Old is New: BMC Teamelite 01 introduces Micro Travel Technology

May 9, 2015 at 14:52
May 9, 2015
by Richard Cunningham  
 
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BMC Teamelite 01 MTT

BMC announced today that its cross-country team will be campaigning on its new-for-2016 carbon fiber Teamelite 01 soft tail suspension bike. BMC calls the 15-millimeter-travel suspension "Micro-Travel Technology" and that is exactly what it is. Using a shaped elastomer built into the seat stays between the bridge and the seat tube, the Teamelite chassis is designed to take the edge off of the racetrack without adding the significant weight penalty of a bonafide rear suspension system. The official press release states:

bigquotes Part carbon construction and part technical feature, MTT provides 15mm of rear-end compliance with the dual-guided, fully integrated XCell damper that enhances lateral and torsional frame stiffness, while maintaining a super-low weight of 1080grams for a size medium with hardware.

BMC Teamelite 01 MTT
BMC Teamelite 01 MTT
BMC is optimistic that its 15-millimeter-travel MTT suspension system will give its World Cup XC team a leg up on rivals who choose either conventional hardtails or dual-suspension bikes.

What MTT refers to is that there are a pair of shafts which pierce the elastomeric element and guide the movement of the rear triangle so that it stays in line with the chassis. A diagram of that mechanism was provided to that effect. Soft tail technology is neither new nor revolutionary. It dates to the early 1990s, when the first dual-suspension designs were emerging and when there was considerable resistance to the concept. The soft tail offered up a half-step to non-believers who didn't want to be left out, or to prudent buyers who were wary of the risks of being first adopters


Back to the Future

The concept was immensely popular among titanium and steel frame makers who were strapped by their choices of materials and struggled with the complexities of rear suspension. For them, the simple soft tail - a rubber plunger guided between the seat stays and seat tube - was the perfect solution and it fit the profiles of their customers, most of which were hardtail racer-boys, or grey-bearded Ti-men who had no desire to participate in the evolutionary dead end that we now call the dual-suspension trail bike. Soft tails disappeared shortly after the 29er arrived, most likely because larger wheels did a better job of smoothing the terrain than a 26-inch chassis suspended by 20 millimeters of elastomeric joy rubber.
BMC Teamelite 01 MTT
With the XCell elastomeric damper removed, the MTT's twin sliders are exposed to illustrate how the BMC chassis retains its lateral stability.

Twenty years later, BMC's re-visitation of the classic soft tail comes in on the heels of some less technical, but equally popular '90's trends like Day Glo colorways and purple anodized CNC-machined components. BMC's Teamelite and its MTT suspension, however, was reborn to serve a higher purpose: to offer elite-level XC racers a little more cushion than a hardtail can provide but not so much that it would tamper with the rider's need for instant and firm out-of-the-saddle pedaling, and maintain the weight of their race bikes to the equivalent number of a pure hardtail. If that rings like something you've heard before, well, consider that the technical skills required to lap World Cup XC venues has increased sharply. Short travel dual suspension bikes have posted a number of victories, but most competitors remain committed to their hardtails. XC racers often spend more training and riding time on their road bikes than they do on a mountain bike of any sort, so from their perspectives, BMC's Teamelite 01 MTT must feel as plush as PB test riders reported Yeti's SB6c felt in Sedona's red rock.

Is MTT technology going to revolutionize the mountain bike world? Well, it didn't back then, and it probably won't do so today. Average riders can get that 15 millimeters of plush suspension simply by throwing the 1.8-inch XC racing slicks into the bin and replacing their tires with man-sized 2.35-inch options. That said, BMC's Teamelite 01 represents a powerful tool for a top XC racer, because it gives him or her one bike with which to take on any race track in the world - and in a war of attrition where emotional stability is as important as lungs and legs, providing that sort of consistency can often make the difference between the top step and one of those other podium placings.

Teamelite Geometry
BMC Teamelite 01 MTT
The Teamelite has no swingarm pivot. The frame's carbon layup provides enough vertical flex to make up for its 15 millimeters of squish.

Where we will most likely see MTT evolve towards, is the as yet untapped gravel grinder road bike market, which has already taken disc brake technology from cyclocross hipsters and thrust it into mainstream road riding. I would expect to see the BMC MTT logo on road bikes as early as fall 2015 - but that is a completely different topic. Listen to what BMC's five-time XC World Champion, Julien Absalon, had this to say about his first impressions aboard the Teamelite 01:

bigquotes To be honest, when I tried out the new MTT technology, I was anticipating a compromise. I'm convinced it climbs just as good as last year's bike, with a little extra something for the downhills, which we definitely need. I'm very happy to have this edge!

Here is the Official BMC Press Release:

Over the past two years, BMC’s team of composite engineers has tested and re-tested MTB prototypes at the Impec Lab in Grenchen, BMC’s in-house composites and engineering playground. After a final round of testing with the world’s most successful mountain bikers, the BMC MTB Racing Team, the end result has come to life in the form of revolutionary race performance. The 2016 Teamelite 01 introduces Micro Travel Technology (MTT) – a new solution for rear-end compliance. Part carbon construction and part technical feature, MTT provides 15mm of rear-end compliance with the dual-guided, fully integrated XCell damper that enhances lateral and torsional frame stiffness, while maintaining an super-low weight of 1080grams for size medium with hardware.

The Teamelite comes is five sizes (including an XS bike with 85mm lower stand-over than the previous Teamelite) and will be available this summer in three builds and a frameset option.

Components / Price - USD

Shimano XTR / Di2 $10599
SRAM XX1 / $6599
Shimano XT / $4599
Frameset: $3599

Want more info? Ask BMC
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176 Comments

  • + 333
 I'd huck some sick lines with all that travel.
  • + 7
 I wanna give you easily 10 ups for your comment!^^
  • + 3
 There's a company that makes a bike with ateeny little airshock or something built into the frame inn the same position as this, maybe abt 3/4" travle, huck off?
  • + 30
 It is not a travel, it is a SAG.
Smile
  • + 13
 A modern day Raleigh Activator
  • + 89
 Yeah it is pretty sick but a bit too much for me, I am gonna wait for the 10mm version.
  • + 8
 Trek did it a year or two ago on their DS!
  • + 3
 Yeah, its kind of a cool concept, except Trek had some reliability issues with it if I'm not mistaken. I think the elastomer was wearing out or something. I hope this frame doesn't have the same issue. I still don't really see the advantage over a normal hardtail though. How much faster can it really be?
  • + 0
 No. NO. no.
  • - 6
flag madmon (May 10, 2015 at 20:00) (Below Threshold)
 might as well post a review of a 12lb road bike or dudes wearing panties here on PB. Ya the dirtbags are interested
  • - 3
 yeah thats literally the exact same shitty design trek uses on thier sub $1000 'dual sport' bikes.
  • + 9
 Couldn't you just get a cushy seat with 15mm travel? my missus has one
  • - 4
flag hampsteadbandit (May 11, 2015 at 0:44) (Below Threshold)
 what a bizarre and over thought solution - typical of BMC!

you can easily get similar flexure by as others commented upping the tire size, or using a suitable carbon fibre seatpost.

Most of the XC racing frames use a skinny 27.2mm seat tube; a quality, full carbon 27.2mm seat post at long extension has a surprising amount of flexure under load.

Hell, my Giant Defy carbon road bike uses a "d-fuse" seat tube and seat post which has 12mm of flexure, just good engineering rather than overcomplicated gizmos
  • + 7
 A seatpost/seat with travel wouldn't accomplish the same goals as it wouldn't provide any extra tire deflection.

Bigger tires would work, but they also come at a weight penalty which is pretty important in XC.
  • + 3
 Silly Silly people! Its not for when your sitting its just a little more suspension when your standing going downhill. So no a gel seat or suspension seat post wouldn't work and yes bigger tires would
  • + 112
 15 mm of travel in warm weather, 7.5 mm in the cold.
  • + 19
 dilatation ... L=L°.(1+α.ΔT) !!
  • + 2
 "Elastomeric damper" haha let's be real it's an elastomer from a 90's fork now inserted into your frame lol
  • + 20
 It's a grower, not a shower.
  • + 7
 But it shows...and Doesnt grow
  • + 3
 They had me at Elastomeric Joy Rubber.
  • + 1
 And in some years that rubber will be dry and then it might fall off and then you realize that you got the wrong frame. I only think this is for the elite racers
  • + 9
 If your rubber is dry, you waited too long to use it. That's why there's an expiration date on those things. If it falls off, then you've got some other problems to worry about.
  • + 1
 looks replaceable actually....so that's pretty good ISN'T IT!
  • + 1
 @Worm-Burner I like replaceable stuff you never know when you'll break something
  • + 81
 15mm of travel aint worth a wank to me Smile
  • + 30
 ya just run lower tire pressure
  • + 79
 Soft tires increases rolling resistance. This makes sense for people who are on a hardtail for hours on end grinding away. aka xc racers. The endless punishment of the trail sucks on the joints, but if you can dampen it with a light piece of rubber and not suffer the efficiency loss of soft tires or a rear shock then you stand to have a more pleasant recovery period. This is not Enduro or DH, but that is no excuse to hate it. The guys on these bikes are less likely to wear flat brimmed hats and more likely to wear lycra, but that is the cost of racing xc.
  • - 5
flag m-boltz (May 9, 2015 at 19:19) (Below Threshold)
 seams kinda like a rip off of Treks Izo Zone used on their hybrids...
  • + 3
 Funny but cool at the same time IMO.
  • + 3
 Im surprised specialized haven't done anything with zert inserts on their hardtails. This is something up their alley.
  • + 5
 I'm surprised it's taken so long. There were bikes like this in the 90s I seem to recall. Merlin had a titanium pivotless frame, although it could have had a shock hidden in the tube... hang on, shocks were elastomers in the early 90s. Anyway I think it's an excellent idea.
  • + 2
 ^Holly chainring Batman! But yeah… that was beautiful in my day.
  • + 0
 Litespeed Unicoi is another similar Ti frame.
  • - 10
flag bholton (May 9, 2015 at 21:43) (Below Threshold)
 Thank goodness carbon doesn't suffer from fatigue the same way metal does, or those chainstays would be toast after a few rides.
  • + 0
 If anything it's a copy of Trek's STP from the early 2000s. They had a pivotless carbon soft tail suspension design, although they used a short stroke Rock Shox SID shock instead of an elastomer.
  • + 4
 DeKerf soft tail
  • - 3
 DeKerf was steel though, which makes a lot more sense if you actually want the shock to be able to compress.
  • + 2
 Ritchey had one too in the days of Frischknekt (sp?) and Djernis. As for metal fatigue... I don't think it was a problem.
  • + 1
 A friend of mine at work was talking to me about his new £6k road bike with this 'cutting edge' elastomer tech in the seat post, while trying not to smirk remembering rst forks, this is a good idea for vibration dampening, can't believe it's taken them so long to reintroduce this 20 year old bike tech
  • - 5
flag acraftygnome (May 10, 2015 at 1:39) (Below Threshold)
 Why not put a cane creek thudbuster on? Or a comfier saddle? Oh yeah, because its a ridiculously pointless gimic intended to differentiate it from any other £3000 bike purchase...
  • + 3
 "Soft tires increases rolling resistance" - False.
  • + 3
 Yeah, I'm sure bigger tires would make a difference comfort-wise but they add rolling resistance and weight. The distances these guys ride in one race are more than most folks ride in a month. 1lb makes a difference and when you're trained and conditioned like the pro xc guys you look for every edge because taking a dump before riding and losing a few pounds aren't an option like PB users think. God forbid you had this in your frame and ran bigger tires on a rougher track. The area I see this making the most difference is adding it to an aluminum frame and making an alu frame that rides like a carbon. this would enable less expensive bikes to be competitive wich would benefit more people at the high school level without rich parents, as well as get more people racing xc. All good things
  • + 8
 I saw some physics up there and yesok said it too.... softer tyres do not increase rolling resistance. I can't believe it. Personal experience tells me pumping the tyres up reduces rolling resistance. I would ride to the servo on my wife's skinny tyred bike, blow them up to 80psi with the air line and freewheel all the way home. The difference it makes is incredible. Care to explain to me why I'm wrong?
  • + 8
 This has already been studied, on anything but pavement lower tire pressure reduces rolling resistance. Google Schwalbe rolling resistance tire pressure and u might find it. Also, a carbon HT already rides way better than an ALU one, this would make it even better.. Especially if it can take out some.of the annoying tire bounce my ALU HT has.
  • + 6
 Even this version of a softtail isn't a new idea, as mentioned Trek has done it already and is even offering it on some mountain hardtails now. There's been a host of pivotless XC hardtails involving various types of shocks from the simple coil or elastomers (Moots YBB, KHS Softtail, Merlin, Litespeed, Dean, Ibis Silk Ti) to those with small air/oil shocks (first gen Cannondale Scalpels, Salsa Dos Niner, Trek STP) and even the Ibis Bow Ti which was a 5 inch travel URT with a shock. I own a Dos Niner and it gets a whopping 1.5 inches of travel but its also a 29er, as are most XC racing bikes today. Essentially you get a slightly more comfortable hardtail and for people riding 40kms in 3 hours... that's a desireable thing.
  • + 0
 @seraph. The Dekerf ST had bonded Titanium chain stays not steel.
  • + 1
 @Satn69 - my point stands though: Trek was one of the first, if not the first, company to make a carbon fiber pivotless soft tail bike.
  • + 1
 And they all fail eventually. Came across one at work last week with a cracked chainstay
  • + 40
 When will people learn that this is the real future in bike technology
www.pinkbike.com/photo/7146829
  • + 2
 That thing looks like a trials bike with a pole attached to the headtube to make a shit seatpost.
  • + 4
 the shit bike!!!
  • - 4
flag Satn69 (May 9, 2015 at 22:57) (Below Threshold)
 The Cock bike!
  • + 5
 Backflipping the shitbike:
www.pinkbike.com/video/82961
  • + 33
 How am I supposed to measure my sag now ?!?!
  • - 1
 Smile ))))))
  • + 7
 doesn't matter, you can't change it if it's wrong anyway! Wink
  • + 30
 "designed to take the edge off of the racetrack without adding the significant weight penalty of a bonafide rear suspension system" . I thought that's what tires are for.
  • + 30
 I'm not one to complain about price usually. But $3500 for that just seems ridiculous.
  • + 1
 And I thought the Yeti siblings going for 3500 was a bit too much also. A softtail with 15mm of travel is a bit hard to swallow. I hope at least it's made in house in Europe somewhere.
  • + 1
 Seriously, let alone paying 10k+ for the full build. Whatever floats your boat I guess...
  • + 22
 And it costs the same as a nomad frame set.
  • + 19
 Holy shit. Di2 is worth 4 g's over xx1 ??? shimano needs to get over itself
  • + 1
 I'm a Shimano guy and my heart just stopped when I saw the XTR price. The XX1 is race proven while the Di2 as a concept is still experimental. The wisest choice is obvious
  • + 6
 Is proven in road racing
  • + 2
 Is it though? Not 100% of the riders use them. It says a lot that Alberto contador that guy who is attempting the imposible of wiining the 3 biggies chose mechanical over electronic for completing that feat.
  • + 1
 Yep, can't remember if was the sky or Movistar was using it on all their bikes, is more a team thing I guess, some users here wanted to use dura ace di2 on DH bikes, based on how well they work
  • + 7
 That would be Team Sky. Movistar is sponsored by Campagnolo you Joey.
  • - 2
 as you would read I did not give exact data about what team and was unsure. Yet some teams are using di2 so is proven, but with a wheight penalty
  • + 4
 the whole "shifting as a system" thing to optimize chain tension only does anything if you have more than one ring in the front, which no one does anymore... it seemed like that was the big selling point of XTR di2, except it was 2.5 years after SRAM proved that 1x is the new way of life. I love shimano and I love tech but I gotta say XTR di2 seemed like a big waste of R&D.
  • + 1
 Di2 was race proven by Julien Absalon last year in the world cup. I also heard that he ended up using the electronic shock controls a lot more than mechanical as it was easier to use.
  • + 1
 I think we'll see more Di2 this year than we did last year. They only released it part way though the XC season, IIRC, and it has some good results so far. Honestly I'd be a little puzzled if Absalon runs this softail crap this season.... after sticking with the hardtail most of last season and getting rocked by Nino on several occasions, he finally switched to full suspension for Hafjell and had a great result. Granted, there was a lot more to that race than the bike he was on, but I can't really see this negligible amount of suspension being any kind of advantage with as chunky and technical as courses have gotten. I rode a softail for a while. Great for ass comfort, but it's not like it let me blast though any tech sections or bailed me out of any crashes. If anything the flex put me in some bad situations. This type of tech belongs on gravel bikes, not xc races. But maybe Julien will prove me wrong... can't wait for race season!!!
  • + 18
 If I wanted a soft tail frame, I would just buy a Moots. Nothing innovative here
  • + 7
 I'm more of a macro travel kind of guy. But heck, I can see what they're doing here. It's just not that exciting to most people here myself inuded. Is what it is.
  • + 5
 All these companies with TLA (three letter acronyms) utilizing the word "technology" seem tired. Is there some TLA overlord requiring this? Same thing with the Bold Linkin IST - "Internal Suspension Technology". Both seem more like features than technologies.
  • + 6
 Moots has been making beautiful Ti bikes with their YBB soft tail for years. I raced gravel grinders on their soft tail cross bike one year, it was fantastic. The idea is brilliant in certain applications.
  • + 4
 Yup, and so was Ibis around 20 years ago, out of Ti as well. Didn't those have 1-2" of travel though, not ~.5"?
  • + 3
 That was the Ibis Silk Ti, had 1.75" of travel, though in reality it was probably closer to 1.5". The shop I used to work for sold a bunch of them back in the day, along with the Ripley which was the aluminum version with less travel. It's kinda strange, I've seen a few of the Ibis hardtail and cross bikes we sold still floating around and being ridden, but all the soft tails seem to have disappeared.
  • + 1
 @aerius30 are you talking avout Chain Reaction?
  • + 8
 This makes me want to party like it's 1999...
  • + 2
 Ok Prince
  • + 1
 more like 89
  • + 1
 Haha not if you're from NZ mate Wink
Although I must admit in 1999 my full suspension bike had a (freaking heavy) coil rear, with an elastomer front end. Ahhh those are the days!
  • + 8
 why microtravel now when nano travel comes out next year ..!
  • + 7
 I think it actually makes sense for this type of bike.
  • + 3
 Gary Klein had something like that on a road bike that he still rides because of all the chip sealed roads in the northwest. That is where this technology belongs - on the road.
  • + 2
 Actually think it would be great to have a slacker trail bike with something like this. Cue the negativity! I like riding a hardtail a lot, but of course there are times when rock gardens just frickin' hurt, and something to take a little more edge off that doesn't take away from the trail feedback or add squish to my life on climbs (and maintenance dollars) would be great.
  • + 3
 Trek has a new superfly "hardtail" coming out with its isospeed decoupler thing on it as well

velonews.competitor.com/2015/04/mtb/spotted-trek-hardtail-with-decoupled-rear-end_366413
  • + 5
 That would actually work. I have a CX bike with it an it's amazing. This just seems like something a bike from walmart would have on it...except it's way more expensive and "patented" or something
  • + 1
 Moots YBB did this in titanium, DeKerf did it in steel.
This is very different from both of those, and from the others mentioned in the comments. It is a new approach within the current market, and clearly aimed at racers...not the dirt jumping park crowd, or the *nduro bike vid crowd that trolls these parts.
  • + 1
 IDK, between sussy posts, tire sizing/pressurizing & full bore bouncing I'm not sure this makes any sense. Is a full sus on air with a lockout really that much heavier? If this thing offers any meaningful compliance then it's gonna bounce proportionally when pedaling. I'd rather take the extra couple/few hundred gram hit & have real suspension when I need it & real rigidity when I need it. Then if it matters use those advantages to offset the weight elsewhere because better suspension means parts stressed by bumps can be lighter.

I'm also an advocate for simplicity though so..... :/
  • + 1
 One of the first, or first, Specialized full suspension bikes had something like this. A little rubber donut about the size of a deodorant can cap. One company used a similar material for a front fork suspension. There are pictures of it on cave walls...and yes, it is my own artwork.
  • + 1
 BMC is too afraid to start a 4th wheel size so this is their attempt at taking the bike world somewhere new. - Captain Kirk You can put gizmos on your bike all you want, just don't feed them after midnight.- Keye Luke Com'on pinkbikers, insult them with movie references, lets get innovative.
  • + 1
 Well done pinkbike (for once) not swallowing the press release whole, and actually giving us a history of previous technology that did this (unlike your parroting of manufacturer sales pitch on a number of other recent innovations, like those forks that lock down rather than up). This may be a good innovation or it may not, but it's certainly better reporting!
  • + 1
 Hmmm, and little tire clearance to run bigger tires...

Trek had something almost identical looking on their high end hybrids. www.hardcorebikes.ca/sites/default/files/images/isosml.JPG

ive seen the isozone system blow out from heavy commuter or fire road use. hope BMC makes replacements and gives clear service instructions.

More interested to see how Trek's isospeed does in XC.
I expect a lot of softails with ultralight micro-dropper posts in XC. Not sure how i feel about that though.
  • + 1
 Isn't it better that the course designers introduced more terrain features so the riders have to show technical mountain biking skills as well? For too long it seems, the XC scene have been influenced by riders that probably just did not make into the top road teams and thus race XC instead, yet "demanding" designers to make race courses look smoother than the Paris-Roubaix cobblestone roads. Anyone remember when Cadel whined about the XC courses being to technical...
  • + 1
 I ride a hard tail, but I have to say if I wanted some rear flex I'd just buy a bike with rear suspension. I like hardtails for their simplicity and cost (I have 3 kids I also have to buy bikes for, including full suspension, CX and road). Putting bigger tires is your best option, not elastomer frame inserts. And, this thing is a little expensive for what is old technology
  • + 1
 This is bullshit - if the carbon frame has enough vertical flex to make up for 15mm of travel, why not just make a carbon frame as such and leave the 'designed polymer' out of the equation..?
  • + 4
 This seems like a potentially really good idea for the application
  • + 0
 Seems like a cool concept, but no way would I ever trust it. Relying on the flex of the carbon in place of a pivot just does not sound like a reliable system at all. Plus, you could honestly get the same results with a regular hard-tail with 25 psi tires.
  • + 1
 old forks used elastomer. If you have ever ridden a 90's bike you have already ridden on this stuff.
  • + 1
 In few months there will be a press release of EDP technology (external drivetrain protection) which will cost 699$. Spy shots: www.thebeijingshop.com/alloy-bicycle-transmission-derailleur-protector-rack-p-2110.html
  • + 1
 Interesting stuff IMHO. I read that Pinarello have done a similar thing with a road bike. Supposedly takes the harshness out of the cobbled roads. It makes perfect sense for XC racing. Would be interesting to ride for sure!
  • + 2
 I still have my old steel KHS soft tail, rides great for quick trail runs. Got the frame for $650.00.I think I'll stick to that, cause $3599.00. NAAA.
  • + 1
 frameset for $3599, yeah right... sj fsr with carbon frame is $3500 msrp www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/mountain/stumpjumper-fsr/stumpjumper-fsr-comp-carbon-29
  • + 1
 I don't think anybody looking for a hard(soft)tail xc race frame is going to say, "Hey why don't I just buy this 5" trail frame instead because it's cheaper!"
  • + 3
 Like Proflex, bring back those awesome bikes.
  • + 3
 Woohoo. It's 1993 again Smile
  • + 3
 Ohhh , Fuck Off NoW ! its not April s fool !
  • + 1
 Id love to have this bike as my race bike.. Considering I have my rear shock constantly locked out or have the brain on the stiffest setting + 12-15 psi... Drool
  • + 1
 I hope this expensive junker comes with BOOST and PLUS sizes tires...then we can really hunt it down and kill it before it breads
  • + 1
 this reminds me of living in steamboat springs colorado in the 90's and seeing all the "soft tail" moots bikes...rare sight these days
  • + 1
 well a road bike with micro suspension from Calfee Design has been around for like 2 years already.. calfeedesign.com/products/manta
  • + 1
 Well it's either this or a Slingshot, but then there is the Allsop Softride hmm...
  • + 1
 "Part carbon construction and part technical feature"

Those two things do not sound like they add up to a whole to me.
  • + 1
 This is pretty cool but I'm not to sure if the everyday Joe would want only 15mm of travel!
  • + 1
 Didn't work shit back then, still not good today. Now with cartwheels and no flexstem. Something for the lycra crowd. Next.
  • + 2
 15mm of elastomer travel. IM STUCK IN 1997 AND I CANT LEAVE.
  • + 4
 Proflex version 2.0
  • + 3
 How about no
  • + 2
 lets see a first ride report. ... with a few senders Razz
  • + 1
 How much for an Alivio kit
  • + 1
 Prof lex with a flex stem FTW.
  • + 1
 what is next huge step? cantilever brakes?
  • + 1
 A $10,599 softail bike! Truly amazing.
  • + 1
 Ill buy it if it comes in "fat"
  • + 1
 What can be written about this so long? Cant wait for the second comment.
  • + 1
 Actually i'm not even mad. It's amazing.
  • + 1
 Elastomer? I tought we were over that......
Next please
  • + 1
 again just the best of both worlds
  • - 1
 Just like how your Momma likes it
  • + 1
 I kept reading "TameElite".

....go figure....
  • + 1
 BMC = Buy More Crap, also, many others I can up with. You?
  • + 1
 wonder how long it will Last.
  • + 1
 I'm sure this thing rides amazing compared to my ultra stiff ALU HT.
  • + 1
 Shimano XTR / Di2 $10599 ...cheap as chips...
  • + 1
 Burn it before it lays eggs?
  • + 1
 Only a grand for XT though
  • + 2
 Breeds*
  • + 0
 15mm and 3600 bucks?? No thanks... Less expensive is purchase a 2.1 tire instead of my 2.0 rear tire
  • + 1
 I need an elastomer on my hardtail Said NOBODY EVER.
  • + 1
 So soft tails are back?
  • + 1
 Gross
  • + 0
 I didn't realize it was April 1st again already.
  • + 1
 just why
  • + 1
 MOOTS YBB Google it.
  • + 0
 Just saying the word 'elastomer' makes me laugh out loud...lol
  • + 0
 STP!!!
  • - 1
 that's a marketing abortion
  • + 1
 more like April fools day
  • - 1
 For the price...how about a dh bike instead?
  • + 5
 Stop complaining about price. A DH bike would be hard to race XC on fella.
  • - 3
 No one but a Moron would pay that much for an XC
  • + 6
 Sir, I'd say it's aimed at a market niche that you don't inhabit.
  • + 4
 That is correct...I am sane.
  • - 6
flag BrightBulbPhoto (May 10, 2015 at 7:34) (Below Threshold)
 @GetMounted (troll) Do not misinterpret me...I believe strongly that anybody that pays 10K for ANY bike, without a power to weight ratio. Is nun to bright. I do not care if it is XC, DH, RR, OVAL.....ect, ect.
The bicycle industry is one of the few that consistently gets away with 500 - 1000% + markup in price. The VAST overwhelming majority of the R&D has been done. In so many other areas. So the True R&D cost is primarily adaptation. Even weight reduction. Something called materials R&D. Once again developed somewhere else, and only adaption R&D required for the cycling industry.
  • + 5
 Who's the troll?? You're on here dishing out abuse, I'm merely stating a fact. Fella it's pretty simple, if you don't like this bike stop looking at the page.
  • + 2
 Well that escalated quickly. I guess all I meant was for the money it doesn't seem like you're getting a lot.
  • + 1
 I agree
  • - 1
 I dunno, looks flexy.
  • - 1
 I really like it
  • + 5
 well, the bike's color is great, otherway...
  • - 2
 10K for 15 mm travel....Suckers Bike!
  • - 1
 It's your bike
  • + 0
 You smoke crank? What?!!?!? No I said anyone who pays 10,000 for this bike is a SUCKA!
  • + 1
 Yeah, that's why it's YOUR bike
  • + 1
 Oh No Mr Bill !
  • + 1
 5K for another idiotic idea. You could buy a stash or a giant and live in BC for a month with the change
  • + 1
 wait for Rocky to make a BC edition softail...
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