NS Bikes Launch Carbon 'Synonym' Range of Downcountry and Trail Bikes

Apr 4, 2020
by NS Bikes  

PRESS RELEASE: NS Bikes

What? NS making an XC bike? Yes, that’s no joke, despite not many people expecting it to happen (even within our organization). But before any of you try to crucify us, let’s clear things out. This is not a regular XC bike. It’s much more than that.

How it all started?

First, let us explain why we have decided to make our mark in the world of cross-country. We always keep our eyes in the backs of our heads and we try not close ourselves in only a few biking genres. Our team consists of people who come from diverse biking communities – from flatland BMX-ers to semi-pro roadies. This is why there’s a lot of crossovers in designing our bikes: dirt jump genes in our trail hardtails, our gravel bikes derive a lot of soul from MTBs, and our enduro bikes are built to match the DH standards.

A few years ago there was a major shift in the XC races character. They became shorter, more intense, technically demanding and most importantly – more fun to watch and ride! No wonder in 2018 XC events audience passed the DH races viewers number for the first time in history! Many of us started to look at it with more interest. Finding and developing local XC loops and racing local events started to be the thing. For some of us, it was getting back to our roots.

bigquotesSzymon Kobylinski, NS founder and CEO on his Santa Cruz Heckler in 1999. Times when we used this kind of bikes to race XC, DH, jump on trails etc. But where the helmet at, bro?

It was really rad, however, there was one missing link – a proper bike. Being used to long, low and slack enduro and trail bikes, it felt quite odd to be forced to fight for your life on the steep, short donkeys – and that’s what the XC bikes generally are (or were). So there was no choice for us, but to get in the beloved DIY mode. That’s how we started the development of Synonym.

The Synonym of...


We started making first assumptions, research among both XC and enduro riders. The main limiting factor of the traditional cross-country bikes was their descending capabilities. Let’s face it – it’s hard to descend anything fairly sketchy on a bike with geometry closer to a road rather than an enduro bike. Naturally, skills are a big factor, but the bicycle is just as important. So in terms of the “downhill side of the bike,” we took what’s best from our experience in building enduro and DH machines.

Synonym lines drawn by George Dabrowski designer of award-winning Rondo bikes and co-funder of Antidote.

This resulted in using values such as: 67 deg head tube angle, 445-520mm reach (S to XL), 438mm chainstays and wheelbase range from 1159 to 1251mm (S to XL). This hasn’t been seen on the XC scene, ever. The Synonym is unbeatable in its category when it comes to going downhill, but climbing is also a thing in cross-country and couldn’t be overlooked. Here comes the 77 deg seat tube angle mixed with the long front end, which actually puts the rider more over the bike’s center. This really aids climbing steep sections.

bigquotes“I had no time to get used to the bike, I just adjusted the saddle and we immediately hit the local XC loop. I kept looking down to check where the motor is. Seriously. This thing absolutely flies uphill. I just couldn't believe it. I won’t even mention what happens on the downhills, but it’s the steep climbs that blew my mind.” - Lukas, XC racer / Enduro rider.


Some may say that such a long bike will be hard to corner on. So were people saying about the 29-ers when they were introduced. Now please name 26” or 27,5” bikes in the World Cup circuit. Unless you’re riding down a staircase as your main trail, you will not feel a major difference in cornering capabilities of Synonym comparing to shorter bicycles. This is our recipe for a radical cross-country/down-country bike. Yes, we’ve used this term despite knowing how much it will trigger some of you. But, hey, we simply think that even this term sums up the character of this bike really neatly. In our view, this bike actually is a Synonym of down-country.


When 100 is not enough



One of the few things that we didn’t change when you compare Synonym to other XC fullies is the 100/100mm suspension travel length. For some, this may simply be not enough. There was one, simple solution – get a bigger fork and shock. Putting beefier 120 mm fork and rear shock with more travel transformed the RC (race) into TR (trail) version of Synonym. The geometry changed a bit – head tube and seat tube angles slackened to 66 deg and 76 deg respectively and the BB went up by 7mm which. All that, combined with a higher cockpit, put the rider in a more upright and comfortable position and make the bike unbeatable on flowy, rolling trails. The TR is responsive, lightweight and really easy to air. It’s kind of a missing link between the XC and “big” trail bikes. Can you still race it? Sure, and it may even be a better choice if you take part in XC Marathons or MTB stage races in demanding terrain.

bigquotes„This bike can climb anything that you can walk up! The setup with the Fox 34 is mind-blowing. It begs you to go full gas and jump on every occasion. The bike is light and responsive that our local trails felt like one giant pump track. The lockout feature on the handlebars, despite being questioned by some, makes it possible to pump the hell out of any roller that pops out. I think I prefer this TR version to the 100mm RC. For sure it’s more of an all-round machine, made for ‚normals’ like me. The geometry is something else, I have to emphasise this - I rode down all the drops and technical descents as easily as I normally do on my 160 travel enduro rig.” Tom - freerider


Geometry: Synonym RC vs Synonym TR

What’s in the package?

Both RC and TR come in two specification options and price points. The top tier TR1 and RC1 are equipped with Fox Factory suspension and X01 Eagle drivetrain from SRAM (including carbon cranksets). RC1 has also got a lightweight 100mm carbon dropper post from Kind Shock, whereas the TR1 uses Fox Transfer. Both roll on our own lightweight, alloy wheelset with wide, tubeless-ready rims (weighing 1520g). The “level two” versions use Fox Performance suspension, SRAM GX Eagle drivetrain, X-Fusion Manic dropper posts and wheels laced on WTB ST Light i25 rims and NS straight pull hubs.


Specs and prices below.

Synonym RC1
• Frame: NS Synonym, superlite carbon fibre w/ 100mm travel
• Fork: Fox Factory 32 Step Cast Float FIT4, 100mm travel
• Shock: Fox Factory Float DPS
• Brakes: Sram Level TLM
• Crankset: Truvativ X1 Carbon DUB 34t
• Drivetrain: Sram X01 Eagle
• Dropper post: KS LEV Ci Carbon
• Wheelset: NS Enigma Lite 29"
• Tires: Maxxis Ikon 2.2 TR / Recon Race 2.25 EXO/TR
• Weight: 10.5 kg / 23.15 lbs
• MSRP: $6999/€6999
• More: Full spec

Synonym RC2
• Frame: NS Synonym, superlite carbon fibre w/ 100mm travel
• Fork: Fox Performance 32 Step Cast Float Grip, 100mm travel
• Shock: Fox Performance Elite Float DPS
• Brakes: Sram Level TL
• Crankset: Truvativ STYLO 7K DUB 34t
• Drivetrain: Sram GX Eagle
• Dropper post: X-Fusion Manic
• Wheelset: WTB ST Light i25 / NS Rotary straight pull hubs
• Tires: Maxxis Ikon 2.2 TR / Recon Race 2.25 EXO/TR
• Weight: 11.4kg / 25.35 lbs
• MSRP: $4799/€4799
• More: Full spec

Synonym TR1
• Frame: NS Synonym, superlite carbon fibre w/ 120mm travel
• Fork: Fox Factory 34 Step Cast Float FIT4, 120mm travel
• Shock: Fox Factory Float DPS
• Brakes: Sram Level TL
• Crankset: Truvativ X1 Carbon DUB 34t
• Drivetrain: Sram X01 Eagle
• Dropper post: Fox Transfer Performance Elite
• Wheelset: NS Enigma Lite 29"
• Tires: Maxxis Recon 2.4WT EXO/TR / Maxxis Ikon 2.35 EXO/TR
• Weight: 11.8 kg / 26 lbs
• MSRP: $5999/€5999
• More: Full spec

Synonym TR2
• Frame: NS Synonym, superlite carbon fibre w/ 120mm travel
• Fork: Fox Performance 34 Step Cast Float Grip, 120mm travel
• Shock: Fox Performance Elite Float DPS
• Brakes: Sram Level T
• Crankset: Truvativ STYLO 7K DUB 34t
• Drivetrain: Sram GX Eagle
• Dropper post: X-Fusion Manic
• Wheelset: WTB ST Light i25 / NS Rotary straight pull hubs
• Tires: Maxxis Recon 2.4WT EXO/TR / Maxxis Ikon 2.35 EXO/TR
• Weight: 12.4 kg / 27.34 lbs
• MSRP: $4699/€4699
• More: Full spec

Photos: Piotr Staron / Charlie Mitchel/


134 Comments

  • 45 0
 Every time I hear " Down Country", I think of country music lyrics, not mountain bikes.
  • 7 2
 I'm down with the country
  • 14 2
 Is “Old Town Road” considered down country?
  • 5 0
 It's the kind of country people play when feeling down.
  • 6 0
 @speed10: I don’t know what any music is “considered as” anymore.
  • 5 0
 @TheJD: if you ain't feelin down it ain't country son
  • 14 0
 Down country bike models: John Denver Alu, Johnny Cash Cro-Mo, Wille Nelson 29er, Dolly Parton Plus.....
  • 2 0
 @Ben-76: serious lolz you win Wink
  • 1 0
 @Ben-76: LOL.
  • 1 0
 @nojzilla: Lockin it down, come on get Down with the sickness. Covid in here, come on get down with the sickness.
  • 1 0
 Just waiting for the latest dork rider to come into a bike shop and exclaim how he is going to use one of these as his "down country" bike. Just cringy. Thanks Pink Bike.
  • 1 0
 John Prine Salute'
  • 22 0
 SRAM Level T and SRAM Level TL on the TR versions might be not enough for a "Down Country" program..
  • 7 1
 The TL levers pair nicely with Code calipers
  • 5 9
flag avg-roadie (Apr 5, 2020 at 6:23) (Below Threshold)
 @road-n-dirt: there wouldn’t be enough fluid pushed from the level to full get the benefit from a code or even g2 caliper... just buy G2 brakes and call it good
  • 4 0
 @avg-roadie: level levers work fine with srams 4 piston calipers
  • 7 1
 Can confirm, I had a set on my SB100 and the only time I was able to get them to lock up was when the wheels were in the air, otherwise it was like not even having brakes haha. The dual piston SLX, XT, XTR are infinitely better
  • 3 0
 I keep reading about people doing mismatched levers and calipers but where the hell do you get the spare calipers from? the ones ive found would cost almost as much as just getting the whole set.
  • 1 0
 I had the chance to test one of the TR modells at last years Eurobike Mediadays, and the SRAM Level weren't as "poor" as I was thinking before the ride. But they aren't Bling Bling and IMO don't match the rest of the Bike
  • 4 0
 can't understand why SRAM are producing this lousy barks at all, it is just giving SRAM bad reputation. any third priced Shimano is way better in any respect, from riding experience to maintenance.
  • 1 0
 @BitterrootRider: Check eBay, Worldwide Cyclery, Jenson they also sell calipers/levers separately. Not just as a set.
  • 1 0
 @BitterrootRider: all those "guide" brakes where the lever failed. Some people just threw the whole set away!
  • 12 6
 I guess reading is hard. "Developed by NS Bikes" in conjunction with CEO of NS saying, that they had cut some cost by sharing the frame project with other companies. Guess he had this in mind, he shared it with chinese oems, so that other brands could develop their bikes on it.
  • 18 0
 Yeah I kinda agree.
For a brand that seems to do little in the way of marketing and has very little pedigree, I don't understand how fitting some fancy components to a cheap frame can warrant such RRP's.
You can get them on CRC though, so -60% discount in about a month
  • 1 0
 @IllestT: and that's exactly why they are a tempting buy
  • 6 1
 Thanks! I messaged carbonda for pricing and availability. I think this is the first Chinese short travel 29er open mold with good geometry.
  • 9 3
 Geo is the same but the back of the rear triangle is different. They probably got help with the design if they let Carbona use the numbers after. FYI, pretty much all bikes are made in China.
  • 11 4
 @warmerdamj: apart from the ones that aren't
  • 4 0
 @bikewriter: Let me know what that quote you dude.
  • 5 1
 That’s why it’s a $6k bike and not a $10k bike.

But feel free to show me another MSRP priced bike with XO1 for the same price.
  • 5 0
 This frame looks awesome!I want one
  • 2 6
flag seraph (Apr 5, 2020 at 14:22) (Below Threshold)
 It's similar but it's not the same frame. A lot of Chinese factories copy bigger brands' designs. You can find Chinese copies of Scott, Specialized, Trek, Cannondale...
  • 11 1
 @seraph: excellent use of facts there, that you heard off some guy's mate who knows Sharon's hairdresser
  • 4 0
 @seraph: yes but with the smaller companies it's often times the other way around.
  • 2 0
 @Saidrick: ya ok I'll just buy the frame straight from the factory and see what i can build for 6k.

Oh wait I already did that.
  • 4 3
 Just because it’s the same mold doesn’t mean it’s the same quality. NS undoubtedly has different strength and QC standards than the Chinese seller
  • 7 4
 @kleinblake: so your saying the same people that make the ns frame are going to turn around and make their version shitty?

Seems racist to me. Like the chinese are incapable of overcoming their greed and can't understand that if they make a quality product people will return to buy from them again.
  • 3 0
 @kleinblake:

And a warranty...
  • 4 0
 @Saidrick: warranty card was the first thing I saw when I opened the box.

And the frame I bought is the second version. The first had a cracking issue. Even though the guy was very heavy and doing gravity shit it wasn't built for they warranty his frame twice.

Just parroting what the industry wants repeated really.
  • 2 1
 @reverend27:

2yr vs NS 3 yr AND no crash replacement policy.
  • 5 0
 @Saidrick: who cares I can buy three frames for the price of one.
  • 1 0
 @reverend27: it sucks going throught the wait for replacements and also having to discard a pile of broken carbon fiber. But yeah, your reasoning does make sense to your wallet at the very least.
  • 5 0
 @miuan: I've been hammering on a FM-06 for a year now with no problems. Good value for $600 shipped. Hambini showed that the chiner pf bbs are better made than the name brands anyway....
  • 4 0
 Haha you are so pathetic, crying “racist”, really? @reverend27:
  • 6 0
 @jclnv: As of this morning, shipping is to US:

ultra light version:820USD
standard weight version:650USD


12USD for headset
13USD for rear axle


The shipping cost:
Via DHL express-190USD

All sizes in stock now.
  • 1 0
 @bikewriter: tracking says mines now with UPS in Germany
  • 1 0
 @bikewriter: Thanks buddy. Great deal.
  • 3 0
 @reverend27: mainstream bike companies have access to the best riders in the world to stress test bikes beyond what machine testing can accomplish. A Chinese frame vendor May decided to use cheaper carbon or epoxy because it meets their in house testing, if they felt NS’ needs were excessive.
  • 1 0
 @bikewriter: any sense of difference in ultralight vs standard weight version in terms of weight? are they just using a different higher quality carbon fibre? can you share the correct email contact to reach them?
  • 1 0
 @CrispyNuggs: I heard your hero is in icu.
  • 3 0
 @kleinblake: The truth is many companies take designs to Taiwan and the manufacturers tell them what will break before they even produce a mould.
  • 3 0
 @jclnv: they mostly tell you what’s possible to make. I work for a company that works with a Chinese frame vendor so I’m not talking entirely out of my ass
  • 3 0
 @kleinblake: Yes, manufactures have little understanding of material technology.
  • 1 0
 My hero? Sorry I’m not a kid like you I don’t have “heroes” lol @reverend27:
  • 12 0
 The testimonials are comical. I'd expect this bike to make me breakfast, too.
  • 2 0
 anonymous testimonials! at least pay some shill with pro race results to put their full name down under their statement
  • 3 0
 It’s like modern enduro bike geometry but the head angle is only a few degrees steeper. Crazy times.

I’m building up an XC hardtail with similar geo. Curious to see how it works out or if the wheelbase will just feel too large
  • 6 1
 People clown on downcountry, but a 27 pound bike with 120 travel and 66 degree HA is just about perfect for my local trails (east coast US).
  • 1 4
 I couldn't stand that head angle - not enough pressure on the front wheel for aggressive cornering.
  • 4 0
 @JohanG: Took me a bit to get used cornering the Smuggler with a 66 head angle. At least on more XC-ish trails. Kept pushing the front end. Trick for me, same trick as on my old 111, was to dump the overly short stem-went from 35 to 50. It seems like such a small change, but that little shift made all the difference in the world on both bikes. Now I feel like 66 is my sweet spot.
  • 3 1
 @rollingdip: Yes, a long stem does help. My light trail bike has a 69 head angle with 65mm stem and I smile every time I stand on the front wheel around a corner. Can't do that on my long 65 ha bike. It's just too far away.
  • 1 0
 You obviously don’t understand how to corner then. @JohanG:
  • 1 0
 @CrispyNuggs: Better than you
  • 3 0
 "...despite not many people expecting it to happen (even within our organization)..." Anyone else remember that interview with Szymon a while ago where he literally said he'd gotten into XC and would love to race a bike of his own design... I've been waiting for this ever since.
  • 2 0
 Pretty cool bike, not a huge flex stay fan but at least it is carbon and not aluminum. The weight seems nice, I have been thinking of a lighter XCish bike to put some miles in. Personally I think the reach is long enough to size down and run a slightly longer stem. Maybe a 65mm. The med has a longer reach than my v3 nomad in large.....could also run a longer dropper.
  • 1 0
 My thoughts exactly. For XC pedaling happiness, I like 630mm ett. I'd go with the M, put a 20mm setback post and 60mm stem.
  • 2 0
 its great that we have choices but i dislike the marketing view that steeper geometry bikes are crap and good for nothing. I know its not popular with the dh/enduro type of riders that this site gears itself for but sooner or later bikes are going to handle so bad that they will have to start steepening things up again.

This bike descends better but climbs and handles change of direction poorer for its slacker geometry and build when compared to more normal geo xc bikes. its always a compromise....the review of this bike i read last year said this. there's definitely a place for these bikes i just dislike the marketing approach that steeper "traditional" xc bikes should be forgotten about when i keep seeing vids and articles trying to push gravel bikes over xc bikes....im sure there not slacker nor have awesome descending abilities so what good are they....its because there super fast and efficient because they dont have the geo of a dh bike with wide wheels and tires. its all compromises but for marketing they gloss over the negatives to promote the positives and people who haven't ridden for several decades just lap it up and dont know what compromises have been made to improve one aspect of the bike.
  • 2 1
 Nice job. Not fan of carbon but it seems to be well build. Ive just seen your last dirt bike before the lockdown. It was gorgeous. The bronze color is really good looking !
  • 9 5
 Proud to be a Pole. Good job NS!
  • 1 0
 Always had a bit of a soft spot for NS, after years of riding their dirt jump bikes it's so nice to see they've brought the same type of cool to the trail and DH world. Maybe I'll own one one day.
  • 4 0
 Wasn't this already released like a while ago..?
  • 2 0
 Hardly new, they were at Eurobike in 2019 and there are already reviews of the Synonym online singletrackworld.com/2019/10/ns-synonym-first-ride-impressions
  • 2 1
 Who’s buying bikes? Can’t ride them these days! Wait a year, the deals will be fantastic! Save your money, wait for market news on Monday, it’s the beginning of the end!
  • 5 1
 I sure as hell ain’t buying anything now, except food...I’ll save my money for the serious worldwide depression that may be coming...if it doesn’t then I’ll get to buy a 2020 bike in 2021 for a good price...if it does come I’ll use that same money for my last loaf of bread...
  • 2 0
 Suspect that founder photo is not from 1999, since Fox didn’t get into MTB forks until 2001. Looks to be a 2001-2004ish TALAS model.
  • 2 0
 Good catch on the fork, that frame might even be a Superlight and not a Heckler.
  • 3 0
 Looks rad, apart from the wheels
  • 3 0
 As a European brand, can we talk about this NS?
MSRP: $4699/€4699
  • 4 0
 US price doesn't include tax.
  • 2 0
 @msusic: ok didn't know msrp was without tax for certain country, amazing it's the exact same number between € and $ without tax!
  • 2 0
 Why don't quoted US prices include tax?
Does tax vary between states?
  • 5 0
 @IllestT: between states and even cities will have their own sales taxes.

Oregon has no sales tax, but higher property and income taxes.
Washington has no income tax (you still pay federal taxes) but it does have a sales and property tax.
  • 1 2
 @pmhobson: Europe has income tax, sales tax, property tax, and those are just the start.
  • 1 0
 @hubertje-ryu: US also has all those things in most places. But we don't have a national VAT.
  • 1 0
 @roma258: VAT is sales tax ( what the UK call it at 20%). A few productions don’t have any like kids cloths or essential foods (look up cake V biscuits with Jaffa cake to waste some time in lock down).
  • 1 0
 @roma258:We also do have federal import duties on certain items. I'm not sure how it works, but my buddy who bought a Cube bike from UK retailer had to pay them.
  • 3 0
 Naming a 'downcountry' bike Synonym is some next-level marketing.
  • 3 0
 Didn't fox not start making MTB forks until 2001?
  • 1 0
 True. Lazy journalism on their behalf.
  • 2 0
 Well if it’s good enough for Tom Freerider, it’s good enough for me! Give us 3 Synonyms!
  • 2 0
 Looks like a Mondraker Podium
  • 1 0
 I was just about to write "looks like a... Mondraker", and you beat me to it. Damn time zones!
  • 1 0
 Yeah, just like a mondraker, except for that completely different rear suspension design.
  • 2 0
 @JohanG: well, yeah, you've got a point...
  • 2 0
 The "More: Full Spec" button doesn't work for me.
  • 2 0
 I thought it was a Scott for real
  • 1 3
 "This resulted in using values such as: 67 deg head tube angle, 445-520mm reach (S to XL), 438mm chainstays and wheelbase range from 1159 to 1251mm (S to XL). This hasn’t been seen on the XC scene, ever."

Except this bike that came out last year : www.pinkbike.com/news/bmc-fourstroke-01-one-review-2019.html
  • 3 0
 LOL no. Look at the wheelbase! 2" is massive.
  • 1 0
 Had a dirt/freeride frame from NS... the thing was bombproof. very high quality STEEL
  • 1 0
 Sounds (and looks) like a Spark RC with better geo, but what's the weight penalty? The Scott is 1780g.
  • 1 0
 so if the flex is designed into the seat stays i presume this works like a linkage driven single pivot suspension bike?
  • 1 0
 Tr2 with 100mm fork? Typo or stupid?
  • 1 0
 It was a typo, 120mm now
  • 1 0
 NS bikes always look nice. I'm sure these rip through trails too.
  • 1 1
 Rather go for that new Evil Following V3. Also very curious about that new YT......
  • 1 0
 It's got a kinked seat tube. Nah, don't want it.
  • 1 0
 what the hell is downcountry
  • 1 0
 What the hell is down country?
  • 1 0
 Flip that switch Boogie up the Trail, Spark it up!
  • 1 0
 If Down Country bikes dont exist, Gravel bikes either???
  • 4 6
 This looked great until the 540mm seat tube length on the XL! There goes any chance of using it with a decent length dropper..
  • 10 1
 Well 54cm would be good enough for me with a oneup 210. Depends on the length of your legs Wink .
  • 4 0
 @cxfahrer: This! Most modern XL frames have become unridable for me due to their ridiculously short seat tubes (and a short stack does not help either). Currently running a 200 mm dropper in an XL frame and I am at minimum insertion limit. I do not consider myself particularly tall (193 cm) - there are plenty of taller riders out there.
  • 4 1
 Remember this is XC, not Trials. Most riders only use a dropper post between 80mm and 125mm of drop so you don’t really need a short seat tube length.
  • 3 1
 For its intention, running a dropper much longer than 150 would seem weird on this bike. Those 210mm droppers are HEAVY, 300g heavier than a short dropper. I actually appreciate a reasonable ST length, at 190cm I could get all the drop I need on this bike.
  • 1 0
 Trail Ripper Smile
  • 1 2
 1800g, 120mm, flex stay frame. Johan like. Made in China though. I'll look somewhere else.
  • 1 0
 Where did you get that frame weight from? It seems impossible to only be 20g heavier than the best Spark RC frame which is physically smaller and uses their fancy fabric and resin.
  • 1 1
 @lelandjt: I've been looking at the FM936 since before china became asshoe; there's a superlight and a regular version, 1800g and 2000g. But then I'd also have to find a nice shock in 165x42.5 trunnion, not easy.
  • 2 0
 @JohanG:
Doesn't this frame use a 165x40 or 165 x 45 to get 100 or 120 travel?
  • 2 0
 @JohanG:
Oh, I think I see what you are saying. NSBikes say 37.5 or 42.5 stroke for 100 v 120 travel.

Looks like those sizes are made by almost everyone though, in a quick scan, ohlins, fox, rockshox all make that size. How available they actually are...only saw one available through the most common distributor, but a fox dps isn't end of the world bad performance, for most.
  • 1 0
 @MeloBikeCO: I guess I've been spoiled by my Mcleods, for a bike that doesn't need a lockout it's quite nice. I could live with a rockshox.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG:
Always wanted to try the McLeod. I really got along great with my Magnum fork, as it seemed to have a lot more support in braking than a Pike. It was noticebly more flexible but never to a point where I felt I had less control.

Perhaps fork flex is a little more manageable when your first suspension fork was a 1st Gen Answer Manitou(the grey ones when answer first took over production). Those were something to get used to with the front wheel kinda going wherever the terrain decided. The rider just having to chose to ignore where the front wheel was headed at the moment and just point it where you wanted to go, on average.
  • 1 0
 Looks like a spark...
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