Nukeproof Mega 275 and 290 - First Ride

Nov 10, 2015
by Paul Aston  



Nukeproof seemed to be a few steps ahead of the game when they launched the original Mega back in 2011. The bike was born out of frustration, the result of what happened after Michael Cowan and Dale McMullan took to their trail bikes and were disappointed that they didn't offer the performance of their downhill bikes they regularly raced. They started fettling with anglesets, linkages and shock tunes and quickly realized the only way to get what they wanted was to create their own framesets. With zero pressure from product managers or accountants, they built their dream and took it to the infamous Megavalanche race in France. The Mega as we know it was born.

Nukeproof Mega 2016

The original Mega was well received when it hit the market in 2012, and for a number of good reasons. First, it was to the point, and it also lacked the marketing spiel that can all too often annoy those who know what they want, not to mention all the fancy tubes or acronyms. Sporting solid geometry and suspension, which shamed many of its more expensive competitors, the Mega's arrival on the scene turned more than just heads. The revamped Mega landed in 2013 and never seemed to generate the same buzz as the original, even with the addition of 27.5" wheels that made an appearance in 2014. It somewhat lacked the sex appeal of its forward thinking predecessors, especially when the competition had started to catch up geometry wise. The Mega was left looking chunky and 'too heavy' in a world where hydroforming and carbon had quickly become the norm.

Since then the Belfast based brand has been hard at work. The updated Pulse downhill bike was released earlier this year, creating some much needed buzz on the scene as spy shots of Sam Hill and the CRC/ PayPal gang on board blacked out bikes with radical looking tubing filtered out across the internet. The Pulse, another Nukeproof classic, was instantly on many a weekend warrior's wish lists, but rumours of a new Mega platform that would follow its downhill brother's svelte new silhouette gurgled away until now. The new Mega is back, and with it an unexpected 29" version as well. Devoid of carbon, lacking any Boost and with no 'plus size' tires in sight, Nukeproof have seemingly repeated the processes that created this classic machine in the first place, ignoring industry buzz and focusing on the needs of the rider. With a good diet and a significant facelift, have Nukeproof delivered the best Mega to date?


Nukeproof Mega 2016

275 Details:
• 27.5" wheels
• 4 spec options or frameset
• 160mm travel
• 65° head angle with a 160mm fork
• 435mm chainstay length
• ISCG 05 tabs and S-Type front derailleur mount.
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• Weight: Mega PRO 28.6lbs (claimed)
• MSRP: £1999 / $3199 USD to £3799 / $5999 USD
• Frameset: £1349 / $2099 USD
Nukeproof Mega 2016

290 Details:
• 29" wheels
• 3 spec options or frameset
• 150mm travel
• 66° head angle with a 150mm fork
• 450mm chainstay length
• ISCG 05 tabs and S-Type front derailleur mount.
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• Weight: Mega PRO 28.8lbs (claimed)
• MSRP: £2599 / $4149 USD to £3799 / $5999 USD
• Frameset: £1349 / $2099 USD
www.nukeproof.com

Nukeproof Mega 2016
Nukeproof Mega 2016

Nukeproof Mega 2016

Mega 275 - The Evolution

Changes to the new Mega have followed current trends for bikes with longer front centers, wheelbases, lower BB's, slacker head angles and shorter chainstays. The suspension travel stays the same at 160mm but becomes slightly more linear, and a 'Horst style' pivot is now used in order to help improve suspension under braking compared to the single pivot and link driven shock of the previous bikes. All the frames get a chunk of extra length in the top tube, combined with a one degree slacker head angle, while the wheelbase has also grown.



• Entirely new tube-set and hardware
• Reach numbers grow: S +12mm, M +17mm, L +22mm, XL +17mm
• Head angle reduced one degree down to 65°
• Effective seat tube angle steepens from 73.5° to 75.75°
• Chainstays are shortened by 10mm to 435mm
• Slightly more linear suspension
• 'Horst style' link replaces the single pivot

Nukeproof Mega 2016
Nukeproof components finish off all the bikes in the range
Nukeproof Mega 2016
50mm stems are specced on all sizes.

Nukeproof Mega 2016
The Mega Pro bikes I tested use a trusty RockShox DebonAir shock...

Nukeproof Mega 2016
Another staple; the 150mm RockShox Reverb dropper seatpost...
Nukeproof Mega 2016
...matched to another classic up front; the RockShox Pike.

Nukeproof Mega 2016
...and a SRAM X01 drivetrain rounds things off nicely.

Like the new Pulse, weight has been shaved across the entire chassis - from every tube and morsel of hardware. During the re-design, the engineers aimed to drop at least 10% off the weight from each frame component, losing a total of 1lb in the process, with changing the hardware from steel to alloy creating one of the biggest savings. The triple butted and beautifully formed top tube was taken from the Pulse and the shock mount was changed from the top tube to the down tube. Why? The tube is designed to absorb impacts at the front of the bike to give a more forgiving ride.

A nice touch to the new Mega is that all the frame's standards are the same as the Scout 275 and 290 hardtail frames. Nukeproof were keen to point this out; as a brand they want to encourage new riders in to the sport. By doing this, a rider could start off with a Scout hardtail, and if they then decide to upgrade to a Mega frame they can swap all of the parts straight across.

Mega 290 - The New Kid

bigquotes The 29er evolved from our desire to make the Mega even better; to make it faster, make it corner better and grip better. It's not a traditional 29er with steep angles, it needs to be ridden to be believed. I would encourage people with their existing views to try it. It needs to be ridden to be understood. - Ali Beckett, Nukeproof Brand Manager.


Nukeproof Mega 2016

Nukeproof introduced their first 29" wheeled bike at Eurobike this year in the form of the Scout 290 hardtail, making the Mega 290 Nukepooof's first big-wheeled full suspension bike. The Mega 290's geometry is very similar to that of the smaller 27.5" bike with a 66° head angle, 150mm of travel and a 450mm chainstay that's said to provide massive stability.




Riding the Mega

I spent a day riding a Mega PRO in each wheel size, with each bike having identical specifications: RockShox Solo Air Pike fork, Debonair shock, a 150mm Reverb dropper post, SRAM Guide R brakes, SRAM X01 drivetrain and a SRAM Roam 40 wheelset. Nukeproof components take care of the finishing kit and Schwalbe organise the contact patches. All of the components are spot on for the price point and just get the job done, with proven reliability. Unfortunately the SRAM Roam 40 wheelset was a bit of a letdown, notably on the 29" version. The narrow rims, low spoke count and light weight are more suited to cross country riding and on the fast rocks of the Riviera, they were too springy and noisy, lacking the great capability offered by the chassis. That said, there are different wheels depending on the model and the Roam 40 wheels would make for useful spares, especially for some narrow winter mud tires when the ground is that much softer.

Both bikes are well balanced with no quirky qualities. Good acceleration for the respective amounts of travel and enough beef in the suspension for the big hits. The frame has a good feeling, being neither too stiff or too flexy, but a nice aluminum damped ride which is also very quiet.

Nukeproof Mega Testing

I ran the RockShox DebonAir shock with 30% sag and three Bottomless Rings, but it still seemed a little spongy and lacking support. Changing to the middle compression setting helped the bike ride higher in the travel and gave a more responsive ride when pushing through dips, corners and trying to force traction. I think the 'Low/Low' shock tune and the high volume DebonAir air sleeve were to blame, but could be improved with a standard volume Monarch air can, perhaps more Bottomless Rings or a more aggressive tune (actually the first time I have seen a L/L tune on any production bike), all of which are easy fixes for the consumer. It wasn't a bad feeling by any means, but those tweaks are something that could easily be done to give this bike some extra oomph.

The 29" Mega is a beast. Boasting even more stability, it was also much easier going up thanks to the longer chain stay, which helped to keep my weight more centered and allowed the front wheel to effortlessly roll over obstacles. On the way down the big wheeler was an absolute monster, which I had no trouble cornering at speed or placing it where I wanted it on technical sections of the trail. In fact, I was so much more confident on the 29er that it seemed more maneuverable than the smaller wheeled option, removing any inbuilt hesitation to change line on awkward sections of the trail.


Nukeproof Mega Testing

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotes Nukeproof have sent the ball flying out of the stadium with this one. Modern geometry and sizing, plenty of specification options, competitive pricing and a pair of wheel sizes. For people who want to get some more extreme numbers the aluminum frame and standard shock mounts mean that you can play around with anglesets or offsets, and there's plenty of space to fit any shape shock. The YT Capra and Canyon Strive now have some tough competition in the 'quality, budget' enduro bike battle. - Paul Aston



Visit the feature gallery for high resolution and additional images of the whole Mega range.








257 Comments

  • + 173
 Awesome looking bikes. I didn't like the look of the old one but this one is the tits. Very refined. I even like the 29er
  • + 31
 29 does look faster in my opinion. Pretty bikes Indeed.
  • - 39
flag joseabvil (Nov 10, 2015 at 3:58) (Below Threshold)
 it is everything i was expecting haha anyone knows if it uses the new boost format (148mm on the rear hub)? I would like to read a better review on the riding (now saying that this is a bad one because it's hard yo write a nice review riding a bike so little), i mean how it climbs, sprints, turn and jump.
  • + 37
 Is it so hard to pres ctrl+f...
"Devoid of carbon, lacking any Boost and with no 'plus size' tires in sight,"
  • + 8
 that black/yellow scheme is sublime!
  • + 31
 The short review basically said, the wheels were XXXX, the suspension is not very well set up, but the 29" is fun, but then summarised with "Nukeproof have sent the ball flying out of the stadium with this one." hmmmm......
  • + 2
 Then buy the frame and put your own stuff on it and you're golden. I love my old mega and will definitely be saving for this beauty =]
  • + 4
 My bad on the reading , and i was trying to write "not " instead of "now" my autocorrector is on spanish so i have problems like this all the time. Awesome bike
  • + 5
 Nevermind 'like' the 29er, I WANT the 29er. It looks like my old FS bike might be getting replaced this year after all... maybe... if I can bare to part with it.
  • + 13
 @OrangeGoblin - Funny that, isn't it? I had the exact same reaction. The whole review read like hey, this is a nice bike with some questionable componentry, you'll need to do some fiddling to make the suspension work, solid effort, blablabla - and then you get to the summary and it just doesn't seem like it was written by the same guy about the same bike. Wonder if this is a case of the edit process going wrong.
  • + 1
 Fix-the-Spade...don't part with it, just decide on someone you know that needs to ride it if they ever come riding with you and hold onto it for "them". I now have my bike (which I call my wife's bike cuz I let her ride it when she comes out) and my bike (which I'm about to call my son's bike since he outgrew his 24" this year), and finally my bike (which I'm building /shopping for right now). Can you see the logic?
  • + 1
 @Warburrito. That's a nice idea. But I already got a 150mm FS bike, my custom made hardtail, a rigid geared mtb for 'my sister' to use when she comes to visit and a steel roadie that totally belongs to my father I'm just looking after it for him. The issue is more available space in my garage than guilt/social acceptability, so if I buy a 150mm FS bike, the other 150mm FS bike has to go.
It's sort of like the Klingon Navy, to gain promotion you must first slay your predecessor in single combat (or ride better at Demo Days, whichever).
  • + 4
 Good to see a brand making a long travel 29er, many disappeared from manufacturers line up. Even mid travel, strangely enough. And: EXTERNAL BRAKE HOSE ROUTING!! Thanks Nukeproof. That may well be my next bike.
  • + 1
 I was thinking about the 29er frameset. When you've built it up it's capra money isn't it. I wonder if they'll do carbon next year.
  • + 1
 That's pretty slack for a 29er
  • + 62
 Aluminum ain't dead.
  • + 10
 Just bought a brand new alum frame. So I'm with ya. Also, have two steel bikes, one of which is 26"
  • + 11
 28lbs is impressive for aluminium too.
  • + 1
 The following is 130 rear so this may be closer to the enduro or intense carbine. I have the following and sold on the big hoops with aggressive geo. Rollover is why-more moto feel
  • + 1
 Unless it's round and has spokes attached to it ....
  • + 1
 feck no! cant stand carbon myself. just got an alloy reign. love it!
  • + 2
 @jrocksdh: The Following is a 120mm frame...
  • + 1
 @le duke, your right! I always forget as it feels like so much MORE...much deeper feel than many 140 bikes I've parkn lot tested
  • + 37
 That's the first 29'' bike I've seen that actually looks good.
  • + 42
 Try Evil Following
  • + 3
 Agree, Following is the best looking 29er. Had one for 6 months. Awesome bike, 160mm-enduro-bike-quick down hill, but the very slack seat angle is the Achilles heal and so it got sold on. This however is more on the same tip as the Canfied Riot.... Nice steep seat angle - Awesome.
  • + 1
 Richt2000 - depends what you like, slack seat angles make epic wheelies Razz
  • + 16
 Specialized enduro 29 looks good as well
  • + 24
 The Enduro 29 is STILL the benchmark that everyone [else] is STILL trying to copy.
I've owned 26 and 27.5" Enduro's, Slashes, and a 27.5" Remedy and Nomad, and insofar as 'true' Enduro-type trails are concerned(long DH runs), I've found NOTHING to be as fast as the 29" Enduro.
The 29" wheels glide over rocks where 26 and 27.5" wheels find the holes, and Specialized was able to design a frame with all the right angles, heights, and lengths, and did something nobody else thought was possible: Hit all the right numbers WITH 29" WHEELS.
I first bought one in '14 to replace a 26" Enduro, and a 26" Slash before that, and kept taking 2 second chunks off my previous best strava times. Despite this I still was able to convince myself that 29ers were for XCers, and the 'new' 27.5" bikes would be faster.
So I sold it and bought a 27.5" Enduro, then Slash, then Nomad, and NONE of them were as fast and stable,as the 29" Enduro.
Maybe there's other bikes that do other things better, but as far as doing what it's designed for-Enduro riding- I'm now convinced there is NO better bike made.
So I bought another, and this time I'm keeping it.
  • + 4
 But how is E29 for XC/trail riding? I found Stumpy 29 Evo hitting right balance between bulldozing downhills and general riding. I live in place with substantial obstacles and steep stuff but very little elevation (300feet at best) so I may climb 1000-1500ft per ride but it happens over the course of 5-10 climbs and descents. I can tell 5 descents that get "fast" here and fast last for 15-25 seconds at best. So would you recommend me E29 or something rather smaller? I tried Kona 111 and I was a bit let down by it, too little win with short travel on rough terrain, bike is not flowing over stuff well enough.
  • + 0
 @yoKev that is exactly why I'm looking at getting a 29er next. Pure pace, if not thrills. But I've got my konig for thrills.
  • + 2
 The miner ROS9 also looks pretty good!
  • + 6
 Waki-
It's 'funny' that you ask that.
This time of year when it gets dark early I'm unable to ride the trail system with all the descents during the week, as it 'closes' at sunset(and they've been ticketing believe it or not. Good 'ole Kalifornistan).
I therefore ride a roughly 8 or 9 mile loop on some relatively flat hiking/horse trails(still only about 10mins from my house-Ive got it rough)after work. I mention this because riding a 160mm 27.5" bike feels like MAJOR over-kill there, and you can totally feel how much harder you have to work to push 'em through the sand, silt etc.
I've ridden this loop for the past 15+ years, thus I've ridden all the bikes I mentioned in my previous post there.
Anyway, riding one night recently I started thinking about how much easier it was to pedal the E29 around there, which got me thinking about how much faster it was on my favorite runs across the street from my house as well, which in turn got me looking on the web for Specialized stores blowing out their leftover '15 E29s, end of story.
So to answer your question, in my experience they do just fine on XC trails.
Would I buy one if that's all I rode? No I wouldn't. Apples to apples, obviously shorter travel bikes tend to weigh less, and their geometry is better for climbing hills and getting through switch-backs/tighter turns.
That doesn't mean the E29 sucks at climbing or dealing with tighter turns etc. On the contrary, IMO it does just fine.
IMO you buy an E29 because the trails you enjoy the most are harder-core.
As I said, this time of year during the week I usually ride what you and I would call an 'XC' loop. I ride the Enduro/DH runs on the weekend, so out of the 5-6 days/week I ride, I only 'use' the capability of the E29 twice.
It's TOTALLY worth it for me to pedal the thing around an XC loop 3-4 times/week so I have it for the GOOD stuff, but again, it does perfectly fine on the XC stuff anyway, so it's not like I'm huffing and puffing during the week just so I have it for the gnarly shit on the weekend.
FWIW, my '15 came with a 1x with a 30t up front. I like Shimano, so I'm running the 30t chain-ring with the same XTR d-train + a One-Up 42t I've used on my last 3 bikes.
ALL the '16 Enduro 29's come with 11-spds(the Comp comes with GX), and ironically, even though they equipped 'em with an 11-spd, the dropped the chain-ring down to a 28t.
I'm personally counting the days 'til that new E13 9-42/44 cassette comes out, as it'll give you the option of stepping up your chain-ring 'cuz you'll have a FREAKING 44T(if you choose the 11spd variant), -OR- stepping DOWN your chain-ring, as you'll have a FREAKING 9T on the other end!
If you're the type that likes to buy a bike and leave it alone, I'd get the '16. I forgot to mention that it(the Comp) also has better brakes(SRAM Guides) and a dropper post.
AND they dropped the freaking price $200 to $3400 on the Comp, and a WHOPPING $1,000 to $4k on the 'Elite'.
  • + 8
 Couldn't agree with you more. I bought a Enduro 29 at the beginning of the year and have constantly gone faster and faster over stuff I would normally pick a line through. It jumps surprisingly well too.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns : I agree on the Process 111. I had the opportunity to get one for this coming year and after 3 thorough test rides on my home trails, I was not impressed enough to get off my Stumpy Evo 29.

I had a Following on order, but have to wait until the spring as they did not get any more XL frames.

This looks intriguing as I am a fan of the Horst Link and geo looks spot on for what I like, but for +/- $250 more, the carbon Following seems like the way to go.
  • + 4
 I rode the Process 111 on a demo day, right after riding 153. I came to the place on my Blur Trc. I rode similar trails all day and I must say that even my blur wasn't getting so stopped by the chatter. I was riding 111 behind a dude on Banshee Spitfire, I was behind him for most of the time, then we went into the rocks and I saw him riding away, while the rear wheel felt like anchor. WHenever I wanted to pop something, all I was hearing was boing and felt the hardtail like resistance. Even my Blur felt smoother while 153 was just rolling over anything on that trail. Could have been a bit too much air in the shokc but I don't think that was the reason, since I ride my Blur quite firm.

Thanks for the tips, I will be filling my account for the Black Friday then... seems like Enduro 29 comp + Reverb + charger damper for Pike RC + all sort of old X9/XT gearing I already own is a good choice. Arerims on Fattie wheelset any light? I mean, any chance for them to be under 600g? My carbon days are over.
  • + 7
 ....and The Following fits a bottle cage. A small but important detail for those of us that can't stand riding with a pack.
  • + 1
 Actually?
  • + 1
 My E29er has been a mixed bag. It climbs extremely well, and on smooth, xc type trails that I normally rode my hard tail on it never felt like overkill or I had way too much travel. It feels so good on the smooth stuff that I'm selling my hard tail. Theres no point in keeping it. The ultra short chainstays also make it a demon on very tight, twisty trails and switchbacks; you can also pump it over rollers and around sharp berms like it has half the travel.

That being said, the 67.5 degree HT angle is the achilles heel for the bike. Way to steep. On all my local DH trails I can't shred with near the confidence of my old freeride bike with a 65 degree HT angle, despite the similar travel. I've gone OTB more this past spring than the last several seasons combined. Since the big S uses proprietary headsets, you can't drop an angleset, and also with the proprietary rear shock yoke you can only use one offset bushing, giving you less than half a degree of adjustment.

This bike looks like the perfect match for what I want- slack HT, longer chainstays, and it looks ALMOST as good as the enduro 29. The E29 is a great bike, but it rides more like a 5" trail shredder than a mini-dh bike.

On a completely unrelated note, does anyone want to buy my Enduro 29er?
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns The E29 is almost on par with the Stumpy Evo, climbing. The '16 Stumpjumper is a better climber, but not by far. On rougher descents, the E29 is in another league.
  • + 1
 @hamncheez Try the 650B shock yoke. You can order it from the Specialized dealer. If that's not enough, try a 650B rear wheel.
  • + 1
 @hamncheez I put an offset bushing on and it's a little more stable on steep stuff. Can't say I've every felt like going OTB before putting it on. Problem is, you start to go slacker with the head angle, the more slower the steering is gonna be. Can't have everything.
  • + 2
 Hamncheez@ Found the charger damper RC pike sits to low in the stroke, and more air makes it harsh. Installed an avalanche cartridge and a ohlins shock and maybe the best am bike period. A mini downhill bike that climbs and corners.
  • + 21
 Holy poops, a POSITIVE, civilized and passionate discussion about 29ers on Pinkbike! Quite relative to usage of prop system... coincidence? @mikelevy @RichardCunningham @karl-burkat @TEAM-ROBOT
  • + 1
 @Vanguard SO, I've spent a few weeks on an MTBR thread about that shock yoke, and there are issues with different rear shocks compressing too much and causing the seatstay bridge to contact the frame. Since the big S uses a proprietary shock stroke, most rear shocks take the longer 2.5 inch stroke and they just put a bushing in there to restrict the stroke to 2.25, but its not stiff enough. Also, the air can is still the volume of a 2.5 stroke shock, not a 2.25 stroke shock, so it doesn't ramp up at the end and bottoms very hard. I think I'm still going to try it, though.
  • + 2
 Some of that has to do with big S's susp. Curve. Not much ramp up, pretty linear. Could not get cane creek plush without bottoming. Ohlins shock fixed everything.
  • + 1
 @MX298 I've dropped a few tokens into the pike, and I have no complaints about the front end now. The Pike doesn't feel as stiff as a lefty on the Jekyll I demoed, but that is probably due to the smaller wheel and carbon rim, while my wheelset is the stock roval ones. It certainly is dampened better than the lefty.
  • + 2
 Cane creek Inline was a terrible shock for the E29. Got rid of mine sharpish and replaced with a monarch which seams to suit the FSR setup really well. Agree with tokens for pike, once setup, never had issues with plushness or diving.
  • + 1
 @mikeep how much do you weigh? I'm close to 220lbs with all my gear, and the M/M tune on the monarch is too low for me. I bottom all the time at 20% sag.
  • + 3
 another bike to consider is the Ibis Ripley, most fun bike I've ever ridden/owned. This trail has an average grad of 25 degrees...the ripley is only a few seconds slower than my nomad: www.pinkbike.com/video/394248
  • + 1
 ham/cheeze-
I'm very surprised you found the E29 to be twitchy.
You gotta understand that comparing head angles between 29" bikes and their smaller-wheeled cousins is comparing apples to oranges.
29" wheels do a REALLY good job of stabilizing the front end all by themselves, which is THE reason why Specialized(and I would imagine the other manufacturers as well) didn't kick the front end out any more.
29ers in general have always been more stable than smaller wheeled variants. If you read any comparos between 27.5" and 29" wheels, one of the biggest differences is stability. That's why the general rule of thumb is, if you want a bike that's stable and confidence inspiring, go 29"(and keep in mind that most 29ers have 70deg+ head tubes). If you want a bike that'll change directions easy, is more playful, and is easier to throw around, go 27.5"(or 26").
Specialized engineered a way to adapt 29" wheels to shorter stays, which gave the bike the ability to change directions easier, but that didn't negate its 29" wheels and their gyroscopic effect creating a more stable(and a bit slower turning) platform than even 27.5" bikes with 2-degree slacker front ends
  • + 2
 From Vital's review:

"The 29er equals the 27.5" version in terms of playfulness and willingness to get airborne, but it adds speed and a safety blanket that you can get used to in a hurry."
  • + 2
 I have the E29 and feel it's the best bike I've ridden. Owned a Nomad and a Stumpy evo 29. Waki the Evo fits into CC through light DH ( although I raced DH on mine) and the Enduro is trail through proper DH and Freeride.

For me I prefer the E29 but I agree it could be a bit slacker. I'm currently running it as a "mullet" with a 27.5 rear with a high volume tire.

I also tried the offset bushing ( not super noticeable) and the 650 yoke ( with a my large Expert E29 it contacts the frame).

I'm loving the 27.5 rear for gravity riding. Best of both worlds and it's nice and slack. I think I may run the offset bushing in reverse with the 27.5 to steepen the HA a tad.

After blowing up my CC Inline a bunch of times they allowed me to replace with a CC DB Air CS and it's been killer. I never bottom out hard ( drops up to about 8' and DH and doubles etc)
I run the Pike with about 90 PSI and two tokens which works for my style and weight ( 185-190 lbs).

It's a big ass, fast bike and I threw on some Saints which was perhaps the best upgrade I did.

Anyway. That's my .02 and experience with the E29. There are many other tempting options but for me it's a great "one and done" bike.
  • + 0
 Try commencal meta 29er, though i am selling it after i have bought the yt capra
  • + 2
 Yt will release a 29" capra next year methinks
  • + 2
 I agree 100%. I love my enduro 29. I have owned 26 enduro (2013), 2011 Sx trail, commecal DH supreme 2012, 2015 cannondale Jekyll. I have also test ridden some very capable bikes like the YT Capra pro. Hands down the enduro 29 is the most capable all around bike I have ridden over all. I have done long 30 mile, 4700 vert all dayers, and have done some super steep fast DH trails. I couldn't do that on my previous bikes and enjoy it as much as I did on my enduro 29. I'm not saying the bike is perfect, but it is a jack of all trades master of SOME.
  • + 1
 I would live this but I doubt it. 29ers are still not common in Europe. Its still mainly a US/UK thing
  • + 1
 Richt2000 - go to Dolomites with Riva Del Garda being the best place. Sit on a bench in the city center. You will see more mountain bikes per minute on a normal day, than anywhere else in Europe. And most of them are 29ers with semi slicks... At least in Sweden there's plenty of 29ers and that includes Enduro folks.
  • + 1
 Good to hear Waki! I did a week in the French and Italian alps recently and I didn't see a single one except mine. I had a load of French ask what it was!!!
  • + 1
 Cuz they're French...
  • + 19
 Someone kill Dilma (Brazilian president) please. Dolar is more than 4 times our Brazilian Real now. I can't buy anything... it fking sucks man.... shite!!!!

I want that bike and I can't buy cos brazilian politics are wasting all our money with taxes and corruption.... fking a*sholes!!! Damn them to hell!!!
  • + 3
 Sounds like I need to take a vacation in Brazil.
  • + 1
 Bring dolar... you'll be king here!!! And I tell you more... bring a bike, sell it here, and that's its. You just payed your trip!!!
  • + 16
 3000+ $ is considered budget?
2100$ for an aluminum frame?
  • + 8
 This^^
  • + 16
 Yes.  Have you been living under a rock?

Can we please stop complaining about price?  Nobody says you have to buy a new bike, but if you want the latest and greatest you have to pay for it.  

Plenty of killer deals on killer bikes in the PB BuySell section.
  • + 4
 Wait a few months and CRC will probably be selling them with a big discount
  • + 0
 "New" is not better. The industry has increasingly productive forces more capable, and therefore, prices should fall.
  • + 1
 No. No we will not stop complaining about the price. The industry has lost its mind. Just because it is a trend, or how business is done doesn't make it right. The current gouging of the consumer is not good for the long term health of the industry. I'm sure I'm not the only rider out there sitting on the fence waiting for a good bargain bike, just waiting for someone to buck the trend. I have the money, I'm just not stupid. Till then I'll continue riding my hardtail, and building my rallycar.
  • + 0
 Does the black one glow in the dark?
  • + 3
 @focofox37 is right, it is intolerable that a bicycle has the same price as a motorcycle; It is totally absurd. The companies producing bicycles for one shit spending.
  • + 1
 They have less technology than a motorcycle, and need less raw material to be manufactured.
  • + 0
 Economy of scale. The moto world is HUGE compared to MTB.
  • + 1
 Wow... There are actually people—the majority here?—supporting and justifying high prices!
Keep a note, bike industry, time to raise the price tag!

This is like being offered a raise at work, and refuse it because you live comfortable with your current salary.
Wake up.

'nuff said
  • - 1
 You know the actual frame cost a large company something less than $50?
  • + 1
 Now you're just bullshitting. Source, if you want to stick to your guns...
  • + 2
 Hey man - $300 bikes are out there. $1000 bikes, $2000 bikes, $10000 bikes. You can pay what you want for a bike, but you're not willing to make the compromise that less money gets you inferior quality and capability. This $3k bike can be compared with what a $5k bike can do. It's a decent price point for a capable bike. There's no point in bitching about how you don't want to pay that much, except to complain.

Ride what you have, buy what you can afford, and stfu.
  • - 3
 ^^^ I understand your family is loaded with money, and they probably have some high profit business... So you defend your turf...
Not everybody was born with a silver spoon like you kid...
You are not a cyclist and at the best a beginner... You know that I know from just looking at the pic of your bike set up... So be sure to put an X sign on the Trump name when you are at it.
Go post pics of your bikes on instagram now.
'nuff said
  • + 12
 I'm a school teacher. I have a good job, but I'm not loaded, and neither is my family. And just like that, everything else you've presumed about me is wrong. Horrible attempt at an ad-hominem attack - it's not that I care what you think, but you should know you're way off base, in case you'd care to... you know... not be a total dick. For a good 5 years, my bike was worth more than my car, until my wife got out of school and got a job. I'm willing to bet more than a few people fit this description. They spend the money not because they have it to burn, but because as a hobby, lifestyle choice, or whatever it is to them, it's worth it. It's just money, bro.
  • + 1
 Btw... How,did you like the Lenz?
  • + 1
 Loved it, but for some reason, it started to feel tall and cramped. Not really sure what changed, but I answered with a Megatrail, taking most parts over from the Lenz, except for the fork and wheels.
  • + 6
 With a leverage ratio like this bike has, volume spacers won't fix it. It's plenty progressive in the last part of the stroke (which is all that your volume reduction is going to achieve anyway), it just has that characteristic high leverage around the sag zone of a top-swing link. Volume reduction will either exacerbate the mid stroke wallow or just restrict travel usage for a leverage curve so progressive.

I would go the opposite way, more volume and slightly more air pressure for more mid-stroke support, then use the low speed compression as necessary. That's what fixed the wallow in my bronson. Just look at all the guys, cedric included, running coil springs on VPP bikes.

But yeah, a L compression tune seems pretty weird for 2.8 leverage ratio at sag.
(Thanks
  • + 1
 I'm a few days into riding my new Mega and was think the same thing as you have said above. I found the same issues as the reviewer. Gona try less rings and more air with more LC. But i am soon to buy a coil, I just hope the low AS number won't mean i have to spend lots of money on a coil with a climb switch. Mark
  • + 8
 It is very boring to see that all bikes are created equal. Pike fork and Sram components.
  • + 5
 They do a pretty smart one with a Mattock.
  • + 1
 Upgrade to an MRP stage, and never be an equal again.
  • + 4
 The 29er looks great - except those far too long chainstays (except maybe in size XL). Still think BMC Trailfox is the best 29er out there (you just need to exchange nearly all components on 2014 models, and 2015 except the TF02 X01. 2016 models are finally proper components - though you still need to rebuilt the Pike from 150 to 160mm). Trailfox is also 66° HA with 160mm fork, more ore less same reach on S/M/L (but missing an XL frame) but it got 435mm chainstays... And they are not overpriced anymore. 2016er models are priced really good.
  • + 4
 I ride a Banshee Prime 29er. I have seen a lot of threads about the Evil Following. It has 120mm in the rear not the 160mm some have suggested. I see the issue with the 29er being the rear chainstay length. The Canfield Riot seems to have taken care of the issue entirely with the short rear end. They also keep the travel fairly high for a 29er. 140mm feels like 160mm on a 29er. A 29er is not for everyone. I have had to adjust my riding style to suit the rear wheel dragging in the tight trails. The contact patch of the wheel seems to grind or pivot instead of rolling. I rode a 650b when I broke my rear hub and I laughed how nimble I became. I am not awesome, I have ridden 29er for 4 years. There are things you change when you ride the 29. My style has changed. But I am 43 years old and I do keep up sometimes or just keep it up. Ride On.
  • + 2
 Those super short chainstays on the Canfield make a 29er viable for average-sized people. If you're tall then those same sub 430mm chainstays basically put you behind the rear axle at full seat height. The E29 at 430mm is borderline but going much shorter you compromise front-rear balance in some sizes.

That being said, going to 450mm on this bike might be too much? But I'd have to try it to really know. The Yeti SB6 has 442mm chainstays and that's not stopping anyone getting around corners.
  • + 3
 I think they looked at a Lapierre frame and said, guys this is how you should have made it. These frames look ace. I really like the fact they have a nice steep seat angle and a nice slack front end. Might pick one of these frames up at some point next year
  • + 3
 Certainly they didn't look to the latest Lapierres...
  • + 1
 Agreed with Richt2000, very similar to the pre-hunchback spicy.
  • + 1
 My thoughts as well - its the same as a 2013 and older Spicy/Zesty!
  • + 6
 Man, I miss their full yellow bikes, I thought it was a fun color specific to their brand.
  • + 3
 Those chainstays seem long but I'm 6'6". On my E29 it always feels a bit like I'm sitting over the rear axle. The additional 2cm of CS might be just the thing to feel balanced on the bike.

I still don't understand why the head tube is so short. Find me an XL person who wants a short head tube I dare you.

That being said I really like the look of this bike.
  • + 1
 Alexsin you speak the truth.......why a short head tube that only increases 10mm across the whole range?....and short CS have issues for tall dudes...why don't they steepen the seat tube if hey want to have short CS on larger frames?

Bike designers please listen to us!!!
  • + 6
 Canfield Brother's Riot for the win!
  • + 1
 The problem with 90% of 29ers in that segment is that they cost nearly double of that Nukeproof :/
  • + 4
 Damn Waki...slow day at work, and/or weather too crappy to ride?
  • + 1
 Just depressed as usual this time of the year. Making up for lack of riding and sour at my work place. I built a nice Lego Technic RC racer last night though...
  • + 1
 Yep. . This Mega 29er looks really good, and it's great to see another mid-to-long travel 29er on the market... but I'm loving the short chainstay on the Riot!
  • + 1
 Riot frameset is same price
  • + 5
 Jesus, the 290 is Looooong - 48" wheelbase for a large - that's an inch longer than a Carbine 29...
  • + 4
 I can't say I'm a fan of the long chainstays. I am looking for something with more pop in the front wheel, but I get why others aren't.
  • + 2
 Agreed. 450mm chainstays will remove all the fun from that bike.
  • + 1
 Go out and practice manuals and bunnyhops... Once you can pull a good one, you'll pop grannys bike...
  • + 1
 Check out NS snabb trail. Just got one, and it's a completely different beast with 420mm stays. It does feel too short periodically, but the rest of the time, it's so much fun. Makes me want to also have an "enduro" specific bike with 435mm or so in back.
  • + 1
 @mbl77 do you think that's true for everyone? I'm 6'6" and I'm thinking a bit longer chainstay might be just the thing. I've tried some 29ers with very short chainstays but they get weird when you're tall.
  • + 1
 @alexsin I think you're spot on - chainstay length should be appropriate for your height. For me at 5'8" long chainstays make it harder for me to get my weight back, especially with the current long top-tube trend. I think Norco actually vary their chainstay length with frame size, which makes a lot of sense to me.
  • + 0
 Altering cs length per size requires redesigning rear triangle with minor consequences to the linkage or creating an oversized BB shell with insert which tends to weigh 100g more at best. You may also make adjustable/ replacable drop out. It increases complication of everything, hence very few do it. There is mo way you could persuade a company's headof economy to do it for the carbon frame.
  • + 2
 Or they can do what Norco does and slightly reposition the whole rear triangle to get the desired chainstay length at each size.
@mbl77 at 5'8" a long travel 29er with 450mm chainstays would be a lot of work.
  • + 5
 Why keep spec'n larger volume air cans only to fill them back up again with volume spacers?
  • + 1
 Bigger negative air chamber. More gains.
  • + 1
 Some company already makes negative chamber tokens for Debonair... So that you can tune it EXACTLY to your riding style.
  • + 1
 I thought it was a new YT bike before reading the title. Personally I preferred the previous generation better. As for the 29er it looks good but the huge chanistays and the even bigger wheelbase makes me wonder about how easy this bike will turn. I am pretty sure that it would be crazy fast and stable in a straight line but I don't really know how agile it will be.
  • + 1
 Too bad Nukeproof bikes aren't available here in Brazil. I actually found their trail hardtails really interesting. Don't get me wrong, I love my Stumpjumper FSR, but I could do without the added maintenance that comes along with rear suspension...
  • + 1
 I love the looks, specs and price of those bikes! Such an honest package. And then review seems to be proving it excellent. That is a bike that could make me sell my 26ers. The only question is 275 or 29?

@paulaston - there's lots of bullcrap told around about 29ers and playfullness, is there much difference with picking the bike into the air between 275 and 29 versions of that bike? Could you compare that Mega 29 to Stumpjumper 29 Evo if you ever rode one? I mean is it a bulldozer like Enduro 29 or just a good regular bike with big wheels like Stumpy?
  • + 14
 What I want to know is is the 275 compatible with 26" wheels and does it have a threaded BB? That would surely make it the ultimate PB commenter's bike
  • - 2
 They look Mega!
  • + 0
 @alexhyland - unless BB is not made super low like Giant Reign (nothing bad about it) I could easily ride with 26" wheels and Lyrik since I crank on hard gear 1:1 and get rock strikes very rarely. My 26"HT has 30mm BB drop with 140 fork while many modern 275 HTs have 15-20mm. But I am super curious about the 29er. Modern 29ers are nothing like the dragons and windmills of the old age that many PB commenters are fearing
  • + 0
 I have a similar intrigue about the on-one codeine, especially given how cheap it is. Unfortunately it looks like they've discontinued it in favour of a new 27.5
  • + 2
 They're doing both according to the website.
  • + 0
 @alexhyland I bought one a few months ago. The GT sanctions stayed in the shed ever since. Bar the wheels being a bit flimsy but their surviving its epic.
  • + 0
 I've recently started looking at 29ers too. Most of the reviews I've read say they are better all round than 275s. If you have a 26 inch play bike and a 275 downhill bike, might as well get a 29 enduro or trail bike, since the others are the ones that are going to get jumped to shit and landed sideways. If it's all about pace, i think 29 is better than 650b
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns You'd be surprised at how agile a bulldozer the E29 is. Riding is believing.
  • + 3
 I don't give much fk about "expected agility" anymore. I filmed myself riding a flow trail on a 26 hardtail, whippin' and sliding a bit... my dreams got shattered - I am not Remy Metallier, so I don't think I would be any less spectacular on a 35" bike. I was surprised though how agile Stumpy 29EVO felt and how tight I could corner whenever I wanted to. And that thing had 456 chainstay. As soon as I rode it I knew that CS length has little to do with overall flickability - it is the whole package tha does it. Bike did all and more than I asked of it. I owned a 2010 Niner EMD for a short period of time, and compared to my 26" HT I felt like a fly covered in poop. Modern ones are nothing like it.
  • + 0
 Wiki, why get a stumpy when an Enduro does everything the stumpy does with 20mm more susp. ?
  • + 1
 @MX298 - The stumpy 29 2016 has quite a different suspension tune than the enduro 29. The stumpy is way more efficient/firm (very little pedal bob too - non in trail mode) whereas the enduro very plush. For me the stumpy is a fantastic trail bike and the enduro 29 a great all mountain bike. I'm not from the big S marketing department by the way. I own a enduro 29 and tested the new stumpy several times.

Here is a review of the new STJ btw.
www.mtb-news.de/news/2015/05/19/specialized-stumpjumper-29-2016-test
Unfortunately it's in german...
  • + 1
 My German is not very good, I would bet most of that is in the shock valving
  • + 1
 Nice frame with skinny top tube like Pulse DH. We've been waiting for the new version of Mega...definitely it looks much 10x better than the old frame as the old frame was the worst nightmare that I'd never buy. Now I'd defi wanna own a new one
  • + 2
 Why would anyone buy that? for the same 6000 bucks you could get a Carbon Enduro 29er that is lighter and better wheels and the chainstays are shorter than the NukeProof's 27.5...??? Needs to be MUCH cheaper
  • + 1
 The frame price is reasonable under current conditions.
  • + 0
 Not with those long 450 chainstays. I'd rather have a little less travel and shorter chainstays on a big wheeled bike any day. These are cheaper too.

Enduro SX alu frame, 150 bucks less, 135 travel 419mm chainstays.

Transition Smuggler alu frame, 300 bucks cheaper 130 rear travel but only 436 CS.


The TR 27.5 frame isn't as bad. But still you can get a Transition patrol for a hundred bucks less...?


And again, complete bike costs are crazy. UNLESS these prices end up being higher MSRP or something? Still can't get past the long chainstay's on the 29er frame. They should have just waited on the big bike till they could produce something better.
  • + 0
 maybe they will show up on CRC discounted right off the bat? (still don't want those long chainstays or flexy wheels though! Smile )
  • + 1
 Yep, showed up on CRC, (or maybe been there all along?), at 250-500 bucks less than they list.

I still think if you were looking at the top mega that you should just spend the extra 500.00 on the enduro expert and get the lighter stiffer carbon frame and wider, stiffer wheels. (wider rims and apparently stiffer wheels is one thing the enduro's have over the mega at every price point. Maybe not lighter though? so pick your poison?)

But for sure the base model mega is 500 bucks less than the base model comp enduro. AND the Mega's sizing is better for bigger/taller riders for sure. there is no XL 27.5 enduro listed for the US? Though the fit and finish of the enduro's seems nicer, took time to work on the welds and the hardware is nicer. But the mega you don't have the proprietary shock.

(the other thing is I haven't been in a shop lately, so not sure how 2016 actual prices compare with specialized website prices? So if you can get an enduro cheaper than what's listed on the website that may chop away at the Mega's advantages. AND you have to add 100 bucks to ship to the US.

anyway...
  • + 1
 I don't understand the geometry differences between the two frames. Some of it doesn't seem to add up or make rational sense to me. I'd be inclined to think this is why the reviews favor the 290. Seems more like they built a new 29er and then half-heartedly massaged it to also offer a (mediocre) 650b version.
  • + 1
 Beautiful. Just want one to ride, 275, im kinda short and prefer a bit of having some air while riding. Only thing that terrifies me is this disgusting Nukeproof stem. However, 50 mm length in all sizes, and i can forgive this.
  • + 2
 Wasn't keen on it at first glance but the more i look at it the more i like it. Which is exactly what happened with the new Pulse when that came out and now i bloody want one!
  • + 2
 29er looks great. Would be good to see leverage curve, forces, anti squat, brake feedback etc. Can't wait for thelinkagedesign to evaluate this frame.
  • + 2
 go to vital...
  • + 0
 Pretty sweet! I'm not in the market for a new bike at the moment, but if I were, I still probably wouldn't go with the Mega. Comparing it to the likes of the Capra and the Strive CF seems a bit like going into a battle you can't possibly win seeing as the highest-spec Capra CF has a $500 lower price tag and marginally nicer componentry in the wheels, suspension, cockpit, etc. The Strive CF blows both the Capra CF and Mega out of the water as far as value goes with components. The only issue is we can't buy them in the US, so unfortunately for our market they're irrelevant. The Nukeproof is definitely a nice looking bike but if I were going to spend $6,000 on an endure bike with pretty similar geo to almost everything else out there, I'd buy a Capra and put the rest of the cash into the savings seeing as there isn't much on the bike to upgrade.
  • + 3
 they must have been doing something right. No bitching and whining so far. would like to try the 290.
  • + 1
 I'm not too interested in the bikes, but those are some really nice photos for a bike review! I love the sunset shot, and I am really digging the shadows and contrast in the action shots. Keep up the nice work!
  • + 4
 If that has a threaded BB that could be my next bike.
  • + 3
 73-mm threaded BB
  • + 0
 Don't forget Transitions Patrol if you want something with a good resale value! :p
  • + 2
 Wonder it the 29er will accept a 160mm fork and be warranty friendly........
  • + 3
 Love the revised look of this bike, looks lighter and more agile.
  • + 2
 Canecreek db coil cs and lyriks please,proper bike,if your gunna do something new,do it right I say
  • + 2
 looking forward to a long term test. specifically how they climb. I actually can't decide which one I want more!
  • + 1
 Not going to lie... That 29 in the team trim is nice looking. . I suspect Specialized will be dropping a new Enduro for 2017 that will get the low, long, slack treatment. .
  • + 1
 So.. should I get a capra or this bike as my first enduro? Comparing the two lowest models of the each brands, which would be better.
  • + 1
 I've owned a couple bikes from each brand. I would go for the Nukeproof every day. They're just as well priced but better quality and better support. I also believe carbon is rubbish but that's personal preference, the aforementioned is fact.
  • + 4
 looks like a Capra
  • + 3
 Nukeproof really did an awesome job when designing the 2016 lineup!
  • + 1
 I'm quite big and maybe this is why I've never felt that 29ers are "sluggish". The 290 must be a trail eating monster. Both nice specs and looks, I think Nukeproof nailed it!
  • + 3
 Seen it a few weeks ago irl and its pure sex!
  • + 1
 Looks good, but a real shame theres no bottle cage mounts on the inside of the frame triangle
  • + 1
 A 29'r that finally looks like it could handle the abusive relationship I have with my mtb!
  • + 3
 Looks clean af.
  • + 2
 more pics of the frame not parts
  • + 1
 Wonder if the 29er can take a 160mm fork.........must not buy 29er...........ah fuck!
  • + 1
 Why nobody talks about their switch to Horst link?

That's the biggest improvement.
  • + 2
 indeed!
  • + 1
 My new bike is finally here... Looks like it's going to live up to the hype.
  • + 2
 That's a rather long travel 29er, love it! Looks very capable
  • + 3
 That is Mega!
  • + 2
 Wow. If i were to choose a 29er this is the one. Perfect geo imo
  • + 1
 Ssshhhhhhhh....I think the new 29ers are on to something. Btw I F'in love my Evil Following! EVILIVE
  • + 0
 sexy bike. especially the 650b

one question, though...what @paulaston means with low/low tune? low rebound and compression damping?
  • + 0
 I am thinking that by low/low he means the bike is tuned with a heavy rebound and heavy compression tune.
  • + 1
 It means there is a fast Rebound needed And a low damping.
  • + 1
 and how is that an easy fix for the consumer? Can I get the different shim stacks somewhere?
  • + 2
 I though it was the opposite. Low, medium or high, depending on the leverage rate of the suspension. Low would mean easier to compress, quicker to rebound because the leverage rate is low. It should feel the same when you ride it. Just different tunesfor different suspension designs. Or I could be talking out of my arse.
  • + 1
 yes @zojdson but i think the M compression tune would make it to harsh. but there are different tunes available. m3 or something else. lighter than M but more than L.

i am wondering if sam hill and the whole team was testing the bike, could it be to lack?
  • + 2
 The way I understand tunes, the M stands for medium tune, which means that if it is a M Compression tune, the fork/shock will be damped to a medium level, L would be Light for a light damper tune which means that the springrate would be damped less and not held back as much. H I would assume means Heavy so the spring is heavily damped and has more compression/rebound resistance. The way I see it, L would mean a more lively bike with faster and less damped suspension, M would be a middle of the road more average feeling bike and H would feel the most 'dead' out of them all. When he says Low/Low I am assuming he means the shock has a Heavy/Heavy tune? that's just how I interpreted it.
  • + 1
 @Callum-H
the tune depeding on the leverage ratio of the frame. low/low means low compression tune and low rebound. the frame has less force to compress so there is not much compression needed. also the rebound needs less force to bring the power back. in contract would u use a Low Comp and a high rebound the frame couldnt get back with the averagy riders weight, because of to much rebound. sorry for mad english
  • + 1
 "I think the 'Low/Low' shock tune and the high volume DebonAir air sleeve were to blame..." I read this as being a tune that is too spongy, because the is shock is over-damped. I'm not quite comprehending what you've said, and that's not me being rude, it just didn't make sense to me just then.
  • + 2
 its not easy for me to articulate correct. i think now i know what u wanted to say. mainly my opinion is that the only significant reason to buy a bike is the rear suspension design and the right shock with it. weight, specc is irrelevant at first. seems to be nukeproof didnt do their homework
  • + 1
 I thought low tune means light damping, which in this case would mean not enough compression damping, using too much travel, and rebounding too quickly. I could be wrong though.
  • + 1
 @jaame exactly what i thought dude, but wasn't so sure
  • + 1
 @Bruccio @jaame I read spongy as being too soft and not rebounding fast enough, interesting how we interpret things differently hey?
  • + 2
 @Callum-H definitively, but i guess the misunderstandig derives from the fact that at first sight low/low and spongy are antithetic, if interpreted as we did. low compression and rebound damping implies a very fast and easy bottoming suspension, with spongy being the opposite. anyway, in order to clarify the situation, i'll take out the FIT cartridge from my fox 36 and will fill the right leg with my bathing sponge, and have a few runs at my local trail.

because science.
  • + 1
 @Bruccio ahaha yes because science, keep it simple though, try not to bring Strava into this!
  • + 2
 never used strava bro. i'm not competitive. i ride for fun Wink
  • + 1
 @Bruccio Best reason to ride!!
  • + 2
 what about mega 26? i'm lookin' for a new frame
  • + 2
 The 275 would (probably) work alright with 26" wheels. Get some fat tyres and go 26"+!
  • + 1
 @alexhyland i don't think so, bb is dropped more than on 26" frames, so i'm gonna 'walk' on my cranks...
  • + 1
 I know this wasn't your intention in the original comment but I have to agree that of all the frames to stick 26" wheels in, this ain't it. Not just for the BB height (that would be fine for me) but it looks very well built around 650b wheels; with a nice low stack etc. You'd be ruining a lot of good design work.
  • + 1
 I saw a thread somewhere (maybe singletrack? Dunno) about someone putting 26" wheels on a Bronson
  • + 1
 To continue (damn you fat thumbs)...seemed pretty happy with it. Also an owner of 2014 mega tr 275 on CRC also very happy with that setup - not sure of geometry differences between the 2 tho. Granted it is a great looking bike!
  • + 1
 I'm actually considering a 2014 tr as my next frame and keeping my 26s.
  • + 2
 Suddenly I feel old with my mega tr 26
  • - 1
 26 is better.
  • + 1
 I've never seen a stock geo sheet so close to what I want! If the ETT was 15mm longer I would have J'd my P
  • + 1
 Actually forget that, 435 R is fine. 585ETT plus a steep SA is also fine. 10mm BB drop is a bit conservative though? Don't mind me, just talking to myself here :-D
  • + 0
 With seat angle that steep you can pop in a setback post with no worries... Or just slide your seat 15mm back...
  • + 1
 You could do yeah and probably still have a pretty steep SA to climb with but that's not really what I was after. What I meant was I'd like the front end 15mm longer but realised the R isn't too bad despite the ETT being a little short (because of the steep SA) in comparison to my current bike. I'd run it with my seat as far forward as possible, I can never get a steep enough seat angle, my seat to bars relation isn't something I'm fussy about, just the seat to BB for climbs and BB to bars for descending. I'd like to lower the BB but that would shorten the reach a bit...tl:dr I'd still like it a tad longer.
  • + 2
 I want that 29er, and it even comes in an xl!
  • + 1
 both of these look great and look great on paper (geo)!! would be proud to own one of these.
  • + 2
 where's the comparison against the spec enduro 29er?
  • + 3
 Where is the mega TR!
  • + 1
 That was the bike I expected some news in this article...no more 130 mm from Nukeproof??
  • + 1
 The TR/AM/etc. designations go away, replaced by four trim levels

Race, Comp, Pro, & Team

nukeproof.com/latest-news/the-all-new-mega
  • + 1
 Well, this is making it all the harder to have the resolve to save money and get the Mega TR for sale at CRC.
  • + 3
 Best looking 29er by far
  • + 2
 Add this to the E29 as the only 29ers I'd like to own...
  • + 1
 Anyone bought one of these?
  • + 2
 These look awesome.
  • + 2
 Mega cool
  • + 1
 Horst Link for everyone..yeahhh
  • + 2
 Take my money
  • + 2
 I'll give you a prop mate since some total twat has given you a negative one for saying something positive.
  • + 1
 Cheers lad.
  • + 1
 Now they looks awesome, as well as suspension design
  • + 1
 Just like what it's called, MEGA!
  • + 1
 What is the seat post diameter?
  • + 2
 31.6
  • + 1
 Thanks
  • + 1
 Don't trust their own dropper post? Okno lol
  • + 1
 Anybody know the shock size?
  • + 2
 Shock is 216mm x 63mm on the 275 and 200x57 on the 290.
  • + 1
 That's great, thank you Smile
  • + 2
 No bottle mount. Fail.
  • + 1
 @Crush12 these are mint and @ArthurSandsmtb this is an option for u?
  • + 1
 What is the saddle on the 275 in the side view picture, @paulaston?
  • + 1
 Looks like a Fabric Scoop, Shallow.
  • + 2
 It's the new Nukeproof Vector saddle..... nukeproof.com/products/vector-saddle
  • + 1
 No TR option any more?
  • + 1
 Looks like a YT Capra...
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 I LIKE THE 29er a lot.
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 Frame weight?
  • + 1
 Saw 2.8 kg listed on the MBR.uk site
  • + 1
 good looking!!
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 Spawn of an evil and yt
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 Also, no boost, no want! Smile Don't fight the future...
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 The future of boost is questionable..or at least the future of the definition of boost is questionable!!
imo boost is an ambiguous term which allows the manufacturers to move to any size hub they like without re branding and causing controversy.
Lets hope we dont see boost 151mm and everyone has to change their frame cos the new wheel wont fit.. but its still called boost??!
Great money maker SRAM.. but hardly moral
  • + 1
 No, the "Boost" standard is clearly defined 148 on the back 110 on the front. There's no ambiguity or question about the spec.

Sure, there will be holdouts. (It did Nukerpoof a lot of good ignoring boost on their 29er and then having the tester comment about the FLEXY wheels on their high end build HUH?)

And "maybe" somebody will come up with some reason why it makes even more sense to go 2mm wider? (I doubt it, but for the sake of argument it's possible) But few companies are in the position SRAM is that can build both the drivetrains and forks. At this point the other companies are going to continue jumping on the bandwagon so they don't get left behind.

The boost standard can support everybody from DH to 29erplus riders. I say make the switch and be done with it. We'll still have a few other set ups for actual FAT bikes. But 99% of mountain bikers will be covered from this one standard. DONE! Smile
  • - 2
 Soooo good! Non of the black plasticy stuff either. Nice one Nukeproof, the 29er looks amazing .
  • - 2
 What? A "plastic sux" comment? Never would have guessed!

Did a carbon bike take your candy when you were a kid?
  • - 1
 There called sweets in this country mate!
  • + 0
 Oh and a kid is a baby goat .
  • - 3
 Looks like a capra Alu
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