Nukeproof Release Updated Horizon Sam Hill Flat Pedals - Core Bike 2020

Jan 27, 2020
by James Smurthwaite  

Nukeproof have released an updated version of Sam Hill's signature Horizon pedal, based on a prototype he has been testing throughout the 2019 season.

The current pedal was originally designed as a downhill pedal for Sam when he was still on the World Cup circuit. Nukeproof spotted that Sam's mechanic was filing down the edges of it for his enduro racing so they then wanted to create something more enduro friendly for their customers too. It ended up not being as simple as just shaving the same material off the production pedal and they actually had to re-engineer and reinforce the areas that had been slimmed down to keep the stiffness and power transfer from the old model.

Jacy Shumilak's handiwork on the old pedal.

The filed down version of the current pedal Sam was using vs the shape of the new pedal

For the rest of the pedal, it was important to keep it as similar as possible for Sam so the pin positioning and concave platform are exactly the same. Losing the material has saved the brand about 23 grams, which wasn't their intention but it's definitely not going to hurt.

If they're good enough for Sam...

The pedals will be available at the end of February and will retail at £84.99. A version with a titanium axle will also be on its way and will cost £159.99.

The pedal coming to life.

Updated Horizon Bars


Nukeproof have also applied some small updates to their Horizon carbon bars. They believe that a 9-degree back sweep and a 5 degree upsweep are the perfect dimensions for a bar, however they realised that riders were losing reach because of it. To compensate for this, the bar now features an offset that reduces the bar arc by 10mm as you roll it.

The bar is made of 2 separate carbons. 3k is used at the end of the bar, where impacts are more likely, while UD carbon is used in the rest of the bar to allow Nukeproof to tune the ride characteristics. Particle paint is also applied so you don't have to use carbon paste.

You now also have more options than ever as Nukeproof have introduced a 35mm clamp size, offer 12, 25 and 38mm rise options and 780mm or 800mm widths (800mm only for alloy.)

Carbon bars - £109.99
Alloy bars - £59.99

Other new bits

Nukeproof are really starting to branch out their product line and it won't be long before they're able to build a complete bike. At this show, we saw new headset cups, bottom brackets, chainguides, valves and a tubeless repair kit.

More colours have been added to the line of titanium coated headsets Nukeproof released last year. Top headset cup - £29.99, bottom headset cup - £29.99
They are now using that same technology in their bottom brackets and are confident enough to give customers a 2 year warranty. Bottom brackets - £59.99 (24mm, 30mm, GXP press fit, GXP, 24mm press fit, DUB BSA & DUB press fit options all available)

Tubeless repair kit - £19.99
Valves - £15.99



94 Comments

  • 13 3
 Great, I LOVE my V1s; I've just rebuilt them with new bushes and bearings and they seem to be good to go for another couple of years so I know the longevity is there.

BUT they didn't solve what has been the main drawback for me, which is that the outer pins are just grub screws and not through-pins. They got torn off a little too regularly whereas the front and back pins shrug everything off and I've never had to touch them.

My next set of pedals will be through-pin only for that reason.
  • 12 1
 Heh, I also have v1 and my next pedals will not have through-pins because they are all bent after one year. Now I will have to use a grinder to unscrew them...
  • 10 0
 Grub screws hold amazingly well if you apply thread locker and when damaged are really easy to remove with a set of pliers and a firm hand. Through pins once damaged, on the other hand, require that you cut the exposed pin prior to unthreading or you risk damaging the pedal's aluminium body threads. Besides being able to slightly adjust the pin height with washers, I really can't see the advantage so many people claim for this design. My V1 Horizons are holding remarkably well, but wen I replace them through pins will not be something I'll be looking for
  • 5 0
 I use the Specialized Boomslang pedals with through pins but the exposed part is narrower than the thread, they are great. £10 for a set of pins, but not pulling your pedal to pieces when they have a rock strike or are being removed though is worth it to me
  • 1 0
 @Tristanssid: i have both pedals and use the nukeproof sparescrews and one of their shims for the center of the Bommslangs to create more of a concave pedal.works very well
  • 8 3
 This is why I like my Raceface Chesters. I just buy new ones every couple years so I don’t have to mess with any of this stuff.
  • 2 0
 @camcoz69: i love chesters on my dj bike but I always feel the platform is a bit small for my liking on any other applications.
  • 6 0
 @pargolf8: OneUp composites are what you're looking for then. Better (larger) platform and more grip than Chesters.
  • 4 0
 Had a pair of v1's: At the the time, I thought they were great... the grip was good... but the bearings were crap (ie. needed servicing far to regularly). Run Chromag Contacts now - bearings are superb (last forever with little to no servicing) and grip is same. I feel the v1's tenacious grip was more attributable to the massive threaded pins that the actual pedal design. I slip peddals far less now with the Chromags.. my shins are thanking me..
  • 2 0
 @NateMob: another vote for the oneup composites. Also really like the Kona wah wah 2 composite pedal.
  • 7 1
 "The main change is a slimmer profile as Sam found himself bashing the current pedals a bit too regularly"

So you want to tell me, that a 1 or 2 mm thinner pedal will bash MUCH less than the old one?
  • 5 0
 And don't forget that any small thickness reduction only expresses by half when it comes to ground clearance. Also no comment made about the new platform shape, nor if there is any changes in dimensions. Would like to know if any revision was made to the axle seal. The current one is one of the worse features
  • 2 0
 You would be surprised how much 2 mm can make, you can trip, walking up stairs with that much difference?
  • 6 0
 Actually, it can.
If you're looking at how high is your pedal from the ground or how much clearance you have, aka "passive riding", it doesn't change much.
so any case of pedal strike appearing when you are not in control of your feet's position won't disappear.

But, if you're looking at how much do you have under the sole preventing you to have a good "proprioception", and how much you have to raise the foot to avoid any contact, aka "active riding", then each mm can make a difference.
  • 4 0
 @aljoburr: first, I can't find any reference of thinner pedals on the article, so this is likely irrelevant.
Second, if the pedals were 2mm thinner, it would me a 1mm ground clearance gain
Third, it's obvious any gain makes a difference, even a 0,5mm gain would avoid some pedal strikes. But the bigger the clearance, the broader effect it will have.
  • 8 0
 @Arierep: @faul: Oh come on now guys, be realistic, 1mm is not going to make a single difference in the actual real-world, we ride mountainbikes with suspension, tyres that deform by large amounts and terrain that constantly changes - actually measure 0.5mm with something then realise just how tiny an amount you are discussing.

I can guarantee the pedal / crank / frame all flex far more than 1mm in use, its just not going to make a real world difference.

The real change to the pedal is the different shape which Jacy used to file into the old pedal, that's about it - unless that's whats being discussed here and not the drop in height of just 1mm per side?
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: we are saying the same thing
  • 1 3
 @Arierep: Aah OK - you did say 0.5mm would make a difference though, which it wont really in the real-world, will it?
  • 1 0
 Some of my rides are through moorland with gardens of rounded granite from football (soccer) sized up to the size of a large animal curled up on the ground, and on that terrain where you're constantly spinning the pedals, EVERYONE is constantly scuffing metal on rock. It's not a case of those few mm eliminating all pedal strikes, but if narrowing the profile and chamfering away the leading underside corner of the platform can reduce the severity of those strikes from killing speed/ throwing you off to a minor annoyance, that's always going to be a good thing.

Thought experiment: If you swap pedal bodies to the spindles and go from (side view) -> /=o=/ to -> \=o=\ , would that encourage dropping heels and increase pedal clearance on the lower back edge of the platform?
  • 2 0
 @ROOTminus1: yea narrowing the body will absolutely do it - looks like they took off at least 5mm or so from the profile and changed the shape a little doing what you said about not completely stalling the pedal on a rock when it does strike.

I was just questioning the whole 1mm / 0.5mm thing.

Interesting one though - people absolutely love the Deity T-Mac and that has almost no offset to the pedal, its completely square, I wonder how much worse it would be in this situation.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: The Tmacs are the worst for pedal strikes!
  • 1 0
 Sram definitely thinks so. They are all about the mm's.
  • 1 0
 @faul: I usually run spds, for most of the season and this year's dry winter didn't push me to flat pedals. I have a pair of Race Face Atlas pedals, and they are really, really flat. I can't remember I was striking them less than Saints. I agree, the less the better, but there are so many variables to this equation, that it won't actually make a real accountable change.

I'm not going to argue with Sam Hill on this one, but for the most of us, it's just cosmetics.
  • 2 0
 The original comment on this was from the article which then got amended as it wasn't accurate. The thickness of the pedal hasn't been changed by Nukeproof, it is the edges that have changed where Sam was prone to clipping rocks.
  • 1 0
 @dhrideruk: Saw that, same with my original comment below made before the article was amended....
  • 1 1
 @justanotherusername: your mom noticed the difference
  • 1 1
 @JimmyWeir: aaww that's very clever sweetie, did you come up with that all by yourself?
  • 1 0
 @Arierep: Just ride shorter cranks & spin gears a bit more, problem solved!
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: Bet you can tell if some one swapped your cranks to different length & that is 5mm
  • 1 1
 @aljoburr: course you could, but then you would as that’s a completely different thing and has an entirely different effect to pedal thickness - not only that it’s also 5-10 times the change of 0.5-1mm a pedal.
  • 4 0
 The 2 main issues I had in 1,5 years of using the MK1s were not addressed in this version:

- the axle seal is just awful. I need to reposition it into place almost every ride.
- I'm size 12, on 5 10 Impacts to make things worse, so real estate is at premium. The MK1 platform size is ok, but sits so close to the crank that I end up never using a good part of it. They could keep the same dimensions but increase the axle length a bit. Like Burgtec does
  • 1 0
 Size 12.5 impacts, I prefer raceface aeffect, for comparison and also have old generation saints with longer pins. also have had decent grip on VP-001 but they hit everything.
  • 1 0
 I'm surprised to hear you've had problems with the axle seal. I moved to these from DMR vaults, which are known to have this problem. They were coming loose on the vaults every ride. But I haven't had to reposition the seals on these nukeproofs yet in over a year. So I got them for both my bikes now. Maybe you got a bad batch?
  • 1 1
 @fpmd: It happens with mine all the time, plenty of people reporting the same and the guys at Enduro-mtb.com had the same problem.
A less extreme version of this:
s14761.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/END-035-Pedal-Vergleichstest-MTB-Flat-Test-Review-058-600x400.jpg

That said, the internals on mine are holding remarkably well. The bearings are on the opposite side of the crappy seal so I guess dirt and water have a hard time reaching there. In 1,5 years I had them come loose once, just had to torque everything correctly and apply a drop of threadlocker as per Nukeproof's instructions, never happened again
  • 1 0
 @Arierep: Ah I see. Good to know, thanks
  • 1 0
 @Arierep: I guess you answered your own comment there, the seal didn't need changed as its not really needed due to being on the opposite side of the bearings, its just an additional help. You have said the internals are still completely fine.
  • 1 0
 @dhrideruk: a bad design is not to be excused by not feeling already it's consequences. And while the bearings are on the opposite side, the same can't be said about the bushing. Grease being contaminated with water is not great either.

So I this situation, worst case some people might be experiencing some avoidable internals deterioration, best case it is hampering the durability potential of the product
  • 1 0
 You dont even need need to change the axel just move the cage further out, maybe they will get it right with mk3!
  • 3 0
 "Jacy Shumilak's handiwork on the old pedal." Pretty sure the marks that are center-frame and in-focus are just rock strikes. The real grinding is the far edge with the thin bit that got obviously moved and beefed up in the new model. Just look at the existing pedal and see the missing bits.
  • 2 0
 Maybe he just used a rock for a file?
  • 1 0
 @drunknride: It's not the filing/bashing itself, it's that the PB pic focused on the wrong part of the pedal: center frame is a spot that was not intentionally altered by "Jaci's handiwork"
  • 1 0
 @just6979: I got that after staring at it for a bit
  • 4 1
 Why does every anodized “Orange” valve stem just look gold? We can get the color right for hubs/stems but orange valve stems always look awful.
  • 2 0
 I've ordered the hope pro 4 hubs in orange and in real life they look more like copper/gold Frown .
  • 2 0
 I bought some from "Goodguysealent" on ebay, cheap and very, very orange. So orange in fact that they made my other orange bits look un-orange.

Now gold, gold is impossible to match, new bike has 5 shades of gold ano., as cool as the gold brakes are, I regret my color choice, should have gone orange again.
  • 1 0
 Could be wrong but I think Nukeproof markets as 'copper'
  • 1 0
 Nukeproof’s is copper, not orange so that’s the colour they intended.
  • 3 2
 What is "bar arc"? Explain more about this marketing wank.

If the bar is rolled enough to mitigate the "lost reach" from going from 8 degree sweep to 9 degree, them it's (obvi) not going to have 9 degrees back sweep and quite a bit more than 5 degrees upsweep. If 9 degrees is too much, and you like 7 degrees, just get a different bar!
  • 2 0
 I guess they are saying the bar arcs forward from the clamp before arcing backwards at 9 degrees at the hands. Like aoustache bar kind of thing. Point being that for some wrists 9 degrees might work better than 7 degrees but you only need that angle where your hands are, not everywhere.
  • 2 0
 The bar projects forwards with the rise and then hits the desired angles going back? They're measuring the angle at the grip, not the angle from the stem
  • 2 0
 Moustache bar, I mean
  • 2 0
 I think its the stuff on the exterior of most conifers.
  • 2 0
 @JockoJones: It that a pun chline? I love puns and chlines!
  • 2 0
 @mmmitch: Ah yes, moustache style makes sense.

Still the wording is weird: "reduces the bar arc by 10mm as you roll it"

If there is an offset, rolling the bar turn some the offset into a rise or drop... Think that's what they mean? But it's same with the rise: rolling the bar turns some of the rise into offset to front or back.
  • 1 0
 The bars have a 5mm forward offset at the clamp, when you then do 9deg backsweep and measure at the end of the bar, you’ll have gained approx 10mm reach vs fitting a normal 9/5 bar rolled to the same position.

I guess Nukeproof will have a press release soon with more details to explain it better.
  • 1 0
 @dhrideruk: Why would a 5mm offset give 10mm more at the end?
  • 1 0
 @just6979: draw a straight line, draw a line running at 5deg starting at the same point and draw one running 10deg. The further out the line gets from the starting point, the further apart they become.

It’s the same story here
  • 1 0
 @dhrideruk: is it degrees or millimeters? Yes, if you increase the angle (degrees), then end points will be displaced by a larger amount. But translate the start point by 5mm, with the same angle, and the end point will only be translated by 5mm, not 10mm.
  • 1 0
 I grabbed two pairs of nukeproof pedals from crc and have have lots of issues with them. Flex/play im spindle mostly. From what I've read in reveiss it sounds like a commonly found issue.

I'll get another brand next time.
  • 1 1
 Just tighten them???
  • 1 0
 @Mondbiker: done that several times. Locktite and all. Should come fixed from the factory.
  • 3 0
 hey, £105 seems pretty reasonable *remembers exchange rate* nooooooope
  • 2 0
 Although after having a look around it seems pretty typical... When did pedals become so expensive
  • 2 2
 Heads out to CRC... oooooh the customs... I’m a exit now
  • 1 0
 @velociraptor-clintthrust: I guess the thing with flat pedals though is if you get a good quality pair you like... You can pretty much run them for decades with some maintenance.
  • 1 0
 @velociraptor-clintthrust:

I use the NP Horizon Comp and Neutron plastic pedals. Can't see what benefit alloy will offer me over plastic for my riding and they're a fraction of the price.

Although they don't bring out the inner-magpie in you like the shiny ones do.
  • 3 0
 @velociraptor-clintthrust: when people decided it was acceptable to spend that much on something that is very easy to get right for 20-30 bucks
  • 2 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Bike24 is now your friend when it comes to CRC supplies
  • 3 0
 @DidNotSendIt:
I cracked my plastic Horizons on a fairly mundane rock strike. The theory of plastic pedals gracefully sliding over rocks didn't happen for me. Alloy Horizons (the replacements) have been flawless.
  • 1 0
 @velociraptor-clintthrust: Just go plastic for pedals, slide way better over rocks!
  • 3 0
 @velociraptor-clintthrust: What's baffling is the price difference between clipless and flats. My Shimano XT trail pedals have a small platform and like 25 springs, screws, clips, etc, per pedal and cost $60. My One-Up flats are a piece of aluminum and some screws, $125. WTF?
  • 2 1
 @maxyedor: yeah but Shimano XT flats are around 10$ cheaper than XT trail pedals. Don’t compare Shimano to One Up or any other smaller company. Shimano Alloy cranksets are day and night more advanced than pretty much any other cranksets around, let’s say Race Face, yet they are some of the cheapest. If you take it objectively, Just take SLX cranks into your hand and Race Face Turbine looks like a machined lump of medium quality metal, not much better than this crap that Sram sells.
  • 1 0
 @maxyedor: Economy of scales.
Remember you are comparing flat pedals from quirky small/medium brands to clipless from a manufacturing giant like Shimano.
I wouldn't be surprised if global sales of the XT Trail SPDs and the M530 would be bigger than all the of Nukeproof, Chromag, Burgtec, One-up etc flats combined.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I have nothing but love for RF cranks. Haven't ridden anything else since 2006. All comes down to who has the best lawyer now.
  • 1 0
 Keep an eye out for sales, I got mine for around $75USD.
  • 1 0
 I guess charge what you know people will pay. I've still got an old pair of spank spikes and they're great, cost like 130aud
  • 2 0
 Looks like they just made it completely flat rather than any concave to me?
  • 2 1
 Maybe these ones are not supposed to be orange but some root beer gold color instead, but the comment still stands. No good orange valve stems.
  • 1 0
 They are copper
  • 2 0
 I think 6 up and 9 back is perfect, but am super happy to see good angles with an offset for reach!
  • 1 0
 Hah. Bought a set of Horizon Pro's last week for the 1st time. Now they try to make me want them more. Not falling for it. Will run this set til they break. I mean if...
  • 2 0
 Damn you. Just got some then saw this
  • 2 0
 To be fair, the difference seems pretty much negligable and the old ones are pretty great already.
SO if you got a good deal, you´re probably better off with your purchase over the new ones.
  • 1 0
 @Loki87: Exactly, a tiny change - I would probably prefer the old ones anyway as they are concave.
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: artikle says they have exactly the same concave shape.
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: Looks like you are right - if you see my comment above this article was live a day ago and didn't have all of the info on it and was then pulled - in the article was a purple pedal that looked to be completely flat and they stated the reduction in height, now it looks like they have re-profiled the shape and not done this.

So, either the info was changed as it was incorrect or I got confused.... probably me.
  • 1 0
 Well I ordered myself some,just yesterday....before this review but i went with the Kovarik s one,from Chromag.
  • 1 0
 Thank you. Was about to get some but I now saw this
  • 1 0
 Love my horizon pro pedals.
  • 1 0
 we need BMW Shinbutgers again
  • 3 1
 No SPD,???
  • 2 1
 If you intended everyone to spit coffee all over their keyboards, you succeeded. If you're actually asking...
  • 1 0
 For that, there's the Horizon CL
  • 1 2
 A review of a pedal? Wow, these big Monday announcements are mind blowing ... as he hits the snooze button

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