NSB cranks?
  • 6 2
 @AppleJack76: yes and yes. The 90's are repeating with this trend. Aluminum cranks, aluminum derailleur pullies, etc. Sram, Shimano and others are real engineered components. These one off machined parts are just not up to par.
  • 10 4
 @RadBartTaylor: no one is making 155 forged cranks. Probably because the economies of scale aren't there yet for forged cranks. So if you prefer 155 you're stuck with machined cranks.
  • 24 0
 @sdurant12: Technically incorrect, Hope cranks are forged then machine finished and come in 155's....

www.hopetech.com/products/drivetrain/cranksets/evo-crankset
  • 58 10
 Trying to figure out why anyone cares about what other riders salivate over. If you found the answer to everything with what you’ve got, then what everyone else wants doesn’t affect you. You’re happy with your forged cranks. They’re happy with 155mm of bling… Let everyone be happy — go on about your business and do your thing.
  • 18 0
 Machined cranks doesn't make sense. What makes sense is doing an entire frame machined!
  • 19 3
 Nice work to NSB, these look killer.
  • 7 1
 My bad, the hope 155 cranks are forged. I thought they were machined, but they are forged. Still kind of hard to get, in the US at least. I'm actually running 145's though, which are basically only made by 5 dev and appleman. Currently on 5 dev but based on the reports of crank failure I am looking to get rid of them.
  • 5 0
 @artistformlyknowasdan: Yup. I can remember 2 of us with intact cranks taking turns pushing my buddy back on a gravel road after his fancy CNC cranks cracked an broke mid ride. No jumps. It was literally "just riding along" when they failed. The un-broken cranks were good old XT and Suntour forged aluminum. This was in the mid 1990's.
  • 4 1
 So for $400 and 24mm spindle, anyone want to test these out for me? Don't fancy destructive-testing cranks out on the trail myself.

www.aliexpress.us/item/3256803512630361.html
  • 2 0
 @sdurant12: is the rate of crank failure that high?
  • 1 0
 @sdurant12: Need some decent cranks for my son in 135-145. Are those my only two options?
  • 4 2
 @AppleJack76: Downvoted by the one dude who likes mom jeans?
  • 8 0
 Also, turns out I was doubly wrong - Canfield cranks are also forged, down to 150mm.
  • 12 1
 @wydopen: if I were you and your son is not ripping dh tracks, I'd go with Appleman. 5 dev is marketed towards real MTB, but there have been a handful of crank failures reported (that seem to be due to fatigue/cracks propagating), and 5dev has shown themselves to be jerks in that whole fiasco. You can find the imtb thread (and eventually the Instagram stories) and judge for yourself.

If your son is ripping dh tracks, then as far as I know Canfield is probably the best option - they go down to 150mm and are meant for DH use. Unfortunately my bike is super boost so they aren't an option for me
  • 1 0
 @sdurant12: Nice find....
  • 3 0
 @wydopen: Trailcraft all day long. Awesome short cranks.
  • 2 0
 @Stoaks: LMAO... looks like they down voted you too.
  • 2 1
 @TheR: thank you for saying this
  • 3 0
 @wydopen: Trailcraft makes reasonably priced options in that size. I bent a set of their 152 cranks with a hard hit on a rock (210lb dude, hard pedal strike riding enduro). Didn't fall catastrophically or anything, was able to ride out with the bent crank. I decided I needed dh cranks, but I wouldn't hesitate to use them in a more reasonable use case.
  • 3 0
 @nnowak: but....but....shiny!
  • 2 1
 Normally companies machine from billet to make it look nice and fancy like 5dev. These look no different than my forged Canfield cranks.
  • 10 3
 @itsonlyaname616: I think it’s a lot better to say something along the lines of, “I don’t understand why you would go with X when Y is a better option,” than to say, “I can’t wait until everyone falls in line with my way — the right way — of thinking.” Not only is it arrogant, it’s insecure — the fact that people have other preferences than you do, or that a company offers an option that isn’t in line with your preference, is absolutely no threat to your preference. Why the need to denigrate others’ preferences to justify your own?

Beyond that it’s just the underlying mentality that if people care about how their bikes look, they’re just rich dentists and not hardcore, brah. People want to be stoked about how their bikes look. So what? It’s fun.
  • 2 0
 Depends on other factors. How the billet was made, what sort of forging its being compared against, what alloys are being used (there are afterall aluminum alloys which don't work well for forging, and ones that shouldn't be machined).
  • 2 0
 Development and progression. A lot of companies starts small with some vision. As they progress, they can come up with new, unique or updated design solutions. I would not throw them under the bus. Yes, maybe for now it is a blink blink component that costs extra bucks with no added value (except to support local makers), but there can be also potential to push the development further – it needs time, resources, support. Give them time, let them shine.
  • 1 0
 @gb8561: good find! Fortunately they're offered in 152mm which is totally different from 155mm so my comment saying "there are no forged 155 options" remains only doubly wrong (and isn't triple wrong lol). Another forged option on the list!
  • 1 0
 @AppleJack76: Well, fanny packs...err...sling bags are back.
  • 3 0
 @wydopen: Spawn bikes also make 160/145/130 cranks - spawncycles.com/components/cranks

Have a set on my son's bike and they've been great.
  • 1 1
 @TheR: Amen.
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: perfect thanks..I searched but those or the trailcraft other suggested didnt pop up..
  • 6 0
 @TheR: strange phenomenon of people caring about what other people spend their money on, or enjoy.
  • 4 1
 @TheR: hey now, stop being so reasonable and logical. Everyone knows mountain biking is about picking a side and being a dick about it.
  • 3 1
 @hamncheez: "We think it's strong enough for Enduro." Exactly what I want to hear from my crank manufacturer.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: does that include e-bikes?
  • 1 0
 @Keegansamonster: ha! So true. Well, at least in the PB world, anyway.
  • 1 1
 @TheR: btw I totally agree with you.
  • 5 0
 @sdurant12: the new Canfield cranks are machined differently and can work with superboost now. You just run a 0mm offset chainring for SB and a 3mm offset ring for "normal" boost. Hope this helps
  • 12 0
 Incomplete list of short crank options

Trailcraft

127, 140, 152, 160mm

Hope

155mm

5Dev

135, 145, 155, 160, 165, 170, 175

Spawn Cycles

89, 102, 127mm

Brood Styx Cranks

130, 145, 160mm

Prevelo Heir Cranks

120, 140mm

Suntour
XCT Jr

152, 160mm

Zeron 1-X

152, 160, 170mm

Canfield AM/DH Cranks

150, 155, 160, 165, 170mm

SRAM NX 1x Cranks

155, 160, 175mm

Appleman Bicycles (will also do custom lengths)

100, 135, 145, 155, 165, 175

North Shore Billet Talon

155, 160, 165, 170
  • 2 0
 @stiksandstones: The strange thing is, it typically doesn’t affect them. That’s why it’s such a head scratcher for me.
  • 4 0
 @BermJunky: Yep, even eBikes. My stance has always been, not for me, but if that’s your thing, ok. Just respect your local laws and rules of the trail.
  • 7 5
 @TheR: Critiquing someone else for providing a critique doesn't mean you're insightful, it just means you lack the self-awareness required to see you're doing the same. If people sharing their opinion in an open forum is such a head-scratcher for you, maybe avoid comment sections in the future ; ) Literally, all your comment amounts to is a criticism of me criticizing something so I am really left scratching my head why you care. Go on about your business and do your thing. ; )
  • 9 0
 @rip8569: but now your just as bad because you’re criticizing him, criticizing you, criticizing the cranks. But where does that leave me? Because now I’m criticizing you, criticizing him, criticizing you, criticizing the cranks! My head hurts
  • 4 0
 Most CNC machined bike parts start from near-net forgings, especially stems. Forging is more about saving machining time than the strength of a forging over a rolled plate that the billets are cut from.
  • 3 2
 @AppleJack76: whoa whoa whoa hang on there…let’s stop with the kink shaming. There’s nothing wrong with mom jeans if she has a figure.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: I have them for 2 season now, so far so good. Had issue with the Q-Factor on my first pair but they sent another pair that was correct. DM me if you have more question
  • 3 1
 I’d argue the differentiator in cranksets are the design details of how it attaches to the spindle and how the bearing preloader works. The weight differences aren’t all that meaningful, especially in an era of 1100g tires.

Sram GX crankset is objectively the best cost:performance design out there until you need a 2’ breaker bar to remove the arm from the spindle and until you work with the flimsy plastic preloader.

Also, 7075 is a lot stronger than 6061 which is used for typical forged cranks, so presumably makes up some of the difference from a forging. Also, there is so little grain flow in a simple forging like a crankarm that it wouldn’t improve fatigue strength all that much, and introduces potential for forging defects (laps).
  • 1 1
 @Keegansamonster: lol you're right in the place I started at...being opinionated with self-awareness of your opinionated nature.
  • 2 2
 As long as the cranks are NOT made in China, I'm all for the best bang for the bike as long as safety is ensured.
  • 2 1
 @TheR: Best reply I've seen in a while. Thank you.
  • 3 0
 @TheR: We're in the PB comments section, everything is war.
  • 1 0
 @nnowak: because they don't make 155's.
  • 1 0
 @11six: NO IT ISN'T
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: YESSS ITTT ISSSSSS AAAAGGGGHHHHHHHHH *breaks keyboard over knee
  • 1 0
 @wydopen: www.trailcraftcycles.com/product/trailcraft-direct-mount-cranks I had a TrailCraft crank on my kid's 20" Commencal. They kick butt!
  • 2 1
 @rip8569: Not critiquing so much as seeking understanding. Why do you care what cranks people salivate over?
  • 7 1
 @TheR: I don't like to see people like my friends who don't know anything about metallurgy or manufacturing getting ripped off by snake oil engineering and performance claims by prioritizing the looks of products over their performance. I also believe this infatuation with anodized CNC leads to increased inflation rate of bike part prices across the board when manufacturers realize riders are willing to gullibly spend so much on imaginary performance gains when really all they did was make their bike worse but now it looks like a motorcycle for a power ranger. TLBig Grin R version...I just think we as riders aren't getting what we think we are paying for with these supposedly high-end parts.
  • 5 0
 Wheres my cold forged in a neutron star and anodized in a pulsar beam accessories?
  • 5 1
 @TheR: Trying to figure out why you have a problem with someone posting some legit criticism. The brand proudly presents its new product, and ones it's out there, people will have an opinion on it.
Some will like it, some won't.
Should only the people who like it speak up?

I think comments like these are helpful. Trends, marketing and the pressure to fit in are strong forces, and comments that point out the negatives can help balance that out a bit. Also, he's not saying other people should not buy cnc'd parts, he's saying he doesn't get their allure and explains why he thinks it's not a smart buy.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: why do you care that he cares?
  • 2 0
 I was salivating over expensive CNC’d aluminum parts loooong before I was a MTBr and when I’m 102 I’ll damn sure have an anodize billet Aluminum CNC’d O2 regulator and walker. You can’t change beauty.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: questionable welds on this one from the pic, plus it weakens the joint when the weld is ground down. overall not confidence inspiring when the one they choose for product photos looks bad
  • 1 0
 @sdurant12: SRAM SX comes in 155 - maybe cast? I think forged but not sure. I am guessing Canfield 155 cranks are forged.
  • 1 0
 @sdurant12: Get a -4mm offset chainring, should be close enough
  • 1 0
 @wburnes: Why do you care that I care what he cares?
  • 2 1
 @WhateverBikes: I don’t have a problem with someone posting legit criticism of a product. But he criticized people salivating over them. Hopes they stop. That, to me, is an odd angle to take. He doesn’t just say, “Hey, based on what I know, these aren’t as good as other products made another way.” He says, “I wish other people would stop having an opinion that differs from mine.”

But he’s expressed why, and I’m good with that. I’m glad he’s looking out for all of us.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: who said I did?
  • 1 0
 @wburnes: Well, you commented on the matter , right?
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: aka Pole dancer bikes
  • 60 1
 Weight: 670g
Price: $420 USD

..... So close, so close.
  • 14 12
 Flip that 4 and that two and we will talk. I'm not paying over $400 for heavy cranks that aren't even that strong
  • 5 0
 add 20g of mud and it's a good day
  • 2 0
 @DizzyNinja: someone isn’t washing their riding equipment frequently enough..
  • 5 0
 @mick06: I'm supposed to wash my bike 20 minutes into a ride?!?
  • 7 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: Wait we're talking about bikes here?
  • 1 0
 454 yo.
  • 1 0
 LOL

i HAVE to have these. $420 was the selling point for me.
  • 55 2
 I get so excited for the new cranks from small companies. Then I read on and see 30mm axle only. My heart is sad I guess everyone abandoned 24mm. I like the 24mm bearings are bigger and last longer no matter if press fit or threaded. Could somebody give us 24mm peeps some l9ve?
  • 15 0
 Agree, I will never understand the love for 30mm spindles, especially on threaded cups. The bearings are too big to leave enough sidewall area on the cup so they tend to break so easy on threaded BBs.
  • 67 1
 I recently switched back to Shimano cranks, for a few reasons, but the two big ones are:

1) With the low torque pinch bolts, they are sooo much easier to service and remove if needed. No more blowing my knuckles out trying to snap a dub crank bolt loose or having to use the Earth as leverage on other cranks.

2) The bottom brackets are HALF the cost of any 30mm compatible bracket. The RaceFace BB is the cheapest one that I can find and it usually costs around $70-80.......and its garbage. A Shimano XT BBwhatever is $30-40.

Not having to deal with fiddly little preload ring is also nice.
  • 5 0
 Before anyone gets pissed at 30mm axles, here's a reminder that the DMR Axe is 28mm on one and 30mm on the other side.
  • 13 0
 If I had to guess, 30 mm spindles are usually aluminum and 24 mm spindles are usually steel, and I believe NSB works with aluminum in-house.
  • 7 0
 @Canadmos: you can go to the SLX level BB and probably get it for $12-15 and will last for 5 years. I recall that video of P.A. Tron teaching Loris how to build his bike, and he gives him his Shimano Dura Ace bottom bracket and says, "this is the one we'll use all season"
  • 16 0
 @Canadmos: It's really hard to argue against Shimano cranks. Cheap and just work. Although, these are beautifuler than Shimano. But over 600CAD plus a BB etc etc. My deore cranks have been flawless and cost the same as a dinner out with my family.
  • 8 0
 I think the issue is, you can’t make an aluminum 24mm spindle. And you can’t (reasonably) machine from billet and anodize purple a 24mm steel spindle. But yeah, 30mm spindles suck pretty much no matter what their application. Although I’m not sure that’s to say 28.99mm spindles are better…
  • 35 0
 I get all excited, see the oversized axle or dumb interface, then I go and buy another set of Shimano XT cranks like I've done every time since 2002. Shimano basically solved MTB cranks years ago, it's very boring but nobody's managing to make a better product either.
  • 6 0
 Shimano does, and SLX cranks weigh less, have hollow arms and they're forged.
  • 2 0
 @Apfelsauce: my race face cranks have an aluminum 24mm spindle. Bought them used for $30 out of a recycled parts bin. 4yrs ago and 3 bikes later they are great. My giant trance I had before got almost 4 seasons out of a praxis 24mm pf. And the actual bb cost is nothing co.pared to the 30mm stuff
  • 1 10
flag thustlewhumber FL (Jun 1, 2023 at 7:26) (Below Threshold)
 Looks like externally mounted bearings, so the bearing size argument is irrelevant.
  • 5 0
 @Canadmos: All my bikes are either Shimano or Sram GXP, that stuff just works.
Raceface BBs can be made to last longer, if you fill them with marine grease right from the start. Friend of mine had them fail about every month and after greasing the new one it held up a full season.
Seems to be a sealing issue, which is also why Sram went for a 28.99 spindle, to have the room for some decent seals.
  • 2 0
 Compatible with Wheels MFG angular contact BBs or GTFO. Most durable bearing products I've ever had on my bikes.
  • 3 0
 @Fix-the-Spade: yeh, same. I fitted some Saints about 10 years ago and they've been flawless with minimal maintenance. I'll still be running them in 10 years time. Fantastic product.
  • 1 0
 @Canadmos: Not to mention their BB's seem to last forever. I've absolutely abused my MT500 BB and it still spins perfectly smooth.
  • 1 0
 @Canadmos: 100% agree.
  • 1 0
 Also guessing the 30mm is a strength issue when using alum.
  • 1 0
 I don't know which model off the top of my head, but this is the second in a row Shimano BB that developed a horrible creak or knock. I clean it out and regrease and it goes away for a few rides. What am I doing wrong?
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez: misaligned frame? Too much preload on it?
  • 3 4
 @Canadmos: I love Shimano but I’m pretty fed up with the cranks. Six bent pairs in the last year (4 XTR and 2 XT). No other part on my bike needs as much attention. Chainrings aren’t supposed to outlast cranks.
  • 2 0
 @Canadmos: Can't be too much preload. I use a torque wrench (the back side of a larger crescent wrench struck onto the allen key with decent force)
  • 1 0
 ..double post..oops.
  • 1 1
 @hamncheez: Why bother with a torque wrench, just do up the little plastic knob piece a little you're done. Not much preload is needed. But if it keeps happening, there must be another cause..
  • 1 0
 @Canadmos: Shimano is also a good option for BB92s with bad tolerances (most of them) since you can use a threaded press fit BB like Hope which helps with alignment and spins a bit easier with misaligned BB bores.

The only drawback of Shimano cranks is that the impact resistance isn't as tough. I have some bent XT cranks but my much more abused Turbine crank would be pretty hard to bend...
  • 1 0
 @trippleacht: that's like a 30mm version of srams gxp, which is 24/22mm.
  • 4 1
 @jessemeyers: damn dude, how big are you and what kind of riding are you doing? I've never heard of that many problems on Shimano cranks. Granted they make Saint which sounds like a good upgrade for you, but tons of folks run SLX/XT/XTR for enduro...
  • 2 0
 @ohio: 190lbs and I ride the same stuff as my buddies. They are breaking wheels and I'm somehow taking out cranks. I stopped breaking wheels when I switched to WAO and DH casing tires with Cushcore.
  • 2 0
 @ohio: I forgot to mention Saints won't work cause they aren't available in 52mm chainline.
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: At install use lots of waterproof grease on the threads, do not do not do not over tighten them into the frame, grease the axle, don’t point a garden hose at them. Doesn’t make a sound.
  • 1 0
 @NZRalphy: Grease the BB shell threads, or the crank threads, or both? m9000 XTR cranks
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: both. The cranks come with grease on them, so that's safe. I always grease threaded BBs as well. Less chance of water issues, parts getting stuck etc etc. But if you're going through them repeatedly, perhaps try a different brand or model. If same results, then it's most likely not the BB that is the issue.
  • 1 0
 @Canadmos: You mean a 6 year old crankset that I'm the 3rd owner of can't be perfect and used forever? haha
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Both and use lots. Oh and make sure you clean out the old goop from the threads - it there are a couple of spots of dirt or sand in the threads it will creek and click for ever - super clean.
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez: honestly the cranks should be fine...they don't magically go bad, unless your name is jessemeyers Smile
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Could definitely be too much preload if you have too many (2.5mm) bb spacers. Ideally you don’t want preload at all, just no play. You can feel the play being taken out by pulling in and out on the driveside crank/spindle while tightening. Once no play is felt, you can start to feel for the preload point by rotating the cranks as you slowly tighten a bit more. At least thats what I’ve always done and had success with.
  • 1 0
 @emptybe-er: Thanks, I'll pull it apart (again), grease everything, and be gentle with the preload.

On the m9000 series, the preload is the plastic screw that requires the special adapter that comes with Shimano bottom bracket tools, right?
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: ….no need for special tool, just cut a dime so it fits and a light twist for pre-load.
  • 1 0
 @NZRalphy: Well one came with my BB tool I need anyways (for the bb)
  • 40 2
 F*cking stop with the 30mm only bs already. 24mm is objectively the better standard.
  • 4 0
 Isn’t it weird?! I don’t know anyone that would complain about larger, longer lasting bb bearings. 30mm bb bearings are so tiny.
  • 3 0
 And it’s not like if a 24mm was flexing too much (it wasn’t) it couldn’t be made a bit thicker or whatever. Increasing the spindle size and decreasing the bb bearing size is such a bad trade off.
  • 28 4
 Another crank that costs more AND weights more than a set of SLXs. These look better designed than 5Devs, but not better designed than a mid-priced set of RF cranks.

C'Mon small manufacturers-if you're going to make a premium "upgrade" product, make something actually better performing than a mid-priced item from the biggest component maker!!!
  • 4 1
 These look to me like RF Atlas cranks with two minor improvements for double the cost
  • 58 4
 As a small manufacturer its impossible. As consumers we either pick cheap parts that come from mega corporations overseas or expensive parts from local manufacturers. There is literally no middle ground.

Every CNC VMC I buy is really cheap at $150-250k. To build forged cranks at any reasonable scale you need a massive hot forging press that can cost between $500k and $1 million. You need a top/bottom die machined out of H-series steel which is a feat by itself and you need one for literally every length/profile you plan on making because you cannot (or should not) machine down a forged part as it disrupts the grain of the metal which reduces its strength significantly. Each die half will cost between $5 and $10k to manufacture.

Then you still have to have a decent sized milling center or 10 to cut the crank interface, pedal holes, chainring holes/spline and trim the forging seam. Then you have to re heat-treat the crank as the forging process resets the heat treating - bringing aluminum back up to a T5 or T6 heat treatment means a large oven that can heat and cool in programmatic steps up to around 200 degrees C over the course of 8-12 hours. Then you still have to paint or anodize the part.

All told, to be able to make a single style of crank in 3 different lengths (165, 170, 175mm) you are looking at nearly $2 million in equipment and tooling not to mention the cost of leasing space that has the room and power requirements to undertake this all plus forge press operators, CNC operators, surface prep people, anodizers/painters etc. To break even you probably need to sell 20,000 cranks a year that cost as much or more than what Shimano and other large OEMs are making overseas for half the cost.

I think consumers need to come to terms with the fact that if we want locally made shit from people that pay their staff fair wages and contribute to the local economy we have to be ok with owning fewer - but more expensive - items. Or we can just come to terms with the fact that local companies will cater to those of us who care and will spend a premium just to support one-another.
  • 2 0
 @cueTIP: is it a local thing or a scale thing?
  • 11 2
 @cueTIP: You can get someone to forge blanks for you, cant you?

Do you really need to buy a $1mill forge to make cranks, its impossible for you to outsource any of the process?

Hope buy in their forged material - why wouldn't that work? - By this logic, do you also produce your own billet?

Buy the forged blanks in already heat treated and then post machine? Again though you can always outsource heat-treat like anyone in the real world would do.

'Decent size' VMC - nonsense, the smallest fanuc robodrill would be just fine to make cranks on, these are crank arms and chainrings, any VMC has a travel greater than 200mm

You are making one extra step seem very complicated, when its not at all, its just much more effort than calling up the local supplier and ordering some 7075 plate.
  • 17 4
 @cueTIP: So buy an inferior product that's more environmentally wasteful.....so a few local bros can have jobs? I'll just put this out there-if you want to positively impact your local community and the global community, buy the most durable best products you can, only when you need to. Don't fucus on having the "coolest" bike-do focus on being a skilled and courteous rider. Maybe try to set your life up so you can bike or walk to work. Help out at community events. Coach some kids. Shop locally. And when a local product CAN be as good or better than one made by a bigger company make that choice.

But the choice here isn't "cheap parts" or "expensive parts". It's cheaper better made parts vs expensive and inferior parts. Unless only local BC folks are buying your product, you're just as reliant on the global supply chain for your business model, and you're also contributing to the waste that a global supply chain causes.

Finally, I'm also pretty sure that Shimano pays their folks decent wages, and notably decent wages for the Japanese workers (SLX/105 and up stuff is made there). Maybe....juuuuuust maybe crankarms aren't the best application of the passion and expertise you have.
  • 7 1
 @cueTIP: While I am all for supporting local manufacturers, it is hard to justify a product that is both significantly more expensive and technically inferior to the mass produced options. There are loads of small manufacturers making unique products that have real world advantages. These cranks just are not one of them. Just because something can be CNC machined does not mean it should be.
  • 4 12
flag jessemeyers FL (Jun 1, 2023 at 9:10) (Below Threshold)
 I’ve bent six pairs of Shimano cranks (4 XTR and 2 XT) in the last year and it’s been extremely frustrating. The last pair only got thru 6 rides. I ordered these knowing the weight penalty but hopefully they last.
  • 1 1
 @nnowak: he’s unfortunately argued that for himself my stating that a forge die could be purchased for about 5k, i am sure with some thinking you could get 3 sizes from 3 sets and then buy in forged blanks to cnc to final form, just like Hope do.

The argument against seems to be that the equipment is expensive but what small manufacturer forges, heat treats, machines and anodises parts all in-house and why would you need to?
  • 8 2
 @justanotherusername: Hey, I am not saying you should/should not buy locally. But outsourcing for forged blanks still means you have to invest in the die, die maintenance and you still have to bring the parts in-house for final machining then back out to a heat treatment facility. I'm saying, if you want there to be local manufacturing jobs for small businesses that is the compromise you have to make. If you don't care, then whatever it's no skin off my back. I make plumbing components for high-end builders, military, healthcare and industrial applications.

And what is the per-part cost of running a single crank through a small VMC? You clearly have zero manufacturing experience. Even with a programmable air vice or swappable pallet you are setting up for each individual crank arm and running all your tool changes for a single part. It makes far more sense to move up to at least a VF2 or better yet Okuma with twin 4th axis indexers and swappable fixtures so you can cut 16-32 cranks on both sides.
  • 9 1
 @wyorider: My comment clearly says "Or we can just come to terms with the fact that local companies will cater to those of us who care and will spend a premium just to support one-another". That is exactly what NSB does. They cater to the people who care about what they do and ignore the rest. Same as I do with my plumbing valves. I don't really care if you personally want to buy mass-produced things from overseas. That's not my target market. I target people and organizations with more money that value what I produce for their own reasons. Neither is better than the other, they both have their niche.
  • 11 0
 @jessemeyers: I can understand one or two, but if you're breaking 6 cranks in a year you gotta be doing something wrong lol.... or just very heavy.
  • 3 1
 @ranchitup: It's legit frustrating. I weight 190lbs with riding gear. I'm buying a new bike with more rear travel and the NSB cranks. Hopefully that will solve it. Shimano has been replacing the cranks under warranty but said they wouldn't replace anymore XTR cranks so I switched to XT. The first pair lasted 3 months but the second pair only 6 rides. I talked with Nick Murdick and one of the engineers from Shimano at the Sedona Bike Festival (before the XTs starting failing) and he didn't have any recommendations unfortunately. At first he suggested Saints but then said they won't work for 12 speed chainline on a trail bike. I've tried RaceFace Next R but also had to warranty 3 pairs because of carbon delamination issues so not super stoked on those either. Are there cranks you would recommend that would work for Shimano 12sp with a 52mm chainline?
  • 2 0
 @jessemeyers: I personally run XT's so I don't think I can give you a recommendation, although going shorter length would definitely help. Hopefully the NSBs work out for you.
  • 1 0
 @ranchitup: Thanks, me too! I had been running 170mm and then with the most recent pair of XT I switched to 165mm. Going for 165mm with NSB too.
  • 3 0
 @jessemeyers: Out of curiosity, are you breaking other stuff frequently too or just cranks? I just broke my second pair of cranks (one Shimano Zee, one RF Atlas) but I also break pedals, many many wheels, hubs, axles, etc
  • 1 0
 @jessemeyers: go shorter! Assuming they just made them less long but have the same design, 155 should be more durable. And shorter cranks don't have any significant downsides. I'm 6'4" running 145's. It felt super strange the first couple rides and I had some buyers remorse. But then I got used to it and now switching between 145's and 165's on two different bikes (with gearing adjusted between the two) I don't have a preference, but the 145's are nice for the ground clearance. In theory they also have body position related advantages descending but that's not something that's made a huge difference for me. If you're bending that many cranks going to 155's may be a good idea.
  • 3 0
 @cueTIP: "because you cannot (or should not) machine down a forged part as it disrupts the grain of the metal which reduces its strength significantly"

That isn't a true statement in terms of reducing strength significantly (in regards to aluminum). It depends on your manufacturing process but aligning the grain structure to account for forging and using robotic compaction on forged/heat treated/machined (in that order) parts will increase your fatigue life by a huge factor. We used to do that at a previous automotive company (although the pressure applied in robotic compaction was a closely guarded secret). Non compacted aluminum saw fatigue life of around 100k cycles where compacted aluminum saw upwards of 1x10^6 (a million) cycles (actual empirical testing).

We were also able to get the yield/ultimate stress of 6061-T6 aluminum up to 50k/55k psi (measured). So machining a forged part does not make it weaker, but it also depends on your process and how much material you are shaving off during machining.

Now is this practical for a mtb application? Probably not, since it would be cost prohibitive.
  • 1 1
 @IsaacWislon82: in the last year the only other bike part part that broke on me was a pedal spindle which I think was just defective. Everything else on my bike is dialed. I have a 2020 Giant Reign Advanced Pro 29, Fox X2 shock, Fox 38 170mm fork, WAO Union rims on Hydras, XTR 12 speed drivetrain, Bike Yoke dropper, i9 stem, PRO handlebars, NSB pedals.
  • 2 0
 @sdurant12: I’ve considered it but there aren’t really any good options that I’ve found. What cranks will work with my drivetrain that are shorter than 165mm and not 5Dev.
  • 1 0
 @sdurant12: also keep in mind this is a trail bike that has to climb too so less than 160mm prob isn’t practical. I’d have to use a smaller chaining but then I’d spin out descending.
  • 9 0
 @ranchitup: I just listened to a podcast with Remy Metallier, he said in the last 2-3 years he had one broken wheel and one broken crank (from casing a landing on the crank).

6 cranks a year in 2023 makes no sense.
  • 1 0
 @schili: I agree. It’s very frustrating.
  • 1 0
 @schili: I should clarify. The crank arms are bending. Not breaking. The bend in the drive side crank causes the chainring to wobble and drop the chain.
  • 2 0
 @jessemeyers: OK, this makes even less sense. Are these the current model direct mount cranks or something older with a spider?
  • 2 0
 @jessemeyers: Have you tried hope cranks. I believe they fit Shimano chain lines and having held them they certainly seem like they have a lot of material.
  • 2 0
 @nnowak: the first pair that bent were XTR cranks model MT900. Those are the ones that Shimano launched their 12 speed line with cause the new ones weren’t ready. They look like XT cause they have pinch bolts. When those bent I was the second owner and didn’t have warranty so I bought a new pair of XTR cranks MT9100. I went thru three pairs with one pair lasting two rides (at some decent size jumplines). Shimano replaced them all under warranty but with the most recent replacement said it was the last time. I still have the XTR cranks new in the box if anyone wants to buy them. Then I bought XT cranks from my local bike shop. Those lasted 3 months and then switched from 170mm to 165mm in hopes that would help and then those only got 6 rides before they bent. They all bend in the same way. When the pedals are supposed to be horizontal/level with the ground they droop below the centerline of the bottom bracket. And depending on how much they have bent, the chainring which is direct mount to the crank arm will wobble which causes it to rub the chain guide (MRP) and cause more frequent chain drops (especially when backpedaling).
  • 1 0
 @hmstuna: not yet. They were on my short list but availability was an issue when I was last looking.
  • 1 0
 @schili: he weighs 60lbs less, rides bikes with more travel, and is a much better rider so likely doesn’t case jumps and generally lands smoother.
  • 1 0
 @wyorider: last I checked it was only some XT/Ultegra and XTR/Dura Ace that are made in Japan, sadly.
  • 2 0
 @cueTIP: I part own a machineshop producing own brand product, well aware of how a vmc works and part density, we don’t run any 3 axis machines anymore but you are stuck in the theoretical - a $400 crank that you could easily fit 4 of on the smallest VMC you can imagine (when most are way bigger) is hardly a poor setup and will run for some time - it’s high profit low qty work.

An as for outsourcing - we outsource locally, within 50 miles of our factory, how is that not giving locals work and jobs?
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: You own a machine shop. I own a MANUFACTURING company that uses machine shops on occasion. Just because you own a machine shop does not mean you have any clue about production scale product. That isn't your niche and that's fine. A good friend of mine owns Promac Industries here in Calgary. When Sean has questions about maximizing repeatable throughput he calls and asks one of my production engineers. When we have questions about best practice on a new material or need help with complex toolpathing/prototyping. We call him.
  • 1 0
 @rybrentd: The issue isn't minor machining after forging. It's reducing the structural length after forging that is the problem. A 165mm crank is a full 10mm shorter than a 175mm. You could theoretically make a single forging with an elongate section for pedal interface holes then drill them at different lengths and trim the end with a CNC but that disrupts the grain structure of the forging as it bisects the stress regime. That's why high quality forged cranks all have their own forging dies rather than "adaptable" forgings. There is no issue with through-holes or surface finishing like trimming the forging joint line etc. It's just cutting significant amounts off the end of the crank.
  • 1 0
 @jessemeyers: well, these are available in 155 and 160. And if you're worried about the shorter cranks being worse for climbing - don't be. At 6'4 I'm running 145 cranks at the moment. And my experience is that if you adjust your gearing, you'll be fine. When adjusting crank length, you want to adjust gearing so that the 'foot speed' stays the same. Your natural RPM will change, and it will feel different at first, but once you get used to it there isn't a significant difference in my experience. With a shorter cranks you can fit in more pedal strokes. With a longer crank each pedal stroke does more. If you change your gearing accordingly it balances out. It does use your legs a bit differently (it's like doing 20 half squats vs 10 full depth squats), but I haven't noticed that impacting anything for me. Shorter cranks engage my hamstrings less (when going back to my road bike with 175's, my hamstrings get more sore), but I don't feel significantly weaker with either setup.

The biggest advantage with shorter cranks for me is technical climbing, and generally being able to put in pedal strokes where I otherwise couldn't (both because of the extra clearance, and because the pedal strokes are "quicker"/higher RPM). This includes pedaling on descents. I don't race much, but was upper midpack in expert in the California Enduro Series races I did last year, if that's helpful (sometimes I read strong opinions on the internet and don't know how much to trust them).

The biggest disadvantage I've noticed with the shorter cranks is doing big "pedal kicks" while climbing in places where I only have time for a single kick of the pedals. Bringing it back to the squat example, doing a single pedal kick is like trying to jump as high as possible, but now with short cranks I'm not allowed to use as much of my range of motion. With 145 cranks, I've lost some of that single pedal kick oomph. The extra pedal clearance is awesome, but with 145's it feels like I have more than is necessary, at least with my current BB height. Maybe 145 would be my ideal length with a bike with an even lower BB, but with what I have now I think going back up to 155 will be a good middle ground. I don't see myself willingly going back to 165s, as overall I prefer the 145's.

Hope this helps you decide if you might want to try shorter. Tldr: if you adjust your gearing, the only big difference going to shorter cranks is extra ground clearance and the ability to pedal through rockier terrain. There are some other subtle differences (pedal kicks, impact on perceived seat angle because your pedals are more "under you" in the power stroke, change in dropper height due to bottom of pedal stroke being higher), and you may not need the extra pedal clearance (no matter how much clearance you have, you won't be pedaling through certain sections of trail) so YMMV. For me, at 6'4, with my current bike, I think 155 will be a good middle ground.
  • 2 0
 @wyorider: yep, better off supporting the Taiwan economy than the guys who actually ride their products.
How do you know they are inferior? Assumption?
I'll buy Canadian or North American made at a substantial price increase over something made overseas any day.
  • 1 0
 @sdurant12:

Short cranks sound like bomb if you're doing fast flow trails/berms etc if you can get a bike with a super low bbh. Techincal climbs too, but the lack of 'oomph' on the ratchety stuff would have me thinking 155-60 more appropriate. I get a lot of pedal strikes on the ups and don't hit the bash guard all that much, so next cranks I'm definitely going shorter.
  • 1 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: to be clear most stuff that used to be ratchety I can pedal through more easily now. The oomph is something I miss for single big moves where I can't get speed into it. Ex a big up and over in a slow techy jumble of rocks.

(Well, actually, all of the above was my experience on 29er - I'm now experimenting with dual 27.5 on current gen Pivot Firebird, which has quite a stupid high BB stock. Dual 27.5 brings the BB down to 330 with my current setup (low flip chip and 180 27.5 fork - I basically have the stock geo but ~26mm lower front and back). Flow trails are so good. Unfortunately chainring strikes have become a problem when riding chunky DH trails, so the BB needs to go back up a bit, which means I may as well go back up in crank length too. My earlier comment was getting real long, so decided not to include all of these extra details. For most people not getting weird with their build, 145 is probably shorter than needed. I think 155 is a sweet spot with current MTB geo and chainring sizes. I've considered getting a cassette with a 9 tooth cog so I can downsize my chainring 2-4 teeth without losing top end but it feels like a bit much).
  • 1 0
 @sdurant12: Thanks for sharing. What size chainring are you running? I'm currently running 32 with a 10-51 cassette. I have ordered the NSB in 165mm so hopefully those are strong enough to not bend/break.
  • 1 0
 @cueTIP: I assumed you would use a different forging die for each crank length rather than a one size fits all die and just trimming and machining down. I agree with you that the latter wouldn't be a good idea and would compromise strength. A die optimized for the appropriate crank length and grain flow for that length would be the way to go, although that would increase tooling costs, changeover times, etc.

I don't think a lot of people understand how expensive it would be to set up your own company (as you outlined) specifically to just make quality cranks rather than outsourcing to a larger plant that already has the capacity to fabricate it.
  • 1 0
 @cueTIP: well as don’t have a machine shop you seem quite happy to comment on the machinery and techniques required to make parts using the method.

And we make our own product here, so we are a MANUFACTURING company, doing more than just machining - we just have the common sense to outsource anodising, coating and heat treat as you seem to do when you need to get something difficult / precise made….

Which is why I find it odd you took the concept of outsourcing aspects of product production, when it’s what you do yourself.
  • 2 0
 @jessemeyers: 30t right now. With 165s I was on 32. I could def go down to 28 with the 145s. I think hope is right when they say -10mm is -2 teeth
  • 1 1
 @wyorider: You haven't a clue about any of this. There's very little environtmental waste in CNC part manufacturing. The cutting fluid is recycled thru the machines for hundreds of pieces, and it goes thru filters that remove any metal shavings. Those shavings from the billet cut away as the part is manufactured are sold back to the aluminum foundry where its melted down and becomes part of another section of billet. And barring an impact failure, overloading the weight of rider applying force to those cranks, or YEARS of fatigue cycles at normal riding intervals, its not unusual for a CNC'ed set of cranks to last just as long as a forged set. I have CNC'ed cranks which I've owned since the early 90s which haven't failed or cracked yet.

Shimano does NOT pay the majority of their folks a decent wage until you consider what a decent wage in another country might be. This is why the majority of their manufacturing is done in countries other than Japan. The average factory worker in Malaysia makes about RM 1700 per month. Today's exchange puts $1CAD at about RM 3.4, in other words... that factory worker is making the equivalent of about $500CAD per month. Now the cost of living in Malaysia is signifcantly lower (like 90% lower than what it costs to live in Whistler, BC) so $500 CAD a month before deductions isn't a terrible wage, but don't for an instant think shimano moved most all their manufacturing to other countries in Asia in a bid to pay workers a decent wage.
  • 1 0
 @cueTIP: I don’t believe what you’re saying about trimming a one-size-fits-all forging weakening the crank is true in any significant manner in practice. For starters, the section being trimmed is the lowest stressed part of the crank, and shorter cranks have a smaller bending moment on them for a given load.
  • 1 0
 @jessemeyers: are you running flat pedals with a wide platform by any chance? If so I t might be worth taking a look at your foot position on the pedal. I’ve bent a few cranks of various types from hard landings with my foot a bit too far outboard.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: We have 4 HAAS VF4 SS, 4 UMC 750s, 6 LT3000 EXs with 12' bar feeders and a rather haggard VF0-E with a TR160 trunnion in it, of course I know about them. I have literally millions of my own dollars invested in them. I don't know of any North American forging houses that would have time for short-run low-profit forgings right now. If you do let me know. Hell, we're having a hard time getting our mill to run some custom 6065 extrusions in Quebec right now. Every forging shop I've talked to recently is 6-12 months out on parts which is a really long time when you are going to have to run through at least 5-10 iterations of a design before you get one you are willing to send off for testing. Yeah, you would likely have at least half a dozen designs ready to go all at once, but that's still a long time to wait.

The whole process of bringing a forging to life is unbelievably expensive even for outsourced parts if it is something like a crank that has real and serious safety considerations. Small things with no real safety implications or that can be ludicrously over-engineered and will work as long as they're dimensionally accurate? Easy. Something where you need to optimize weight, strength and aesthetics? Not so easy.
  • 1 0
 @hg604: I'm running NSB pedals and I ride mid-foot (front to back) and as close to the crank arm as possible without rubbing.
  • 18 2
 North Shore Billet is one of those companies I love to support because they do it for the love of bikes and machining. They make parts that work, last, and look fine. I also love that they are giving 155mm and 160mm lengths which I have moved to myself and actually quite like. I don't get some peoples negativity around being given more options from a great manufacturer who has only ever released good product.

I'm happy to pay a little extra for something made by a rad company churning well made components out of Canada.

Worth a watch, Makers: North Shore Billet: youtu.be/wwhjsNR2xUE

I am just about to pull the trigger on an order for pewter cranks, bb, chainring, and tool - thanks NSB!
  • 3 0
 A little? Since when is three times the price a little? PS I absolutely love everything they make.
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: A little extra meaning a little extra share of wallet.
  • 1 0
 This stuff is jewelry like Chris King. Yeah, I'm sure it's made well and I like the idea of buying local just cause, but I'm dropping that kinda money for beauty let's be real. Shimano XT or Saints gives me all the actual performance needs I could probably ever utilize on a crank. I do like these a lot, but I also like custom titanium hardtails, which I also can't afford haha
  • 10 0
 35mm handlebars and 30mm have to be the two dumbest solutions to non-problems out there. Who the f' was riding along and thought "I think my crank spindle is flexing too much". Were they 500 lbs on a hardtail? Find me that person.

I do like that NSB has totally eschewed the long crank myth. 170mm is the longest they are making. Now if we could get other companies on board in shifting their production runs to shorter (165s are always out of stock), and even more dramatically, get the road bike world to do the same, then my hips and knees would be a lot happier. I can't even pedal my cross bike around a corner with its stupid 172.5 cranks.
  • 8 4
 The burning question that a few hundred people need to know the answer to:
"Will these DEFINITELY work with the Rocky Mountain Power play Dyname 4 Motor?
(Spindle length, etc)
Because if so, they will be a mandatory purchase.
  • 5 0
 I've emailed them to ask. The Powerplay uses a stock 149.5mm spindle, and the 151mm spindle is known to work well. So long as NSB offers a spindle length close to that, they should work. You can already get 165mm cranks that fit the Powerplay from Race Face.
  • 1 0
 Have you been able to confirm if they work?
  • 7 1
 Yes they're heavy. And yes they're expensive. But the biggest problem is that they don't come in purple.
  • 3 0
 SLX all day long...

Until they offer them in purple, or better 3D violet, then it's "TAKE MY MONEY!!!"
  • 4 0
 SLX arms-aftermarket purple chainring.
  • 2 0
 @ReformedRoadie: dunno, SLX cranks are easy to damage. Bent both crank arms (separately) in less than 2 weeks from brand new. Stripped both pedal threads in the third week. 210lbs and not that much of a sender either. Had better luck with XTs but still killed those too.
  • 6 0
 I vote for 24 mm axle as well (still on 2009 atlas FR cranks)
  • 3 1
 Anoter commercial advertisment without even a comment about the absurd price for an aluminum crank. You can by bullet-proof Race Face Era or e-thirteen TRS, both in carbon, for the same price. And they weight half a pound (200-250 grams) less!!!!!!
  • 1 0
 But not in the short length I want...
  • 3 0
 As the owner of several RF Cinch cranksets I just want to know if I can get the aluminum preload collar as a separate item. In my opinion the nylon collar with tiny screw is the only weak link with the RF Cinch design.
  • 4 0
 Cane Creek makes collars that work seamlessly with RF cranks.
  • 2 0
 @privateer-wheels: can confirm. Unfortunately they won't make a cinch crankset in less than 165mm, I emailed and asked. So if you want short cranks dont bother with Raceface
  • 1 0
 @wburnes: 165mm no longer considered short...what a time to be alive...


(FWIW, I'm on 165 now and would consider going shorter)
  • 7 1
 670g Nice
  • 5 0
 Short Crank arms....So hot right now.
  • 1 0
 I wish more "super-strong" aluminum cranks would use steel inserts for the threads. Just trashed a pair of RF Atlas cranks on a rock strike, the crank wasn't bent at all (nor was the pedal surprisingly) but the chromoly pedal threads absolutely wrecked the alu crank threads far past the point of saving with a tap. What's the point of a beefy crank with such a glaring weak point?
  • 4 0
 Steel threaded inserts are readily available. Drill out the old threads, tap new threads to accept the insert, install the steel insert. A good shop should be able to do this for you, or you can buy a kit and fix it yourself.
  • 2 0
 @nnowak: I've debated doing this with the Unior kit, but the kit cost more than the cranks....
  • 2 0
 Race Face cranks used to be built this way.
  • 3 0
 The real selling point here is that Rocky Mountain Powerplay riders now have an option for a short crank with the required RF Cinch mounting interface.
  • 1 0
 I've got the previous gen, tried and true, Raceface Atlas cranks. Stripped the paint off by submerging in Easy-Off Oven and Grill cleaner. A little bit of elbow grease to clean and polish and they look almost identical to these at over 60% the cost.
  • 9 4
 $420
Nice
  • 8 3
 $420
Nice
  • 9 4
 $420
Nice
  • 3 1
 $420
Nice
  • 2 1
 $420
Nice
  • 3 0
 Appleman >> this. Pinch bolts interface in both arms >>> preload collar.
And they come in purple.
  • 4 0
 Well, these are tested to a harsher standard. Appleman are tested to 4210 mountain, which is kind of the minimum bar for MTB. It's possible that the appleman cranks could also pass EFBE Tri Test gravity standard, and are totally fine spending days riding whistler. But I don't know if they are, and wouldn't put them on my park rig. These I probably will. I'm pretty sure I'm also influenced by the marketing (these are rad yoann cranks, while Appleman cranks are gravel cranks that come in pretty colors). But I really don't think Appleman is focused on DH/park, so I don't think I would trust them.

Here is more info on testing: www.efbe.de/tri-test-en.html has more info
  • 1 0
 I've worked a few times with 7075, and it's surprisingly tougher than standard 6061.

I'd be leery about an alum axle (spindle), but I'm sure it's been thoroughly modeled and tested.
  • 2 0
 Its great to have another option but I'll stick with my Shimano XT, no fiddly preload ring and no big 30mm axle, throw in well priced and durable and you've got a winner.
  • 1 0
 @wydopen Bombshell makes cranks 135-180mm. They have a weight limit listed for their models. Crazy popular in the BMX crowd. My daughter spun a used set of those cranks for 2yrs+ w/ no problems.
  • 8 4
 $420
Nice
  • 2 2
 FINALLY! An alternative and shorter length crank arm I can use on my Rocky Powerplay instead of the standard Race Face versions. I wonder if I'll actually be able to get some in the UK?
  • 5 0
 Remember, you can already get 165mm cranks that fit the Powerplay from Race Face.
  • 1 2
 I can literally buy 9 sets of iIXF cranks with BB an chainring from Amazon for the price of these cranks. Are these cranks 9 times better? UNLIKELY! I am not saying IXF cranks are that great, but these are not 900% better.

Get some SLX cranks and move on - decent weight, great price, last for a very long time!
  • 3 0
 155mm cranks are the new 820mm handlebars. Change my mind.
  • 1 0
 I saw a guy last weekend riding 155mm cranks. He was 6'4" and has a size 14 shoe. Though he was riding a size appropriate bike, XL or XXL, it looked like he stole the cranks off a 16" child's bike. It was so odd looking when he sprinted standing on the the pedals.
  • 3 0
 Talon because it really gets it claws in to your wallet?????
  • 2 0
 420 bucks for cranks that offer nothing ……… good luck, you ain’t getting my USDs
  • 1 0
 Made it thru all the comments-fairly good banter Decent subject matter, good interaction and aggression with just the right amount of Belittling! 5 star comment section.
  • 4 1
 $420
most excellent.
  • 2 4
 I like these guys. Small local machine shop. Not buying the crank because i just got the XO Transmission. Cool brand for the bros on the North Shore who run clapped Cromags with clapped XT groupos. I can hear the creaky links and BB from where i'm sitting as they climb up to do another lap.
  • 4 0
 On clapped out creaky Chromags and still faster than you, up and down.
  • 2 0
 And faster than me too for that matter Razz
  • 1 0
 For me the draw to them is the variety of crank arm lengths other then the main 3
  • 3 4
 Damn! Tough crowd here today! I love NSB. I already have their brake adaptors, Daemon pedals and Overlord stem...and I will buy more stuff from them for sure! They make great quality and nice looking parts.
  • 4 1
 @11six: stems, pedals and cranks. Expensive goods being pumped out with no identifiable improvement over cheaper and lighter items already on the market. Seems like people have had their fill and are happy to feedback their thoughts
  • 3 1
 that "tough crowd" literally explained exactly why it's much more than "great quality and nice looking" hahaha
  • 1 0
 Speaking of 820mm handlebars, would a few mind chiming in with a couple of companies making 820mm bars?
  • 1 0
 My Enve Minnaars are 808 but I didn’t know 820s were a thing
  • 1 0
 bontrager
  • 1 0
 I've got NS License bars and they come in 820mm. I've been running them for a few seasons and no issues.
  • 1 0
 I bought some protapers at 810, fully intending to cut them down to ~780, but never did. I quickly got used to them and can’t say going shorter again would feel better.
  • 1 0
 Bontrager 820mm cut down nicely to 770mm
  • 1 0
 Doom bars are mostly 880mm. Possibly not for DH though...
www.doombars.com/shop
  • 2 0
 Light, strong and cheap. Pick none.
  • 1 0
 genius, i'm stealing this!
  • 1 0
 i wonder if that grade of aluminum could withstand the toxicity of these bohemian commenters.
  • 1 0
 I want these but not the axle size. Bring back better bigger BIGGeR bearings.
  • 1 0
 these new cranks and their prices, the mtb industry has become disconnect with their consumerbase
  • 4 4
 I've bought aftermarket derailleur hangers from NSB and have been very impressed. Their build quality far exceeded OEM.
  • 1 0
 looks like a hope Nice chain ring tho
  • 3 1
 $420
Nice
  • 3 2
 Hey North Shore why should I buy you cranks over 5Dev ?
  • 30 0
 They won't break tup
  • 16 0
 Cause they aren't ugly.
  • 12 0
 NS cranks are waaaaay less likely to break. But why buy either when SLX cranks are ligher, stiffer and in every functional regard superior???
  • 6 0
 @wyorider: cause these look cooler*. Hard to argue with the performance/price of SLX (or any of Shimano cranks).

*subject to personal preference
  • 6 0
 They can withstand wheelies!
  • 4 2
 @mtmc99: I feel like sending a committing line is "cooler" if you're into rad culture (I am, grew up in the 80's and 90's). Nothing particularly rad or cool about expensive but underwhelming bike parts.
  • 2 0
 @PHeller: street wheelies at that!
  • 1 0
 @wyorider: hard to argue with that.
  • 14 0
 Because North Shore are good people and at least one of the people at 5Dev is an absolutely colossal dick head. Also because wont break riding down street.
  • 3 0
 @justanotherusername: I'd go one further and say NSB are great people. I trust them to make parts that won't just discombobulate. They teased cranks made in house several years back on a bike one of their employees built I believe - I'm willing to bet they test the living daylights out of parts before releasing them.
  • 2 2
 @justanotherusername: deets on dickhead? My local shop sells 5dev and I like giving them money, but I have limits. Are we talking bad customer service, racism, homophobia, trump supporter..?
  • 3 0
 @jdejace: whoever was running their customer service had what became a pretty public spat with a Youtuber over a broken crank (along with a video of the crank failing while riding through NYC). Both parties came off as a*sholes but it was definitely bad PR
  • 4 0
 They basically admitted that they knew about cranks failing but didn't warn customers, and ignored the issue when pressed. They quickly offered a refund or replacement, but didn't address the issue of radio silence on failures.
  • 2 0
 @PHeller: found it for anytime curious. I didn't take 5dev's response to mean they were aware of a manufacturing problem. But yes, their representative should go back to CS school. The guy whose cranks broke wheelie-ing through traffic is a douche too, but still a bad look on 5dev's part.
  • 2 0
 $420
Nice
  • 2 0
 $420
Nice
  • 1 0
 Hahahahaha I fuckin love you guys
  • 1 1
 my fathers breasts were peirced by eagle talons and it flew away to devour him. Thanks for the reminder
  • 1 0
 SO FREAKING COOL. Well done NSB!!!
  • 1 0
 They'll match the chromag doctahawk frame
  • 1 0
 Beautiful cranks. Certainly cheaper than eeWings.
  • 1 0
 i liked it more in the early 1990s when it was called the Kooka I-Beam
  • 1 0
 Black will look better on my green norco fluid but I want silver sooo bad
  • 2 0
 KOOKA
  • 1 0
 beat you to it in the comments and TOTALLY kooka! fwiw props to kooka, i snapped one of their crankarms when they were still around and they sent me a replacement even though the cranks had been part of a trade show demo build and i wasn't the original owner.
  • 2 2
 Wicked Lever finger.sent me one please.
  • 1 0
 why so expensive?
  • 1 0
 Made in Canada, not Taiwan. Their machine shop is located right next door to Chromag in Whistler, and I believe they still make a lot of Chromag's Canadian-made cnc'ed components.
  • 2 0
 @mattmatthew:its cool yes, very cool, but 420$ cool? Idk…. Cranks are cranks, they all do the same thing, if weight and durability are no different from other cranks available for half the price, I have a hard time finding a reason to get these other than have 250 extra bucks to spend on bling factor
  • 1 0
 @Maxwrbike: personally i wouldn't spend $420 on a crankset but it's not completely unreasonable for someone that likes something that looks extra nice. all my bikes run gx or nx cranks. they're pretty much all the same to me. but when i say "unreasonable" i mean $420 vs say the price of eewings for $1200. yeah, $1200. well everyone is different i suppose. some people have more disposable income than others.
  • 1 2
 Drop them by 100$ and add a tip option at checkout
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