OneUp 44 Tooth X-Cog - Review

Apr 15, 2015
by Mike Levy  
OneUp Components have quickly gained a reputation as a company that offers gearing solutions that simply make sense for the masses. They first debuted their 40 and 42 tooth cogs that allow ten-speed riders to take advantage of a wide-range, single-ring setup that they would have otherwise only been able to use by replacing their entire drivetrain, and the company has since come out with everything from narrow / wide chain rings, a downhill-specific cassette spacer/spoke guard, and even replacement cages for Shimano derailleurs. With the 44 tooth X-Cog, they're now offering a solution to those riders who could benefit from an even wider gearing range than SRAM's stock 10 - 42 tooth X-Dome cassettes offer, not just an easier low-end gear.

The 100 gram X-Cog is available in black or green, and is only compatible with SRAM's XX1 (XG-1199) or X01 (XG-1195) eleven-speed cassettes. It retails for $90.00 USD. OneUp has no plans to offer replacement 42 tooth cogs for those who wear out the easiest gear on their X-Dome cassette. www.oneupcomponents.com

OneUp X-Cog review test



Installation and Setup

Installing the X-Cog means prying apart your rather pricey SRAM X-Dome cassette with a big flat blade screwdriver, which is something that some riders may find unnerving. It's not that it's a hard thing to do, just that some could find it intimidating. OneUp equates the task to cutting a fork steerer tube down, and I'd have to agree - it doesn't take any special skills, but you best not muck it up. They also say that you're better off letting a shop mechanic do the job for you if you don't feel up to it, and I'd have to agree with that. You'll need a large flat blade screwdriver, a hammer, and the tools to adjust your derailleur's limit and B-tension screws.

OneUp X-Cog review test
Use a large flat blade screwdriver to carefully pry off the stock 42 tooth cog.
OneUp X-Cog review test
Make sure the screwdriver is aligned with the press-fit joint between the 36 and 42 tooth cogs.


The first step is to remove the X-Dome cassette from your wheel and place flat on a table. Slide your big flat blade screw driver between the stock 42 tooth cog and the 36 tooth next to it, making sure to align the tool with one of the eighteen press-fit pins that join the two. Twisting the screwdriver to the left or right slightly will begin to separate the cogs, but make sure to only go for a tiny amount at each joint rather than working to completely pry the cog off at each pin, and also try to put pressure onto the base of the cassette body rather than the teeth themselves. Working your way around slowly should see the 42 tooth cog pop off without any issues.

OneUp X-Cog review test
  Nothing like prying apart your mega-expensive cassette.


It may not look like it at first glance, but one of the eighteen press-fit pins on the back of the 36 tooth cog is actually slightly larger than the others, and OneUp says that on most X-Dome cassettes this larger pin sports a small groove to make spotting it easier. You'll need to find this pin and align it with the slightly larger hole (identified by a laser-etched arrow) on the X-Cog before you join the two. Here's where it gets slightly violent: place the cassette face up with the X-Cog's press-fit holes lined up with the pins on the back of the 36 tooth cog, then align a flat blade screwdriver on the 36 and directly over the first pin before giving it a gentle tap with a hammer. Work your way around the cassette, tapping each of the eighteen pins into their corresponding holes. Again, you aren't trying to do this all in one go, so take your time and go around the 36 tooth cog three or four times.

OneUp X-Cog review test
Spot that slightly wider post with the grove in it?
OneUp X-Cog review test
It has to go into the slightly larger hole with the arrow pointing at it. This is important.

The last thing to do before reinstalling the cassette on your bike is to make sure that the X-Cog is completely seated. Do this by getting down so that the cassette is at eye level, and then spin it slowly to make sure that the gap between the 36 and 44 tooth cogs is consistent all the way around. You'll likely also have to add a link or two to your chain, and OneUp says that the standard big-to-big (bypassing the derailleur) plus four links will do it, but I'd check that length at full-travel by deflating your shock (write down your shock pressure first) and bottoming the bike. You'll also need to tweak the low-limit screw, as the X-Cog does sit in a slightly different position than the stock 42 tooth SRAM cog, as well as turn the B-tension screw in at least one turn to move the derailleur's upper pulley wheel away from the cassette.

Double check your shifting and low-limit, then you should be good to go. The job took me about fifteen minutes, including taking the time to clean the cassette once I had the stock cog pried off the back of it.

OneUp X-Cog review test
  The 44 tooth X-Cog looks enormous compared to the 36 tooth cog that's one step down.






SRAM's Take...

As you might assume, SRAM is not a real big fan of any sort of modifications to their products, and this is especially true when it comes to the high-end X-Dome cassette. I reached out to SRAM's MTB PR and Media Coordinator, Duncan Riffle, to get his thoughts on OneUp's X-Cog, and he wasn't shy about bringing up industry standards and regulations, as well as the voiding of any and all warranties. ''Suggesting or endorsing a modification to our parts without proper testing isn’t a good idea. Furthermore, it voids ANY warranty we may provide,'' he explained when I questioned him on modifying their X-Dome cassette. ''Also, it should be noted that making changes to the cassette is not just a cassette issue by itself, it is now using the chain and derailleur in a manner it was not designed or intended to be used. That’s also unwise and not recommended.'' So there you have it: install the X-Cog if you like, but SRAM would obviously prefer that you don't.

OneUp X-Cog review test
  The stock 42 tooth SRAM cog next to OneUp's X-Cog.


I think that SRAM's concerns are valid given that the X-Dome cassette is an impressively machined piece of steel and aluminum that's all about precision, but I also also vaguely remember SRAM talking about offering replacement large cogs when XX1 was first debuted a few years back. That obviously never happened, but at the time, I took it upon myself to pry off a handful of 42 tooth cogs just to see, and I had no troubles re-installing them. That said, it clearly wasn't recommended, and the X-Cog isn't a SRAM product. It's also worth noting that SRAM's X-Horizon derailleur easily clears the 44 tooth X-Cog with room to spare, which has me wondering how seriously SRAM considered going even bigger than the X-Dome's stock 42 tooth cog, or if that clearance is there for some wiggle room when it comes to all the different bike designs on the market.







Performance

Shifting up to and down off of the X-Cog was surprising, but not in the way you might think. I expected the shift from the 36 tooth up to the 44 tooth X-Cog to be noticeably slower compared to going up to the stock 42 tooth cog, but that wasn't the case. I'd say that things were about equal when talking about just normal riding, but it was marginally slower to shift up to the X-Cog under heavy pedalling loads as you might find when halfway up a steep wall of a climb. I know, you're not supposed to shift when you're putting the ponies down, but you sometimes don't have a choice. Either way, the difference isn't enough to dock OneUp any points on this front.

OneUp X-Cog review test
  No excuses for not cleaning that steep climb...


However, shifting down off the cog was strangely slow, and it's something that no amount of tinkering with cable tension or the B-tension screw was able to remedy - the chain just wasn't eager to drop down from the 44 to the 36 tooth cog. Keep in mind that this was with a brand new shift cable and fresh housing, as well as a perfectly straight derailleur hanger. The shift does happen, of course, but it takes noticeably longer than with the stock 42 tooth cog. I'd argue that being able to shift into the easiest gear quickly as needed is more important than going the opposite direction and into a harder gear, but it'd be nice if it was quick going both directions. On this front, the X-Cog is not as good as the stock SRAM cog when talking about shift quality.

And just how useful did I find the X-Cog on the trail? Well, there's a chance that I might be in the minority here, but I'm not a believer in simply having as easy gearing as possible. If that was the case, I'd have a three-ring crankset on my bike, but I don't. I have a single-ring crankset, and I unashamedly admit to putting an emphasis on fitness and climbing strength because I believe that it makes one a better all around rider. I had been running a 30 tooth chain ring with the 10 - 42 X-Dome cassette and found my gearing to be pretty spot-on for the steep climbs in my 'hood, and I'd bounce around the cassette's three largest cogs depending on how I was feeling and what I was trying to get done. Putting the X-Cog on kinda messed that up a bit because now I actually found that my drivetrain's easiest gear was a bit too low for my liking, even for when I was looking for an easy recovery lap, but dropping down onto the 36 tooth cog (the next easiest gear) made things a bit too tough when I was just looking to cruise. For me and how I ride, the step between the OneUp 44 tooth cog and the stock 36 tooth cog just didn't feel as natural as it did with the stock 42 tooth pie plate on the X-Dome cassette.

The obvious thing to do would be to change the size of the chain ring so as to get the most out of the new, wider gearing range that the X-Cog provides, and bumping up a few teeth to a 32 tooth 'ring would make a lot of sense for me. Yes, the jump between the 36 and 44 tooth cogs would still feel a touch odd, but I would then have the easy gearing that feels close to just right for me while also benefitting from a wider range. With this in mind, OneUp is also debuting their new $65 USD SDM (SRAM Direct Mount) chain rings in 28, 30, 32, and 34 tooth sizes.

OneUp X-Cog review test
There's no hiding your gearing choice when it's done up in bright green.
OneUp X-Cog review test
The shift up is reasonably quick, but I found coming down off the X-Cog to be a little slow.


While the jump between the 36 and 44 tooth cogs doesn't feel ideal, the step down in gearing let me get up some short, steep climbs that I usually can't clean until I come into some 'summer fitness'. The X-Cog gives riders that ultra-low gear that some could take advantage of, but without the penalty of losing top-end speed that you'd pay by going with a smaller chain ring. It widens your gearing spread a noticeable amount, which, for many riders, especially those on heavier all-mountain machines, will be exactly what the doctor ordered. The other way to look at it is that it's there when you need it, but you obviously don't have to use it. Think of the X-Cog as a kind of 'bail out gear', which, as anyone who's wished they had such a thing during a big day on the bike, can really come in handy. It's also a viable product for riders who's cranks don't feature a removable spider, thereby preventing them from running a 28 tooth chain ring.

There's really two kinds of mountain bikers in my mind: those who want to get to the top and may care at least a little bit (or a lot) about how long it takes them, and those who simply just want to get up there, period. The X-Cog is definitely for the latter.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesI do still believe that a stock SRAM 1x drivetrain will, so long as you choose your chain ring size correctly, offer pretty much any rider a wide enough range and low enough easy gear, but the X-Cog is that reasonably priced bit of insurance that basically keeps you from ever having to walk up anything that's remotely rideable. In effect, it takes your horsepower out of the equation, widens your entire gear range, and will let you climb up anything that your skillset will let you scale. - Mike Levy




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165 Comments

  • + 240
 OK. Be honest here. Be TRULY honest with yourself as a rider. If you NEED a 44 tooth rear cog to get up your bike trails...you should just throw your front derailleur back on because 1x10/11 was not designed for you or you are riding impossibly steep trails. Seriously.
  • + 75
 You are forgetting the cost of a new SRAM cassette vs. replacing the one which wears out quickest, I don't need a 44T gear, but if I can replace for my worn out 42T without buying a whole new crazy expensive cassette because a single cog is worn, then why the hell not?
  • + 1
 Yep. I've just converted to 1 x 10 (32 with 11-40, OneUp conversion) and love it, but this strikes me as reinventing the (cog)wheel.
  • + 19
 I respectfully disagree. I am an all mtn rider that has some steep climbs ahead of himself sometimes and I find it useful. Personally, (AND THE MAIN REASON) I like having one less cable going to my bars.
  • + 2
 There is still a good reason for 1x - narrow wide chainring + upper guide. 2x setups with two different chainguides (stinger and dewlie) failed me with keeping my chain on upper cog, despite having clutch rear mech and chain one link shorter than optimal for shifting at cost of potential breaking it on bottom out when on larger cogs in the rear. Trade offs!

Buying OneUp 42t and Radr cage soon
  • + 5
 Have just got a 42t and RadR... It's a great mod, super easy to install and well worth the money.
  • + 3
 I think it's a good idea, it's effectively just widening your gear range without the need for extra gears. I'm not particularly a good climber and tend to ride in a low gear with a high cadence, on 1x11 I would have to use a smaller chain ring, so on faster sections or where I might be on Tarmac for short distances I would be riding slower than needed. The 44t ring would allow me to use a bigger chain ring and still maintain that high end speed but still plod along up the hills
  • + 0
 I wonder if it is possible to make a NW middle/upper chain ring that is narrow wide for 2x setup, eventully with some front mech mod.
  • + 1
 My boss runs that setup in the Alps. Just a kicks it down when he's on the big climbs.
  • + 1
 I think a 50℅ narow/wide ring for 2x setup would be great. When your crank is horizontal the top and bottom teeth are narrow/wide. Vertical crank and the teeth are normal with pickups for easy transitions.
  • + 10
 @WAKIdesigns
Problem with that is getting the chainring to line up with the correct (narrow or wide) links on the chain
  • + 8
 @ccolagio running a 44 on the back also lets up go up to a 34 /36 / 38 tooth ring on the front, so you gain a higher top end speed with out sacrificing any climbing. Expanding your range quite considerably
  • - 1
 If you go too high on tooth count with rings you're going to have issues with ground clearance in some areas of the world.
  • + 2
 With all the popularity with sram's 1x11 and the conversion 1x10 cogs i was expecting to be limited with 11-36 cassette, to my surprise it was perfect! First 32t, then 34t and now i'm contemplating 36t. For reference my bike is 26" hardtail thats weighs around 29lb.
  • + 1
 36 isnt too high, most small guides go to 36, so not gonna make a difference. But yes i agree, can be an issue going higher than that.
  • + 3
 Not only that in increasing gear range, but we are talking about suspension performance improvements when going to a bigger front chain ring. If there is one disadvantage to the 1x11 drive trains and ultra small front rings is that suspension pedaling performance with the horst link bikes has been sacrificed. This 44t ring gives 1x11 users a way of gaining some of that performance back AND expanding their range possibly.
  • - 4
flag WAKIdesigns (Apr 15, 2015 at 6:06) (Below Threshold)
 how does chainring size change suspension performance, if we don't change the gearing ratio?
  • + 5
 If a chainring's circumference (so, where the teeth are) is always below the suspension's main pivot, then the suspension will tend to extend when pedalling, whereas the opposite is the case for larger chainrings.
  • + 3
 @BobChicken Wolf tooth components released a 42t xx1 replacement cog yesterday, available in multiple colors.
  • - 1
 @Santoman, it is interesting but I am not sure I understand what you mean, can you please elaborate?
  • + 1
 (Disclaimer: I am not a physicist, so I might mix up terms like "tension" and "force" in the ensuing explanation) When one applies pressure to the pedals the chain tenses up. Part of this tension is transformed into rotation, but not all. The remaining tension will act (partly) on the frame. If the chainring's "top" is under the main pivot, then the chain will pull the rear axle towards the bottom bracket, thus, extending the suspension. This is akin to closing a door by pulling its handle. In the opposite case, the effect would be like being on the other side of the door, so pulling on the handle would open the door. Translated to the effect of the chain's tension on the frame, this would compress the suspension.

PS I just realized that the use of "extend" and "compress" might be misleading. When I say "extend" I mean that the shock will extend and the suspension will be less into its travel and vice versa for "compress"
  • + 1
 @Waki Draw a line from your rear axle to the main swingarm pivot. Now visualize a force vector pulling from the rear axle. If the vector is above the previously mentioned line the swingarm will rotate clockwise compressing the suspension while the opposite is true if the vector is pulling below the line.

Enjoying your old lyrik btw. getting some good rearwheel time?
  • + 7
 @WAKIdesigns If you're wanting the option of a granny ring up front, but need a narrow-wide for chain retention, consider the setup ACC ran on her enduro bike last year: granny ring attached to the cranks, but no shifter. if you need it, stop, grab the chain, & move it down with your hand. I've found the situations that I would actually need the granny to be so few that I would actually be fine with stopping to use it, personally.
  • + 3
 I use the same bike for bike park, racing DH, and climbing until my lungs explode. I now have 2 different chainrings, a little one for winter and a big one for summer. This seems better.
  • + 1
 If we gear up the chain ring so get more top end, while going 44T in back to get the low back, then we only have granny gear and a 36T in back for climbs. I find I ride the 36T a lot and would no longer be able to as it would be higher and the 44 too low. I personally wouldn't like the huge jump.
  • + 2
 Waki he's reffering to anti squat.

100% anti squat means the chain pull is having zero influence on suspension, above 100%, pedalling action tries to extend suspension, below 100%, pedalling action will try to compress the suspension.

Antisquat and is dependant on ring size/pivot position/sag. Most bikes will be designed with a certain ring or ring sizes in mind. Changing ring sizes beyond what the bike is designed around may be detrimental to the way the bike pedals.

Mine is designed around a 32 middle, in this ring I'm pretty close to 100% anti squat.
  • + 0
 Thanks a lot for info guys, I'll take it to CAD drawing some vectors of forces this weekend and digest it Big Grin @feeblesmith , I'm glad you like it! I miss it!

For now what I don't get is:I draw the line between rear wheel axle and the pivot that the chainstay is mounted to, and let's say that pulling force is attached to the top of the chainring. Now if top of the chainring is above that line, then pedalling force pulls the axle UP, thus contributing to compression of suspension. But if top of the chainring would be below that line, then chain would pull the axle DOWN, thus extending suspension... I'll draw some crap then send you PMs Big Grin
  • + 1
 Waki have a look here they explain things better much than I can.

www.i-tracksuspension.com/suspensiontheory.html


You might find your bike listed here with full analysis of its kinematics, think its in spanish so you may need to use google translate.

linkagedesign.blogspot.co.uk/?m=1
  • + 1
 34t driver and 11-36t cassette is all anyone should ever need. like the first guy said, thats what front derailleurs are for.
  • + 3
 ... says the guy who doesn't live any near the rocky mountains...
  • + 1
 feeling ambidextrious we are?
  • + 2
 I personally think that this is a late April fools joke
  • + 2
 "You are forgetting the cost of a new SRAM cassette vs. replacing the one which wears out quickest". @BobChicken, how does the cog with the most teeth & the least amount of tooth stress wear the fastest? The smallest ones are (or were back when I used cassettes) the ones usually left separate because they (obviously) wear the fastest. :s
  • + 3
 My 42T on my X01 11spd cassette is a fair bit more worn than the rest of the cog. I think this is largely due to a slightly mis-matched q-factor to chain line, as well as the fact that much of our climbing is quite variable in grade and technical features, requiring a lot of hard shifts (I know I know!). I am not looking forward to the day that I have to drop $260 on CRC for a new cassette...
  • + 4
 @freeride-forever The 42t wears the fastest because it is made of aluminum. The rest is steel I believe
  • + 2
 @skeen95 Cheers, I will check it it out because mine is looking quite worn, rest is fine.

@freeride-forever: what bigmike and skeen said, it is made of cheese, I understand the less teeth more rotations business, but the rest of my cassette is fine, the 42T is getting a bit shabby and may become unusable at some point. It's great these guys are filling a niche so we don't have to throw away our mega bucks cassettes so we can buy a new one for more mega bucks...
  • + 67
 Only if there was a way to have a wider gear selection! Like what if we put a smaller cog upfront, next to the larger one for climbs....
  • - 11
flag Freerideguy14 (Apr 15, 2015 at 0:10) (Below Threshold)
 2x and front derailleurs are slowly becoming extinct my friend. Unlike all those commercials, more is not ALWAYS better.
  • + 34
 Radical, but far too easy. Combine that with a new chainring and BB standard and you might have something.
  • + 7
 Gearbox?
  • + 5
 Well a new hub standard is on the way so a 1x12 is on the horizon to make this soon to be a moot point
  • + 9
 Hammerschmidt?
  • + 14
 @AZlinerider Seriously. I can understand elite riders using 1x for the weight and simplicity, but if you're not strong enough to push a 10-42 cassette then just suck it up and admit a 2x might be a better fit. Hell, if I lived somewhere with really long climbs I'd throw a small ring up front and just finger shift it before the big uphills. VIrtually no weight added, and a huge range extension. There's no shame in it; if you're just out there to have fun on a bike or do all day rides, why wouldn't you want the easy gears? With as many casual riders there are I don't think the FD will ever really disappear from mtb.

Tbh, I think as time goes on we're going to see that Shimano wasn't all that crazy to keep the 2x alive. If you're not ultra fit, there's just no substitute for the range. I think this is a case of 1up trying to future-proof themselves so they can stay in business once 10speed starts to disappear.
  • + 3
 My words. One-by is fine for the very fit, and for California, but riding a one-by in the Alps when you're 220lbs and don get to spend your days reviewing/riding bikes, it sucks.

By the way: Not dropping a chain isn't one-by specific. Haven't dropped one on my last bike yet, in a whole year. Clutch deraillieurs is where it's at....
  • + 4
 Cali has pretty steep terrain where we actually ride. Not 5 hour slogs at altitude but climbs that need gears nonetheless unless you are a beast (most aren't though)

I agree with bkm303. Shimano 2x Di2 is alive and well. I just have to be able to buy it and fit it. Framebuilders are starting to really like the freedom of no FD mounting issues especially with the new B+ and 9+ stuff coming. I hate running the narrow range of 1X but am intoxicated with the the lack of hardware.
  • + 32
 MEGARANGE is back all comes back around in the end!
  • + 23
 hmmm... my 6 inch travel bike has a 1x9 where my lowest ratio is 1:1 and I still can get up just about anything so long as I can keep traction with the rear tire. why do I need this?
  • + 12
 Amen brotha...people need to man up Wink
  • + 6
 1:1 ratio is nice, but to have 1 easier, bail-out ratio, is nice. I'm the same as you and found the 1:1 not enough on a long climb (no crazy climbing, it was just very long and got tired because of the ratio).
  • - 4
flag robhill (Apr 15, 2015 at 4:54) (Below Threshold)
 Agreed TheStig04! if you can't push a 32F 36R or 30F 36R as an absolute lowest ratio, you should be put in a cannon and sent into orbit! It would probably require more effort to ride an e-bike! Get fitter!
  • - 4
flag robhill (Apr 15, 2015 at 5:43) (Below Threshold)
 So get a front mech and stop bastardizing cassettes. There is only one place a 44T ring belongs on a bike, and that is attached to the cranks!
  • + 2
 You don't need it. But it could make those long, steep and technical climbs a bit less tiring, leaving you more energy to blast down the other side. Also, the 1x setup means you can run a proper chainguide and still keep your chain on through the really rough stuff.
  • + 8
 because you live in Texas and NOT on the East Coast
  • + 1
 Totally @ justincs! I ride that loop when im short on time and cant get to the shore. Ive never not made that climb on my old 2x9 26"... I just started riding a new bike 29" XTR 1x10, and it's not rideable. We'll maybe it is, but l don't want to grind my knee to dust
  • + 2
 30F44R is so low that you only go forward 74 centimetres per pedal stroke on a 650B bike. You might as well push your bike!
  • + 3
 @redman733 I lived in Baltimore for the last 16 years. I moved to Texas less than a year ago. Your argument is invalid Wink
  • + 4
 well I have a 30 front, and a 40 tooth OneUp on my Chilcotin,
and find myself wishing I went with a 42 tooth on numerous occasions....

everyone is different and some people are stronger than others i guess Smile

so maybe YOU don't need the 44? but there's still plenty of people like me who not necessarily need one but WANT ONE Smile

some NEED ONE too Smile

I think I need one cause i'm old and fat..
  • + 3
 Yeah, I mean I can see the benefit. I kind of like giving these huge cassettes crap, and most of the climbs I deal with are shorter punchier climbs, even in Baltimore to some extent, but there certainly have been long sustained climbs where I have ended up sucking wind pretty hard. Armstrong trail in Park City, Utah comes to mind, and then the climb up Pinecone Ridge right after that. By the top of that, I was having to take pretty frequent stops just to catch my breath. Sure elevation plays a big part in that, but I was really wishing for my granny gear on my hardtail at that point.
  • + 3
 Are people that say 30x36 or 32x36 is all you need going on long 5+ hour rides with 5,000' of vertical? I'd like to go 1x but don't want to give up my 2/3 ratio granny gear (650b) and don't want to buy a new crank set.
  • + 1
 I use 30x42 1x on a 29er, I'm slow as all hell but I get' er done.
  • + 1
 Right now on a 1x10 set up I run two chainring options- either a 28 or a 30 depending on the ride with an 11-36 outback...most of the time I leave the 30t on there as the 36 offers enough range for my at out of shape 240lbs get up the hill, nothing too steep. On our more epic rides I like to run the 28t and the extra range it provides...trust me I do not worry about my top end speed (thats what gravity is for). Once I pick up one of the 10s 11-40 cassettes coming out I will have all the range I need.

I say this now but you never know what the future holds having a 42 or 44 eventually may be the only thing keeping me going!

If we're going to embrace all this new crap coming out we might as well jump into it all the way (eventually!)
  • + 1
 1:1 ratio is plenty for many situations. But if you have a 20-30 minister climb where you are grinding while riding the 1:1, youre very happy if you have a smaller gear. For example here in The Netherlands i dont need it. But when i was in South Africa i really missed having a smaller gear on some of the climbs.
  • + 1
 Turns out I'm a moron... bike is actually 36T cog, plus 29" wheels make things worse! However, I did just mash up cardiac hill without a dab! Don't think my knee would last a season of this though...
  • + 0
 @robhill: nope! Not with Eagle now!
  • + 19
 It's called 'one up', they never said anything about it going down again.
  • + 15
 "he wasn't shy about bringing up industry standards and regulations"

Sorry Monsieur Riffle, industry what?
From where my plethora of frames, components and rims sit, I fail to see many of those things these days.
  • + 10
 "the X-Cog is that reasonably priced bit of insurance that basically keeps you from ever having to walk up anything that's remotely rideable. - Mike Levy"

There is much easier way to get some insurance for the ups and a damn sight cheaper - Keep your granny ring on the front!.
I'm running 1 x 10 set up with 32t Narrow wide up front and a 40t rex on the back. I also have left the 22t granny ring in place. If you reeaaaally get that stuck going up the mountain of all mountains, just pull the chain off by hand and drop it onto the 22t. Job done.
  • + 1
 I like this idea and I'm not sure why anyone doing conversion doesn't leave it on. Can't be too heavy. My bike came with 1X and DM chainring, but I still think the finger shift granny is a good call
  • + 1
 I removed the granny to help the 32t ring with chainline issues.
  • + 1
 I just did the same. Have a 34 NW with 11-42. Left the granny on there for a "manual shift" when needed, I think it is 24t. I worry about top end on the descents. I have yet to ride it, damn winter will not go away in the northeast. If I don't like it, I will make some changes.
  • + 1
 I would but I like the security of a top guide when things get rough. But I do really like that idea
  • + 11
 If only someone would machine a steel or titanium 42 cog to replace the one made from soft cheese that's there from start on a XX1 casette!
  • + 2
 One of the new full pin cassettes is all steel, I believe.
  • + 1
 Ahh yes the cheapest one is all steel Smile That will be the one I "upgrade to" when I've run my XX1 to the ground.
  • + 8
 We need 42t replacement cogs!!! I've geared my bike with a 32t up front instead of 34t so I can use the 42t less and rely on my 36t STEEL cog rather than my bail out 42t Ally soft as cheese gear! Got over 2000 miles out of the rest of the X01 cassette but the 42t cog is worn-out so will have to replace the whole thing in the next couple of weeks, which is what SRAM wants, I guess.
  • + 0
 im busy now, google a little bit and u will find what you are searching for!
think theres an italien brand wich makes 42t replacement cogs für xx1 in any colour....
  • + 2
 wolf thoot will offer that in 2 weeks, go to their facebook page and see
  • + 1
 SRAM GX. Whole new x 11 steel cassette 144 bucks in May. I'm in the same boat Rooster-x, but didn't change my front ring
  • + 2
 Wolftooth, soon. GX, soon. I'll bet after a little bit, one will be able to buy a whole 10-42 GX cassette for just over $100, which makes the WTC and One Up hacks a little bit obsolete.
  • + 1
 pAzk - I tried the Italian Aribike replacement cog, poor shifting and eventually broke after 2 months, they offered me a replacement instead of my money back, but as they wanted to charge me 30 Euro's for shipping I said no and walked away as the design was too flimsy and not fit for purpose, fortunately my new chain had stretched sufficiently that it worked with my old cog and I've got away with it for another 4 months but its had it now.

This new One-up COG looks like a direct copy / replacement which is why they probably cannot offer a 42t version as they would get sued by SRAM, clever that they just changed the number of teeth to get around that little problem! Smile Looks like it should work a lot better than the Italian rubbish as it is pinned to the block unlike the Italian cog that flexed too much and eventually warped under shifting / pedaling loads and then cracked through fatigue / too thin material.
  • + 11
 This is one up on SRAMs offerings
  • + 7
 I sense a pun chain is coming.
  • + 7
 SRAM better gear up or shut up
  • + 3
 I don't reCOGnize this bike
  • + 6
 Yep, SRAM seem kind of toothless in comparison.
  • + 7
 I want the world to stop the nonsense and just start focusing on making more affordable high quality gear boxes. Why are we fiddling with cassette mods to get bigger gears that just get worn out and have shitty chainline etc. etc. A Rohloff can allow for stupidly easy pedalling, plus 13 other gears worth of range, all with perfect chainline and no maintenance. If I had the cash I would ditch my shitty derailleur in a flash. To me, seeing all the R&D going into derailleur based shifting is like spending tonnes of time perfecting high performing horse carriages or super efficient wood burning stoves.

Sorry for the rant.
  • + 9
 30t with 11-42 is not "putting and emphasis on fitness and climbing strength" in my book. (See Jared Graves gearing)
  • + 10
 I see your point, but running a 36t-38t front ring (with a 36t rear!) not to lose time on timed enduro descents is outside the needs of the average rider.

I run a 30t with 11-42t on my 2013 Trek Slash - I'm 5 months in with this setup and overall I love it... unless I am in the small window of times I really hate the compromise! Big Grin

For 90% of the climbs I do the 30x42t is ok - but when I hit real Alpine mountains at the weekend, I find I could really use another smaller gear sometimes as I just don't have the climbing strength for the long steep ascents.

Conversely, I spin out the 30t x 11 easily on the flat (let alone downhill!), I pretty much ride it all the time on the flat in this gear. I commute on the Slash (I know, odd choice), and last week a guy on a 29er in front of me dropped his gloves from his pocket. I stopped, picked them up and tried to catch him... I spun out the 11t super easily, and as he was pressing on a little it took me a while to get back to him and give him back the gloves...

I'd love to switch to a 32t or 34t upfront, and keep the same ratio the 42t gives on the back... with the 44t, I am thinking that I could actually now do this. Part of me misses 2x10 for the very steep climbs, but I'd never want my front DR back and lose only having the dropper post lever on the left of my bars...
  • + 4
 Marc, you can play arround whith this... gear-calculator.com
  • + 4
 I like how 1xN drivetrains look, and there is surely a weight advantage to them, but I would not be able to ride in the high mountains with one without sacrificing on the higher gears (as Marc pointed out). I ride a Cube with 650b-sized wheels with a 22-34 double chainring configuration and an 11--36 cassette. I use the 22x36 a lot when in the Alps, while the 34x11 still provides a decent highest gear. I have a bash ring for good measure and a Bionicon c-guide and I do not believe I have ever dropped a chain. Maybe the front derailleur looks old school and my hadlebar would be a tad less crowded without a fron shifter, but for an all-around bike I do not see myself going for a single chainring.
  • + 6
 This is really cool if you still want the climbing ability of a 30 tooth but want to run a 32 or 34 without spinning out in your smallest gear during the downhills (29er)
  • + 4
 They got the color wrong, should only be "Handicapped Blue"

JK, this product should be enough proof that a 1X is not practical for the average MTBer on an AM bike. I've tried it and there are too many sacrifices for real world riding. If I want to climb, there is NO top end, If I want top end, there is not enough gearing to climb steep stuff. I usually run a 36/20 up front with a 11-36 in back and there is a gear for every occasion this way.

I don't think the MTB industry wants you to know about the 20T front chainring, It is a godsend and they are on Amazon.com for $29.

2X is for me, despite the pain in the ass it can be sometimes.
  • + 1
 2X is for you but it is not for everyone, for those of us who live in areas with shorter or less steep climbs or who don't mind pushing once in a while or have better leg strength/fitness (that one is not me) 1X has more advantages than downsides and this might expand that group even further.
  • + 1
 This 44T will help to run a 30 or 32 up front for more top end, but still no where near what a 2X has for range. It really depends on where you ride and what your strength is. I would still need the 28T up front to get up the hills where I live.
  • + 2
 Gimme a break - get rid of the 10 and 13 gear and make a 10 cassette with 36 and 42, Some places have so many abrupt climbs that this is useful. Make it out of steel so we dont have to replace as often AND make it in AMERICA or CANADA!
  • + 2
 As a Clydesdale I never had trouble climbing with a 32 back in the day. When I went to a 34 tooth gear years later climbing was even better. My past two bikes have been 2x10 set ups with a 36 low gear, which personally I think looks better than the 1x set ups. Depending on where and how you ride choose the drivetrain that works best for the terrain you ride.
  • + 1
 agreed
  • + 5
 If 42T isn't enough for you, best choice is to switch back to smaller 26" wheels Big Grin
  • + 5
 I know I was joking, but a quick calculation showed me that 42T on a 29" is comparable to a 47T on a 26"
  • + 1
 double post..
  • + 2
 indeed, SRAM made XX1 cranks able to handle a 28t front ring for 29ers.
  • + 1
 that was a triple post @Mattin
  • + 1
 @Mattin I think you may have got the math backwards, 47T rear on a 26 would be way lower than a 42T on a niner
  • + 1
 I said it wongly indeed. What I ment was that a 42T on a 29" would be comparable to a 47T (on a 29"), if you'd use it on a 26". Easier to say it your way though haha Smile
  • + 2
 These sort of mods along with riders using 28t front chainrings smells of the death of the deraileur. Bottom bracket area gear boxes with added benefits of wider range gearing, slower loss of performance from less wear, very good chain retention, and less unsprung weight is the way forward.
  • + 1
 People have been saying this about internal gearing for over a decade. And it kind of makes sense in theory. In reality they're more expensive, heavier and don't shift as well. At some point they might be common but that is probably at least 10 or 20 years out still, if ever.
  • + 1
 On my first attempt at this I ran a 30t chainring and a 11-36+42 out back. Pretty good but there's still a big jump to the 42.
Now I'm on a 28t chainring with a 11-36+40 out back. Now I've got all the gearing I need and no jumps.
The whole point of this exercise is to get away from these big shift jumps and this 44t cog seems to add them right back in. Which is weird because it was OneUp that was moving us away from these jumps in the first place.
I'm not sure why, for many SRAM users, a smaller chainring might not be a better option. Especially considering this cog is the same price.
  • + 1
 Thinking I may step up to 32 from 30 and add 44 now. Laguna has some really steep climbs and I'm only seeing em done w/28 (1x11) and 2 or 3x setups. Most other places I ride I either nvr use 42cog and/or spin out w/30 at higher speeds..or tryn to stay in line on road transfer.
  • + 2
 Does anyone make a 9 or 10T cog? Why not instead of increasing the largest cog, just get a smaller small cog and a smaller front ring. What's the harm in a 9-42T or even 9-36t with a 30T up front?
  • + 2
 The 9t would be less efficient but we don't ride road bikes. The advantage of more ground clearance and smaller cogs far outweighs the negative for a mtb.
  • + 2
 I'm not sure you can fit 9t even on a an xd driver body
  • + 5
 Canfield took a good shot at the 9t using shimano's capreo interface but nobody bit, damn shame.
  • + 3
 I really wish the canfield solution had caught on.
  • + 1
 Honest question: How many of you find yourself needing a harder gear than what you get from 32x11? Personally I found I seldom used harder than 32x14 and I couldn't afford to 1up so I went 30T up front with an 11-36 range. I can climb. I use my 11 tooth cog on descents and never find it insufficient. I plan to do the Scott enduro at canyons this summer and I am a little worried I'll find my setup's limits but test rides between now and then should resolve my concerns.
  • + 1
 I run a 36x11 on a 29er and spin out all the time on descents. Looking to put a 40 on there, I like to go fast
  • + 1
 Wow. I could imagine spinning out on road descents, but not curvy stuff. Then again I am not that fast. I guess getting to the point of needing a bigger chainring can be a goal.
  • + 1
 It reminds me of shimano MEGA RANGE, but I think that it does make sense. Here I made a comparison of a typical 2*10 setup (11-36) and the 11s one by 10-44.
gear-calculator.com/?GR=DERS&KB=24,38&RZ=11,13,15,17,19,21,24,28,32,36&UF=2215&TF=90&SL=2.6&UN=KMH&GR2=DERS&KB2=32&RZ2=10,12,14,16,18,21,24,28,32,36,44&UF2=2215
The gear range is almost the same. It would be interesting, if somebody compared the weight and gear efficiencies of the two systems. The reviewer is right that the jump from 36-44 is huge. Somebody should make a casette that would end with 32-37-44, the gear steps percetage makes much more sense.
  • + 1
 I've been running the e*thirteen Extended Range Cog for a year now and I have to say I'm a bit disappointed regarding its durability. The aluminum wears down pretty fast and has to be replaced every 4 months or so. I don't know why they use aluminium for those aftermarket cogs instead of steel.
  • + 1
 Cool idea and I'm sure it works well but for $90 that's a bit steep especially considering the XX1 cassette is like $400! I just bought myself an XX1 / X01 group set and there's no way in hell I'd ever consider ripping it apart like this Eek
  • + 3
 if you ride a lot in the wet glacial till of the PNW. Plan on replacing your $400 every seaon due to the 42 tooth cog wearing out, or get One Up'd and save $300!
  • + 1
 I have heard one of these guys WTC or OneUp is working on a dual NW chainring. Hand shift from 30's to 20's by hand in front when it gets nasty. With that setup a stock 10-36 or 10-40/42 should work well. No need for chain guide. Ride until the mtn goes up or drops down and shift by hand.

Given all this nonsense 2X on XTR Di2 with Syncro is starting to look pretty sweet.
  • + 1
 Seems excessive. I'm fine with an aftermarket offering to replace the SRAM 42t cog so the poor sob's who bought it don't need a whole new cassette each season, but 44t? At what point does the torque start to screw with the freehub body too much? Anyway, nice to have options and sounds like it works but we're stretching into the recockulous range now.
  • + 1
 This reads like a bike box's assembly instructions. "Bike mechanic will need - 1) screwdriver 2) hammer". Both will be useful when you realize your bike wont shift as good, to lobotomize yourself.
  • + 1
 Does anyone know how the X1/GX models are "pinned"? Is it completely impossible to replace cogs on those? I just got a bike with an X1 and hadn't thought much about this difference, or about replacing cogs at all.
  • + 0
 Probably been said but I have a 32 nw upfront and a 11-40 on the back with a £20 Superstar Xpr. If I was going up hills steeper than that could cope with, I would not keep my forks on the deck, especially on the 160mm rig. In fact, I slogged a slag of a hill the other day and what ended it about a metre from the top was the inevitable wheelie 180 that occurs when it gets too steep. If you need a 44t ring, may I also recommend a harness, rope and some carabiners?
  • + 1
 wow now a 44T, riders are so spoiled these days, the question is, would the standard 10 speed derailleur be valid to carry such extra tension? but the stock 42T for sure can handle it not much of a difference.
  • + 2
 I think 1up is in trouble with cheaper 1x11 setups becoming available. This is reaching for a solution. I hope they find something that works for them.
  • + 3
 maybe thats why we had to go to 27.5" wheels so they can make cassettes bigger.
  • + 2
 I run their 42,radr and 30 t front, it's pretty flawless,maybe this 44 is unnecessary but it's still shows that they are a fckin innovative company, I'm all for it !!
  • + 4
 if its that steep, just push!!
  • + 0
 Wow... the 42T cog makes sense. The 44t plus the added expense of getting 1x11 seems to me as a consumer just a ploy to take even more money. Manufactures seem to want to re-write the industry standards every 3 weeks now. I understand having a competitive offering of products, and new innovation changing the cycling industry, but it is product like this that takes it a little far. I feel like this is getting a bit like the computer gaming industry where I was stuck having to upgrade a $400 video card every 6 months just to be able to play the new games. Maybe I am just being a little sensitive and need to get over myself too?
  • + 3
 It is not greed. It is fear. The 1x11 setup is getting cheaper. It is coming stock on bikes. The 1x10 will go the way of 1x9 and 1up will die unless they get something new out there. I or they figure it out.
  • + 1
 Luckily you don't need new anything to ride new trails. It seems like you can still get new parts for anything you break. The only time you will really get screwed is if you want to buy a new frame and swap over your parts.
  • + 1
 The wide range cassete design is almost drained out. In 1, 2 years the all new hammerschmidt will arrive, maybe with 3 gears, and we can all drop these ugly cassetes :-D (including myself).
  • + 1
 Do you have any info on the new Hammershmidt?
  • + 1
 No! No info whatsoever. This is just a feeling I have! ;-) The hammerschmidt, or if you want, the concept, was abandoned too soon.
I think that when the derailleur and cassete sales drops they will remake it lighter and with more gears. Nowadays this is pure business and they need to keep the sales up.
  • + 2
 why is nobody complaining about the ridiculous price for this piece of shaped metal?
  • + 3
 I'm on the fence with this one until Protour has spoken ...
  • + 2
 Protour is waiting for my post since is stalking me.
  • + 1
 This seems like a great product. But, I wish companies would quit futzing around with this stuff and start producing gearbox bikes.
  • + 2
 28t up front and 44t in the back in case you want to practice a track stand while pedaling.
  • + 1
 Am I stronger than I think? Same bike as Mike levy and same xx1 drive train, except I've run a 32tooth since I started riding and haven't ever considered switching..
  • + 0
 if you are running a small front ring like everybody does nowadays and struggle to ride uphill with a huge 42tooth sprocket then you are not trying hard enough, surely a cog of that size is dead easy to ride uphill with
  • + 0
 Anyone who needs to add this to their 1x11 drive train needs to get down the gym and start squatting!! If there was ever a book called "Products that are just not needed" then this will be No1.
  • + 0
 When will the Bike industry learn that a Bicycle uses Sprockets (by definition), not Cogs. As a tenured mechanic this is my biggest pet peeve. Far bigger I say, than this 44T sprocket.
  • + 1
 finally installed a 44 t on the rear. Okay, I am ready for a 11 tooth up front .......
  • + 1
 Premium mtbr.com account free with purchase.. The pussification of MTB continues..
  • + 1
 As Team Robot once pointed out so eloquently, if you need less than 1:1 bottom gear then kill yourself.
  • + 2
 running 1x8 32x11-32..........
  • + 1
 So what happens with these companies now that gx is announced and xt 11 speed inevitably coming soon?
  • + 2
 I'm pretty happy with 32x42 on my 29r. Fitness is key.
  • + 2
 Personally I would also rather buy a new smaller N/W chain ring in the front for +- €45 than spend double of that on 2T extra. If you sell your old N/W chain ring it costs you even less.

I like the progression, but I will rather wait till companies start producing these in stock cassettes for under €100, than spending this much money. This is a step towards the good direction though.
  • + 1
 How about go to the gym and get stronger legs!my 9 speed 11-32 works just fine.even in Pisgah forrest.
  • + 2
 or just ride and practice uphills till the rider is strong enough to climb steep hills.
  • + 1
 this is just getting silly now LOL.
  • + 1
 Maybe if it was $20... I can buy a new cassette for $90
  • + 1
 I haven't used 42t,but 44t is coming.
  • + 1
 As if 36 - > 42 wasn't already a stupidly large gap
  • + 1
 Are we really getting so lazy that we need stuff like this.
  • + 1
 SRAM warranty??? Hahaha!!!
  • + 1
 I swear, some of you mtbers are soft as f*ck. what's next, 52t?
  • + 1
 Going to get arsey about having a choice.....
  • - 2
 Up yours

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