Now THAT Was a Bike: 1993 Klein Adroit

Nov 24, 2015
by Mike Kazimer  
1993 Klein Adroit - Team Storm

In the early 1990s cross-country racing was approaching its heyday in the United States, with the likes of John Tomac, Ned Overend, and Tinker Juarez battling it out at NORBA National races across the country. Mountain bike technology was rapidly advancing, but hardtails and cantilever brakes still reigned supreme, although suspension forks were becoming more and more common, and the advent of V-brakes was just around the corner.

The 1993 Klein Adroit featured in this edition of Now THAT Was a Bike was assembled by Martin Kozaczek of Second Spin Cycles, built up to mirror the bike that Tinker Juarez raced to his first World Cup victory at Mount St. Anne. Although the frame isn't the actual one that Tinker raced on, according to Martin it was likely one of the team's backups, and its rarity is further increased thanks to the original custom paint job. After the 1993 season Tinker went on to firmly cement his legend status by garnering multiple national titles for cross-country and 24-hour races, and even now, after over 40 years of racing, the dreadlocked hardman is still a force to be reckoned with on two wheels.


1993 Klein Adroit - Team Storm
The Adroit has Klein's signature horizontal dropouts, with every bit of extra material removed to shave weight. Shimano's XTR gruppo was still a recent development, but it was quickly gaining in popularity among professional racers and weekend warriors alike.
1993 Klein Adroit - Team Storm
Action Tec's titanium chainrings are mounted to a set of anodized violet Grafton cranks, which spin on a press-fit bottom bracket. The underside of Tinker's signature Look clipless pedals was downright frightening - those sharp edges are enough to make shins quiver in fear.


Constructed from oversized aluminum tubing, the Adroit has all the features that Gary Klein's frames were known for – an integrated head set, press-fit bottom bracket, and internal cable routing. Internal cable routing is currently back in fashion, but Klein was on of the earliest manufacturers to include this feature, one that caused plenty of hair pulling and cursing by mechanics trying to coax a stubborn cable out of the narrow exit port. It did give the bike a very clean look, and combined with the Team Storm paint job and abundance of anodized parts the Adroit Team is the epitome of a high end race bike from this era.

Speaking of anodizing, 3-D Violet was still the hot color for components in 1993 thanks to a collaboration between Ringlé and Grafton Performance. Beginning in 1991 the two American companies began to release anodized violet components - cranks, stems, pedals, hubs, skewers, and even bottle cages, and soon the color was inescapable.


1993 Klein Adroit - Team Storm
More anodized goodies from Grafton, this time in the form of their Speed Controller cantilever brakes.
1993 Klein Adroit - Team Storm
Front suspension was handled by a custom painted RockShox Mag 21 fork, which offered a whopping 45mm of air sprung travel.


1993 Klein Adroit - Team Storm
Klein's Mission Control system has the bars welded directly to the stem, which is then secured into the fork's steerer tube with an expanding wedge. The wide bar trend was still years and years away, and the MC1's width was under 600mm.
1993 Klein Adroit - Team Storm
Ringle Components took care of the Adroit's purple seatpost, topped with Avocet's Air O2, one of the most popular saddles of the time.



Visit the gallery for high resolution and additional images


Thanks to The Pro's Closet and Second Spin Cycles for facilitating another trip down memory lane. On a side note, Second Spin Cycles is still interested in tracking down Tinker's original 1993 Klein Adroit race bike - drop them a line if you know where it may be.


162 Comments

  • + 323
 Miami Vicycle
  • + 21
 I would give you more than 1 prop if i could.
  • - 41
flag RedBurn (Nov 24, 2015 at 15:57) (Below Threshold)
 you could create a lot different pinkbike accounts to do that! @johnmoore55 used this technique to have more chance to win the Remedy. just kidding Smile
  • + 1
 Zap straps to hold the brake cable end. I am pulling out my pleated khakis and going full Vice!
  • + 1
 Got'em!
  • + 5
 I couldn't afford this bike back in the day, but tried to build my bikes emulating this one. My bikes since then were and are by far superior, but I am still jealous of this ones owner... A real beauty!
  • + 1
 just weird seeing that bike with rockshox forks. All the Klein's we used to lust over had Klein own stupidly oversized rigid fork.

I remember quickly riding a buddies Klein Attitude during a pre-race warm up and having the cr*p beaten out of me by the bike. Was very glad to get back on my KHS Team with its True Temper OX Ultra II cromoly tubing.
  • + 119
 THE PEOPLE DEMAND PURPLE DROPPER POSTS
  • + 9
 Don't know how well this link will work but I've seen similar purple stanchioneed boxxers in the flesh before
m.fotos.mtb-news.de/p/1531738
  • + 5
 That boxxer is hideous
  • + 14
 that is chester
  • + 7
 I had that bottle cage! Nothing says success in mountain biking better than a purple Ringle cage!
  • + 6
 Do suspension companies know how much profit they would reel in if they did multi-colored stanchions?!
  • + 29
 Yes, no profit
  • + 5
 you'd probably get some bastard hipsters buying mountain bikes because of some rainbow colored forks!
  • + 7
 .... I would buy the shit out of rainbow forks.... But then my left pedal is pink and my right one is orange and I have one orange and one lime green grip, blue stem and blue saddle on my dirt jumper. I may be a bastard hipster.
  • + 1
 I might as well ride a fixie and wear capri jeans and a roadie hat with the brim up.
  • + 50
 This is Mission Control to Major Tom,
That big ass stem is going to hurt My Dong,
Take your protein pills and put your helmets on,
Ground Control to Major Tom (Ten, Nine, Eight, Seven, Six)
Commencing countdown, engines on (Five, Four, Three)
Check ignition and may God's love be with you (Two, One, Liftoff)

..... Over the bars
  • + 22
 Every one of these articles make me so glad for what I ride today. Those are not brakes, their speed modulators. And those tires....
  • + 7
 I often wonder how I survived the 90s riding some of the equipment that was available back then.
  • + 2
 the brake lever gave me flash backs to when I had a similar looking copy set and the whole clamp assembly piece twisted and literally bend in half.
  • + 1
 So true. I remember so many parts failing in the 90's. On my modern bikes, shit just doesnt break! Super cool to look at the vintage stuff, but would not want to ride it!
  • + 11
 Such a rad bike in its day... a real part of MTB history. I don't think have been components since, which were as lustworthy as the purple Grafton stuff The lack of internet meant a lot less exposure to this stuff so when you saw it in the flesh or a good pic in a mag it was drool worthy. Different times.
  • + 6
 Its true - when you actually laid eyes on a bike like this, it was jaw dropping.
  • + 4
 Yeah the paint jobs on the Kleins back in the day were drool-worthy. Like candy coatings.
  • + 2
 remember savin every penny for anodized parts. bought a set of red ano critical racing cantilever brakes. they were the worst brakes i ever had but they looked ace haha.
  • + 15
 We have the matching helmet too. Wink bit.ly/TPC_Tinkers_Helmet
  • + 5
 That is godly.
  • + 3
 I was going to say TPC has the actual bike I believe - it was in the front of their shop when I stopped in. SO purple!
  • + 5
 Gorgeous helmet.
Matching jacket & jersey. Wink i.imgur.com/mibzHZh.jpg
Unfortunately, both are size extra small.
  • + 10
 Me too!
Plus a matching bike, jersey, pants and shoes... Wink
i43.photobucket.com/albums/e389/kailinds/Bike/klein_storm_outfit.jpg

My helmet is 1 of 5 originally painted at Klein. Two went to Tinker, two to Sara Ellis and mine is that extra one.
And the bike has Tinker's original wheelset on, they even have the inspection numbers from the '93 Worlds. Smile
  • + 3
 My guess is Tinker has the actual bike he won his first World Cup on.
  • + 3
 Well this escalated quickly. Fake internet points to everyone!
  • + 2
 Sadly Tinker doesn't have that bike
  • + 12
 Press fit bb, press fit headset, internal cable routing. Everything old is new again.
  • - 6
flag makripper (Nov 24, 2015 at 16:38) (Below Threshold)
 just like this comment on every "now that was a bike" article"
  • + 7
 Really @makripper? Because I just searched all the "Now THAT was a bike" articles, and mine is literally the only comment on all eight articles so far that says "everything old is new again". Life pro tip for you: do a bit of research before sticking your foot in your mouth.
  • + 19
 *Grabs popcorn.
  • - 7
flag makripper (Nov 25, 2015 at 7:28) (Below Threshold)
 not the exact words you idiot. The same everything is old is new again bullshit every time. Don't be so sensitive.
  • - 3
 Sorry, who's the one being sensitive here @makripper? Don't worry though, I get it. Being 15 is pretty rough.
  • - 1
 you tell me. you're the one who did "all the research" into trying to prove me wrong. Which you didn't. emo guy over here pahahhaha
  • - 1
 Emo? You're the one getting all worked up and calling me an idiot. Calm yourself.
  • - 2
 who's worked up? not the guy laughing is arse off over here lol
  • - 1
 And yet you can't seem to let it go. lol
  • - 1
 Let it goooo, let it gooooo...
  • + 0
 My two year old loves Frozen. Let it go is her favourite song.
  • + 0
 Cool story guy.
  • + 7
 I was just telling a young (18 years old) riding buddy of mine a few days ago on our Friday ride about ultra narrow bars we used to run. I had a set of Hot Pink Answer Hyper lite bars that were under 600mm. Mega squirrely handling! He couldn't believe there were bars under 780mm!
  • - 12
flag deeeight (Nov 24, 2015 at 15:41) (Below Threshold)
 not really squirrely if pared to a proper length stem. Today we use wide bars and short stems but its the same as narrow bars and long stems. Look at road bikes, they still run narrow/long.
  • - 3
 So true @deeeight I actually was running them on a 100mm stem that I subsequently swapped out for a 150mm Answer A-TAC stem. (it was purple anodized come to think of it!).
  • + 34
 i strongly disagree, squirrely as fuck
  • + 5
 I am 40 and road narrow and long stem.... stupid squirrely. Just a hold out from road bikes that mtb hadn't she'd yet. Ridiculous to have the bars in front of the front axle
  • + 4
 It's safe to say that my 150mm Syncros Cattleprod stem / Answer Hyperlite combo BITD handled absolutely nothing like my current 50mm RF Atlas stem / NEXT 760mm bar!
  • + 6
 And running a road bike set up would still be squirrely af on a mountain bike trail...
  • - 14
flag deeeight (Nov 24, 2015 at 17:52) (Below Threshold)
 Yeah and frame geometry was completely different too, but perhaps you lacked technical skill, because lots of us didnt and never had issues with narrow bars and long stems and short travel or even rigid forks.
  • + 14
 Always quick with the jabs Deeight..... I don't claim to be Steve Peat but as an old school high level XC racer BITD and who's home trails are now the North Shore I think I have at least reasonable technical skillz. Loading the front wheel with a huge stem, and gaining steering response with a narrow bar is exactly the opposite of a short stem / wide bar combo. It's the road bike inspired shitty 'NORBA' geometry that set MTB design back for years.
  • + 6
 Spot on @wallheater. Your sane skills, your trails on the Klein and then a modern bike.....the modern bike runs laps around the old. Hell, a modern "trail bike" would destroy a World Cup DH bike from anywhere in the 90's and the very early 2000's
  • + 9
 @deeeight: " not really squirrely if pared to a proper length stem. Today we use wide bars and short stems but its the same as narrow bars and long stems. Look at road bikes, they still run narrow/long."
This may be the dumbest comment ever.
Last time I checked, when I was road racing, I never encounter rock gardens, log overs, or drops...
  • - 16
flag deeeight (Nov 24, 2015 at 19:14) (Below Threshold)
 Cleary then you fail to understand how levers work, or for that matter, have apparently never cross raced, and know little about the racing history of this sport from that time period or what the riders of the period could accomplish on bikes such as the one being featured.
  • + 6
 Do you mean 'raced cross' rather than "cross raced"? Or are you talking about copulating with mixed race people?

Regardless, descending wise, even the most talented riders of the day on old shit horses like the one above would get destroyed by a half decent rider on a modern bike.
  • + 4
 I race pro Enduro and DH, and cross in the winter. I can honestly say the long stem and narrow bars is squirrely af. It's not simply a thing of a slightly longer stem gives more leverage, so you can get away with a narrower bar. Where it physically puts you on a bike in your normal attack stance plays a huge part as well. And have you seen a cross track? It's nothing like the technical trails mountain bikes see everyday, lacking roots and rock gardens, jumps and high speed berms. Not comparable. Still squirrely
  • + 2
 we always used to put the shortest stem available (dannys stem from roox) paired with the widest dh bar (answer dh alumilite or club roost go fast) to our bikes, as we did a little trials back in the days. always hated the common xc stems with 130mm length and the narrow 560mm flatbars at the times.
  • + 8
 Deeeight, you seem miserable and I feel bad for you that it seems so important for you to always be "right" on some obscure Internet forum.
  • - 10
flag deeeight (Nov 25, 2015 at 5:37) (Below Threshold)
 I think you're remembering the years wrong since the Roox Danny stems didn't come out until the late 90s, and the club roost and Answer riser bars weren't until about 1995-96. Club Roost got their start in mountain bikes making really long I-beam profile alloy stems.
  • + 5
 @deeeight - clearly you fail to understand how body position (in conjunction with leverage) works...a dumb comment, followed by an equally dumb response.
Some of us on this site are not kids. I have been in the sport since Tomac was the new kid on a Mongoose (his BMX sponsor). Yes, there were riders killing it on rigid bikes with useless brakes and shit tires...but no one was going nearly as fast as WC downhillers are now and no one even dreamed of doing something like Rampage.
Road riders, specifically racers, are concerned with being aero ( narrow, flat back)...not the biggest priority for mountain biking.
Get a clue.
And why in the world do you have a PLUS next to your name?
  • + 1
 @deeeight - first it was the answer atac or the controltech stems in its shortest versions with 25 degrees rise for trials and in the end of the 90ies we used the dannys stem from roox
  • + 4
 Sorry PB folks! I didn't mean to get this Deetdeedee fellow all riled up! Shutting up now...,
  • - 12
flag deeeight (Nov 25, 2015 at 8:14) (Below Threshold)
 Whatever ReformedSchmuck, you've done it all, seen it all apparently, and have answers on every subject. Strange that you're even younger than me and yet fancy yourself like you're a peer of Tomac. Tomac was the new kid on a Mongoose mountain bike in 1986. You can lecture about why roadies go narrow and low yet you somehow failed to grasp that THAT was exactly why mountain bike racers did it also. The speeds today? Really? So riders today routinely break 100kmh in the downhills like they were doing 20 years ago? I think you're knowledge of 80s and 90s racing comes from reading about it in magazines alone, but not actually doing any of it.
  • + 6
 Yes, '86 when I got my first mountain bike to train for riding the moto...back when the only Enduros were on motorcycles and required a time keeping element that would blow most PBer's minds.
Never in a million years would consider myself a peer to Tomac...perhaps the best all round rider ever (only got to see him road race in person).
At the time no one knew any better and made the most of what was available and what they knew. That is why mountain racers did it, they would still be doing it today if it offered any advantage. At the top end of the sport, XC or DH, or any sport, winning trumps everything.

Sorry you are so miserable. Sorry you have resorted to name calling and actually took the time to look at my profile. So sad. If I poled PBers you would be voted #1 as the person on here who thinks they know everything.
Good day to you, sir. I am done here.
  • + 6
 Deeeight dumbing down the comment section one article at a time.
  • - 10
flag deeeight (Nov 25, 2015 at 10:19) (Below Threshold)
 Better than just being a dummy all the time in all ways like you jay.
  • + 2
 D8... you could be Trumps wingman.
  • + 4
 No, he could be mine.
  • + 9
 That XTR derailleur is one sexy piece of work.
  • + 4
 This model, and the one following this, were the pinnacle of XTR design in my opinion. Most subsequent efforts were garish by comparison.
  • + 1
 I still have rapid rise dual control nightmares.
  • + 4
 I think some of these old hardtails are getting a little same same same. The old full suspension bikes are far more interesting: Klein mantra, trek Y bikes, mountain cycle San Andreas, AMP Research with parallelogram fork, trek 9500 from 1992, Storm H2 etc. These bikes are older than many PBers and I think they will blow the minds of people who never saw how bad things used to be. Feel free to add more below .
  • + 4
 You need to know what you're looking at. They are NOT the same. We old fast bastards cut our teeth on rigid bikes and insane geometry. Hard as F. You kids are soft, do 100 endos and then we'll talk.
  • + 3
 @iamamodel Or the a early Fors frames. They were well ahead of the time. 6" out back when you could only get a 3-4" fork.
  • + 1
 From afar a lot of the old frames were the same because they were 'double diamond' style (i.e. a normal frame) however the detail on them is what made them stand out, and the Klein here was pretty much king of the detail and produced the cleanest looking bike.
Still preferred the green to white to pink fade over the purpler though.
  • + 2
 @Justinvp , my first two mtbs were rigid and the first one predated the one featured. I do know what I am looking at. And I would prefer to see more interesting bikes and I'm sure others would too.
  • + 1
 Fartymarty, yes, I should have included the Foes Weasel and LTS. They were insane for their time.
  • + 7
 Same model Seinfeld had hanging on his wall?
  • - 3
 no Seinfeld's was a green klein, when the production wags weren't swapping it for a cannondale, depending on who got bribed what that week.
  • + 6
 There was always that old fs Specialized. In the bike shop window. mobile.twitter.com/tim_grainger/status/495127049971838977
  • + 5
 klein rascal
  • + 1
 Courier bike from mullet era!
  • + 1
 the bikes were nice BUT i always loved the nikes he was wearing! huaraches for the win!
  • + 5
 I was a mechanic back then. I wanted to punch Gary Klein in the face everytime I had to run a new cable on those. Ha!!
  • + 3
 Some nitpickings: The pedals have edges or ridges rather than pins, shin safe for sure.

Also, is that not a repainted mag 21 SL? Mag 20 had crome plated stanchions and these seem to have a goldish hue of 21 SL had...
  • + 4
 Yep, it's a Mag-21 SL fork with lowers painted by Klein
  • + 2
 My buddy raced a Klein back in the mid 90's. I remember coveting that bike so much. That purple fade. So dope. Klein Attitude. I ended up buying a Cannondale F1000 because it was the closest thing to it. Raced that bike in DS and crushed on fools. LOL!
  • + 2
 Ive actually ridden some of the same trails that i rode 20+ years ago on bikes just like this. I got down those trails just fine back then as i do today. In fact i did 6ft drops, rode shore style trails, raced cross country as well as competed in trials all on my 1993 kona cinder cone. All my friends did the same. Skinny bars, long stem and rim brakes. Bikes are definitely better now but they didnt suck back then either
  • - 10
flag deeeight (Nov 24, 2015 at 19:24) (Below Threshold)
 Exactly... I used to run 560mm bars and 150mm stems but now use 635-685mm bars and 100-130mm stems. I can still however run a bike the old way and not go squirreling off into the bushes just because someone on an internet forum says that must be. And all the best speed records in downhill racing were done on shitty fireroads with pot holes that swallow 4x4 tires with cliffs beside them, on narrow bars with long stems and minimal travel (and rim brakes). Some racers even ran drop bars (John Tomac for one).

www.bikeradar.com/gear/article/trail-tech-are-wider-bars-better-bars-36350
  • + 4
 Tomac ran a drop bar for a while to match his road bike set-up when he was a pro-roadie. It had feck all to do making the bike handle well. Made for some good photos though.
  • - 10
flag deeeight (Nov 24, 2015 at 22:35) (Below Threshold)
 I know why Tomac used one, and it didn't hamper his results at all. I'm not sure why I bother some nights, its not like I can expect intelligence out of this place.
  • + 3
 @dittohead77 I think the big difference between then and now is speed. You can do the same trail a lot quicker on a modern bike than you can on an old one. I would definitely prefer my 29 hardtail with 4" travel over any if my bikes up until the late 90s
  • + 6
 D8 surpasses Protour for most negative props this year... well done. #idiotoftheyear
  • - 7
flag deeeight (Nov 25, 2015 at 10:18) (Below Threshold)
 Of course, morons always negative prop facts and logic here.
  • + 3
 Maybe deeeight is protour...
  • + 2
 D8... maybe it's the peeps that are neg propped are actually the morons. Your logic is flawed to say the least.
  • + 2
 I really lusted after Klein frames around this time, but they were the sole preserve of sponsored riders or the (compared to me at the time) rich. I was riding a Marin Pine Mountain back then and joined a shop ride one Sunday. This guy, a few years older than me, rolled up on an Adroit with the Mardi Gras paint job and enormous rigid Klein forks. Everything on his bike was the lightest possible available at the time and the bike weighed next to nothing. It was awesome. Anyway, we set off for our ride and a few miles in we were grinning like idiots as we threw ourselves down a fast, stony double track. At the bottom, were waited for the Klein guy... ten minutes later he joined us on foot, pushing his bike. Double snakebites in both of his super light Ritchey Z-Max 1.9 tyres... Later, it started raining and he chickened out of the rest of the ride... Long story short: great bike, utter poser of a rider!
  • + 1
 In 1996 I bought a burton snowboard and that board would not look out place on the hills today. They really havent changed much at all. Now to think about where mountain bikes have come.....wow. I never got into mountain biking until recently and the equipment is probably partially a reason for that (and popularity). Wish I grew up with great bikes and the influences to make me start riding MTB when I was younger.
  • + 1
 lol! my board from 2003 sucks compared to my ride highlife. they may look similar to the untrained eye but they are night and day with ride characteristics, dynamics, shape, tune, etc. much like an mtb.

Bikes are just getting easier and easier to ride so you can go faster and do more. (like snowboarding, again)
  • + 0
 Really. Well bindings shape etc look the same to me. Anyway I switched to skiing.....so it was just what I observed. Haven't ridden a new board, so you might be right. Still cant imagine the tech in a snowboard has changed nearly a fraction in that time compared to mountain bikes.
  • + 1
 yeah it really has. snowboards and skis have evolved as much as bikes as my opinion. Try a pair of skis from early to mid 2000's and then try some brand new ones, back to back and you would notice a massive difference in performance and handling. Even my board from 2012 feels like shit compared to my newest one. Binding and boot interface has changed alot as well, its night and day. from materials to footbed camber, weight, fit, etc. I don't ever want to go back thats for sure.
  • + 1
 I had a beer with Tinker last year in Amecameca, without even knowing what a legend he was. The man had attitude, passion, and so much knowlede. He might be a cross country racer, but his soul is pure mountain bike. Cheers to him!
  • + 6
 kooka!
  • + 1
 My dream middle school dream was either a Klein Rascal or Top Gun. $4k in 1991. Mike from Cambria Bicycle, back when it was a small shop in Cambria and when I lived there, actually let me take on the Top Gun to the store for some candy one day when I was in 7th grade. That was amazing moment I can tell you.
  • + 1
 Beautiful bike indeed. Cracks me up how much time I used to spend agonizing over which hardtail to buy. I had some nice ones back then too...S Works M2, Serotta ATX, Litespeed, American M16 and others. Never had a Klein though I did have a friend with a Rascal. Some of the most iconic and beautiful paint jobs ever to ride down the trail. Appreciate Pink Bike and The Pros Closet and others for bringing all of these back.
  • + 1
 Oh the memories. I had those Look pedals with the matching shoes. All they did was gather mud. I do miss Ringle though Until they mentioned it like it was a museum piece I didn't realize the expanding wedge stem was that long ago.
  • + 1
 This stuff worked well at that time and it works well now. I ride occasionally my RMB blizzard from 1993 and breezes twister from 1997. Old Marzocchi Atom and RS Judy.. Still on 2.1" IRC tires, 8 speed XT, 130mm synchros cattleprod stem and bars with tune "horns"... Comparing to modern bikes they require more skill for sure. However these bikes are great for sharpening the riding skill.. Sit back on a new bike, I feel unchallenged, almost bored.. I can keep the pace with buddies riding 29, and am faster on every nasty single trail... I keep pace on all except gravel roads... And there is nothing more stupid then riding a mountain bike on a gravel road..

Only real progress was adding disc brake to the bike
  • + 2
 I'd love to see a write up on the restoration on one of these "back in the day" bikes. They all look almost show room new. It'd be interesting to see how they get no longer produced components to look so spiffy.
  • + 2
 Anyone who ever have seen Klein frames knows that they are one of the most beautifully welded constructions on the planet. After all these years the quality of the workmanship is still absolutely amazing!
  • + 4
 still got mine.. she's 18 years old made in USA.. weld skill is top notch.
  • + 5
 Im glad I never understood the struggle
  • + 10
 It was real...
  • + 1
 That is a sexy beast from another planet. A few more pics would be nice, like a full-on side shot to see the geometry, and some close-ups of the internal cable routing near the BB.
  • + 4
 radial laced front wheel ftw
  • + 2
 What no purple bar ends? Btw bar ends would be great for this new enduro stuff.
  • + 2
 Good call - Tinker definitely used some purple Onzas in certain races: bit.ly/1PNjbZJ
  • + 0
 That was such a rad bike back in the day.. and it seemed SO Expensive!!! ($2.5-$3k ish, as I recall)
Little did I know, we'd be dropping twice that much on bikes in the future.. who knew!?
  • + 2
 If there were any bike that would put you over the bars, Klein Bikes sure would!
  • + 1
 Awesome! I'm still a sucker for purple anodized components. What ever happened to Kooka? They had the coolest stuff. I always wanted a Rasta Anodized crankset.
  • + 2
 @rockin-itis that was a klein rascal. I had this same bike and a attitude loved those bikes.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the info!
  • + 2
 this makes me want to rebuild my grello fat chance Yo eddy. it had all American parts. I would break bb spindles weakly.
  • + 1
 Better yet, sell it to me. Post some pics on your page.
  • + 2
 LOL! You kids will never understand. I still have a few purple bits from my 1992 Univega Alpina RX-500.
  • + 2
 I just sold my 1995 Alpina 606s frame. It was my first bike as a teenager. Even had the newer version of the fork from this Klein. Good old 48mm of buttery air-oil travel Rock Shox Mag21.
  • + 2
 I think that thing was hanging in Jerry Seinfeld's apartment!
  • + 2
 I lusted over the Klein Attitude back in the day.
  • + 1
 It sure was... two of my riding buddies had Kleins back in the day... This paint scheme was pretty rare though.
  • + 1
 Darn I want that saddle, mines starting to look a little ratty And minty on Ebay is daftly priced
  • + 1
 Yeh me too need one for my motorola eddy roadie.. Not keen on ebay prices either!!
  • + 1
 This bike is absolutely amazing. I really like the anodizing on the brake and shifter clamps!
  • + 1
 I love these colours! Got some oldschool Tranz-x accessories in purple that I've got from my friend years ago.
  • + 0
 Tranz-X on a Klein? Really???
  • + 1
 Oh gosh.. Did you read my post carefully? Is it written "it has got some oldschool tranz-x accessories"?
  • + 1
 I saw a chap with two of these up at Swinley. One was pink (his wifes) and both were immaculate.
  • + 1
 Bikes like this make me thankful the past is the past.
  • + 1
 me need purple dropper post !!!!!!!!!
  • - 1
 Trek/Klein should come out with a fat bike attitude or adroit 29er 27.5 plus all aluiminum rigid fork crazy paint made in USA!
  • + 1
 Really nice, the frame wouldn't look too out of place on a modern bike.
  • + 1
 Gator Linear Fade will rule forever.
  • + 1
 Gum walls and purple everything
  • + 1
 hey baby how cool is that bike!!?

its just a bike....

GET.THE.HELL.OUT.
  • + 1
 Still much prefer the attitude. That was a bike!
  • + 1
 I need to crank up some Headpins!
  • + 1
 those tires look terrible...
  • + 1
 square chainstays FTW
  • + 1
 She's a beauty, eh!
  • + 5
 A real beaut, Clark!
  • + 1
 26 is back
  • + 1
 Fucking Majestic
  • + 1
 sooo 90's! coolSmile
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