Nukeproof Mega AM 275 - Review

Feb 24, 2014
by Mike Kazimer  
REVIEW
Nukeproof Mega AM 275




WORDS: Mike Kazimer
ACTION PHOTOS: Paris Gore

Last year, Nukeproof split their Mega range of bikes into two different models, the TR and the AM, with the 130mm TR billed as the lighter, more trail oriented version, and the AM the 160mm, all-mountain machine. Both models remain for 2014, but they are now rolling on 27.5” wheels. When we first talked with Nukeproof about the decision to bump up to the bigger wheel size, Alastair Beckett, Nukeproof's brand manager, said, “It was extremely important to keep the same feel and geometry as we had with the 26” Megas and if we had to sacrifice that because of the wheelsize then it wasn’t going to be the right thing to do. When we started looking at the drawings and the geometry, we quickly realized that we could get exactly the geometry and ride that we wanted with the bigger wheelsize, so it was a win-win situation.” Available in small, medium, large, and x-large sizes the Mega AM 275 retails for $5149.99 USD, and weighs in at 32 pounds without pedals for a size large.


Nukeproof Mega AM 27.5

• Purpose: All-mountain, enduro
• Rear-wheel travel: 160mm
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Hydroformed 6061 aluminum frame
• 12 x 142mm rear axle
• ISCG 05 tabs
• Weight: 32 lbs (size L, without pedals)
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• MSRP: $5149.99 USD


Frame Details

The squared off shape of the Mega AM 275's hydroformed 6061 aluminum tubing gives the bike an industrial air, as if the tubes could also be used in the construction of a skyscraper, and the iconic head tube badge (the symbol for radioactivity) gives further credence to the idea that this bike could withstand a nuclear blast. The down tube and seat tube are welded to a one piece, CNC machined 73mm bottom bracket assembly that accepts traditional threaded bottom brackets. Asymmetric chain stays give enough clearance for a front derailleur or a chain guide like the SRAM XO one mounted to our test bike's ISCG tabs.

Nukeproof Mega AM 27.5 review test
  The squared off hydroformed tubing and thick welds make it clear that the Mega AM 275 is meant to be able to withstand a solid thrashing.

The only internal cable routing to be found is in place for a stealth dropper post, but the remaining housing is well managed, running along the top of the down tube and on the underside of the seat stays. The 12 x 142 rear spacing is in line with the bike's intended usage, as is the 44mm head tube that allows for either a tapered or straight fork steerer tube to be run depending on the headset cups used. There's certainly no shortage of branding on the Mega AM – we started to count how many times the word 'Nukeproof' appears on the frame and components, but lost count at somewhere close to 40.

Nukeproof Mega AM 27.5 review test
  Nukeproof's Erosion Link suspension design uses a one piece rocker link to drive the Monarch Plus rear shock through its 160mm of travel.

Suspension Design

The Mega AM 275 uses a link driven single pivot design, with Nukeproof's one piece “Erosion Link” activating the rear shock. According to Nukeproof, this linkage was designed to provide “smooth progressive suspension action with a well controlled mid-stroke to avoid wallowing under pedal loads,” a claim we'd be putting to the test once we hit the trails.The bike's seat stays are joined by a thick aluminum brace that curves underneath the Erosion Link, a feature that is meant to add further stiffness. Clevis pivots are found where the seat stays join the chain stays, and sealed cartridge bearings are used at all pivot locations.


Specifications
Price $5149.99
Travel 160mm
Rear Shock RockShox Monarch Plus RC3
Fork RockShox Pike RCT3 Solo Air 160mm travel
Headset Nukeproof 44IETS
Cassette SRAM PG1030, 11-36
Crankarms Truvativ Descendant 170mm
Chainguide SRAM X0
Rear Derailleur SRAM X9 Type 2
Chain SRAM PC1030
Shifter Pods SRAM X9
Handlebar Nukeproof Warhead 760mm
Stem Nukeproof 60mm
Grips Nukeproof Element lock-on
Brakes Avid Elixir 9 Trail 180mm rotors
Hubs Nukeproof Generator Disc
Rim Nukeproof Generator AM 275
Tires Maxxis High Roller II
Seat Nukeproof Trail Mega
Seatpost Rockshox Reverb Stealth
Nukeproof Mega AM 275 review test




Riding the Mega AM 275


bigquotesThere doesn't seem to be an upper speed limit to the Mega AM 275... If anything, it has a speed that needs to be reached or exceeded in order for it to achieve its true potential.

Climbing

Out of the box, the Mega AM 275's priorities are evident – wider bars, a short stem, Maxxis Highroller II tires and a RockShox Pike RCT3 all make it clear that this bike is equipped to take on serious terrain. On the flip side, the extra weight from the beefed up frame combined with the stout build kit do translate into a bike that takes a little extra effort to get to the top of the hill – you're going to want to eat those Wheaties before heading out on an all day mission, especially if you decide to run the Mega AM with the stock front chain ring. While we're fans of single ring drivetrains no matter how many speeds the rear cassette has, the 36 tooth front ring on our test bike ended being a little too tall for the extended steep climbs most of our local trails start with. After toughing it out for a few rides we threw in the towel and installed a 32 tooth ring, a change that allowed us to have enough energy left at the top to rally on the descents.

Nukeproof seems to have found the sweet spot for the pivot location on the Mega AM – when climbing the Monarch Plus rear shock remained free from any unwanted bobbing, especially when it was set to the middle compression setting. There wasn't any trouble tackling straight ahead sections of technical climbing, and the bike was able to span the spaces between roots and rocks that likely would have stalled a more compact, smaller wheeled bike. However, throw in a few sharp turns and the bike's length does become noticeable. With a 1198mm wheelbase and 445mm chain stays for the size large, the Mega lives up to its name, and advanced planning is necessary to successfully navigate tight switchbacks. For its intended purpose, the bike gets the job done with minimal fuss, but riders who are looking for a sprightly bike that will allow them to dance up the climbs without breaking a sweat won't find it here.

Nukeproof Mega AM 275 review. Paris Gore 2013 This image may not be used distributed copied printed published or displayed without the prior written permission of the Photographer Paris Gore Paris Gore Photography . Doing so without prior written permission will result in a charge of 3 three times the Photographer s customary fee for such usage.
  It might take a little extra effort to get the Mega AM 275 to the top, but it's worth it when the trail points downhill.


Technical Handling / Downhill

To see if we could find the limits of the Mega's capabilities we took it to the burly trails hidden deep in the woods of the Pacific Northwest, trails that starts with steep, root filled chutes and then continue on to slippery rock rolls followed by large drops and jumps, the type of trails that would have been the domain of clunky freeride bikes a few years ago. On steep, fall line sections of trail the benefits of the bike's 66° head angle and long wheelbase became clear, providing a stable platform for carving down the mountain. There doesn't seem to be an upper speed limit to the Mega AM 275 either; if anything, it has a speed that needs to be reached or exceeded in order for it to achieve its true potential. Casual, low key cruising isn't in the Mega AM's repertoire, and the proper soundtrack for a ride aboard the Mega AM is going to be something along the lines of Slayer or Sepultura instead of Simon and Garfunkel. This is a bike that can be plowed through the rough stuff without faltering, ripping down the trail like Casey Jones in his infamous Cannonball Express.

Despite having 160mm of travel, the Mega AM doesn't feel excessively plush, a feeling that the stiff frame no doubt plays a part in. This isn't a negative trait, it just means that the bike responds well to multiple impacts in a row without blowing through its travel, while at the same time having a bit of reserve for those moments of mis-judged air time. We took full advantage of this, since at first the Mega's uncanny ability to carry speed had us landing deeper into the transitions of jump and drops than usual. There wasn't any harsh bottoming out though, just a solid, controlled touchdown, no matter what we launched it off of.

It did take a few rides to get accustomed to the Mega AM's cornering habits - at times it felt reluctant to finish a turn, which made for a good crash and a couple of near misses while we got used its handling. The bike's geometry makes whipping it around corners at speed more of a task than we're accustomed too, but the key is to keep a firm grip on the reins, and be ready to use a little more muscle to bring the back end around. After a few rides we became accustomed to setting up earlier and slightly shifting our weight to help encourage the rear wheel to get around the apex of a sharp turn.


Nukeproof Mega AM 27.5 review test
  Locating the Reverb remote underneath the bars was a nice touch. Nukeproof's Generator wheelset handled everything we tossed at it, although the hubs did need a little attention, and SRAM's X9 1x10 drivetrain was low maintenance and problem free.


Component Check

• Nukeproof Generator 27.5" wheelset – The Mega AM has Nukeproof's house brand wheelset, which uses Sun Ringle's Inferno rims. The rims themselves held up well, shrugging of a number of hard hits without any damage, although the end caps on the hubs had a tendency to come loose, and we had to tighten them up on both the front and rear wheel more than once.

• Avid Elixir 9 Trail brakes – The Elixir Trail 9 brakes provided plenty of stopping power, but the rear brake was extra noisy from the start, emitting a high pitched wail on extend sections of braking. We eventually swapped out the organic pads for a set of metallic ones, which quieted things down a great deal.

• Drivetrain – As was mentioned before, the 36 tooth front ring ended up being too tall of a gear to comfortably use on the steeper climbs in our area. Riders that will be using lifts or shuttles to get to the descents won't have any trouble, but those planning on earning their turns will likely want to swap it out for something smaller. Other than that, the SRAM X9 10 speed drivetrain and chainguide was trouble free.

• RockShox Reverb dropper post – The Reverb worked flawlessly, and we particularly appreciated how the thumb remote was configured on the underside of the handlebar, a much more intuitive placement made possible by the bike's lack of a front shifter.


Nukeproof Mega AM 275 review Paris Gore 2013 This image may not be used distributed copied printed published or displayed without the prior written permission of the Photographer Paris Gore Paris Gore Photography . Doing so without prior written permission will result in a charge of 3 three times the Photographer s customary fee for such usage.
  Wide open charging is the Mega AM's strong suit - for the best results, simply stomp on the pedals and let it rip.



Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesThe Mega AM 275 isn't a bike for the timid, responding best to being pushed hard on steep, technical terrain, not lollygagging on buttery smooth singletrack. There is a definite learning curve when getting accustomed to the bike's handling, but the enjoyment the Mega AM can provide on the descents makes it worth taking the time to figure it out. It might not be the lightest or the most nimble bike out there, but at full speed the Mega AM is a blast to ride, and for riders seeking a stout, capable bike that's well specc'd to handle the rowdiest terrain it's certainly worth a look. - Mike Kazimer

www.nukeproof.com


122 Comments

  • + 102
 $5149.99? for less than a thousand more, you can get a norco range 7.1, carbon frame goodness with 1X11 drive train.
  • + 54
 Yes, but is it nuke proof? That question has yet to be answered...
  • - 28
flag mtbrider619 (Feb 24, 2014 at 3:57) (Below Threshold)
 it's not Enduro ....
  • - 28
flag wolly96 (Feb 24, 2014 at 4:01) (Below Threshold)
 it looks nice, it also looks enduro. my personal opinion says to stay well away form anything enduro
  • + 26
 @mountguitars, yes your right buddy but here in Europe the range cost $7500!!
  • - 3
 So? I'd rather have this beast any day!
  • + 23
 I love these 27.5 160 bikes!
  • - 7
flag Fliberico (Feb 24, 2014 at 6:44) (Below Threshold)
 That's way too expensive for what is out there at the same/lower price...
No thanks i'll stick to my own bike for now!

P.S. what's with the house brand components? just look at the price one more time please
  • + 7
 That price is pretty steep considering it has some heavy parts & comes in at 32lbs. I agree with Mountguitars & the 31lb specked "carbon" Range is $3800.
  • + 7
 650 was last week, it's 27.5 this week. Can you guess what's next week?
  • + 6
 @drivereight- 698.5 mm
  • + 10
 In europe, nearly all canadian and american brands except gt, specilzed and a few more, are overpriced because of import duties. so if i want to buy the range, i have to pay an extra thousand euros. i guess the same tthing happens in canada with some european brands like canyon, mondraker or nukeproof. it's all about taxes.
  • - 2
 I've got the 2014 TR. baby is fuuun. Climbs like a champ (though i plan to swap out the 36 for a 32 narrow wide). Love the pike fork. first time riding a wheel size bigger than 26" so I'm still getting the hang of it but she handles the colorado terrain well and even with the 130mm in back its far from shy on the descents.

Also now that i've talked it up search the Buy and Sell as i;ve got a brand new still in the box Nukeproof Mega TR Pro with your name on. for $1000 less than you can buy it on chainreaction
  • + 4
 it will be over 33 lbs with pedals... no sale.
  • + 23
 Why all of sudden everybody here is so f*cking weight conscient? A couple of pounds extra won't make a difference if your beer belly is 50 pounds over weight... Leave the weight matter for roadies and XC riders, and quit trying to find irrelevant shit to hate on. It's a f*cking AM bike!
  • + 4
 entry level pivot mach 6, $4400, DONE
  • + 3
 @ Fliberico: It is expensive but considering they were a component manufacturer before frames and their components are top quality, having " house brand" components isn't too shabby at all in all fairness...
  • + 8
 @tjet, for $5149 I am sure as hell going to be weight conscious.
  • + 2
 it's around 4 lbs overweight for what it is. Weight makes a huge difference in your ride.
  • + 7
 evil uprising..? anyone
  • + 3
 Yes in 275 w/rear tire clearance issue solved plz..I'd rise up for that
  • + 1
 @sewer-rat, that is a huge price difference. i kinda know how that feels. sometimes there are huge discounts @ jensonusa.com and other bike related websites based in the US but they don't ship to f@ckin' canada because of certain 'restrictions'. the sad part is, its hardly the other way around.
  • + 1
 whats the difference between enduro and all mountain?
  • + 11
 Enduro is a Race Event, All-Mountain is a riding style.
  • + 8
 so enduro is all mountain racing?
  • - 1
 get a job at a bike shop, get your bikes cheap!
  • + 21
 overpriced, and overweight. And by all indications it doesn't shred the turns. Nukeproof have essentially made a freeride bike, called it an enduro bike and then charged $1500 to much for it.

I've got a large 650b aluminum range, thats 2x10 with x7 cranks, a 36mm x fusion fork, and some hefty fsa gravity bits... its still lighter than this thing.
  • + 6
 It's due to the import taxes i think, cause i think it's cheaper here in Europe.
  • + 6
 I believe his brother 26" is $1500 cheaper.. coz I'm riding it
  • + 10
 It is because the company is based in the European Union. And because of that in Europe they are mid priced bikes.

@g-off7 If you knew how much we have to pay for high quality brands like Santa Cruz in Bulgaria you will get a cardiac arrest Big Grin .
  • + 4
 It has the chainstay length of a DH bike, so I bet it corners more like one. I prob doesn't pop in and out of turns, but I bet when its fast and steep its in a class all its own
  • + 8
 "overpriced, and overweight. And by all indications it doesn't shred the turns. Nukeproof have essentially made a freeride bike, called it an enduro bike and then charged £903 ($1500) to much for it."

I didn't know that the only difference between Enduro and Freeride bikes was the weight.
  • + 2
 I own a 26" version of this bike with a CCBD, and I can tell you it can definitely shreds the berms. It's such a smooth and planted feeling while still being nimble enough to dance through trees and rooty/rocky sections. My rig is pretty heavy and takes a bit of effort to get up a hill but it's definitely worth it on the way down. Can't really comment too much about the cost for you guys as I bought the frame as ex demo for about half the retail price....
  • + 3
 They described it as a bike that corners poorly, and grudgingly goes uphill, but rips the down. Isn't that more or less what a freeride bike is? I'm not writing the bike off and saying that its a pile of garbage, on the right terrain, in the right hands it's probably a bunch of fun. But relative to the weight, and versatility of what the competition is putting out, especially at this price point the bike seems rather lacklustre.

It just seems a silly product to put out, when nukeproof has positioned itself as a brand that delivers greater value, via its distribution through CRC. Hell the new process 153 DL is $150 cheaper, better spec'd, and will be sold at a real live bike shop that can handle maintenance and warranty issues...
  • + 2
 I'd say it's plenty versatile enough, I've ridden on roads, fire trails, XC singletrack, jumps, downhill trails, yet to have an uplift day on it but I'm sure it'll handle it fine. I think here in the UK they're a bit cheaper because there isn't the import tax you guys get, but I know what you mean with the specs, I built mine up from the frame so I could get what I wanted. You're not going to have any warranty issues with the frame, it's a tank....
  • - 2
 Other than this bike, Nukeproof is a nice company that actually makes some of best components as a company getting back into the game. I'd rather have some of nukeproof's components than some of the chromag stuff.
  • + 1
 You can pick this up in the UK for £2800, which is a good price if you ask me...
  • + 1
 Only 2 years warranty.
  • + 4
 So this is what passes for innovation in 2014; design a frame with geometry and measurements approaching that of a DH bike, but without the travel. Make it heavy, and then put bigger heavy wheels on it. Minimize the sluggish handling by saying it works well when your going really, really fast. Brilliant.
  • + 23
 You can't f****n win with pinkbikers. waaaaah it's too heavy, waaah it's too expensive, sounds like it handles slow in corners. WHAT DO YOU WANT?!!
  • + 69
 Light, cheap, fast, nimble, silent, shiny, stable bike with tits instead of grips.
  • - 1
 YT wicked ticks all boxes.
  • + 8
 And why would anyone expect razor sharp cornering from a bike with a 66 degree head angle, long wheelbase and big wheels? Ride it fast or ride it moto (weighting the front for the corners), or do both as required. Should be a fun bike for its intended use, though.
  • + 3
 Has everyone forgot that it's about the rider in 95% of riding. I know guys who win races all the time on $1500 craigslist deal rather than the guy who has $5000 bike.
  • + 2
 Why are you negpropping mate1998 ? Need explanations i think. And from those who tried a wicked on different terrains : singletracks, XC, climbing and even @ Tignes. You see what i mean ?
  • + 2
 dunno why i got neg props. maybe those guys don't like the truth.

www.yt-industries.com/shop/de/Bikes/Trail/Wicked-650B-Pro?xedb7b=k9dsge1c1q577j59758etea3a7 check this out and there won't be any explanation necessary.

btw. what do you think why pinkbike haven't tested any YT bikes yet?? other brands would go bankrupt when they realize YT can produce even better bikes for the half of the price as their.

think on it
  • + 15
 Summary for pretty much every 150-160mm bike reviewed on PB in the last 6 months: A little extra effort to get to the top, but worth it coming down.

Conclusion: Get the prettiest.
  • + 2
 Well, we do really have great bikes these days. Choosing by visual appearance is what I did last year and I don't have any regrets.
  • + 9
 I would love a bike like this! I'm still on one of those dreaded sluggish freeride bikes mentioned in the article. But when will these companies stop putting garbage avid brakes on $5000 bikes?? Do they all have some kind of special contract w/ sram that requires this?
  • + 1
 sram brakes are significantly cheaper for companies to stock on their bikes as sram makes them with such cheap materials for such cheap prices
  • + 2
 On my aluminum stumpjumper fsr the Avid 5 rear brake made the same loud harmonic sound that Pinkbike experienced, and this seems to be commonly reported for the stumpjumper. It did this periodically even after cleaning and sanding the (semi-metallic) pads and carefully aligning the calipers. There was no margin of error in the setup or bedding-in procedure.

It may be that on certain aluminum frames, Avid brakes as-delivered are going to be noisy, no matter what you do.

I swapped the Avid HS1 rotors for larger Ashima rotors and the Ashimas are noticeably thicker. So far there are no more harmonics (although my testing has been limited to riding around my basement with the brakes on) .

I think that Avid's use of an especially thin rotor predisposes their brakes to nasty noises. When the brakes are making those noises, it is because something (it doesn't take much) has started the extra-thin rotor vibrating and so the pads are bouncing off the rotor. This vibration is amplified by certain aluminum frames. It also means the brake is not as powerful as it could be and must be causing premature wear and tear on the calipers / pistons, and likely leads to the frequent bleeding that some of these brakes seem to need, all from the vibration

It seems that moving from 5 up to XX doesn't solve the harmonic problem, which supports my theory about the rotors. I love the power and modulation and silence (so far) of my Avid brakes with the slightly thicker rotors. Setting them up so they don't rub the thicker rotors takes some care, but the performance is worth it.

I will say that my circa 2004 Shimano XT brakes were a bit less fussy overall.
  • + 1
 All SRAM brakes have been bad until the new Trail's. They're amazing. I ride Hope Tech M4's and they're awesome, however I spent a week in Whistler with Avid Trail X0's and I felt so at home, the modulation was great and power was consistent throughout descents. Before I rode these brakes I hated Avid's due to previous experience with Juicy 3's and Elixir X0's, constant bleeding, felt powerless and the fact they just never seemed to work right. I'd take a set of Avid Trail's any day!
  • + 1
 in reply to the original question. avid, rockshox, truvativ, sram etc etc all come from "Sram", so by buying bulk from them they get getter rates which is why they can offer bikes cheaper. you won't often find shimano/sram mix's... no contract as such, more a trade agreement...
  • + 10
 I ride the 26 and it's bloody ACE . I rode the lot on it DH/FR /XC and I did a 80 mile canal ride no problem . Really like how this bike pedals no bob .just flys :-)
  • + 6
 Same and agreed, I'm usually last up all the climbs but not too far behind and f**king plow on the downs, great bike . Heavy? Yes! Fun? Absolutely! Can handle anything in Ireland...no doubt. Great do it all bike for this country anyway.
  • + 3
 My mega is 32lbs so not bad with the right build . ALLSO I did a DH track years ago on a big DH bike and went back did the same track on the mega and it was sooooo much more fun ok ok a little skittish in the corners due to being 32lbs but let some air out of these tyres and bingo . Big smiles for miles :-)
  • + 2
 feel ya mate .. me too been riding mega am from first model ... but newest one is so nimble, I don't notice any flex
  • + 6
 Perfect for those who cant afford both a DH rig and an AM rig. A jack of all trades bike.
  • + 3
 Super solid, dependable bikes and if you're not too much of a weakling it's plenty easy to muscle it around tighter turns and send it over anything you want. Great bike for the price, in the UK no brand new bike for this price point and for this purpose even comes close.
  • + 1
 And for the less fit, just put a OneUp ring on the back to help with those climbs. 32 tooth sucks if you're racing Super D or Enduro. When I was on a 32 tooth front ring I often found myself running out gear on the top end.
  • + 2
 I hope you idiots realise that the price for the Pro model in the UK is exactly the same as the originals were back in 2010/2011. The frames have gone up in price, the full builds havn't. In the UK the bikes are still pretty good value, cheaper than the aluminium Konas whilst the equivilent specced Norco Carbon Range is 1600 quid more or about 3200 canadian dollars. That model comes with a lower spec Pike as well.

Although I do wish Nukeproof had kept the Mega AM as a 152mm travel frame, the old one was a bit more versatile... when compared to the increased rotating mass (27.5) and 160mm of travel. The TR model is a bit to short in terms of travel and it would have been nice if it has the same head angle etc.
  • + 2
 Seriously how can anyone complain in the uk about the price of this bike £3199, I have the this bike and can tell you it's a belter of a bike!! Handles like a dream and you can horse it into any corner!

Yeah it's got a lot of logos! Name a bike that's under 3200 with the same spec these days, Yeti, Santa Cruz, Specialized, Orange, all silly money for a good spec .... Yes even the non carbon models!

Unless your going direct I.e YT. Industries or Canyon nothing can touch it in my humble opinion.

I've ridden Fives for years and confidently say the Nukeproof rides better and that is a bold statement

Buy one you'll love it
  • + 1
 Got one just last week as a replacement for my 6-year-old Reign X. It's brilliant and great value; nothing in the UK/Ireland can touch it for build and spec. Norco Range carbon £1k+, Process 153DL the same. Who cares about the weight? Can be pedalled everywhere in the 36t ring so far and shreds the DH. I'd looked at going direct to Canyon/YT but even though I'm not a fad-chaser, decided that 650b was best future-proof option. It is a brilliant bike.
  • + 2
 I want a go. Looks like you can't go wrong with a bike like that, then maybe add some lighter parts over time High ish weight probably something to do with proper tyres fitted for once rather than showroom light tyres that the review suggests changing
  • + 1
 Beautiful bikes, i have the TR. Obviously different but same craftmenship and same idea. I think theyre lovely looking bikes and my tr shreds anything i throw at it! Coming from a dh background im naturally more aggressive and throw my bikes around a little, and its wicked! Dont like how they say Nukeproof like 76 times on them or something haha
  • + 1
 That CTM has awful, awful geometry. Anyway, here's the equivilent Kona. www.biketart.com/350090/products/kona-process-153-dl-2014-green-complete-bike.aspx

It costs 3999 in the UK, a whopping 600-800 quid more for what effectively amounts to a similar spec bike of similar weight. But you get an X0 rear mech for all that extra cash. Awesomes, way to go Konaaaa!!!!

The Americans/Canucks on here should quit whining, we have to put up with your ridiculously overpriced bikes over here.
  • + 1
 WTF are you weight watchers on about??? its a heavy duty AM/Trail bike FFS. Mines 15kg with pedals and a FXXxing huge 986gram Conti trail king on the front. It rides uphill better than my soon to be sold Carbon Jekyll and its not far behind my Trek EX9. but much more stable on the downs. Its a great bike, I built mine from frame up and it cost me about £2500.00. No regrets. As for the Norco, boy thats one ugly muthaf*cka!!!
  • + 2
 I own one of these babies and it's the best decision I've ever made. I've riden XC, AM and DH and it rides like a dream. After owning a super light yeti 575 I actually prefer a few extra lbs. it's worth the money.
  • + 1
 I have had this bike about a month now, Pretty much agree with the review. The weight though it is not much heavier than all the other 27.5" wheel enduro bikes, most seem to weigh just over 30lbs.
My review: it seems to just barrel through everything effortlessly like a mini DH rig, at 1st (probably 4 or 5 runs) it does have a tendency to want to run wide exiting out of corners like the review said (this is probably because it is so long & hence stable at speeds), but once you start to get used to it & expect this you start to adjust your style - muscle it out of the bends more, it becomes second nature after a while its no issue and the problem is gone.
I have the comp version but have changed it to single ring with a 33T & fitted the reverb. Putting a 38T on this is plain daft unless you are only uplifting or have insane quad power, my advice would be to use a 32T (remember bigger wheels change the pedal to distance moved ratio about 5% and you need a slightly smaller chain ring)
  • + 0
 To highlight my point further for the people on here who should know better 8465.21 Canadian Dollars or 7644.00 US Dollars for an Alumiunium Kona! Big Grin www.biketart.com/350086/products/kona-process-111dl-2014-red-complete-bike.aspx
  • + 1
 The 26,is easier to get around tight switchbacks,because of the smaller wheel size,go figure,maybe next year go back to 26 to reslove the 27.5s handling issuses ,just a thought,oh it won't be enduro then tho,forget it.
  • + 2
 Jaysus haters guna hate, I could take a dump and loose your epicly important 3lbs, gimme another bike in NZ for $5k with a stealth post and Pikes!
  • + 1
 I'm building a TR right now with lighter, better parts and its a 2x9... and I didn't even spend that price noted up there... I just bought a closeout price frame.. last years model...probably saved $1000 right there
  • + 2
 I own a 26er mega and it handles like a dream.
tried a 650b recently and was immediately turned off by its clumsiness.
am i the only one?
  • + 4
 Am I the only one who thinks the Mega isn't a looker and looks heavy?!
  • + 2
 heavy, expensive, long cs, and a 66 head angle..... that's 1/2 degree too much..... I'm out
kona process 153 is looking like the winner so far....
  • + 1
 The TR wont be over 33lb. My 2010 mega weighed in at 32lb with coil lyriks and cost 2500 to build. The frame was about 1lb heavier than the tr.
  • + 2
 Compare it to a Trek Slash and the price and weight make sense. These are heavy duty trail bikes.
  • + 1
 36 upfront out of the box...yikes (doubt most buyers would benefit there).
Stand over?
All these aluminum bikes are gonna have a tough time beating out the kona.imho
  • + 2
 $5100?! X9? Come on, an X9 spec'd SB66 costs $3200 and probably weighs less too.
  • + 2
 "Lower tier"? For me it seems pretty solid bike from pretty respected manufacturer? I could see myself riding one.
  • + 2
 Here you have Carbon bike wit solid specs just for 3000 Eur Smile
www.ctm.sk/model/full/point
  • + 1
 Few few weeks ago, I bought a Mega Am 26'' frame (with monarch plus) form Chain. for 1150$, taxes and shipping included !
  • + 1
 Maybe you should introduce "Compare to other Enduro bike" because there is no sence to compare it to XC bike ....
  • + 1
 They didnt need to reinvent this bike - by the sound of it this one could win in SA ;-)
  • + 2
 Nice, Nukeproof make good bikes, not to fancy but solid
  • + 1
 nice to see some quality pictures in a pb review, they were getting pretty pathetic
  • + 1
 £3200 in the Uk , I paid that for my 2012 AM pro with a shit rear shock and brakes lol so the price has not changed much.
  • + 1
 um my custom 2012 enduro evo weighs 32 pounds and im running coil suspension front and rear
  • + 1
 Nukeproof used to be a good deal, but now -
5000$ for an aluminum rig, there isnt even a Sram X0!
Still want it tho!
  • + 0
 I love how in the past 3 days 5 articles/videos have been dedicated to 650b. :/ marketing anyone?
  • + 1
 A nice bike ruined by 173263 logos.
  • + 0
 Yt industries Capra pro €3,999 , cheaper lighter better spec , hands down a lot better
  • + 0
 It was a rough night the last time I seen this much ugly in one place. Dat colour scheme. Dem decals. Nasty.
  • + 1
 still got a 2012 150mm mega best thing since sliced bread
  • + 1
 Don't even like the brand's name
  • + 0
 A prototype, then it wasn't . Why a dinosaur now?
  • + 0
 Sepultura is so old, jeez
  • - 1
 "Locating the Reverb remote underneath the bars was a nice touch" .. is there anywhere else it would go ??
  • + 2
 over.......it looks to be a right handed remote lever, flipped upside down and on the left side.
  • + 0
 no shit sherlock .. why would you want to run the button on top of the bars ??
  • + 3
 @Savmeister - many bikes come set up with the remote on the top of the bar, which is why it was mentioned in the first place.
  • + 0
 i know but why would you want to ??
  • + 2
 It depends on your preferences of what's easiest for your thumb to actuate. I had mine flipped at first and on the left like the in the picture, but ended up putting it back on the right/ top (intended design)....just works better for me.
  • + 1
 you must have long thumbs then !! haha
  • + 1
 I broke an over-the-bar-reverb-remote twice because of hitting (not so hard) little trees ...
I had the cool combo reverb match maker but i choose to protect it underneath the bar. It worked quite well so far.
  • + 0
 overpriced
  • + 1
 Do you remeber guys, when the Nukeproof brand was completely new? I remeber their first prices on CRC, and they were really cheap, but after a year they started to push up the prices. And what we got now? The same components for double of their original cost ? I see the innovation in their frames, complete bikes, but are you serious about this overpricing?
  • + 8
 Nuke proof are no longer one of the better priced brands, heavy bikes compared to others, reasonable and solid kit at best but not top notch, inflated prices.

Much better options are available, sorry but they are missing the boat.

It's great to have Sam on the team but he must be costing them some extra ££££££ a year and it's being passed down to customers.
  • + 2
 Absolutely agree with you.
  • + 2
 Sam can't be cheap.
  • + 0
 Lollygagging?!?
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